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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, November 19, 1903, Image 4

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'KS
THE PRINCETON UNION
BY R. C. DUNN.
Published Every THursday*
TERMSS1.oo PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.
$1.25 I NOT PAID IN ADVANCE.
OFFICE: FIRST ST., EAST OF COURTHOUSE*
Q. I. STAPLES,
Business Manager.
GEO. WRIGHT.
Editor.
Columbia couldn't see the band
wagon when it went by and now it will
have to take the wheelbarrow.
It requires 40,000 cod fish to make a
barrel of cod liver oil. There are a
whole lot of people who take the stuff
who wish it required a million cod
fish to make a dose.
The copper war in Montana ha's
been settled and the governor of that
state will call an extra session of
thegross
legislature to pass a fair-trial law.
That's right, get together and play
fair in the future.
The coal miners of Colorado, "Wyom-
ing. New Mexico and Utah, number-
ing 30,000 have quit work and it is
their intention to tr and depopulate
tne coal fields of that country. It
seems to be a fight to the finish.
Volume 1, No. 1 of the Thief River
Falls Review has been received. It is
a si^-column. eight-page paper and is
published D. A. and John A. Mc-
Donald, who evidently know how to
get out a good paper, judging from
the initial number of the Review.
Morgan is thinking of retiring from
active business the first of the vear.
The recent slump in steel and other in-
dustrial securities has been laid at
his door and he probablv thinks
that he ought not to be compelled to
take care of all the chickens that come
home to roost.
The cashier of a bank in Cincinnati
who has been with the bank for over
fortj years, and, who started as a
porter, is in disgrace, having become
olved to the extent of a million and
a hal
and having drawn on the bank
for $70,000 without any security. This
is a sermon in a nutshell.
One of the results of the recent ic-
tory of Tammany is the resurrection
of Chas. A. Towne who ma be the
succesbor in congress of Mayor-elect
McCiellan. Tammany has fallen in
love with the old Sixth district con-
gressman whom Dame Fortune has
favored, though with not very good
company.
Dr. Albert Leffingwell in an article
in the Journal of Education, savs:
"Dangeious and unnecessary These
are the words uhich. in the august
name of science, ma we not stamp
upon all methods of instruction our
public schools which make for thethe
brutahzaMon of childhood by induc
ing ea rh famiharitv with the sacrifice
of life.-"'
That watcn-dog of honor, District
Attorney Jerome of New York, says
that if the Tammanv thugs think they
are going to hav an open town they
have made the d, biggest mistake of
their lives. He savs: '-If this citv
wants the spectacle of its district at
torney applving for private funds for
purposes of enforcing the lawb, that
spectacle will be shown. I can get all
the monev I ant.'"
The supreme court of the State has
handel down a decision to the effect
that hen a corporation or person em-
ploy a person under sixteen vears of
age without a permit from the school
board said corporation or person is
responsible for the child as long as it
is in the employ of the company or
person who is making use of its labor
and if it is hurt those employing' it
are clearly responsible for the injury
and are liable for damages. The de-
cision is a good one.
A New York woman whose husband
left her quite an estate, enough of this
world's goods to keep her, has be-
come penniless, because according to
the terms of the will of her husband
she was obliged to erect a handsome
monument for the family in Woodlawn
cemetery. The courts said that she
would have to erect the monument and
go hungry. You can just bet that old
man had some kind of a grudge
against his wife. He didn't take Jais
money with him but he came the next
thing to it doing so.
Senator Hansbrough of North Da
kota has introduced two bills which
are liable to create a good deal of dis-
cussion and attract much attention.
One provides for a federal inspec-
tion of all gram under the supervision
of the inter-state commerce commis-
sion and does away with all state in-
spection. The other bill repeals the
timber and stone act and withdraws
all government timber land from the
market, which under the provisions of
the bill is to be disposed of at its mar-
ket value.
less, but net earnings not materially
affected either wav
averao-ino-verv much Qreater- the een-
tura whose
lies the general prosperity, stronger
Editor Allen in his-'Growler" col
umn in the Morton Enterprise savs
the following about old settlers leav-
ing the country: "W wish the oldno
settlers would not sell out. They are
the salt of the earth in the best place,
and they have spent the best ears of
their lives making magnificent homes,
and now in their old age to sell for
the pittance they are getting and go to
some strange land is a mistake and
one they will regret a thousand times.
Don't sell, rent if you are tired of
farming, move in town but hang to the
old home where 3 ou have spent the
best of your lives."
Womankind with mawkish ways and
morbid curiosity made a disgusting
exhibition at the Goelct-Roxburghe
wedding in New York last week.
Women, called stylish and respectable,
jammed the streets, tore the canvas
leading to the church doors and stop-
ped the bride's carriage and poked
their heads into ohe carriage window
that they might get a look at the bride.
Policemen were almost helpless in the
mob of frenzied feminines. They were
women of all shades of crime and re-
spectability who went mad over an
event in which an English dude and
an American dame with a fortune were
made man and wife. Oh, fools, fools!
