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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 08, 1903, Image 3

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A LOWERTAX RATE.
The Abstract of Taxes Reveals Some
Interesting Statistics On Val-
uation and Tax Rate.
Increase in Valuation of County of
Over Fifty Per Cent--The
Data in Detail.
The abstract of taxes for the county
of Mille Lacs for the year 1902 shows
many changes from those of a year ago.
The valuation of the county is $1,975,-
574 as against $1,315,350 a year ago, or
an increase of $660,224. The valuation
of real and personal property by town
and villages, with comparisons with
last year is as follows:
Bogus Brook
Borgholm r.
East Side
Foreston village
Greenbush Isle Harbor
Milo
Milaca Milaca village
Onamia Page Princeton Princeton village
Robbins South Harbor
Total
Bogus Brook
Borgholm East Side
Foreston village..
Greenbush Isle Harbor
milaca, Milaca village..
Milo Onamia
Page
Princeton Princeton villagei
Robbins South Harbor.
1901. 1902.
*78,706
70,616 22,950 13,515
106,355
44,169 83,609
55,030
148,355
30,412 50,866
238,538
260,924
84,906 26,397
8127,176
102,387
43,272 15.037
194,290
78.608
168,133 102,346
152,212
75,552 74.236
417,079 271,472
104,622
49,152
$1,315,350 $1,975,574
It will be noted that there are many
increases, and with the changes or
dered by the county and State boards
of equalization, land values through
out the county received a very material
advance, the State board ordering an
increase of forty per cent on all land
in the county with the exception of the
villages of Princeton and Milaca, where
the increase was ten per cent. It will
be remembered that Borgholm was re
turned last spring by the assessor at a
real valuation of $34,092. It was dou
bled by the county board, and with the
increase ordered by the State board
the real and personal property amounts
to $102,387. With the icrease over two
years ago as returned by the assessors
and the increase ordered by the State
board, the valuations in some of the
towns is almost doubled. East Side
being nearly doubled while Onamia is
more than doubled. The abstract of
taxes for State, county, township and
school districts is as follows:
STATE TAX.
State revenue 1.30 mills, $2,568 25
fatate school 1.00 mill, 1,975.57
State university 23 mills, 454.38
Total State Tax. 2.53 mills, $4,998.20
COUNTY TAX.
Revenue..... 5.00 mills, $9,877.87
Railroad bonds 1.50 mills, 2 963 36
Court bouse bonds 1.00 mill, 975 57
Road and bridge 3.10 mills, 6,124.28
Funding bonds 0.30 mills, 592.67
Poorfund 1.00 mill, 1,975.57
School 1.00 mill, 1,975.57
Total Oounty Tax. 12.90 mills. $25,484.89
TOWN AND VILLAGE TAX.
Town and Villages
c3^2
Valu-
ation.
$127,176
102,387
43 272
15,037
194,290
78,608
102.346 152,212 168,133
75,552
74.236
417,079 271,472 104,622
49,152
Am't
$763 05
511.93
259.64
4.0 3.5 3.0
3 7
3.0
No. of School
District.
1 2 3... 4
5... 6... 7... 8...
30.
Including one mill county tax.
"932.'52
393 04
859.70
1.507 98
1,126.48
181.33
386.01
3,586.91
624.38 732.35
205 67
*6.4
6 6
5.0 0 7
3.2
+6.5
5.0
2 5
"Including State loan of 1 4 mills.
tDelinquent land road of 2 9 mills.
The tax in the village of Princeton is for
State loan.
SCHOOL TAX.
