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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, July 23, 1903, Image 7

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STSINSEMI-STATE
THE FORM OF POPE LEO NOW
LIES IN THE HALL OF THE
THRONE ROOM.
INTERMENT NEXT SATURDAY
(HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE FLOCK TO
CHURCH TO PRAY FOR THE
LATE PONTIFF.
Rome, July 22The body of Leo
iXUI lies now in the hall of the throne
|room a few steps from the room in
which his death took place. The same
"vestments, the comauro hood, the
rochet and the white gown which were
put on Monday cover the form, which
iTests in semi-state surrounded by the
lighted candles, the noble guard and
'Franciscan penitentaries.
Today the diplomatic body, the high
dignitaries and the Roman aristocracy
[will enter the hall to pay their tributes
of respect to all that remains of the
frope, who won the respect and affec
tion of the world. In the afternoon the
body will be arrayed in all the glory
of the pontifical robes, the mitre re
placing the hood and at sunset it will
be taken into the chapel of the sacra
Jment of St Peter's, where for three
days the public will be given an op
portunity of paying a last farewell.
The interment will occur Saturday
evening.
Impressive Ceremonies.
Tuesday was notable for the impres
sive ceremonial of the recognition of
the death ot the pope, which occurred
in the morning in the chamber in which
he died. Thereafter only those were
admitted who were concerned in the
embalming of the body, an operation
which occupied six hours. Meantime
Ithe authorities of the Vatican pro
ceeded with the preparations for the
funeral and the conclave and the ac
knowledgement of the condolences
which had been received. Among the
latter was a notable message from the
German emperor.
Throughout the day the Vatican was
surrounded by crowds which increased
towards night. Several thousand en
tered St. Peter's at vespers and joined
in prayers for the departed. Among
these were many Italian officers, whose
troops shortly after sunset were
imarched from the Vatican back to
their barracks. At no time had their
'services been needed. It is not the
custom in Italy to wear the conven
tional emblems of mourning and hence
the crowd which, in consequence of
the closing of many places of business,
wanders the streets, has more the ap
pearance of an aimless holiday mak
ing throng than one sorrowing for the
death of the pope.
Hundreds Pray for Pope Leo.
Into nearly all the churches, how
ever, hundreds, not often seen in places
of devotion, flocked to vespers to say
a hurried prayer Afterwards they
loitered outside, reading the deep
black edged proclamation of Cardinal
Respighi, the vicar of Rome, concern
ing the funeral arrangements, the
meeting of the conclave and the church
ceremonials.
The quiet of the evening was broken
by a chorus such as the world has sel
dom heard. On the strike of 8 all of
Rome's 400 churches commenced to
toll bells for the passing of the soul
of Leo XIII. From the seven hills and
from every quarter of the city which
contained churches came the constant
clang until all was one vast reverbera
tion.
The harsh jingling of the smaller
chapel bells striking quickly and more
often was not drowned by the solemn
strokes that came in mourning meas
ure from the great dome of St. Peter's.
It was as if a great fire raged and
'every bell in Rome was vieing with
ievery other in anxiety to warn the
populace. Except in its common mo
tive and common sorrow it was an
amazing discord, which continued an
hour, and which will recur nightly un
til the obsequies are over.
Seals Papal Property.
Monsignor Cagiano, the major domo,
assisted by the papal notary, and Mon
signor Bisleti, master of the chamber,
sealed all the drawers and boxes in
the papal apartments, making a minute
inventory of all objects of value found
These were entrusted for safe keeping
to Prince Rospigliosi, the comman
dant of the noble guard. Cardinal
Oreglia, in giving instructions to the
commanders of the papal armed bodies
said:
"Although the relations between the
church and the government of Italy
are less strained than in 1878, so that
certainly order will be maintained out
side the Vatican, I remind you that it
Is your duty to watch closely inside
the Vatican to prevent, especially dur
ing the conclave, the interference of
any extraneous influence."
