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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 01, 1903, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1903-10-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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DISCUSSMILLERCASt PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AND
BOR LEADERS CONFER AT
THE WHITE HOUSE.
SAYS HiS DECISION IS FINAL
CHIEF EXECUTIVE REFUSES TO
TAKE ANY FURTHER ACTION
IN THE MATTER.
Washington, Sept. 30.An import
ant conference took place at the White
House last night between President
Roosevelt and five members of the
executive council of the American
Federation of labor, including Presi
dent Gompers and Mr. Mitchell, head
of the miners' union, during which the
case of Foreman Miller of the govern
ment printing office, who was dismiss
ed because he had been expelled from
the local Bookbinders' union, and af
terwards was reinstated by direction
of the president, was the principal
topic of discussion. The conference
was granted at the request of the la
bor leaders. The Miller case was
very fully presented by the members
of the executive council at the con
ference, at the close of which the
president made a statement in which
he announced that his decision not to
dismiss Mi. Miller was final and the
question of his personal fitness must
be settled in the regular routine of
administration.
The statement in regard to the Mil
ler case is as follows:
Cannot Permit Discrimination.
"As regards the Miller case, I have
little to add to what I have already
said. In dealing with it, I ask you to
remember that I am dealing purely
with the relation of the government
to its employes. I must govern my ac
tion by the laws of the land, which I
am sworn to administer, and which
differentiate any case in which the
government of the United States is a
party from all other case whatsoever.
These laws are enacted for the bene
fit of the whole people, and cannot and
must not be construed as permitting
discrimination against some of the
people. I am president of all the peo
ple of the United States, without re
gard to creed, color, birthplace, occu
pation or social conditions. My aim
is to do equal and exact justice as
among them all. In the employment
and dismissal of men in the govern
ment service, I can no more recognize
the fact that a man does or does not
belong to a union as being for or
against him than I can recognize the
fact that he is a protestant or a Catho
lic, a Jew or a Gentile, as being for
or against him.
Grounds of Complaint.
"In the communications sent me by
various labor organizations protesting
against the retention of Miller in the
government printing office, the
grounds alleged are twofold:
"FirstThat he is a non-union man
serond, that he is not personally fit
The question of his personal fitness is
one to be settled in the routine of ad
ministrative detail, and cannot be al
lowed to conflict with or to complicate
the larger question of governmental
discrimination for or against him or
any other man because he is or is not
a member of a union. The is the
only question now before me for de
cision and as to this, my decision is
final."
The members of the executive coun
cil attending the conference constitut
ed th subcommittee appointed to take
up the Miller case at the meeting of
the executive council held in Wash
ington last week. They asked the
president for a conference to discuss
labor legislation and the Miller case,
and the following labor leaders attend
ed the conference: Mr. Samuel
Gompers, Mr. James Duncan Mr
John Mitchell, Mr James O'Connell
and Mr. Frank Morrison.
Labor Leaders Not Satisfied.
From the manner of the labor lead
ers as they came from the White
House It was evident they were not
entirely satisfied with the result of
their interview. They declined to be
interviewed. Mr. Gompers referring
the reporters to the statement that
wculd be given out by the president's
secretary regarding the Miller case
While he was talking, one of his as
sociates wished it to be impressed on
the reporters that the president's
statement should be understood by
them as an "entirely independent
statement and not at the council's re
quest
The executive council brought to
the attention of the president several
matters in which it was interested
Among these were the enforcement of
the eight-hour and anti-injunction
Dills which passed the house of repre
sentatives at the last session of con
gress.
The president. Mr. Gompers said,
expressed himself as favorable to the
principles of the short hour workday
and his deep concern for the interest
of the wage earners of the country.
BRITISH CABINET CRISIS.
Its Prolongation Likely to Further
Discredit the Government.
London, Sept. 30.A prolongation
of the ministerial crisis seems likely,
judging from newspaper comment, to
still further discredit the government.