9.5 8.0 2.6 4 4
3.6 6.0
3.0
14.0
3.5 6.0
15.0
6 4
32.0 10.2
5.0
12.0 10 0
8.6
10.0
13.0
8.0 6.4
15.0
15.0
4.4
15.0 14 0
15 0
10.5
9.0 5.6 5.4 4 6
7.0 6.1
35.0
5.7 7.0
25.0 11.1
34.5 13.1
8.2
13.0
11.0
9.6
11.0 15.8
10.5
7.8
16.0 19.3
6.5
22.8 20.2 17.9
$529,915
38,935 86.649 94.614 59.706
87.069 40,121 17,851 45,843
42,735 55.279 46,894
187,058
82.204 43,272
104,622
29,363 78,608 19.127
26,596 26,200 76,214 30,174
9,787
58,236
15.619
22,600 20.183
15,564 11
350.40 485.23 510.91
274.75 609.28 244.73 446.35
265 30
299.15
1,881.97
521.52
6,453.50 1,115.22
354.82
1,360.08
322.72 754.63 210.40
420.22 275.10 574.46 482.78
378.89
378.54 351.11 456.52
361.28
2.0 2 1
10.0
1.2
10. 11..
13.... 13 1* 15....
16
17 18 19
20 21
32 23 24 25 26
9.0
3.7 1.5 1
2.2
The.tax rate in every township in
the county is much lower than it was a
year ago. The county tax this year is
1^.9^mills as against 17.1 a year ago.
^Ln JfcJe State tax there is a reduction of
three-tenths of a mill for revenue tax.
The tax in Princeton is simply 2.3
mills for^he State loan. The village
council did\iot vote any tax last fall
and there is no revenue tax to raise.
The year previous $1,000 was voted,
making a tax rate of four mills. There
is a big reduction in the school tax of
Princeton this year, the reduction
amounting to 5.5 mills, the rate this
year being 9.5 mills against 15 mills
last year. The valuation of the school
district" this year is $529,915, an in
crease of $144,149 over last year. It
Vill not be long before the school tax
of Princeton is cut down to half what
it was a year ago, at the rate land is
enhancing in value in the county part
of the school district.
Almost every school district in the
county shows a material reduction in
the tax rate, most all the districts
showing marked reductions, in special
and State loan tax.
'THE GAME O MFE.
|5X4^*%^^/^^fe^^l'i
"The Game of Life," a new book
written by Bolton Hall, contains many
ideas pertaining to labor agitations.
One of these on "Prosperity," is as fol
lows:
"Hard Times?" said the Fox, as he
grabbed another gosling, "why, I
never knew such prosperity."
"But," said the Goose, "we can't
live"
"Can't live!" replied the Fox. "Non
sense if you didn't live and put on
flesh, how could I be getting fat?"
"But my children are dead," said the
Goose.
"The Incables always succumb," said
the Fox, as he licked his chops. "Look
at the increase in my business and the
extension of my Belt Line I have
added two links and yet it is strained to
its utmost Capacfty."
Said the Goose: "You even keep us
out of the Fields, where we need to
feed."
"You are dissatisfied," replied the
Fox, "because you are a Goose. What
do you wish me to do?"
"We should have shorter hours,"
said the Goose, "and more Liberty."
Said the Fox: "I have learned not
to quarrel with my Food. So I will ac
cede to your demandsby inspecting
your Nests and passing a Law against
Trusts."
Good Season for Logging.
J. A. Nichols of the Nichols Lumber
company, returned Saturday from a
trip along the Brainerd & International
railroad. Mr. Nichols visited several
camps, and found the work well ad
vanced, and progressing rapidly. There
is the right amount of snow, and the
roads are in first-class condition for
good hauling. The ice on the lake is
not yet thick enough to allow the larg
est loads to be hauled, but fortunately
very few of the Nichols camps have
lake hauling this year.
The season promises to be a profit
able one for small contractors, as the
roads do not need the care they have
some seasons. The work started early
and there is every prospect that there
will be an unusually long season of
hauling.
Top-notch wages are paid this year,
and there is no difficulty in securing
men, especially for the smaller camps.
Many of the crews in the Nichols camps
are made up largely of Morrison county
men, and some of the contractors are
from here.Little Falls Transcript.
Mast be a Candidate.
Apropos of a point he desired to
make, Hamilton Mabie told the story
at the Aldine association in New York
of an old negro who expeiienced relig
ion, and of his master, whose conversa
tion was punctuated with profanity. It
was just after the civil war. The ne
gro had been the colonel's body servant
as a slave and remained in that capac
ity even after receiving his freedom.
He joined the Presbyterian church.