According to tradition, ths camer
lengo is entitled to have his apartment
watched day and night by a picket of
the Swiss guard, but at 9 o'clock last
night Cardinal Oreglia sent word that
the eight Swiss guards posted at his
door should withdraw Cardinal Oreg
jlia's request to -Imal Rampolla
that the latter sho i remain at the
iratican is considered
A Most Diplomatic Move,
being perhaps the first step for an
agreement between them and might
entirely change all the prophecies hith
erto made concerning the issue of the
Iconclave. Indeed, some profess to see
ft result of this in the morning's skir
toaish at the first meeting of the con
gregation of cardinals over the ap
pointment of a secretary to the con
sistorial congregation. After the dis
cussion of several candidates, among
whom was Mgr. Gaspari, known to be
Cardinal Rampolla's protege, some
one suggested Mgr. Merry del Val. He
was immediately supported by the
whole anti-Rampolla element, merely
to test the strength of the ex-secre
tary of state, but this strategem was
unsuccessful, as Cardinal Oreglia made
it manifest that he was not personally
interested in the matter, while Cardi-
nal Rampolla swung his followers to
the support of Merry del Val and thus
avoided a measure of his strength at
this juncture.
RELATIVES SAY FAREWELL.
Touching Scene in the Death Chamber
of Pope Leo.
Rome, July 22.There was a touch
ing scene at the Vatican Tuesday
morning when the nephews of Leo,
With their families, entered the death
chamber to take a last farewell of
their uncle, for whom they had an in
tense reverence. The elders were
dressed in black and the children in
white. As they entered, the younger
children, awe-struck and frightened,
began to cry at this, their first ac
quaintance with death, but the beauty
of the scene soon quieted them and
they ceased to weep. The little party
advanced on tiptoe, and circling around
the bed, fell on their knees and joined
in the prayers of the penitentiaries.
The whiteness of the children's gowns
added a pleasing note to the rather
highly colored scene.
Presently the visitors arose and
slowly filed past the bed, kneeling to
kiss the dead hand as they passed
Count Camillo, one of the nephews who
knew him best, accompanying him al
ways when he went into the gardens
of the Vatican, was quite overcome,
more so, in fact, than at any time since
his uncle's death occurred.
The will of Leo XIII has not yet been
opened Consequently all alleged news
concerning it and the millions he is
said to have left to the church is
imaginary
A death mask was taken by Com
mendator Galli, director of the Vati
can museum, Tuesday The delicate
work was successfully executed and
the result is considered highly satis
factory
PURE FOOD LAWS.
National Legislation Favored by the
Speakers at St. Paul Convention.
St Paul, July 22.Representatives
of seventeen great states of the Union
assembled in this city yesterday in
the convention of the National Asso
ciation of State and Food Depart
ments, held in the senate chamber of
the capitol. Besides the members of
the state dairy and food departments,
who were fifty-three in number, there
are various other interests represented.
From the United States department of
agriculture have come Professor H. W
Wiley and Henry E. Alvord, and twen
ty-five manufacturers of food products
have representatives in attendance
The states represented are Oregon,
Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Iowa, Michi
gan, North Carolina, North Dakota.
Ohio. Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois,
South Dakota, Utah, Wisconsin, Cali
fornia, Nebraska, Minnesota Idaho
The keynote of the entire proceed
ings yesterday was national legislation
to establish food standards, and every
paper presented and every portion of
the discussion had its tendency toward
that one great subject The necessity
for national pure food laws was unani
mously recognized, and while there
was some variety as to how those laws
should be framed, how they should be
promoted in congress, or what they
should contain, all speakers agreed
that the standards of purity for food
products should be established by na
tional law, and that state laws should
conform to the standards thus fixed.
The chief feature of the day's pro
gramme was the address delivered last
evening by Professor W Wiley,
chief of the United States bureau of
chemistry, in which he explained the
recent experiments with borax and
boric acid which he conducted
Addresses were also delivered by
Professor J. H. Shepard. state chemist
ot South Dakota Professor S S Ladd,
state chemist of North Dakota: Ed
ward N Eaton, M. S state analyst of
Illinois Professor S Scovill, direc
tor of Kentucky experiment station
Dr William Treat, vice director of
Pennsylvania experiment station.
KING EDWARD IN DUBLIN.
British Ruler Welcomed By Immense
Crowd at Capital City of Ireland.
Dublin, July 22.The entry of King
Edward and Queen Alexandra into
Dublin was made the occasion for a
general holiday. The decorations of
the city, especially along the route of
the procession to the viceregal lodge
in Phoenix park, surpassed anything
hitherto attempted by Dublin, not ex
cepting Queen Victoria's last visit.
The grandstands erected at various
places were crowded, while the people
were massed on the sidewalks. Their
majesties continuously bowed their
acknowledgments of the warm greet
ings, especially at the College green,
which was packed by a multitude of
people.
