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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 08, 1903, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1903-01-08/ed-1/seq-4/

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II 1
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Great Northern- Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND SANDSTONE.
GOING BAST.
Le. Sandstone PRINCET ON
Ar. Elk River
Le. St. Paul
Ar. Minneapolis
Le. Anoka
Ar. Elk River
Le. PRINCET ON
Milaca Mora
Ar. Sandstone
9:10 a. m.
9:55 a. m.
10.15 a. m.
GOING WEST.
4:45 p. m.
5:10 p.m.
5:49 p. m.
6-10 p- m.
6:48 p. m.
7:20 p. m.
7:54 p.m.
9:10 p. m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca
Bridgeman
Ar. St. Cloud
GOING EAST.
Le. St. Cloud I 8:00p.m.
Bridgeman I 8:53 p.m.
Ar Milaca 9:00p.m.
These trains connect at St. Cloud with trains
Nos. 1 and 3.
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING EAST.Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday.
Le. Milaca 11:10 a. m.
PRINCET ON 12:25 p.m.
ElkRiver 2:30p.m.
Ar. Anoka 5:00 p.
GOING WEST.Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Le. Anoka I 9:10 a. m.
ElkRiver 10:80a.m.
PRINCETON 12-0B
Ar. Milaca 1:25p.m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookHenry Gustaf son Princeton
BorgholmJ. Herou Bock
GreenbushR. A. Ross Princeton
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggberg Isle
MilacaOle Larson .Milaca
MiloR. N.Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonErnest Sellhorn Princeton
RobbmsWm. Anderson Vineland
South HarborA. E Peterson Cove
East SideGeo. W Freer Opstead
OnamiaW. N. Peterson Onamia
PageJ Huglen Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
iseumann Foreston
1 W Goulding Princeton
e McClure Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinL. Berry Princeton
Blue HillThomas E Brown Princeton
Spencer BrookG. C. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
FyanettJ. A. Krave Wyanett
I .ivoniaChas. E. Swanson....Lake Freemont
PRICES OF HE
Princeton Roller MillsT anil Elevator,
Vheat, No 1 Northern.
Vheat, No 2 Northern.
torn, new
ats
RETAIL.
feHourl,
fsta per sack
(100 per cent) per sack
Janner, per sack
(Uround feed, per cwt
)oarse meal, per cwt
I Middlings, per cwt
jhorts, per cwt
IJran. nercwt
All goods delivered free anywhere in Princeton.
PRINCETON
Marketjteport.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern
Wheat, No. 2 Northern
Qats
orn, new
ye i
I^lax i'Jarley Ueans *[email protected]
liay, wild 5
Ijay. timothy 7
Maple wood
Oak wood A"AA~,
Mixed wood
POTATOES.
Burbanks.. Rose.
IlarlyOhio Triumphs.
FRATERNAL -:-LODGE
NO. 92, A. F. & A. M.
Regular commnnicationB^Sd and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
B. D. GRANT, W. M.
A. B. CHADBOURNE, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE,
1 NO. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eva
ding at 8 o'clock.
C. W. VANWORME R, C.
OSCAR PETERSON K. R. & S.
O. M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall O. PETERSON, Com
N. M. NELSON. R. K.
Hebron Encampment.
N o. 42,1.0. O.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 o'clock M.
M. C. SATTSSER, C.
D. W. SPATJIJDING, S. W.
Jos. CRAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O O.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7:30
O'clock. A. B. CHADBOURNE, N.
L. S. BRIGGS, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.,
N o. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
each month, at 8:00 p. M., in the hall at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
N ED C. KEiiiiET, V. C.
J. F. ZIMMERMAN. Clerk.
Hofcol lui^roi^u
AND FEED BARN.
E. D. CLAQQETT, Prop.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a rioments' Notice.
nmercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty.
PROFESSIONAL
$2 15
2 05
1 65
1 00
00
1 00
95 8- 0
ROSS CALEY, M. 0.,
ft
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore
Tel.-Ruraj, 36.
Princeton, --_/.. Minn.
pLVERO
Ex. Sun.
6:11 a. m.
7:01 a. m.
7:36 a. m.
8:03 a.
L. MCMILLAN,
LAWYER.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
J.
A. ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
''BUSINESS CARDS.
rM. KALIHER,
W
9:40 a. m.
9:47 a. m.
10:40 a. m.
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A C. SMITH,
Dealer in
FRESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Telephone 51.
Princeton. Minn.