"Look here, George," said the colonel,
"tell me about this predestination and
the elect. You don't believe your old
master is doomed to hell, do you?
Don't you think he will go to heaven
with the elect?" Respect and love for
his old swearing master did not over
come the newly acquired religion, but
there was cunning and diplomacy in
his answer. "I nevah heahed of no-
body," replied George, "who done got
elected who wuz not a condidate."
Minneapolis Journal.
December Weather.
Last December was the wettest De
cember Minnesota has had in thirty
two years, except the years 1880 and
1891. The month did not seem unusu
ally wet, as the precipitation of mois
ture was mostly in the form of snow.
The total precipitation for the month
was 2.48 inches, whereas the average
for the last thirty-two years is only 1.15
inches.
The temperature for December was
three degrees colder than the average
for the last thirty-one years. The aver
age temperature for that time is 19 de
grees and the average temperature for
last December was 16. There were
eight days when the mercury regis
tered zero or below the coldest day was
17 degrees below zero the 26th, accord
ing to government records.
What a Chronic Kicker Can Do.
A Bird Island business man finds
himself in a very unpopular position
just now. He has always and at all
times been opposed to public improve
ments in the village. When a move
ment was started there to secure a
system of waterworks he secured an
injunction against it that temporarily
stopped all proceedings. The question
has thus been delayed for a long time.
And now when his fight has left the
village without the protection they de
sired, a bad fire destroys a big portion
of the main business block in town and
takes one young man's life. That is
what a chronic kicker can do for a vil
lage.Renville Record.
New Century Comfort.
Millions are daily finding a world of
comfort in Bucklen's Arnica Salve. It
kills pain from burns, scalds, cuts,
bruises conquers ulcers and fever sores
cures eruptions, salt rheum, boils and
felons removes corns and warts. Best
pile cure on earth. Only 25c at C. A.
Jack's drug store.
[NCBTOK
by a Modern
A. Fox and Goose Fable
Writer.
trsriotf:
MORE HOLIDAY NUMBER COMMENT.
The holiday edition of the Princeton
UNION was a hummer, and would do
credit to many of the eastern maga
zines. Much credit is due the manag
ers.Evansville Enterprise.
The UNION is a splendid paper every
week in the year, but its Christmas is
sue is an extraordinary fine piece of
work in every respect.The Virginian.
The work is a revelation, and no mat
ter from what standpoint viewed
whether from the high tone of the mat
ter published, the originality displayed,
the perfection of press work, qr the,
neatness typographically, the1
The first of all was the Princeton
UNION, which was a gem in every re
spect, one of the best ever issued in the
State.- Hutchinson Independent-Times.
Quite the largest, most sumptuous
special holiday edition which has come
to our exchange table was the Prince
ton UNION. Bob Dunn and his assist
ants always get out a good paper, and
when we come to think of it, this splen
did issue is about what we would ex
pect of them.Madelia Times.
Newspaper Changes.
S. S. Lewis has bought the Pelican
Rapids Press of A. B. Allen.
N. D. Barker of the Sauk Centre
Avalanche has assumed the editorial
and business management of the Long
Prairie Leader.
Mrs. E. P. Barnum has sold the
Sauk Centre Avalanche to F. H.
Michaelson. The paper has been
changed to a six-column quarto.
The Mora Enterprise was launched
on the sea of journalism last week.
Willis Fairbanks is its editor and pub
lisher. It is a six-column quarto.
W. S. Cox of the Brainerd Arena,
has "gone away," the period of his ab
sence being alike indefinite and uncer
tain and R. J. Hochtritt, formerly of
the Isanti News will guide the destin
ies of the Arena. Mr. Hochtritt has
been with the Arena for the past ATear.
Willis Williams, advertising man
ager of the Hamm Brewing Co., has
purchased the Glencoe Register, and
will take charge Jan. 15th.
Ezra E. McCrea took charge of the
Alexandria Post-News last week.
The Contented People.
America is noted for the fact that
you never can tell when a man is going
to become a power in the community.