It had been taken for granted that
Premier Balfour would complete the
reconstruction of the cabinet before
going to Sheffield to deliver his long
expected speech, explaining his fiscal
policy, which is due on Oct. 1. It is
now seen that that is impossible, and
the apparent waiting for Lord Milner's
decision is commented on in Conserva
tive as well as Liberal papers as em
phasizing the dearth of firstclass
statesmen in the Conservative ranks.
A large section of the Unionist party
5s restive under the report that Br. Bal
four is supporting Mr. Brodrick In the
latter's determination to remain at th
war office.
TRIAL OF JAMES H. TILLMAN.
Large Number of Witnesses Examined
in Murder Case.
Lexington, S. C, Sept. 30.Good
made Tuesday in the trial
here Former Lieutenant Governor
James H. Tillman, who is charged
with the murder of N. 6. Gonzales, edi
tor of the State. A large number of
Witnesses were examined.
One line of examination pursued by
the state was with a view to laying
the foundation for the introduction of
dying declarations of N. G. Gonzales.
Four of the physicians who participat
ed in the operation on Mr. Gonzales
after he was shot were on the stand.
Much of the testimony of the physi
cians was technical.
Ambrose Gonzales, publisher of the
State and a brother of N. G. Gonzales
was called to the stand when the
prosecution offered in evidence the
files of the State for the year 1902,
the purpose as announced by counsel
to introduce the editorials of the State
newspaper, of which N. G. Gonzales
was editor from July 1, 1902, to Dec.
31, 1902. The editorials in question
are in relation to James H. Tillman.
Reading of the editorials was post
poned so that the counsel for the de
fense might read them first.
Mr. Gonzales, on cross-examination,
said the relations between his brother
and Mr. Tillman were not pleasant,
but he had never heard his brother
use abusive language in regard to
Tillman.
The defense objected to all the tes
timony relating to the carrying of a
pistol by the defendant prior to the
shooting, unless it could be shown
that there was a connection between
the carrying at that time and the
shooting.
The court admitted the testimony
with the provision that if it was not
developed that it was competent, the
jury would be instructed to disregard
it.
LA-speedowas
VERY DECIDED CHANGE.
New York Stock Market Witnesses
Buying In Large Volumes.
New York, Sept. 30.A very decided
change came over Tuesday's stock
market. In place of the recent heavy
liquidations and further shrinkage of
values, there was buying in large vol
umes apparently by the leading finan
cial interests, though it was more than
likely that a goodly part of the day's
purchases was really in the nature of
supporting orders. It is also probable
that some of the high grade stocks
were absorbed for investment. The
bears were not slow to observe the
changed conditions and covered very
extensively in fact, their attitude
helped in no small degree to sustain
the list, which was at top prices at the
close.
Conditions at the outset were not
encouraging. The cables reported a
situation bdrdering on demoralization
in London, where consols had fallen
to another low record with heavy de
clines in the leading Americans, not
ably the steel stocks. Initial transac
tions in this market reflected the tone
of that in London, but after the first
few minutes the market reversed its
course under the lead of Pennsylvania,
which was the pivotal issue of the
day. That stock was openly bought
by interests that represent the road
financially and on sales of more than
123,000 shares made a net gain of 3%
points.
A story went the rounds during the
day that leading financial interests
had agreed to protect the market by
united action. The story was denied
in authoritative circles.
LONG SEARCH ENDED.
Wife of a Minnesota Millionaire Finds
Her Daughter.
Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 30.After a
seven-year search through many
states, in which scores of detectives
participated and thousands of dollars
were expended, Mrs. J. S. Robbins,
wife of a millionaire of Willmar, Minn.,
Tuesday recovered her eleven-year-old
daughter at Copenhagen, Lewis county
N. Y. Mrs. Robbins' first husband
was a man named Starr. They had
four children. While young they were
placed in a school at Owatonna, Minn.
Later Starr died and his wife married
the millionaire.