A. ROSS,
m.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR.
Will take full charge of dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer In Monuments of all kinds.
E. A. Ross, Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
V. WICKLUND,
UNDERTAKER and EMBALMER
Coffins and Caskets always on hand.
A full line of granite and marble monuments.
Telephone call 52
Office Main street, Princeton, Minn.
W Offe You Friends^
UNCLE SAM'S
MONOGRAM
WHISKEY
The best is none too
good for a friend."
GfO.
ST PAUL. RE^7"INNCAP0LIS
& SONS
DISTILLERIES AT
CMINENCE.KY AND BftLTIMORE.tlO.
HE HAS CURED THOUSANDS
Given up to Die.
Dr Re a
Next regular professional visit to
PRINCETON,
Monday, Jan. 19th,
From noon until 6 M., at the
Commercial Hotel.
Returning every month. Consult him while
the opportunity is at hand.
DR. REA has no superior in diagnosing and
treating diseases and deformities. He will
give $50 for any case that he cannot tell the dis
ease and where located in five minutes.
All curable medical and surgical diseases,
acute and chronic catarrh, and special diseases
of the eye, ear, nose and throat, lung disease,
early consumption, bronchitis, bronchial ca
tarrh, constitutional catarrh, dyspepsia, sick
headache, stomach and bowel troubles, rheu
matism, neuralgia, sciatica, Bright's disease,
diabetes, kidney, liver, bladder, prostatic and
female diseases, dizziness, nervousness, indi
gestion, obesity, interrupted nutrition, slow
growth in children, and all wasting disease in
adults. Many cases of deafness, ringing in the
ears, loss of eyesight, cataract, cross eyes, etc.,
that have been improperly treated or neglected
can be easily restored. Deformities, club feet,
curvature of the spine, diseases of the brain,
paralysis, epilepsy, heart disease, dropsy,
swelling of the limbs, stricture, open sores,
pain in the bones, granular enlargements and
all long-standing diseases, properly treated.
Young, middle-aged and old. single or married
men and all who suffer from lost manhood,
nervous debility, spermatorrhoea, seminal
losses, sexual decay, failing memory, weak
eyes, stunted development, lack of energy, lm
povished blood, pimples, impediments to mar
riage also blood and skin diseases, syphillis,
eruptions, hair falling, bone pains, swellings,
sore throat, ulcers, effects of mercury, kidney
and bladder troubles, weak back, burning
urine, passing urine too often, gonorrhea, gleet,
stricture, receive searching treatment, prompt
relief and cure for life.
Cancers, Tumors, Goiter, Fistula, Piles
varicocele and enlarged glands with the sub
cutaneous injection method, absolutely without
pain and without the loss of a drop of blood, is
one of his own discoveries, and is the most
really scientific and certainly sure cure, of the
nineteenth century. No incurable cases taken.
Consultation to those interested, 81.00.
DR. REA & CO.,
Minneapolis, Minn. Louisville, Ky.
wmammm
"CK^"i|fJfTHB PRINCETON TOIONi.
The Keystone
of Good Health
is pure food.
Lion Coffee
is all COfleeno glazing of
eggs "or glue to conceal de
fects and cheapen its quality.
Fresh and uniform, rich
in flavor, because always in
sealed packages never in
bulk.
FRANK PETERSON. N, M. NBJLSON.
PETERSON & HELSOH,
Blacksmiths
and wagon makers.
Sleds and Cutters manufactured
and repaired.
Satisfaction also guaranteed in all other
lines of our business.
Shops next to Starch Factory,
Princeton, Minn.
The Horrible
Tortures of
Rheumatism can be overcome and
the dreaded disease
expelled from youf
system by the use ol
60S
Fo* Sale attg Guaranteed Only
C. A JACK, Druggist.
Burlington
St. Louis and
the South
Are conveniently and comfortably
reached by our two trains a day.
The Limited, leaving Min
neapolis at 7:25, St. Paul
8:00 p. M. daily, arrives in
St. Louis the following
afternoon. Combination
Compartment and Standard
Sleepers and Reclining
Chair Cars.
The Scenic Express, leav
ing Minneapolis at 7:30, St.
Paul 8:05 A. except Sun
day, arrives in St. Louis
early next morning. Sleep
ing Cars from Rock Island
south.
This is the most direct route from
Minneapolis and St. Paul to Clinton,
Davenport, Rock Island, and all
Mississippi River points.
Passengers by either train make
close connections with lines south,
southeast and southwest in St. Louis
Union Station.