It was late in the afternoon when
the viceregal lodge was reached.
Their majesties lunched with the lord
lieutenant and the day's programme
was concluded with a formal visit by
their majesties to the Duke of Con
naught.
The whole day's proceedings were
not marred by any unpleasant incident
beyond the ceremony of handing the
keys of the city to the king. The city
hall, alone, of all public buildings, was
not decorated.
CORN CROP DAMAGED.
Heavy Rain Creates Havoc in Vicinity
of Toledo, O.
Toledo, O., July 22.The heaviest
rain of the season passed over this
section Tuesday evening and did much
damage to trees. Reports from the
country are to the effect that the corn
crop was badly damaged.
Lightning struck the Home brewery,
now in course of construction, and two
men, John Woods and H. Mueller, were
seriously injured.
Returns Indictments.
Jackson, Ky., July 22.The grand
jury last night returned indictments
against Edward Tharp and Joseph
Crawford, teamsters for the Hargis
Brothers, for arson. They were al
ready held on the charge of setting
fire to Ewen's hotel last month. An
indictment was also returned against
Gardner Plummer for attempting to
bribe Ewen.
Human Skeleton Found.
Minneapolis, July 22.A human
skeleton was found yesterday in the
space between roof and rafters of a
building at 503 Washington avenue.
The police are investigating the matter
in order to determine whether murder
tad been committed.
DEFEAT THE REBELS
PHILIPPINE SCOUTS AND ^URAL
CONSTABULARY KILL FIFTEEN
INSURGENTS.
FIGHT LASTS THREE HOURS
FOUR NON-COMBATANTS AND ONE
SCOUT KILLED IN STREET BAT-
TLE AT ALBAY.
Manila, July 22.The Philippine
scouts and rural constabulary defeat
ed 250 rebels in the streets of Albay,
the capital of the island of Albay, on
Thursday last, killing fifteen and
wounding fifteen. The combatants
entered the town from opposite sides
and street fighting continued for three
hours. Four non-combatants were
killed. The scouts lost one killed and
two wounded. The rebels were led by
Simeon Ola, chief of the Albay rebels,
and they had fifty rifles. Colonel
H. Banheltz, formerly captain of the
Second infantry, who was in command
of the scouts and constabulary, has
been campaigning actively in Albay,
but this was the first decisive engage
ment he has had.
Twenty-five native priests who se
ceded from the Catholic church in Ho
llo because of the failure of the church
to appoint a native bishop, have re
fused to join the Aglipay movement
and will continue their Catholic rites
while refusing to acknowledge the oa
pal authority
DESPERATE PISTOL DUEL.
Three Kentuckians Wounded in a Fight
Near Jackson.
Jackson, Ky July 22 In a desper
ate pistol duel at Cave Run school
house, three miles east of Jackson,
Tuesday, three persons were seriously
hurt James and William Barrett and
Mack Howard and his fourteen-year
old son were the principals. A bullet
from James Barrett's pistol lodged in
the abdomen of James Vires, aged
twelve, who was sitting at his desk in
the schoolhouse Mack Howard was
shot In the arm and his elbow was
shattered. James Barrett was shot in
the head with buckshot and his skull
was fractured
The civil authorities declined to take
action and two details of soldiers from
here were sent into the country to
make arrests Captain Foley's posse
arrested the Howards, and details un
der Lieutenant MacLeod overtook the
Barretts several miles from the scene
of the shooting Mack Howard was
too seriously hurt to be brought to
town, but the others were landed in
jail here James Barrett is a mullat
to He admitted shooting twelve men
and one woman and of these two died.
For one killing he was acquitted and
for the other given one year in the
penitentiary, being pardoned last April.
Mack Howard is paralyzed from the
waist down from being shot in a fight
four years ago
Last night Howard and James Bar
rett played poker in Jackson and Bar
rett won Howard's money and accept
ed his pistol as a pawn for $10 How
ard followed him to the scene of the
shooting in an attempt, he says, to re
deem the weapon Barrett claims the
pistol was bought outright Howard
bnrrowed a gun and his son had a pis
tol The Barretts had revolvers and
several shots were fired The school
boy may recover and the two men were
fatally wounded
NEGROES FIGHT OVER CARDS.
One of Then Killed and Three Others
Seriously Wounded.