She wanted her children back, but
could find no trace of Myra :?earl The
girl was brought up by the matron of
the school and adopted by Mr. and
Mrs. Levi Trembly of Copenhagen.
Mrs. Robbins could get no trace from
here. A few days ago a detective who
had a clew visited Copenhagen, took
kodak pictures of the children in the
schools there. These were sent to
Mrs. Robbins, who recognized her
daughter in one of them.
Tuesday she arrived in the village
and found her child. Mr. Trembly re
fused to give her up, but finally con
sented, with the understanding that he
was to go to Minnesota and see if the
child would receive good care. Last
night he and Mrs. Robbins and the
child left for the West. He is to re
ceive $1,000 for the care of the child.
The detective will receive a large re
ward.
JEALOUSY RESPONSIBLE.
Aged Man Kills a Young Woman and
Commits Suicide.
Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 30.George
Worthington Garwood, a wealthy coal
broker, aged sixty-five years, Tuesday
shot and killed Hilda Vogel, aged
about twenty-two, and then killed
himself in a room occupied by the
couple at 131 Moultrie street. Jeal
ousy was the cause of the deed.
Garwood was a retired farmer, liv
ing at California, Pa. His wife and
nine children are still living.
Passengers Badly Shaken.
Montgomery, W. Va., Sept. 30.
Chesapeake and Ohio train No. 5, was
wrecked at Collin Hill, near here! The
engine and five cars left the track but
did not turn over. The pasengers
were badly shaken up but not seriously
injured.
Retail Grocers Combine.
Cincinnati, Sept. 30.A combination
of retail grocers in Ohio, Indiana and
Kentucky, with a capital of $3,000,-
000, was organized here Tuesday.
Its announced purpose is to protect it
self from recent combination of
wholesale grocers.
UPRISING IS GENERAL
JNHABITANTS OF FIVE DISTRICTS
IN EASTERN MACEDONIA ARE
CALLED TO ARMS.
CITY OF RAZL0G IN FLAMES
CHRISTIAN POPULATION PUT TO
DEATH BY THE SOLDIERS
OF THE SULTAN.
Sofia, Bulgaria, Sept. 30.A tele
gram received here from the camp of
General Zontcheff, the commander-in
chief of the Macedonian insurgents, at
Razlog, fifty-five miles from Sofia, an
nounces that a general rising was
proclaimed Sept. 27 in the districts of
Razlog, Necrokop, Demirhissar, Mel
nik and Seres and that all the insur
gent bands in Eastern Macedonia had
received direct orders to begin opera
tions.
The chief hope of the revolutionary
organization now centers in the out
break in Eastern Macedonia, which is
expected to assume considerable pro
portions, as the leaders there are all
officers of the Bulgarian reserve. This,
the sympathizers with the Macedonian
cause hope, will arouse a war feeling
in the Bulgarian army and force the
government to espouse the Macedonian
cause.
Dispatches received here from va
rious sources say General Zontcheff
has been greeted everywhere with the
greatest enthusiasm and that all the
peasants are flocking to his banner
A dispatch from Rilo monastery says
the town of Razlog hat, been in flames
since Sunday night.
The insurgents are attacking Kut
chevo and severe fighting is reported
to be going on between the insurgent
bands and the Turkish troops. The
sound of artillery is plainly heard at
Rilo. Another fight is. reported to
have then place near Okhrida. twenty
eight miles from Mcnastir, in which
fifty Turks were killed and many
wounded.
It is reported that all the intelligent
Bulgarians of the town of Okhrida
were recently arrested on suspicion
of communicating with the insurgent
bands and were sent in chains to
Monastir.
A letter from Phillipopolis, dated
Monday, says the authorities there
have distributed rifles and ammuni
tion in all the frontier villages, for use
in case of an attack being made by
the Turks.
A dispatch from Rita Jirila reports
continuous fighting all along the lines
across the Turkish frontier, results of
which are at present unknown. It is
stated that the town of Razlog has
been destroyed by the Turks and the
Christian population massacred. Fugi
tives are arriving in hundreds. Al!
the wires have been cut. The Turk
ish troops are flying in disorder from
Kutchevo.
