OCR Interpretation


The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 07, 1904, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1904-01-07/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

1
-1
meet her fae to face, and I have no
present hope of ever doing so."
Derringer smoked hard and Trask
took off his hat and rubbed his rough
red hair with a gesture of impatience.
"It is the mystery," Scovel continued,
"waving his hand gently and gracefully
toward the orchard. "Our interest
might vanish if we saw her. the
wa y, I came very near doing so yester
day afternoon. I was out on the lake
and she was sketching by the shore, so
I rowed in a little way"
Instantly there was a strong chill in
the air, and Scovel, who, to do him jus
tice, was in some respects a sensitive
animal, detected it and stopped.
"Well, I didn't exactly row in," he
said after a pause "I let her drift."
"A distinction without a difference,"
said Trask. "An unwritten law cir
cumscribes, that orchard."
"No man can be less inclined to in
trude than I am. protested SCOT el.
"However, it without intrusion one
might hat a glimpse of her tace"
did not finish the sentence, but it
had the effect ot a question. The
silence of Derringer and Trask was as
loud as any oice I ever heard.
"For instance," the lawyer persisted,
"we are clearly within our rights here.
Now to state a hypothetical question:
Suppose you, Mr. Trask, were standing
this spot during the houi\s of day
light and saw the young lady approach
ing, would you not hold that the re
sponsibility of a meeting, if one should
occur, would rest with her?"
"How natural it is," said Tra&k, ad
dressing the moon, "for a lawyer to
break the law."
"But I should be inclined to argue"
Scovel began.
"Of course 3'ou would," interrupted
Trask. "That is what you are on earth
for."
Scovel laughed.
"Will the court please rule on the
matter of Miss Scott," said he, "as to
whether it would be within the statute
for me to make her acquaintance?"
"If she requests the pleasure of hav
ing you presented," said the artist, "the
court will not interfere. But don't
make any advances."
Scovel sat down on the fence and ap
peared to consider these rulings. Th
conversation waned and died. W
wandered silently back to the house.
For my own part I was too deeply
perplexed to talk much. The situation
was extremely unusual. I was evi
dent that the girl was of vital interest
to Trask and Derringer, while no more
than an object of romantic speculation
^xnd natural curiosity to Scovel that
the lawyer did not even attempt to
guess who she was, though the other
two men had settled convictions upon
the subject.
Moreover, I would have made oath
that Trask and Derringer were not in
each other's confidence, and that their
\iews about the girl were utterly at
variance. It would be impossible for
me to state the grounds of this belief
or to quote a Avord spoken by either of
them in support of this theory. Th
thing was in the air. I held it to cer
tain that one of these men was delud
ing himself with a romantic notion
that had no basis in fact. Indeed both
might be mistaken.
CHAPTER VII
THE GIHI. IS THE PICTURE.
HE next morning after break
fast I sat in my favorite win
dow and cut off the end of
one of my mildest cigars. I
was feeling for ray matchbox when
there was a crackling sound at my el
bow, and there stood Jimmy Lamoine
offering me a light.
"James," said I, accepting the match,
"I observe that you rarely use any
__ form of salutation. That is why the
pleasure of seeing you is so often
heightened by surprise."
"Good morning, sir," said he gravely.
"Good morning, James. Have you
seen Miss Witherspoon today?"
He shook his head.
"I don't see her very often," said he.
"She's always at work. But she
wouldn't tell you."
"Wouldn't tell me what?" I demand
ed.
"About the young lady who lives in
the orchard," said he.
Now, it really had been in my mind
that I would ask Miss Witherspoon a
few questions not directly about the
girl, but of a general character de
signed to fix the limits of the problem.
I would like to know, for instance,
about how many young ladies there
were in the house who might be Sibyl,
i for it would be disturbing to my mind
to meet a new one every day without
having any notion how long this proc
ess might continue. It bad not been
my intention to question Jimmy La
I moine, partly because of the difference
in our years, but more because I had
a great and growing distrust of his ve
racity. Yet since he came flaunting his
I cloak of mystery in my face and with
somewhat the air of a champion sent
forth by the other side I set him down
for fair game.
"Why should I wish to know any
thing about the young lady?" said I.
"What is she to me?"
Jimmy shifted from one foot to the
other and finally said:
"I thought you wanted to get her to
move out."
It would have been a good answer if
he hadn't been obliged to hunt for it.