ASK YOUR HOME AGENT
FOR TICKETS VIA THE BUR-
LINGTON.
Wood Haulers Wanted.
I have one thousand cords or more
dry standing tamarac wood I want cut
and hauled to Bock, Minn. Wood five
miles from station.
50tf W. B. RiCHARDSr Princeton.
MOW AN, INFANT SLOWLY
TO EXERCISE IT.
-fHi^^'r*^
-^^asw^iaf
At First the Newborn Babe Has the
Power Only to Distinguish Between
Light and Darkness Tne Develop
ment of the Power of Vision.
The sense most early exercised by
the newborn infant is the sense of
Bight, but at first it has the power only
to distinguish light from darkness and
is in comparison with its later devel
opment blind, while in many of the
lower creatures the senses are at birth
fully developed.
What a difference there is between
the dull eye of the.newborn infant and
the sharp vision of the young chick,
which is able to pick up with precision
a grain of corn or even snap up a fly
while the eggshell may be still stick
ing to its back! The eye of the infant
howsver, is developed very gradually,
and during infancy and childhood it
learns how to see. In the first few days
it notices the difference between light
and darkness when the light is very
intense, and it may even knit its brow
in sleep if a bright light be brought
close to its face.
On the same principle a striking
bright color will also be noticed when
held close to the face.
In all these cases, however, the in
fant follows the object by turning its
head and not by the movement of the
eyes.
The eyelids open and shut from birth,
but they are not always moved at the
same time with the movements of the
eyeballs until the infant has reached
the second or third month. Under two
or three months of age infants do not
wink when the hand or an object is
waved before the face, because they
do not see the hand distinctly.
One of the remarkable points of in
terest in the development of the in
fant's power of vision is the way in
which it learns to appreciate the ob
jects seen. It has to learn to discover
the distance o.f objects, their shape,
size, character, etc., and this it does
with the assistance of the sense of
touch.
The face of the mother or nurse is
made familiar in that it is brought so
close to the infant's face.
After the infant has learned to see
objects distinctly at the distance of
several feet it begins to use both eyes
in common. At first the eyes act inde
pendently of each other, so that it un
doubtedly has double vision and sees
everything double. This double vision
can be produced by many at will by
looking "cross eyed."
The infant having reached the point
when it sees an object clearly, it must
also begin to understand objects of
three dimensionsthat is, to find out
the difference between a flat surface
and a solid body. Here the sense of
touch also assists. The infant grasps
an object and, putting it to its lips and
face, satisfies Itself as to the shape,
character, etc.
It is interesting in this connection to
note some cases in which a person born
blind recovers sight when grown.
In one case a young man who had
lost his sight in early infancy was so
completely blinded that he could not
distinguish even the strongest light
from darkness.
After on operation on one eye had
been successfully performed he began
to see objects without understanding
themnot being able to judge their
distances from his eyead he felt as
if everything was touching his eye, so
that to touch an object be at first
would put one finger or the hand up
before his face, pointing at the object
aimed at, and reach forward until his
finger came in contact with the ob
ject.
After be had recovered the use of
both eyes be began to find out that
everything was not flat, but that many
things had a certain thickness as well
as length and breadth, and in this way
he began to see solid objects.
But even for a year or two after com
plete recovery he was unable to decide
whether a certain figure was a flat sur
face, as in a painting, or a solid body.
He was also obliged to learn the dif
ferent animals and objects, not know
ing the difference between a cat and a
dog until he had touched them.
We all go through just the same proc
ess of learning how to see in infancy.
The child may be two or three years,
or even older, before it has control over
its eyes and can judge of the distance
of objects in the room, etc.
The care of the eye is a question of
great importance for mothers and
nurses. The eyes of newborn infants
should be carefully washed with fresh,
clear water, and if anything unusual
is noticed the physician should be seen.
The infant's eyes are specially to be
protected against too bright a light It
is by no means an uncommon thing to
see a nurse wheeling a young infant in
the carriage while the t-igh't sun is
pouring into the child's eyes. This does
not argue against taking infants into
the sun when the weather is not to
warm, but the eyes should always be
protected against the bright glare,
whether direct or reflected.
Wasn't One of the Two.
Uncle GeorgeYou are always coin
plaining about your wife's bad temper,
but you know it takes two to make a
quarreL
HarryIn this case the two are my
wife and my wife's mother.Boston
Transcript
Overplayed Themselves.