FOREIGN MINISTERS TO MEET.
Turkey Will Afterwards Be Notified
to Carry Out Reforms.
Odessa, Sept. 30.The Bourse Ga
zette asserts that the coming meeting
between Count Lamsdorff and Count
Goluchowski, respectively Russian and
Austro-Hungarian foreign ministers,
will be followed by a notification to
the porte that the powers insist upon
the execution of the Austro-Hunga
rian reforms in Macedonia being en
trusted to an exclusively Christian
commission.
REPULSED WITH LOSS.
Insurgents Attack Turkish Quarters
at Razlog With Bombs.
Salonica, Macedonia, Sept. 30.A
band of insurgents, Sept. 27, attack
ed with bombs the Turkish quarters
at Razlog and were repulsed with loss.
Orders have been received to stop
the military movements but large
quantities of ammunition and fifteen
guns were sent Tuesday to Demirhis
sar, forty-five miles from Salonica.
TO AID STRIKING MILLERS.
Minnesota Federation of Labor Will
Raise $100,000.
Minneapolis, Sept. 30.The execu
tive committee' of the State Federa
tion of Labor at a meeting last night
decided to raise $100,000 for the bene
fit of the flour mill strikers. This
money will be raised by asking each
member of the federation to donate
one day's salary. There are 40,000
members of the federation in the
state and they receive an average of
$2.50 per day. The members of the
committee say every member of the
federation will respond.
The mills seem to be gaining daily
in the number of men willing to take
the strikers' places. Men who are
experienced in the various depart
ments of the milling process are be
ing gradually picked up. It is claim
ed that thirty-five of the old men have
returned to work.
Birthplace of Dickens Sold.
London, Sept. 30.The birthplace
of Charles Dickens, 387 Commercial
Road, Landport, near the Portsmouth
stockyard, in which the author spent
the earlier part of his life, was sold
at auction at Portsmouth last night
and bought in for $5,625 by the mayor,
representing the city of Portsmouth!
Firemen Elect Officers.
Chicago, Sept. 30.The National
Firemen's association Tuesday chose
the following officers: President,
George C. Hale, Kansas City, Mo
secretary, D. W. Gillen, Chicago treas
urer, John H. Fier, Whitewater, Wis.
St. Louis gets the convention next year!
Double Tragedy at San Francisco.
San Francisco, Sept. 30.Marie
Jordan, saleswoman in a cloak store,
was shot on the street by Edward de
la Bromsse, who then fired a shot in
to his head, inflicting a wound which
probably will prove fatal. The trage
dy was the result of jealousy.
THE PRINCETON UNION: THUBSBAY, OCTOBER 1, lQOBjmm
Real Estate Transfers.
The following are the real estate
transfers in Mille Lacs county as filed
with Register of Deeds Chapman dur
ing the past two weeks.
The Mille Lacs Lumber Co. to Mary
mSS?*?6IS,
I
t, xj.-^?fk Jdr
ny2 of lot 10 in bl'k 8 of
First Add. to Milaca $300.00
Citizens State Bank of Princeton to
Jpnn J. Kuperus. Sr., sej* of neX
of sec. 13, Milo 340 00
Erick W. Johnson and wife to Andrew
firickson, nw\ of nw of sec. 2,
Milaca 350 00
Peter J. Wikeen and wife "to "j. L.
Larson,e lot 7 and ny2of lot 8 in bl'
-.T TV.0
1 itr's 2n Add to Princetonk 1,500.00
F&se
Nortnwestern Improvemen-t1 Co. to
Milto Sr.eenbush Rutherfordf, s'A of se% of
A- C. Howard, to Wesley S.