Morgantown, W. Va., July 22.As a
result of a free-for-all fight over cards
at Opeklska, this county, Monday
night, Tom Carter was killed outright,
Charles Lewis was mortally wounded
and William Jensen and Henry Horner
seriously wounded. All are negroes in
the employ of the contracting firm
building the lock and dam on the Mo
nongahela river at Opekiska. The
shooting, it is said, was done by Robert
Hyer, also a negro, who made his es
cape and hasjiot yet been captured.
TERRIFIC WIND STORM.
Many Buildings and Other Property
Damaged in Missouri.
Marshall, Mo., July 22.A terrific
wind and rain storm visited this city
Tuesday, resulting in much damage
to property. The tent of Rev Dr
Munhall, an evangelist who had been
conducting revival meetings here, was
blown down, but fortunately the con
gregation had been dismissed in time
to escape. Major Randolph, colored,
was killed by a live wire. Many build
ings were badly damaged and consid
erable destruction was wrought in the
country.
ENVELOPED IN~FLAMES.
Village of Arcadia, O., in Danger of
Destruction by Fire.
Findlay O., July 22.A telephone
message from Arcadia, a town ten
miles east of here, announces that the
village is enveloped in flames. Several
large buildings have been destroped
and the entire town is in danger. Ow
ing to the storm here, communication
by telephone or telegraph with Arca
dia is practically cut off. The Find
lay and Fostoria fire departments have
sent assistance to the threatened vil
lage.
Charged With Killing His Wife.
St. Louis, July 22.Samuel A. Par
sons, a former brakeman, is locked up
in the East St. Louis jail on the charge
of killing his wife, whom he shot Mon
day night, thinking her a burglar, lie
said. Mrs. Parsons, who died Tues
day, did not make any charges against
her husband, but neighbors say the
couple quarreled Monday night.
Hailstorm Causes Damage.
Hartford, Conn., July 22.The most
violent hail storm ever known here
struck this city Tuesday afternoon,
causing much damage to gardens,
fruit trees and windows.
THE PRIKCETO^ TTKION: THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1903.
SIR THOMAS A MASCOT.
Shamrock III Scores a Big Victory
With Her Owner on Board.
Atlantic Highlands, N. J., July 22.
After her narrow margin of victory
Monday, Sir Thomas Lipton's new
challenger for the nautical blue ribbon
was again in racing form Tuesday and
trimmed her trial horse by 33 minutes,
QL7 seconds in a twenty-mile race.
Much of her big victory was due to a
nuke in which she covered miles of
water while Shamrock I hung idle in
a calm. Another thing which the
sailors say brought luck to the new
boat was that Sir Thomas, after
watching the race from the Erin for
several days, sailed on the challenger.
Her crew declares that he rarely fails
to bring good luck. Sir Thomas was
pighfy pleased at the work of Sham
rock HI.
RICH ORE DISCOVERED.
Iron Found in Abundance in Famous
Section Thirty.
Duluth, July 22.The famous sec
tion 30 case is recalled by the discov
ery of rich veins of iron ore on the site
which, for seventeen vears, was in
litigation.
Drills which have been at work for
over six months have at last discov
ered the ore. The first bed is over a
quarter of a mile long and 200 feet
wide
The Pennsylvania road is behind the
(new owners and they expect to get
,15.000.000 tons of ore out of the place,
paying $3,000,000 bonus and 40 cents
per ton as royalty to the exploration
,company that recently won out in the
litigation ENGINEER CRUSHED TO DEATH.
Caught by a Cable and His Bcdy Hor
ribly Mangled.
Duluth, July 22.John T. Atkinson,
an engineer in the employ of the Lake
Superior Construction and Dredging
company, was crushed to death on
dredge No. 8 of the blast furnace docks
at West Duluth during the afternoon.
He fell on the floor where some oil
had been spilled and was caught by
a cable and twisted around the drum
of the engine. The body was horribly
,mangled and life was extinct when it
was rescued by his companions.
Russia Mobilizing Troops.
London, July 22.The Standard's
Odessa correspondent sends a report
that 128,000 troops are being mobilized
from Central and Northern garrisons
an Russia for immediate dispatch to
the Far East in case of necessity.
TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.
Fire Tuesday wiped out the milling
hamlet at Harrison River, C. Loss
estimated at $100,000.
The entire East Side of the town ot
Hobart, I. T., was burned Monday
night Loss, $100,000.
