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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 03, 1903, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1903-09-03/ed-1/seq-3/

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TO FIGHT THE TRUST
BATTLEMEN OF MISSOURI OR-
GANIZE INDEPENDENT PACK-
ING COMPANY.
DISTRIBUTION OF THE STOCK
IT IS SO ARRANGED THAT THE
COMBINE CANNOT CONTROL
NEW CONCERN.
Kansas City, Mo, Sept 2.Twenty-
five cattlemen from different portions
of the grazing section of Missouri met
here last night and agreed to form an
independent grazing company to com
pete with the so-called packing combi
nation The name agreed upon was
the Independent Packing company.
Articles of incorporation will be drawn
up and agreed on today. The company
Will nave a capitalization of $5,000,000
and will be incorporated under the
laws of Anzona Of the proposed
capitalization, 51 per cent will be dis
posed of to be held trust by the
board of directors of the company.
This will insure the stockmen who are
interested in the concern that the
company will always be controlled by
the stock interests The rest of the
stock will be sold to stockmen if pos
sible, although no purchaser will be
barred
The division of the stock as agreed
upon Tuesday was made to prevent
any possibility of the trust getting
control of the independent company
Two million dollars of the stock will
be issued at once and the rest will be
put out later
Formerly it was part of the plan to
include the United States Packing
company of Pueblo, Colo in the com
bination Now it is said the Pueblo
plant will never be built, but its cap
ital of over $1,500,000 will be offered
to the Independent Packing company
or will be allowed to revert back to
the stockmen who subscribed it.
Charles Martin, secretary of the
new concern, who was one of the pro
moters of the United States Packing
company and a stockholder, is in Kan
cas City promoting the organization
of the Independent Packing company.
The Independent Packing company
will build one plant in the Missouri
valley, but its exact location has not
been determined on It will be in
operation next year Another plant
will be built, probably in Texas
STOCKMEN MUST PAY.
After the First of January Free Trans
portation Will Be Curtailed.
Chicago Sept 2 Stockmen through
out the West, who have for many
ear been enjoying free transporta
tion from their homes and the ship
ping centers, will find this privilege
curtailed after Jan 1, 1904. The ex
ecutive officials of Western lines met
here Tuesday and agreed that on and
after the date mentioned they would
discontinue the issuance to stockmen
of return tiansportation, thereby com
pelling them to pay their fare to their
homes after having come to the various
shipping centers with stock Before
the agreement can be carried out,
however, a great deal of work will have
to be done by the traffic men.
Committees will be appointed soon
for the purpose of preparing a digest
of all the laws of the various states
pertaining to the subject of stockmen's
passes with a view to seeing what vio
lation, if any, will result from the ob
servance of the order A large num
ber of the Western states have enact
ed laws compelling the railroads to
issue passes to men charge of stock
cars but there is no uniformity in the
reqmiements The new regulations
are the same as those force in East
ern territory where the stock traffic is
not nearl} so great
The change is proposed largely for
the purpose of curtailing the operations
of ticket scalpers
WASHINGTON MOB FOILED.
Jailer Galloway Frustrates Attempted
Lynching.
Shawanee, Wash Sept 2 A gang
of fift\ masked men went to the jail
early Tuesday morning and demanded
that Jailer Galloway turn over to them
James Griffin, coloied, who was under
airesl for attempted assault on Mrs.
Jane Hobbs a white woman living
neai here Griffin had been frightened
away by the woman's sciearns and ar
rested a short distance away When
the mob demanded that Galloway turn
o\ei Guflln to them Galloway armed
himsell and after arguing with them,
told them that any attempt to enter the'
jail would be at their peril After a
fw ineffectual attempts to break down
the doors the mob dispersed at day
light A tew colored persons, thinking
it was a race riot, left the town The
negro has, been taken out of town for
cafe keeping.
SULTAN CELEBRATES.
Abdul Mamtd Congratulated on Anni
versary of His Accession.
Constantinople, Sept. 2.The cele
bration here of the anniversary of the
sultan's accession passed off without
any untoward incident. The sultan
held the customary reception and re
ceived the congratulations of the rep
resentatives of the powers and the
state dignitaries. This evening the
city is brilliantly illuminated.