-iiT2^eiAn&single, William D. Washburn and wife to
James Rasmussen, of swj^ of
i
240.00
220.00
sec
3
nw
A Bogus BrooswM 00
sec
Aulger Rines and wife to James Eas
mussen, w}4 of sw^ of sec. 17, Bo
gus Brook 800 00
Sylvester Kipp and wife et al to Gus
tar bjostrom, swx of setf of sec.
co, Page 900 00
Gustaf Sjostrom and wife to Andrew
!_- Lmdberg, swti of seii of sec.
v,
3a
ag
240.00
^"Ward Petterson, single, to
John Lafgren, seM of swM of sec.
11, Borgholm 380.00
Jacob Vanfthee and wife to Ellen
Landerdahl, 8 in bl'k 18 of 3rd
-to Milaclot a 700.00
Arthur \y. Woodcock and wife to
Lvaia A. Townsend, the west 66
feet of lot 1 and the east 4 feet of
lot 3 in bi'k i of Dunham's Add. to
Princeton 140000
Thep. F. Koch Land Co. to Harold
Mudgett, sy of seM of sec. 11, s'A
of swjfand setf of sec. 12, se^ of
nw*, n% of sv?H and eA of sec. 13,
ne% of sec. 14, nw& of ne#, sy2 of
neji and ne of sejf of sec. 15, and
ne# of sec. 24, all in 40-26 5,580.00
Aulger Rines and wife to Lillian Van
Alstein, nV4 of lot 7 in bl'k 7, Oak
Knoll cemetery 7 50
Carrie J. Rutherford and husband to
Nels Olson, w'/ of nw# of sec. 11,
Bogus Brook 720 00
Thomas B. Ross and wife to Wm. H.
Evans, sea of nwj of sec. 7, Rob
bins 500 00
Mary A. Schriber, widow", to Annie F.
Campbell, et al., ey, of seM of sec.
17, Hayland
Jens Olson, widower, to Peter Sund
berg, 60 acres in nw^of sec. 4 Milo 3,500.00
Northwestern Improvement Co. to
The Isle Harbor Land Co., 21,529
acres in Hayland. Onamia and
East Side. 44,133.92
Axel Oman and wife to Andrew Mo
line, lot 4 in bl'k 11 of 2nd Add. to
Milaca 350 00
E. Mark Live Stock Co. to Fred C.
Keith, lot 8 and of sw\ ol sec.
6. nys of nw# and swM of nwM of
sec. 7, Robbins 100
Aurilla N. Buck and husband to Fred
C. Keith, lots 3 and 4 in bl'k 6 of
Highland Add. to Princeton 2,000.00
Aulger Rines and wife et al. to George
Callahan, nejf of neM of sec. 15,
Bogus Brook 500 00
The Mille Lacs Lumber Co. to Henry
Long. wys of n-wy2 of sec. 6, Milaca 459.10
J. Louis Larson et al. to The Village
of Princeton, part of sea of nw&
of sec. 33, Princeton, (for street).. 900.00
Bernt Bendickson, single, to John
Franzen, nvrH of seM of sec. 2,
Bogus Brook 800.00
C. Augustus Pulsifer, widower, to E.
Mark Live Stock Co., lots 10, 11
and in bl'k 52 of Princeton 45.00
E. Mark Live Stock Co. to Bertha C.
Davis, lots 10.11 and 12 bl'k 51
andlotsl0,ll and 12 in bl'k 52 of
Princeton 150 00
The Mille Lacs Lumber Co. to Vaclav
Vondra, seft of nw^ of sec. 7, Mil. 340.00
Robert Swenson and wife to Tillie M.
Erickson, nw% of nwJi of sec. 9.
Milaca 1.200.00
Sylvester Kipp and wife to Orrin Kipp
sea of nex of sec. 11 and sw# of
nwjf of sec. 12, Milaca 1.00
Orrin Kipp and wife to Andrew J.
Anderson.se of netf of sec. 11 and
swM of nwM of sec. 12, Milaca 480.00
Charles Keith, unmarried, to Marcus
Gustafson, swj of seii of sec. 3,
Milaca....
da
275.00 360.oo
Marcus Gustafson and wife to Andrew
Erickson, sw# of se# of sec. 3, Mil 200.00
Elden F. Douglas and wife to Samuel
A. Carew, lot 10 in bl'k 40 of Prince-
600.00
John Johnson, unmarried, to Byron A.