There is one thing the people of
New York state did at the last election
and that was to vote for the expendi-
ture of $101,000,000 for the widening
and deepening of the Erie canal so as
to allow barges of 1,000 tons burden
to reach the seaboard. This means
much to the people of Minnesota as
products of the farms and theMen
factories and mills for export to Eutiently
rope can go an all-water route, and
at a big saving in cost of transporta-
tion. If the canal can be kept intact
for the benefit of the people and is nothours
to fall under the control of the rail-
road influences it will prove a great
saving in transportation rates to thelief
Atlantic seaboard. New York City
has been gradually losing a large
share of the export business which of
late vears has been diverted to other
seaboard points, but she is waking up
to the importance of having more of
the western export trade and it begins
to look as if she would get it.
It was lucky that there were enough
postal officials left in the postal
the annual report could be issued. Ac-
cording to the annual report
department the expenditure for
rate of cost per mile traveled is $12.
There are 1,900 lines of traveling post-
car, covering 189,298 miles in length
mv
quite correct. The report says that
,of the entire star route- service on
more than 20 000 to
partment of the government so that grew into a mighty empire. While
cording to the annual repor of that laws of the country many thousands
with 10,555 employes. I is estimated tion
that the railway postal clerks handled
during the year 15,999,802,630 pieces
That is What tfie Office-Holders' Union
Alias the State Administration Has
Done to Judge L. W Collins.
'Observer" in the Commercial West the announcement of Judge Collins
says: "When the new year 1904 starts, that he would be a candidate for the
the following are likely to be the con- governorship, said: "Before giving
ditiolSs, as compared with January 1,
1903: Material and labor cheaper:
The St. Paul Dispatch, the Mouthpiece
of Gov. Van Sant, Says Jamison
earnings of many corporations term. He has so stated to me."
Doubtless Judge Collins was led to
the percentaoe of believe that he would be Gov. Va
net earnings to stock market values Want's legatee that Gov.
Hoodwinked Collins.
Gov. Van Sant's private secretary,
Judge Robert Jamison, in an inter
view which appeared in all the city
Pa
th
ditionclasses,position the of the was also assured the hearty suppor1t prosperityagricul-
under
St.
given utterance to no private as-
surance that he will not permit the
use of his name if the conditions
at the proper time should demand
it. We are now in the first forma-
tive stage of the campiagn. The
air will be clarified in the course
of the winter.
The Dispatch no doubt has inside
information and speaks by the card.
The inevitable conclusion is that
Judge Collins has been buncoed and
that at the proper time Gov. Va
Sant will announce that he is again
willing to sacrifice himself upon the
altar of his country by accepting a
third-term nomination for the gov
ernorship.
The rush at the Crookston land
office to file on land thrown open to
settlement by the government would
indicate that next to gold and precious
metals land is the great desideratum.
to file on land they had selected. One
young woman hung onto the door knob
of the land office door for over three
years of age breathed a prayer of re-
when she was informed that her
filing was good. Another woman
walked over thirty miles through the
woods and across the swamps to make
her filing. Government land that has
been practically given to bonafide set-
tlers has made the west. Without the
homestead act the nation would be
fifty years behind the times and much
of the west would yet be a wilderness
While thousands of settlers were prov
ing up on their claims the- great west
there have been abuses of the land
all of well-meaning persons have been
classes of mail transportation service made comfortable and happy. Bu it
in this country is $63,594,542, and the was the people'a land and it was
office railroad, steamboat and electric west furnishes the most interesting
theirs to inherit. The struggles and
chapter in the development of the na-
A
,v T^O^I A. Bullis returned last night from
of mail matter, exclusive of registered th
cam
matter and 1,387,664 errors were re huntersp onw tht hCloquect rineto
a
ported in their distribution, a ratio dowe to Duluth to make preparations $-
of one error to 11,530 correct distribu-
sn
tions. This is getting things down S Tfirst f*^ ^J*
Th sho
THE PRISTCETON TTNTOHH^THUBSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1903.
COLLINSJMCOED r~~S^~^ 1
T- A dog is never behind the times, for
papers last Wednesday morning anent
i
th
ione
^^r
Paul, Dispatchj,
1U11TO
Press, the Minneapolis Journal and
the Minneapolis Tribune. Now comes
th^e
the recognized
k_u. lulu i/x^^wu^n VX1.KJ i^WV/gliiZiCU.
mouth piece of Gov. Va Sant in a
double-leaded editorial in its issue of
the 17th inst. and boldly asserts that
one had authority to speak for
Gov. Va Sant and intimates that Mr.
Jamison did not speak the truth. Here
is the Dispatch editorial in question:
While Gov. Va Sant is swing-
ing around the circle in the East,
there seems to be a lively interest
in certain quarters at home in
eliminating him from the list of
entries for the gubernatorial race.
Just where the authority is obtain-
ed for this elimination is another
matter. Certainly there is nothing
in the last public utterance of the
governor which contains the slight-
est warrant for considering him
on the retired list, and it may rea-
sonably be assumed that he has
11 -n -.1 r. nVi, _tr 1-11,
It's not the custom to smuggle.