Uncle Andy Montgomery Dead.
Atlanta, Ga, Sept 2.Uncle Andy
Montgomery, 117 years old, the only
negro ever owned by the state of
Georgia, died here Tuesday He is
said to ha\e been born in South Caro
lina in 178G He was well fcnown to
many newspaper men in the North
and East, where he often lectured.
Negro Found Guilty of Murder.
New York, Sept 2.The jury in the
case of Charles Jackson, the negro,
accused of the murder of Charles W.
Roxbury in River avenue, the Bronx,
in July, Tuesday returned, a verdict of
guilty of murder in the first degree.
lJ'^''-""'
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QUESTIONS FOR D. M. PARRY.
Long List Submitted to President of
Manufacturers' Association.
Indianapolis, Sept 2 President
Barry of the Central Union 01 Indian
apolis Tuesday submitted to D. M.
Parry, president of the rational Man
ufacturers' association, me following
questions, and asked for a formal art
ier:
"What is your idea of the legitimate
purpose of a labor union?
"Would you permit the formation of
6 'perfect' union your plant?
"Is your plant conducted along po
litical lines?
"Do you believe that our laws are
such as to foster special privileges and
restrict the opportunity to labor'
"Is it not a fact that wages are
higher in communities using union la
bor and the community thereby bene
fitted''
"Ought the welfare of the many to
be placed in the hands of the few
9
SUGAR FACTORIES ABSORBED.
American Refining Company Now Con
trols Michigan Concerns.
Detroit, Sept. 2The Free Press
says that for some time past the
American Sugar Refining company has
been gradually purchasing stock in
manv of the large beet sugar factories
throughout Michigan and Tuesday it
was announced that this company had
obtained a controlling interest in the
following factories- Sebewaing Sugar
Refining company, Sebewaing, Sani
las Sugar Refining company, Cros
well, Peninsular Sugar company,
Caro, Tawas Sugar company, East
Taw as, Michigan Sugar company, Bay
City Alma Sugar company Alma
Saginaw Sugar company, Saginaw
Valley Sugar company, Saginaw, Me
nominee River Sugar company, Me
nominee
It is also stated that as soon as the
beet sugar season is over the manage
ment of the factories will be placed
under one head The combined capi
talization of the companies absorbed
by the American Sugar Refining com
pany is placed at $6,350,000
CAMPAIGN FORMALLY OPENED.
W. J. Bryan and Tom L. Johnson Start
the Political Battle in Ohio.
Versailles, O Sept 2The Ohio
Democratic state campaign was for
mallay opraed here last night with a
large and enthusiastic meeting Ex
cursion trains were run from the sur
rounding country and brought thou
sands to the meeting
The chief speakers were W J.
Biyan, Tom I, Johnson mayor of
Cleveland and the Democratic candi
date for governor, and John Clarke
candidate for United States senator
to succeed Senator Hanna
All Bryan his speech spoke en
thusiastically of the ticket nominated
b\ the Demociatic state convention
and predicted victory for the ticket
He also endorsed Clarke for United
States senator
Mr Bryan had been billed exten
sively for the opening week of the
Democratic campaign Ohio, but a
pressure of business prevented him
from filling his other engagements.
FIGHT WITH WIRE TAPPERS.
One of a St. Louis Gang Wounded, But
All Escape.
St Louis, Sept. 2.Superintendent
Matthews of the Delmar track discov
ered "wire tappers" in operation at
the track Tuesday afternoon. In a
fight between the "tappers" and Mat
thews' men, one of the former was
shot in the face and thought to have
been badly wounded.
The wire extended from the betting
ring north to Olive street. It was just
ready for use when the discovery was
made The other end of the wire was
in Delmar Garden There were six
men in the gang They carried away
their wounded comrade on a street car
and all trace of them was lost.
WITHOUT FOUNDATION.
Report of Disease Resembling Plague
in Cuba Is Untrue.