The Reliance, Constitution and Co
lumbia were unable to finish their race
Tuesday, the wind dying out.
It is said that Charles M. Schwab,
the steel magnate, will visit Wauke
sha, Wis., in an effort to regain his
health.
Ernest Nichols, star pitcher of the
Pacific National Baseball league, died
suddenly at Natatorium Park, Spo
kane, Wash., of heart trouble shortly
after taking a plunge in the natatorium
pool
Oscar Szontagh committed suicide
by shooting Tuesday at Spokane
Wash He was one of the most dis
tinguished chemists in the United
States and had a national reputation
as a metallurgist.
BASEBALL SCORES.
National League.
At Brooklyn, 4 New York, 1.
At Chicago, 3 Pittsburg, 1.
At St Louis, 5 Cincinnati, 4.
American League.
At New York, 9 Cleveland, 3.
At Washington, 10 Chicago, 7.
At Philadelphia, 1 St. Louis, 0,
Second gamePhiladelphia, 11 S
Louis, 3.
American Association.
At St. Paul, 9 Indianapolis, 6.
At Milwaukee, 3 Columbus, 2.
At Minneapolis, 5 Louisville, 2.
At Kansas City, 6 Toledo, 7ten
innings. Second gameKansas City,
13 Toledo, 4.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, July 21.WheatCash,
831,4c Sept., 74%c Dec 73%c. On
trackNo. 1 hard, 85^0 No. 1 North
ern, 84*4c No. 2 Northern, 82^c
No. 3 Northern, [email protected]
St. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, July 21.CattleGood to
choice steers, [email protected] common to
fair, [email protected] good to choice cows
and heifers, [email protected] veals, $2.50
@5.00. Hogs$5.00 5.65. Sheep
Good to choice, $4.00 4.25 lambs,
$5 [email protected]
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, July 21.WheatIn store
No. 1 hard, 85*6 No. 1 Northern,
84c No. 2 Northern, 82y 2
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago, July 21.CattleGood to
prime steers, [email protected] poor to me
dium, [email protected] stockers and feed
ers, [email protected] cows, [email protected]
heifers, [email protected] calves, [email protected]
6.00. HogsMixed and butchers, $5.30
@5.75 good to choice heavy, [email protected]
5.65 rough heavy, [email protected] light,
[email protected] SheepGood to choice,
[email protected] Western, [email protected] na
tive lambs, [email protected] Western, $5.50
@6.00.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, July 21.Wheat July,
75%c old, 75y8c Sept., 76*[email protected]%c
old, 76%,c Dec, 761/4c
8
fc^yA^^
First publication July 16th, 1903.
Mortgage Foreclosure Sale.
Default having been made in the payment of
the sum of four hundred, thirty-two and 26-100
dollars, which is claimed to be due and is due
at the date of this notice upon a certain mort
gage, duly executed and delivered by Josiah L.
Wilber and Jane Wilber. his wife, mortgagors
to Ida Townsend, mortgagee, bearing date the
3rd day of May, 1895, and with a power of sale
therein contained, duly recorded in the office of
the register of deeds in and for the county of
Mille Lacs and State of Minnesota, on the 6th
day of May. 1895, at 10 o'clock A. M., in book
of mortgages, on page 441.
Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that
by virtue of the power of sale contained in said
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such
case made and provided, the said mortgage will
be forclosed by aale of the premises described
in and conveyed by said mortgage, viz:
Lot four (4) and the southeast quarter of
the southwest quarter of section thirty (30) in
township forty-two (42) north of range twenty
five (25) west, in Mille Lacs county and State
of Minnesota, with the hereditaments and ap
purtenances: which sale will be made by the
sheriff of said Mille Lacs county, at the front
door of the court house, in the village of Prince
ton in said county and State, on the 29th day
August, 1903, at 10 o'clock A. M., of that day, at
public vendue, to the highest bidder for cash,
to pay said debt of four hundred, thirty-two and
26-100 dollars, and interest, and the taxes, if
any, on said premises, and ten dollars, attor
ney's fees, as stipulated in and by said mort
gage in case of foreclosure, and the disburse
ments allowed by law: subject to redemption
at any time within one year from the day of
sale, as provided by law.
Dated July 15th, 1903.
IDA TOWNSEND.
CHAS. KEITH, Attorney. Mortgagee.
First publication July 16,1903.
Summon s.