"Confound it!" exclaimed the sallow
dyspeptic in the fifth row. under his
breath. "We've overdone the applause.
Instead of merely coming out and
bowing her thanks, she's going to sing
again."Chicago Tribune.
Child labor Is an undesirable "Infant
Industry."Boston Herald.
the Moon Meal.
The scholar and professional man,
like the anxious housewife, is apt to
carry his cares to bed, and insomnia
becomes a curse. Men and women who
are busied in getting and gaining, the
merchant the banker, all alike, fail to
secure that self control which can
manage the mind as well asleep as
awake.
Normal sleep should be purely a
physiological repose similar to the rest
of animals, who go to sleep with the
darkness and awake with the light
Some one has said that sleep is like
hunger and thirst, representing a dimi
nution of energy throughout the entire
body. I hardly think this can be true,
but in my judgment sleep rather sug
gests the diminution of the energy of
the brain, and he is a wise man who
takes the hint when brain fag sets in
of an evening and goes comfortably
and properly to bed.
Of course it goes without saying that
night is not the only time for sleep.
Men and women who are busy could
steal just a few minutes before or after
the noonday luncheon to catch a little
nap, and, indeed, I am nearly sure
that the noonday nap is worth far
more than the noonday meal, for the
digestive processes are surely hindered
during the periods of mental activity,
and it is the exceptional person in this
busy world of ours who is not called
upon to use all his brain and brawn to
make a living. It has been my habit
to advise mothers to steal a while away
from every "cumberous care" and,
even if sleep fails to be wooed, to take
about twenty minutes every day in ab
solute peace and quietness, diverting
the mind from all anxieties and relax
ing all the muscles. A habit of this
kind is easily acquired, and we might
have fewer neurasthenic women, whose
nerves make life hideous to their fami
lies, if a word like this, spoken from
considerable experience, were heeded.
Pilgrim.
THE PIANO TUNER.
Why Left I a Hurry After Fin
ishing His Joh.
A lady stepped into a piano ware
room recently to engage a tuner, but
before doing so insisted upon the stron
gest assurance that the tuner was re
sponsible. She was so determined that
the manager became curious to know
the reason for her disbelief in the re
liability of tuners. She gave her ex
perience with the last tuner she had,
and this is the story as she told it:
He had finished tuning the piano
when he looked up and said:
"Your instrument was in awful con
dition. You ought to have sent for me
sooner."
"It was tuned only three months
ago."
"Then the man who did it certainly
didn't know his business."
"No?" "No, ma'am. He had better be do
ing street cleaning than tuning pianos.
Why, my dear madam, a delicate in
strument like a piano needs fingers
equally delicate to handle it, combined
with an ear of unerring accuracy. The
individual who attempted to tune this
instrument last evidently possessed
neither of these. In fact I am free to
say he did it more harm than good."
"Indeed." "Indeed he did. May I ask who it
was who so abused your instrument?"
"It was yourself."
"Madam, you are wrong. I never
tuned a piano in this house before."
"Probably not, but you tuned that in
strument nevertheless, or made a botch
of It in attempting to do so. It be
longs to Mrs. Jones, who sent It here
while she is out of town. She told me
you always had tuned it and to send
for you when"
But the unhappy man fled with such
haste as to make his coattails a good
substitute for a card table.Philadel
phia Musician.
Difficnltles of Our Language.
A Frenchman came to England to
learn English, and the following sen
tence was given him:
"The rough cough and hiccough
plough me through." The teacher told
him the first word was pronounced
ruff. He thereupon said this: "The ruff
cuff and hiccuff pluff me thruff."
"No, no, the second word is pro
nounced *koff.'"
"Then," said the Frenchman, "it
must be the roff coff and hiccoff ploff
me throff."
The third, fourth and fifth words
were explained with the same result
which the reader may repeat for him
self.London Express.
Too Much.
Mrs. MarryatMamma is talking of
closing her house and coming to live
with us. Do you think you could sup
port both of us?
Mr. MarryatMy dear, I can support
you very nicely now. but I'm afraid
your mother would be insupportable.
Catholic Standard and Times.
Added Attraction.
"No, indeed," said the crafty agent to
the bride and brideerroom. "Our com
pany does not prohibit kissing on the
platforms, and, besides, 1 would call
your attention to the fact that we have
more and longer tunnels than any
other railway in the world."Balti
more American.
No Comparison.
"That New York girl was awful mad
wnen I asked her if she was from Bos-
ton."