Havana, Sept. 2.Dr. Finley, the
head of the health department, says
that there is not the slightest founda
tion for the report published in the
United States that disease resembling
the plague had developed at Baquiri,
Santiago.
r"r
""*?'^V
-rv"
i
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0
"Ought not the laborer to be on an
equal footing with the employer when
it comes to a question of wages?
"Is it within the power of law to sup
press labor unions?
"Have you not adopted an institu
tion similar in scope and nature to the
bojcott
"Is it necessary to have law regulat
ing child labor
9
"What actuates your opposition to
labor organizations?"
President Parry, in a statement,
sas
"Barring one or two things in which
there is a touch of animosity to my
personality, I think Mr. Barry's ques
tions open to a fair answer."
He added that the real issue was
whether an organization can perform
acts which its individual members can
not legitimately do.
CONFESSION WAS FAKE.
John W. Sluder Now Denies Connec
tion With Chicago Crime.
Chicago, Sept 2John W Sluder,
er-employe of Chicago City Railway
company, who on Monday night gave
the police an alleged confession of
the circumstances surrounding the
murderous raid on the company's
barns last Sunday morning, informed
Chief O'Neil, in the presence of a num
ber of newspaper men last night, that
all his startling j'arns about the trag
edy were false.
"That was all a lie chief, I don't
know why I told it, but I was not
there at all when the shooting took
place."
The chief declared that Sluder's de
nial was no surprise to him, as ever
since the young man had been arrest
ed he had been telling one story and
contradicting it in its next breath.
The strange thing about Sluder now,
seems to be, as the police view it, his
familiarity with every move made by
the robbers, details which Henry
Biehl, one of the clerks in the office,
alone was supposed to know, except
ing the robbers themselves.
I^^^U'WlJiy,^,,!)!,i|jlii
**#"*$ w&pm
$ vy
FORTY PERSONS ARE HURT IN A
HEAD-END COLLISION AT
HASTINGS, IA.
STRIKES A FREIGHT TRAIN
BURLINGTON PASSENGER TRAIN
AND BOTH OF THE ENGINES
ARE WRECKED.
Hastings, la., Sept. 2.Passenger
train No. 3 on the Burlington was
wrecked here last night in a head-end
collision with a freight engine and
three cars. The passengers were
thrown from their seats and about
forty were injured more or less severe
ly, but none fatally. The train did not
leave the track, although both engines
were wrecked. As soon as a new en
gine could be secured the passenger
train proceeded to this city.
MILWAUKEE BANK ROBBED.
Daring Thief Obtains Five Hundred
Dollars, But Is Captured.
Milwaukee, Sept. 2.The Germania
National bank was robbed of $500
Tuesday by a daring thief who gave
his name as George P. Johnson The
money taken was a package of cur
rency, and was extricated from the
paying teller's desk by means of a
short piece of copper wire while the
teller was engaged at the telephone
The thief was run down and cap
tured and the money recovered all in
the space of a few minutes.
The prisoner acknowledges that his
real name is George Shea, and the
Bertillon measurements establish this
fact. He is credited with having
robbed the Metropolitan National bank
of New York of $10,000 on July 28,
1899, for which he served a term of
two and a half years in Sing Sing, and
was identified at that time by Captain
Coleran of Chicago as Philip Bailey,
who had several years before been un
der indictment for stealing a $1,000
diamond pm Lorn a State street jew
eler in Chicago The prisoner appears
to be about thirty years old.
AMATEUR DETECTIVE ROBBED.
Prospective Prisoner Beats Him and
Takes His Money.
New Albany, Ind., Sept. 2.As a re
ward of his service as an amateur de
tective to run down a bill raiser,
Charles Marshall of Orange county
was so badly beaten by his prospective
prisoner that he will die. Marshall is
a young countryman who shortly after
joining an amateur detective associa
tion received a letter from a man in
Chicago offering to sell $500 In gen
uine currency for $200 The letter
was so worded as to give the idea that
the bills were raised Marshall open
ed correspondence and arranged to
meet the man, who gave his name as
Hite, in a secluded spot near New Al
bany The amateur detective borrow
ed $200, and when the negotiations
with Hite reached the point where the
moneys were to be exchanged he told
Hite he was under arrest Hite
knocked Marshall down with a large
stone and then Marshall was found
horribly beaten several hours later.