STATE OF MINNESOTA. I
County of Mille Lacs fs
District Court, Seventh Judicial District
Helen F. Cone and Erastus H. Cone.
Plaintiffs, vs.
Stephen McCormick, J. B.McCormick,
Ruel E. Bowen, Sylvester H. Bowen,
Philotha Blood, Robert Noble. Hugh
Noble. Pluma Noble. Egbert H. Cone,
George H. Deans, and all persons un
known having or claiming an interest in
the property sought to be divided here- I
in. Defendants.
The State of Minnesota to Stephen McCor
mick. J. B. McCormick. Ruel E Bowen, Svl
vester H. Bowen, Philotha Blood. Robert No
ble, Hugh Noble, Pluma Noble, Egbert H. Cone
George H. Deans, and all persons unknown
having or claiming an interest in the property
sought to be divided herein, defendants
You, and each of you, are hereby summoned
and required to answer the complaint of the
plaintiffs in the above entitled action, which
complaint has been filed in the office of the
clerk of said district court, at the village of
Princeton, in the county of Mille Lacs, in said
State of Minnesota, and to serve a copy of your
answer to said complaint on the subscriber, at
his office in the village of Princeton, in the said
county of Mille Lacs, within twenty days after
service of this summons upon you, exclusive of
the day of such service, and if you fail to
answer the said complaint within the time
aforesaid, the plaintiff in this action will apply
to the court for the relief demanded in the com
plaint. This action is brought for partition of
real property, and said property sought to be
divided is described as the northeast quarter
of section 20, in townshm 37, range 27, in said
county
Dated .Tune 1st. A D. 1903.
A. Ross,
Attorney for Plaintiff. Princeton, Minnesota.
Notice of Lis Pendens.
STATE OF MINNESOTA. I
County of Mille Lacs. fss
District Court. Seventh Judicial District
Helen Cone and Erastus Cone,"|
Plaintiffs. vs.
Stephen McCormick. B. McCormick,
Ruel E. Bowen. bylvester H. Bowen,
Philotha Blood. Robert Noble, Hugh
Noble. Pluma Noble. Egbert H. Cone,
George H. Deans, and all persons un
known ha\ ing or claiming an interest in
the property sought to be divided here
in. Defendants
To whom it may concern
Take notice that an action has been com
menced and is now pending in the district
court of said county, wherein the names of the
parties, plaintiffs and defendants, are respect
ively as above written: that the object of said
action is to obtain the partition and division
among the parties hereto according to their
respective rights of land in said county de
scribed as the northeast quarter of section 20,
in township 37, range 27.
Dated June 1st. 1903
J. A Ross,
Attorney for Plaintiff, Printeton, Minn.
First publication July 9,1903.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, I
County of Mille Lacs, fs
District Court. Seventh Judicial District.
The Mille Lacs Lumber Company, a]
Corporation, Plaintiff
vs I
Andrew Richey, Thomas l'. Card.
Thomas H. Curd, also all other persons
or parties unknown, claiming any right, i
title, estate, lien or interest in the real
estate described in the complaint here
in. Defendents
SUMMONS.
The State of Minnesota, to the above named
defendants
You and each of you. are hereby summoned
and required to answer the complaint of the
plaintiff in the above entitled action, a copy of
which complaint has been filed in the office of
the clerk of the district court, in and for the
county of Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota, at
the village of Princeton, county of Mille Lacs
aforesaid, and to serve a copy of your answer
to said complaint on the subscribers at their
office, in the village of Milaca. county of Mille
Lacs aforesaid, within twenty days after the
service of this summons upon you, exclusive of
the day of such service, and if you fail to answer
the said complaint within the time aforesaid,
the plaintiff in this action will apply to the
court for the relief in said complaint de
manded.
Dated July 1st, A. 1903.
FOSTER & PRATT,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Milaca, Minn.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
To arrive
No. 1 hard, 82%c No. 1 Northern,
81 ^c No. 2 Northern, 79%c July,
84c Sept., 76^ Dec, 74%c. Flax
In store, to arrive, on track and July,
'95^4c Sept., 96%c Oct., 97*4c Nov.,
97%c
old, 76%c
May, 78%c. CornJuly, 49%c Sept.,
49%c Dec 49y8c May, 49%@49%c.