The poor man of to-day may be the
corn king, the cattle king, the coal
king, etc., of to-morrow, but the aver
age citizen, the one contented to live
modestly, is still the bulwark and hope
of the country. As Vanderbilt says,
"No matter how rich a man may be,
he can only sleep in one bed at a time,
only wear one suit of clothes, and only
eat three times a day." He might add,
that on rich or poor golden grain belt
beer has the same effectit stimulates
the digestion, clears the mind and pro
duces perfect health. Order of your
nearest dealer or be supplied by Henry
Veidt, Princeton.
W. T. Francis of Dalbo who was in
town last week, came in to tell the
UNION what Dalbo land was good for.
He located there three years ago with
a relative and they bought 320 acres of
land. They paid $2,200 for the tract
and the next year they were offered
$4,400 for the same piece of land but
did not think the time had come to
sell. Mr. Francis has 160 acres, 100
acres of which is fine meadow land,
from which he cuts eighty tons of grass
every year, most of which he feeds to
cattle, of which he has quite a number.
Mr. Francis has cleareed twenty-five
acres of his land. He says that he finds
Princeton a good enough market for
any farmer and always trades at this
place.
Dnring the first part of this week
there was a large and jolly house party
entertained at the home of Senator
Barker. It was a reunion of all the
grandchildren of S. M. Byersof Prince
ton, who had not met in a body before
since 1894. The visitors were the
Misses Blanche, Grace and Rita Byers
of Princeton, Mr. Joseph W. Libby of
Elk River, Mr. Ernest Byers of Valdez,
Alaska, the Messrs. Leslie and Denni
son Byers of Princeton and Mr. Frank
Peters of Baroda, Mich. The three
days were passed in making merry
with games and song, sleighing, seeing
the sights of the city and posing for
group photos.Isanti County Press.
Hlgh-Priced Wood.
The Crookston Times reports the fol
lowing prices for wood: Poplar, $4.50,
tamarac, $5.50, oak, $6.50, birch, $6.00,
basswood, $4.50.
^HUESBAT, JANUARY
1902
Christmas UNION stands unsurpassed.
It is a marvel and should serve
inspiration to country journalists.
Lake Falls Gazette.
5 an
Red
The Princeton UNION'S great holi
day edition has made the biggest hit
ever with the State press.Duluth
News-Tribune.
It is the best that has reached our
exchange table from every point of
view.Akeley Independent.
If we should name the best, without
any disparagement to the others, the
blue ribbon would be tied onto Bob
Dunn's Princeton UNION.Granite
Falls Tribune.
Church Topics a* as
4. A. A Sunday and Weekday
Announcements. METHODIST.
Topics for next Sunday: Morning,
"Our Dual Self evening, "God's Ap
peal to Man's Will," the last in a
series of sermons that have been de
livered during the past week by Rev.
Gratz.
CONGREGATIONAL.
Last Sunday Rev. C. B. Fellows of
Minneapolis filled the pulpit morning
and evening. Next Sunday Rev. C. M^
Heard of Minneapolis, will preach
morning and evening. There will be
regular services every Sunday in the
future.
SPIRITUALIST.
Regular services next Sunday even
ing at the usual hour at Farnham's
hall by Mrs. Tryon.
An Oyster Sapper.
On New Year's night Mr. and Mrs.
Arnett of Greenbush gave an oyster
supper to the Ladies' Aid Society of
the Greenbush Methodist church.
There was a good attendance and all
enjoyed the hospitality of host and
hostess, and the event will not soon be
forgotten. The ladies of the society
enjoyed the supper with more than or
dinary relish because of the fact that
Mr. Arnett had stated that if they took
in $100 at the sale and supper he would
serve them an oyster supper. When
the Princeton contingent had finished
patronizing the Greenbush sale and
supper Mr. Arnett could see the finish
of that oyster supper at his home. He
made good his promise and did it in a
royal manner.
Mince meat in bulk and package at
LUDDEN'S STORE.
BUSINESS LOCALS.
W MONEY to loan on improved
farms. M. S. RUTHERFORD,
Princeton, Minn.
Just cut another delicious sage cheese
at LUDDEN'S STORE.
All of grain bought at highest
rarkekinds
prices.
49tf
?\*9Htifp**m
The Prevailing Shoe
for men at this season is our fine
BOX CALF LACE
At $3.00.