The $200 he had taken to the spot was
gone Physicians say there is no
chance for his recoveiy.
MAY APPEAL TO THE COURTS.
Veteran Workmen Object to Increased
Assessment Rate.
Buffalo, N. Sept. 2.An appeal
to the courts will be made by the vet
eran members of the Ancient Order of
United Workmen should the supreme
lodge put into effect the new rates and
plans of beneficiary assessment adopt
ed at its session in St Paul this year.
The new rates heavily increase the as
sessments on the members over fifty
five years old.
At a meeting of over 1 000 protesting
members of the order held here last
night, resolutions were adopted out
lining their grievances and concluding
with the following declaration*
"After consulting eminent legal au
thorities, the committee is convinced
that if the supreme lodge officials fail
to heed the protests of the aggrieved
membership and the demands of fra
ternity and equity, but on the other
hand persist in the enforcement of the
new plans, they, in loyalty to the older
members, must seek equal and exact
justice in an appeal to the courts un
der the well defined principles of
equity as laid down by the courts of
this and other states and of the United
States
TOOK CARBOLIC ACID.
Catherine Rourke Commits Suicide at
St. Paul.
St. Paul. Sept. 2.Heartbroken on
account of treatment she declared she
had received from Richard Perre her
lover, Catherine Rourke, twenty years
old, whose home was in Elrow, Wis.,
ended her life sometime Monday night
by drinking the contents of an ounce
bottle of carbolic acid. She was
found dead in a room at the Maple
Leaf hotel.
Catherine Rourke is the girl who,
some months ago, discharged a revolv
er in South St. Paul, the bullet from
Which came near hitting L. Thomas,
a commission man.
POLICE DOUBT HIS STORY.
Detroit Man Confesses to a Brutal
Murder.
Detroit, Sept. 2.A man giving the
name of Charles Risch, walked into
police headquarters at 2 o'clock this
morning and said he wished to give
himself up, as he was the murderer of
little Alphonse Wilmes, the four
year-old boy who was found murdered
and his body terribly slashed several
days ago. The police say the man is
either partially intoxicated or mental
ly unbalanced and are inclined to
doubt his story, whicli is not exactly
in line with their theories.
THE PRINCETON UNION: THUBSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1903.'
,|i1|t, J^l
SENSATIONAL MINING SUIT.
Leston Batliett and E. G. Millard Ask
for an Injunction.
Nevada, Cal., Sept. 2.A sensation
al mining suit has been filed in the
superior court in which Leston Bal
liett is one of the plaintiffs He and
E. G. Millard asked the court to issue
an injunction, and restraining order to
keep the directors of the Creek Mining
company from rescinding an assess
ment at a meeting to be hejd in
Truckee Thursday. The plaintiffs
charge that the large stockholders
Want to rescind the assessment so as
to defraud the smaller owners, while
the latter say the assessment will re
deem the property, besides leaving a
balance in the treasury. It is also
charged that the books are kept in the
state of Iowa, except at the times of
annual meetings when they are taken
but of the state again. The complaint
alleges that this is done for the pur
pose of preventing other directors
knowing what is done in order to de
fraud the stockholders.
FERNANDO VEN2EULA KILLED.
Accused of Many Murders Along the
Mexican Border.
Tucson, Ariz, Sept. 2.Fernando
Venzeula, for whose capture dead or
alive a large reward was offered, has
been shot and killed by Mexican rura
les at Santa Cruz, Sonora. He was
accused of having committed half a
dozen murders along the border with
in a few months, the latest being that
of Notches Rotches, a trader.
ENGINEER AND FIREMAN DEAD.
Collision on the Milwaukee Road Near
Star Lake, Wis.
Minocqua, Wis, Sept. 2.A collision
on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St.
Paul road between a work train and a
logging tram near Star Lake resulted
in the death of Engineer Charles Blair
and Fireman Thomas Close, who failed
to jump The men were pinned in the
engine close to the boiler and roasted
to death
Mrs. Burdette a Police Officer.