"I'll bet she wasn't half so mad as
the Boston girl whom I asked if she
was from New York."Life.
Forest covers 36 per cent of Russia'!
total area, or, in all, 464,500,000 acres.
In other words, there are four acres of
at to every inhabitant of Russia.
rical record left by the historian of
Table mountain concerning a particu
larly strenuous session held by the
Society Upon the Stanislaus. You will
remember that the debate had to do
with fossil bones, that it became heat
ed because of the insinuations of one
Jones that the rare animal recon
structed by the Stanislaus discoverer
owed its skeleton to one of his lost
mules and that in the ensuing discus
sion Abner Dean of Angels was more
or less seriously injured by a chunk
of old red sandstone. ,-a,^
But this was told of the days when
our science and our manners were in
the rough. Of course even now we
often discover prehistoric animals
which, as we afterward learn, never
existed, but we know mule bones
when we see them. And we have
learned to hurl shafts of sarcasm in
stead of paleozoic remnants.
Still there is room for improvement
We read with reminiscent smile of the
recent doings of quite modern scien
tists who met the other day in New
York to read to each other papers on
various topics connected with research
in fields designated by impressive,
polysyllabic names. These gentlemen
indulged in what is described as "a
long, heated and somewhat acrimoni
ous dispute" over the admission or re
jection of the word "Amerind," the
name being intended to designate col
lectively all aborigines of the western
hemisphere.
Probably the average unscientific
mind will wonder that very learned
gentlemen should become so disturbed
by the coining of a new word as to
lose their tempers and call each other
names. Most of us agree with Truth
ful James, who says, you know:
Now, I hold it ia not decent for a scien
tific gent
To say another is an assat least, to all
intent
Nor should the individual who happens to
be meant
Reply by heaving rocks at him to any
gTeat extent.
The convened Americanists, it should
be stated, did not heave rocks at each
other, but they did make use of such
offensive epithets as "hybrid," "mon
grel" and "monster," which, while they
may be forceful, expressive and possi
bly scientific, are certainly unparlia
mentary and impolite. The learned
Americanists are respectfully urged to
be polite first, after which they may
be as deeply scientific as they please.
As for "Amerind," let it force its way
into the word book if it can. If it is
needed, it will slip in easily, and if it
is superfluous it will die the death.
Holding Sheriffs Responsible.
There is in Indiana a law which-pro
yides that when a sheriff allows a pris
oner to be taken away from him and
lynched he thereby loses his office and
can get it back only after proving that
he used~all his powers to prevent the
crime. The recent lynching of the ne
gro Dillard has brought Sheriff Dudley
of Sullivan county, that state, within
the terms of this law, and Governor
Durbin has done his part by notifying
the sheriff that he is now a private citi
zen.
It will be interesting to learn what
happens nextthat is, to see how this
rather unusual statute works when
put to the test of practical application.
That the sheriff will have any difficulty
in securing witnesses ready to depose
that he was unable to defend his pris
oner is highly improbable, particularly
if his acquaintance among the lynchers
is large, andwell, sheriffs do usually
know most of their neighbors, and it
would require no very desperate exer
tions on his part to convince the par
ticipants in a lynching that he had done
all that could be expected of him in the
way of resisting the mob.
However, if such a law as this in In
diana could be generally enforced in
states where lynchings are of too fre
quent occurrence and sheriffs and their
deputies be held strictly responsible for
prisoners it might be an important fac
tor in lessening the number of these
outrages upon justice. If the sheriffs
were given to understand that they
would lose their positions if they lost
their prisoners, they might make some
what more strenuous efforts to outwit
and, if necessary, outshoot the lynchers
than appears to be the case in many of
these illegal executions.
A single shot from an express mes
senger, which struck one of the rob
bers, says a late news item, prevented
the looting of a train on the Colorado
and Southern railroad. There were
four of the scoundrels, and they had
the train stopped and dynamite under
the express car when this one shot
started them on the run, carrying the
wounded man with them. The strange
thing about the affair is that the mes
senger should have thought of using
his gun. The shooting or attempting
to shoot train robbers by trainmen is
such a radical violation of the rules of
the game as it is generally played that
the incident referred to is decidedly 3*Jj
unusual and almost unique.
Tennesseeans were disappointed at
first when they learned that the naval
vessel named In honor of their state
was to be a cruiser instead of a battle
ship, but they are reassuered by tha
probability that the Tennessee will be
the greatest fighting machine afloat
T^
**&
ii
MB^

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