It has the style demanded by the
dressy man, the comfort demanded
by the ease-loving man and the
strength and durability demanded
by the economical man. It fills
every man's requirements without
emptying anyone's pocket.
Made in all sizes and widths.
Boys' sizes at $2.50.
S. LONG.
Pianos
An Organs
Any style or grade.
Old instruments taken in part payment.
Time given to suit purchasers.
Call and see new Pianos
and Organs now on hand.
Room 4, 2nd Floor. I. O. O. F. Block.
Airs. Guy Ewing,
6,1W3.
SAM CAREW.
skin lining Duck coats with sheep
selling at bargains at
LUDDEN'S STORE
and I buy hides and furs of all kinds
pay cash for the same.
49tf SAM CAREW.
WANTEDWood choppers to cut
cordwood by the cord. Will pay $1.00
for hardwood, 50c for block stove wood
and 80c for soft wood. For further in
formation call at UNION office. 2-3t
DENNIS SALEE.
Hides, pelts
take them to
and furs are higher
LUDDEN'S STORE.
Princeton, Minn.
0. H. BUCK,
Blacksmith,
All kinds of Blacksmithing neatly
and promptly done." I make a
specialty of
HORSESHOEING and
PLOW WORK.
first street, PRI M.
Established 1892.
Incorporated 1897.
PRINCETON
COMPANY
Retail orders solicited and
promptly delivered in the
village. Exchange
workt
solicited
4
HARRY ENGLISH & CO.
ZIMMERMAN, niNN.
Have on hand a full stock of
Building Material,
Including Lumber, Sash Doors, Pine,
White and Red Cedar Shingles, Maple
Flooring, Lime, Hair, Cement, Stone,
Brick, Plaster, Nails, Building Paper,
Mixed Paints, Leads and Oils,
and in fact everything needed to put up a first-class building, at prices
that will save you money. Parties contemplating building, will do
well to let us figure on their bills.
We also carry a full line of
God Resolutions
ARE THE ORDER OF THE DAY.
Our Resolutions Are
1. To give the best quality at the
lowest price.
2. To give poor qualities under no
circumstances.
3. To hold our old trade.
4. To gain new trade.
TKis is how
Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes,
Furniture and General Merchandise.
Highest Cash Price paid for
everything a farmer sells.
FEED AND SALE BARN.
Near West Branch Bridge, Princeton, Minn.
I have recently opened a first class Livery in connection
with my feed and sale barn. When in need of good rigs,
reliable horses, prompt and careful attention call at above
barn. Soliciting a share of your patronage, I am,
Yours Truly,
8 lbs. Rio Coffee $1.00
I gal. Best Maple Syrup $1.25
1 gal. "Breakfast Drips"' (no glucose) E/"),-,
one trial brings you for more vl/t
4 lbs. Java and Mocha, (try this) $i00
Fresh Ohio Hickory Nuts, K/-i
per pound. *7t
Fresh Smoked Halibut,
per pound I 7t
Cabbage, Parsnips, Onions, Rutabagas, Apples,
Pears, Grapes, Oranges, Bananas.
Fresh milk and cream delivered dally
A TV1
A. H. STEEVES, Prop.
ROLLE MIL Wheat Flour,
THE UNION FOREVER*'
AT ONLY II.OO PER YEAR.
All Local and County News, Market R.sorts, Interesting
Stories, etc. I you are not a subscriber
YOU SHOULD BE.
N-
E-
a3
WALKERS
eW 1 CI. Rural 39
PROMPT DELIVERY.
-*&
4
ir
K-
/''i
IO.0KPer
WrWWIWMMWMUWW(MW
Rye Flour, BUGM QI HOOF,
Vestal 0 Cent
Banner
Ground Feed, Etc.
A Careful Fittet
makes a stylish garment,
the cutting and fitting are qx
as important as the material.
Get your clothes made
and all three items will
right.
Our prices are not too higfh for
you, but they're just high
enough to insure you the!
workmanship and material
L. Fryhlin&
Tie Tailor.
it
Princeton
A
i
4
4^
I

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