Pasadena, Cal, Sept. 2 Mrs. Robert
Burdette, wife of the famous humor
ist, has been appointed a special police
officer in and for the city of Pasadena,
wheie she resides. She is the first wo
man to receive such an appointment
in this state
TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.
The attendance at the Minnesota
state fair Tuesday was 47,000.
Colonel Richard Eskridge, U. S. A.,
retired, died in the hospital at Ma
nila Aug. 29.
E D. Libbey, adjutant general of
Minnesota, and Miss Hannah Mayer
were married at St. Paul Tuesday.
Lou Dillon broke her former record,
to wagon, at Cleveland Tuesday, going
a mile in 2:04%. Her former record
was 2:04%.
The war department has approved
the plans for the new cavalry buildings
to be erected at Fort Snelling at a
cost of $400,000.
General George B. Wright, one of the
best known men in Ohio, died at Co
lumbus Tuesday of pneumonia, aged
eighty-seven years. He was prominent
in state and national affairs.
Caleb Dwinell Randall, a well-known
resident of Michigan and originator of
the state system for caring for de
pendent children, is dead at Cold
water, Mich., aged seventy-two years.
BASEBALL SCORES.
National League.
At Chicago, 0 Cincinnati, 3.
At New York, 7 Philadelphia. 3.
At Brooklyn, 8 Boston, 3 Second
gameBrooklyn, 5 Boston, 0.
American League.
At Washington, 1 Boston, 2.
At St. Louis, 0 Cleveland, 4.
At Philadelphia, 1 New York, 5.
Second gamePhiladelphia, 1 New
York, 1called end ninth inning
darkness.
American Association.
At Indianapolis, 10 Minneapolis, 2.
Second gameIndianapolis, 4 Min
neapolis, 1.
At Louisville, 7 St. Paul, 0.
At Toledo, 6 Kansas City, 7.
At Columbus, 3 Milwaukee, 5.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Sept. 1.WheatDec,
80c May, 82%c. On trackNo. 1
hard, 87%c No. 1 Northern, 86%c
No 2 Northern, 84%c No. 3 Northern,
[email protected]
St. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul, Sept. 1CattleGood to
choice steers, $4.25 @5 00 common to
fair, $3 [email protected] good to choice cows
and heifers, [email protected] 00 veals, $3 00
@5 25. [email protected] Sheep
Good to choice yearling wethers, $3.15
@3 35 good to choice shorn lambs,
[email protected]
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Sept. 1.WheatIn store,
oldNo. 1 hard, 85%c No. 1 North
ern, 85%c. To arrive, newNo. 1
hard, 83%c No. 1 Northern, 82%c
No. 2 Northern, 80%c. FlaxIn store,
to arrive, on track and Sept., 99c
Oct., 99^c Nov., 99%c Dec, 99%c
May, $1.03.
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago, Sept. 1.CattleGood to
prime steers, [email protected] poor to me
dium, [email protected] stockers and feed
ers, [email protected] cows, [email protected]
heifers, [email protected] calves, [email protected]
6.75. HogsMixed and butchers, $5.20
@5.85 good to choice heavy, [email protected]
5.70 rough heavy, [email protected] light,
[email protected] SheepGood to choice,
[email protected] Western, [email protected] na
tive lambs. [email protected] Western, $4.00
@5.10.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Sept. 1.WheatSept.,
80%@80%c old, 80%@80%c Dec,
81%c old, 81%c May, 83%c. Corn
Sept., 51%c Dec, 51^0 May, 51%c
OatsSept., 3478c Dec, 36%c May,
S81/[email protected]%c
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
PRINCETON, MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
me. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the
sickadvantages
a
and the invalid.
5?
sLaboratory,
cia
AT-
PorkSept., $12.27%
Oct., $12.50 May, $13.07%. Flax
Cash, Northwestern, 99c Southwest
ern, 94c Sept., 94c Oct., 95c Butter
Creameries, [email protected] dairies, [email protected]
17c Eggs15%@17%c Poultry
Turkeys, lie chickens, 10%c
springs, 13c
Alilnforms
r
of
Electricale Treatment Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ralyi Trained Nurses in attend-
obtained this in
stitution for the treatment of chronic diseases
and diseases of women, either medical or sur
gical, and for the legitimate care of confine
ment cases
Open to the profession Any physician in
good standing can bring patients here and at
tend them himself. Only non-contagious dis
eases admitted Charges reasonable
MISS AUGUSTA PETERSON,
Superintendent
HENRY C. COONEY, M. D.