OatsJuly, 37%c Sept., 32%@32y2c
Dec, 33y @33iic May, S5c. Pork
July, $14.05 Sept., $14.25. FlaxCash,
Northwestern, 96c Southwestern, 91c
July, 91c Sept., 94c Oct., 95y 2 But-
terCreameries, [email protected] dairies,
13%@18c Eggs12%@14c Poultry
Turkeys, 12c chickens, 12c.
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CQ
County of Mille Lacs
SS
District Court, Seventh Judicial District
The Mille Lacs Lumber Company, a")
Corporation Plaintiff,
vs
Andrew Richey. Thomas F. Card,
Thomas H. Curd, also all other persons
or parties unknown claiming any right,
title, estate, lien or interest in the real
estate described in the complaint here
in, Defendants.
NOTICE OF LIS PENDENS.
Notice is hereby given, that an action has
been commenced in this court, by the above
named plaintiff against the above named de
fendants, that the object of said action is to
determine the adverse claims of said defend
ants, and each and all of them, and the rights
of the parties herein, in and to the real estate
hereinafter described, and asking that the said
adverse claims of said defendants, and each of
them, may be adjudged by the court null and
void, and that the title to said real estate may
be adjudged and decreed by the court to be in
the plaintiff: and that the lands affected by
said action are described as follows: The
south half (S^) of the southwest quarter
(SWJ of section three (3), township thirty
eight (38) north of range twenty-seven (27)
west of the Fourth principal meridian: the
same lying and being in the county of Mille
Lacs aforesaid.
Dated July 1st, 1903.
FOSTER & PRATT.
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Milaca, Minn.
First Publication July 16,1903.
STATEe
OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF
Mill Lacsss. In Probate Court
July 12th. 1903.
In the matter of the estate of Wi-say, de
ceased.
On reading and filing the petition of George
E. Budd, administrator of the estate of Wi
say, deceased, representing, among other
things, that he has fully administered said es
tate, and praying that a time and place be fixed
for examining and allowing his final account
of administration, and for the assignment of
the residue of said estate to the persons enti
tled thereto,
It is ordered, that said account be examined
and the petition heard by the judge of the pro
bate court, on Friday, the 7th day of August
1903, at 10 o'clock A. M.. at the probate office in
the court house in Princeton in said county.
And it Is further ordered, that notice thereof
be given to all persons interested by publish
ing a copy of this order for three successive
weeks, once in each week, prior to said date
of hearing, in the Princeton UNION, a legal
newspaper i printed and published in said
county.
By the court.
re
M. VANALSTEIN,
[Seal of Probate Court.! Judge of Probate.
First Publication July 9.1903.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, I
County of Mille Lacs,
a
Eww ?h^i
ss
District Court, Seventh Judicial District,
ihe Mille Lacs Lumber Company, al
Corporation, Plaintiff,
vs.
Alexander Key, Elizabeth Rey, George
W. Thompson, William M. Corcoran,
Lewis Johnson, Edward Simms. John
P'
Sturtevant, Jonatha
Chase. Samuel M. Cook, Joseph H.
Charles. Jeremiah C. Donahower. and
Alvah Smith, also all other persons or
parties unknown claiming any right ti
tle estate, lienor interest in the real
estate described in the complainta hereeTo
in. Defendants.
SUMMONS.complaint
ThedefeandantsMinneSOtart'
o^Ji'
an dir 5 aJ
S*
entitled action, a copy of
which complaint has been filed in the office of
the
clerkf of*the districState
court, in
Lacs of Minnesota,thearfodan
the village of Princeton, county of Mille Lam
aforesaid, and to serve a copy of your answert
to said complaint on the subscribers atl
office, in the village of Milaca, countcy Mille
Lacs afordsaid, within twentyS days after the
service of this summons upon you, exclusive
of the day of such service, and if you fail to
answer the said complaint withiD the time
aforesaid, the plaintiff in this action will apDlv
demanded1"
6
sta 0
of the said defendants, and each of them, may be
adjudgedby
re
the court null and void and that
ai 2
ur
J^i
0
f
eteh
&2ie
land S
affect y said action are de
quarter (SW of NW) and the
scribed aswfollows- The southwest quarter of
rl
west half of southwest quarter (Vfy. of SWK)
2f^fS2?
tw ***J-fte. (26) township thirty
eignt (j) north of range twenty-seven (27)
west of the Fourth principal meridian, and ly
ing and being in the county of Mille Lacs afore
Dated July 1st, A. D. 1903.
FOSTER & PRATT
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Milaca, Minn.
First publication July 23,1902.
CJTATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF
*f Mille Lacs.ss. Probate Court
Special Term, July 18th, 1903.
In the matter of the estate of Margaret Lo
water, deceased.
Whereas, an instrument in writing, purport
ing to be the last will and testament of Marga
ret Lowater. deceased, late of said county, has
been delivered to this court and
Whereas, B. A. Bradley has died therewith
his Petition, representing among other things
that said Margaret Lowater died in said county
on the 2lst day of June, 1903 testate, and that
said petitioner is the executor named in said
last will and testament, and praying that the
said instrument may be admitted to probate
and that letters testamentary be to him issued
thereon:
It is ordered, that the proofs of said instru
ment, and the said petition, be heard before
this court at the probate office in said county
on the 15th day of August. A. 1903. at 2
clock in the afternoon, when all persons in
terested may appear for, or contest the probate
of said instrument.
And it is further ordered, that notice of the
time and place of said hearing be given to all
persons interested, by publishing this order
once in each week, for tbree successive weeks
prior to said day of hearing, in the Princeton
Union, a weekly newspaper printed and pub
lished at Princeton in.saidecountv.
^'S^J
nceton th 18th~ day of July.
1
A. D. 1903. By the Court,
M. VANALSTEIN.
[Probate Seal.] ,j udge of Probate.
First publication July 9,1903
OTATE OF MINNESOTA. COUNTY OF
Mille Lacs.ss. In Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Joseph Bruml
baugh. deceased.
The petition of Henry Hamilton having been
duly made and filed in this court, representing
among other things that one Joseph Brumbaugh
who resided last prior to his death at Prince
ton in the State of Minnesota, died at the vil
lage of Princeton in the county of Mille Lacs
State of Minnesota, on the 2nd day of Novem
ber. 1889, seized of an estate of inheritance in
certain lands in the county of Mille Lacs. State
of Minnesota, described in said petition and
that said petitioner has an interest in said lands
and that more than five years have elapsed
since the death of said Joseph Brumbaugh de
ceased, and that administration has not been
granted or had of said estate in this State, and
praying that the descent of said lands and of
the interest of said petitioner therein be by
this court determined, and said lands assigned
to such persons as may be entitled thereto by
law.
Now therefore, it is ordered that the said
petition be heard at a term of this court to be
held at the probate office, in the village of
Princeton in said county of Mille Lacs, State of
Minnesota, on Saturday the 1st day of August
A. D. 1903, at 2 o'clock P. M.
It is further ordered, that notice of said hear
ing of said petition be given by the publication
of this order once in each week for three suc
cessive weeks prior to said day of hearing, in
the Princeton Union, a weekly newspaper
printed and published in Princeton in said
county.
Dated at Princeton this 7th day of July, 1903.
By the court,
B. M. VANALSTEIN,
fProbate Seal Judge of Probate.
OR SALE.360 acres of the best
meadow land in the State. On the
brook and two miles from Zimmerman
station. For sale cheap.
M. ZIMMERMAN,
31-2 Midway, St. Paul. Minn.
W'fM i\
name
tehereby
0
th
summonedthfo
lofyo ur'
a
U?&
ued i
Mwe
atheirni
mof
al
i
th
reUe
Dated July 1st, A. D. 1903.
FOSTER & PRATT,
Attorneys for Plaintiff. Milaca, Minn.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, I
CountyCourt.
of Mille Lacs,
mPls
ss*
Sevent Judicial District.
The Mille Lacs Lumber Company, al
Corporation, Plaintiff,
vs.
Alexander Rey, Elizabeth Rey, George
W. Thompson, William M. Corcoran,
Lewis Johnson, Edward Simms. John
Purdy, O. B. Sturtevant, Jonathan
Chase. Samuel M. Cook. Joseph H.|
Charles. Jeremiah C. Donahower and
Alvah Smith, also all other persons or
parties unknown claiming any right, ti- I
tie, estate, lien or interest in the real
estate described in the complaint here
in, Defendants
NOTICE OF LIS PENDENS.
Notice is hereby given, that an action has been
commenced in this court, by the above named
plaintiff against the above named defendants
that the object of said actionh isPlaintiff, to derterminedan
the adverse claims of said defendants, an eachd
and all of them, and the of the parties
herein and to thee reatleestate hereinafter de
scribed: and
askinagtthat
adjudged
an
ma irights
the said adverse claims
A

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