Cole, lots 2,3 and 4 in bl'k 1 of Ma
lone's Add. to Bridgman 400.00
Charles Keith, unmarried, to James
Rasmussen, -wyz of sw of sec. 17,
Bogus Brook 1 00
Old Papers for sale at the UNION of
fice for 25c per 100. Just the thing for
carpets and house-cleaning.
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
PRINCETON, MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment. Medical Baths, Massage,
X-ray Laboratorv, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Special advantages obtained in this in
stitution for the treatment of chronic diseases
and diseases of women, either medical or sur
gical, and for the legitimate care-of confine
ment cases.
Open to the profession. Any physician in
good standing can bring patients here and at
tend them himself. Only non-contagious dis
eases admitted. Charges reasonable.
MISS AUGUSTA PETERSON,
Superintendent.
HENRY C. COONEY, M. D.
Medical Director.
A. Q. ALDRICH, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist.
BU
in the way that you can buy right.
I
BUY
at the time when you can buy right, and I
BUY
at the place where you can buy right.
I YOU CAN
buy right if you buy for cash and you
can buy right
AT
all times if you buy at
tR. D. BYERSJ
Dealer in general merchandise,
I agent for Pratt's perfumes and I
toilet articles and HcCall Bazaar
patterns.
MM
HELP WANTED!
STUDENTS AMD TEACHERS.
Ambitious students and teachers
looking for profitable employment,
will do well to write Prof. J. P.
Simon, Superior, Wis. The plan
of the New Era Business College
is one of admirable mutual benefit,
that supplies a method that is
practical for helping one another.
We never lose anything in this
world by doing a good turn for
each other.
Banking on Paint
The practical painter saysy
you can "bank" on
Patton'sSun-Proof Paint
because it saves the cost
of at least one painting
every five years. The
painter "banks" on it
because it gives him a
reputation.
Patton's
SUN-PROOF
W. P. CHASE,
flanager.
mistfYi
A ND PEED BARN,
CRAVENS & KAL1HER, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a rtaments' Notice.
CommercialTravelers' Trade a Specialty
II^
is made in exact proportionsof the most durable materials,
perfectly mixed by improved machinery. It is the best spread
ing, longest wearing paint, and has the most brilliant and lasting
colors. Guaranteed to wear for five years. Send for book of
Paint Knowledge and Advice (free) to
PATTON PAINT CO., Lake St., Milwaukee, Wis.
FOR SALE BY
FARMER'S EXCHANGE, Princeton,Minn,
Foley Bean Lumber
Company
Manufacturers and
Wholesale Dealers in
White Pine Lumber,
Lath and Shingles.
Also Sash, Doors, Mouldings and a Com*
plete Stock of Building Material.
J. A. JETSINQA,
-Dealer in-
H"'\
%p
PRINCETON.
General Merchandise
Dry Goods, Hardware,
Groceries, Flour and Feed, i
Boots and Shoes, Patent fledicines, 5
Gents' Furnishings, Crockery and Glassware.
Highest market prices paid for butter and eggs
and all kinds of country produce.
PEASE, MINNESOTA.
In Sickne.?. or in Health"s
UNCL E SAMS
MONOGRAM
WHISKEY
\s alwsLy^y
dependable*
V5T.PAUI BENZnJNNEAPQUS
fciOHS
DISTILLERIES AT
EMINENCE,KY
AND
BALTIMOREJ1D.
FRANK PETERSON. N. M. NECSON.
PETERSON & KELSON,
Blacksmiths
and wagon makers.
Wagons and Buggies manufactured
and repaired.
Satisfaction also guaranteed in all other
lines of our business.
Shops next to Starch Factory,
Princeton, Minn.
2 H.~ 1
'1H

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