Medical Director.
A. Q. ALDRICH, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist
TwoP'sinaPod
opular
Products
i wrest
1
New Cranberries,
per quart....
New Cabbage,
per head
Fancy Large Apples,
per peck
Choice Crawford Peaches,
per dozen
Fresh Cocoanuts,
each
Fancy Bartlett Pears,
per dozen
Native Plums,
per peck
New Clover and Basswood Honey IA
per pound lU^
Apple Butter (New England I
kind) per pound /.C-
40c 20c
5c
25c 25c
White Star Coffee, none
better per lb. 20, 25, 35c.
FRESH MILK AND CREAM
eCl N-
PROMPT DELIVE RY
^m
~'.I~L~'-~L~_~_
DR. F. L. SMALL
Resident
DENTIST
OFFICE HOURS,
9 A. M. TO 12 M.
2 P. M. TO 5 P. M.
Office in Caley's Building over
Anderson's store,
Princeton, Minn.
^'*'^^^^^^i^^^^M^ ^iB^ WM^M
ABOUT FACE!
on the shoe question. Don't pay
$5.00 for $3.50 footwear hereafter.
Purchase
SHOES
for yourself and the family here
and the balance will be in your
favor. W sell $5 shoes for $3.50.
There is really remarkable value in
our offerings. Our shoes fit have
style and great wearing qualities.
S. LONG.
When in need of any new and second
hand wagons, buggies and harnesses of
all descriptions call on A. H. Steeves,
at barn near West Branch bridge. 21tf
PHYSICIAN AND SUBGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugsto re
Tel.Rural, 36.
Princeton, jf
CLVERO MCMILLAN,
1 BUY
3 3
I RuraEl- 39
1
WALKERS
mn
LAWYEB.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton,
A. ROSS,
Minn
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street Princeton.
J3USINESS CARDS.
W
rM. KALIHER,
BABBEB SHOP & BATH BOOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A C. SMITH,
Dealer in
FBESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Telephone 51.
Princeton, Minn.
A. ROSS,
8c 5c
FUNEBAL DIBECTOB.
Will take lull charge of dead bodies when
desired Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock Also Springfield metalics
Dealer in Monuments of all kinds.
E. A Ross, Princeton, Minn Telephone No. 30.
V. WICKLUND,
UNDERTAKES and EMBALMEB
Coffins and Caskets always on band.
A full line of granite and marble monuments.
Telephone call 52
Office Main street, Princeton, Minn.
I BUY i
in the way that you can buy right
at the time when you can buy right, and
BUY
at the place where you can buy right
YOU CAN I
buy right if you buy for cash and you
can buy right
I AT
all times if you buy at
|R. D. BYERsJ
Dealer in general merchandise,
I agent for Pratt's perfumes and 1
toilet articles and ilcCall Bazaar
patterns.
O. H. BUCK,
Blacksmith,
All kinds of Blacksmithing neatly
and promptly done. I make a
specialty of
HORSESHOEING and
PLOW WORK.
first sireei, PRINGETOM.
FRANK PETERSON N NEJLSON
PETERSON 4 NELSON,
Blacksmiths
and wagon makers.
Wagons and Buggies manufactured
and repaired.
Satisfaction also guaranteed in all other
lines of our business
Shops next to Starch Factory,
Princeton, Minn.
One-half
Reduction I
ON ALL OUR
STRAW HATS
while they last. Call and get
your pick.
Have you tried "GRAPE
VINO"? the delicious sum
per drink, made from the i
juice of the best Concord
grapes. Great thirst-quench
and tonic. Try a sample
bottle.
Our Stock of Groceries
was never more complete.
W pride ourselves on this
and can suit you with any
kind of an order.
John N. BdrgJ
Princeton, Minn.
I i
3 E

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