Charm and chic are second cousins.
It is far better to see a point than
feel it.
It's a mighty sandy lane that has
no turn.
A butcher sometimes has a trying
time of it.
Po or roads do not mean poor purses
but poor policy.
a cur ren
out his recent statement, Gov. Va
Sant had made up his mind that he turn water into milk
would not be a candidate for a third
a
and his entire official family would
A
u,veid,tomto vBi^ inuL-iigimiei, tue ^eu devotS theiur energies to securPe hime the 4.1, I.
1 the tapestries when he is getting a cur
eral money market in a sounder con- nomination, etc., etc. Judge Collins
ier
Dispatch,
ent
Life savers arvee needed by all who
enter the social swim.
A good promoter is one who can
The most striking feature of a pa
ade is the bass drum.
The milk of human kindness too of-
Sant ten has a "pumpy" taste
A
i.i i A man never pays much attention to
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Reed of Santi
ago were here Saturday for medical
treatment for Mrs. Reed who has been
ailing for some time. Mr. Reed is a
stock raiser and has about 128 head
of cattle to winter with a short crop of
fodder. Where he usually cuts 500
tons of hay, this year he got only
about fifty tons. will buy corn for
feed.Elk River Star-News.
4.4.
and women waited in line pa-
for hours to get an opportunity
and she proved a "stand patter"
she got her land. A old lady sixty
$*-
privations of the early pioneers of the 4.4.
%l river.^
came
gcms up to bring down
th
a dee
an
'^&^ks^d^-i,-m^i^^:
Shot
1
haV
da out Magnus Sjoblom 4*
it was an easy
Andrew
the feature of delivering mail into shot and wounded a bear,Umbehockerd%%* which hike
boxes along the lines of star routes awayi ihne the snow, but as there was
will be extended to the entire system
sno
nc
matter to track the bruin and get him.
AndyJ
says that when heei lefiti the campp oa J
uuau wucuueiaecani
over 249,000 ^.ssiTL^ ^"taL^flSl^?.^"* Sffl33J$r3S3333jj$f%$j$3J&^^
i Dry Goods,
sgwM
Swort statements are worth just
wn at they prove to be and nothing
more.
An up-to-date marriage vow gener
ally has telephone connections with
the divorce court.
Some people run their faces so much
that they forget to pay any attention
to their nose when it runs.
Some peoples' mental calibre is of
mighty small bore while they are
pretty good bores themselves.
If there isn't a heaven for some
dumb animals, there are an awful lot
of human kind who will miss the
golden gates by several leagues.
Cannibals will eat human flesh but
they are not half as bad as some very
civilized individuals who will grind
the same kind of flesh in the mill of
averace and greed.
There was a young man up at Bock
Who placed last ear's fur coat in
hock
But when the wind blew
And the beautiful flew
He sat by the stove in his frock.
Clothing,
I Ladies' and
Gents' Fur=
$ nishings,
$ Hats, Caps,
Shoes, Flour
and Feed.
HARRY ENGLISH & GO.
TH!
BIG STORE
Highest
Price Paid
for Farm
Produce.
A Pleased Customer is
our best Advertisement
ZIMMERMAN, MINN.
-*h"*^-aM..^.S.^.^.3.^.^.j.^
Near West Branch bridge.
Just received a bunch of good, sound and reliable farm
horses that will be sold on easy terms. Remember I keep
for sale at all times a good supply of horses for all pur
poses. See me before purchasing.
My Livery is Complete.
Good nobby rigs and gentle horses can
be found at my barn at all hours.
fly fine black Percheron Stallion will be found at the barn during I
the season. Farmers should not fail to see this horse.
You will save money by calling on the undersigned for any thing
in his line.
I A. H. STEEVES, Prop.
A Princeton, Hinn.
||^m^mm^mmmttm?mt$$mi:mt$mmmm$i$mi$mnmi:
E. B. ANDERSON, PRINCETON
YOURS FOR COMFORT.
"The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold"
and Old Boreas came down with his jug full of cold. Ther-
mometers have been on the decline ever since. But it's not
thermometers that we sell. We gave them away. We are
selling things of more value to you, especially so in
the winter garment line. Light garments either inside
or outside, are mighty poor protection in cold weather.
This reminds us that we ought to remind you that one is
never so comfortable in winter weather as when protected
by a McKIBBIN FUR COAT. They are standard goods,
and there isn't a warmer coat made.
They wear well and look well.
Then we have a fine line of duck
coats, sheep-lined, durable and warm.
A large stock of Mackinaws, Caps,
Mittens, Duck Leggings, etc. None
better for winter wear. We have a
well-selected stock and can suit you
in goods and price.
Anderson's store is successful be
cause it suits popular because it
pleases.
E. B. ANDERSON,
^Princeton, Minn.
Groceries, Crockery,
Hardware,
Furniture, Lumber and
Agricultural
Implements.
I
i
1*.
i'
hi
I
44
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i
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