I decided to converse further with this
precocious youth and
openeanticipates
I print of Sibyl among them and then in
vited Jimmy's inspection. For a few
minutes the boy dropped his mask.
He viewed the pictures with hearty In
terest, asking questions which proved
SsSj^X'l K$Y
my lip
to say "Come in, but he
the words, nodding and pointing to the
other window. It was so aptly done
that I did not speak at all. I merely
nodded in response, and he climbed In
to the room.
There was a heap of pictures on my
desk, mostly small photographs of
scenes and people abr^id. I put the
that he was well taught and more than
ordinarily mature in mind. Yet once
or twice I caught him cleverly pretend
ing to know more than he did, and I
gained some small acquaintance with
the methods by which he delighted to
anticipate the thought and speech of
his elders.
A last he came upon the print, and
It was a genuine surprise. Beyond
question he recognized it at a glance,
but when I asked him in the most or
dinary tone I could command whether
he knew the lady he lied with a coun
terfeit of sincerity quite shocking in
one so young. Indeed I could not have
done it better myself.
Still more suspicious than this false
hood was the fact that he almost im
mediately remembered something that
he had promised to do for Mrs. Wither
spoon. made this the excuse for
his departure, and a few minutes later
I saw him hurrying away toward the
Tlieic stood Jimmy Lmnotnc offering
vie a light.
strip of woodland that lay back of the
house. He was not in search of Mrs.
Witherspoon or upon any errand of
hers. It did not comport with my hon
or to follow him, but he had directed
my attention to the grove, which was
more than large enough to afford room
for both of us.
I had come out with the intention of
going down to the lake, but the wood
upon the rising ground looked very in
viting, and so, taking a different course
from Jimmy's and a more leisurely
pace, I ascended the gentle slope. I
was almost within the shadow of the
fine old trees when, turning a little to
the right, I came suddenly into view of
a white parasol with blue polka dots.
There was a girl under it, and I stopped
short. Immediately Mr. Trask jumped
up from the far side of the parasol,
sketchbook and pencil in hand, and
hailed me by name. The sunshade
dropped at that moment, and I had a
glimpse of a dainty white gown adorn
ed with blue ribbons and of a very
effective hatso effective, indeed, that
I nearly fell over backward at the
sight of it, for beyond possibility of
question it was the one I had a picture
of in my pocket. This was the more
certain because I saw the hat before
the lady turned her headsaw it pre
cisely as the camera had caught it.
There was but an instant of time, yet
it was quite enough. Then I saw the
lady's face and recognized Miss Jones
of St. Jo. She looked even prettier than
when I had first seen her, and the gown
she wore was certainly a miracle of
sweet simplicity. As she rose to greet
me I perceived that she also had been
sketching, and I had already seen the
"subject," who was no other than our
landlady's niece, looking quite pictur
esque in her plain gray gown and the
big sunbonnet, which seemed to be her
favorite headgear.
"Good morning," she said, looking up
at me without moving from the "pose."
Trask laughed at her in a gently teas
ing fashion as he took a step or two
toward her and put his sketch pad into
her hands.
"You're a great model, Lucy Ann,"
he said. "I'm ashamed to have done no
better."
She looked at the sketch with an
eager, childish interest and seemed to
enjoy holding it in her hands.
I saw this out of the corner of my
eye, my main attention being given to
Miss Jones. Positively this could not
be Sibyl there was not the slightest
physical resemblance. Her manner
vaguely reminded me of some one I
had known, but surely not Sibyl, whose
habitual embarrassment in youth must
have left some trace upon her, and
Miss Jones was perfectly at ease. I
had been pursuing a phantom. The
picture I had found unquestionably
represented the girl before me. She
and Sibyl must be friends, and thus
the picture had come into our house.
It was both a disappointment and a
relief. My thought of it was a strange
mass of contradictions. I would have
liked to find Sibyl, though I had come
to Mrs. Witherspoon's to avoid doing
Bo. I had given myself great uneasi
ness for fear that Sibyl would not be
pretty, and here was the prettiest girl
that I had seen in five years, yet I was
glad she ws* not Sibyl.
While we talked there was a crac
kling in the underbrush and suddenly
Jimmy Lamoine burst forth in a great
hurry. It must have been the surprise
of his life when he saw me. As
youth
of ordinary resources would have been
puzzled to account for his own pres
ence there, and I think it was a notable
triumph of his peculiar genius that he
hesitated so short a time for a false
hood, scarcely long enough indeed to
get his breath.
"Your aunt wants you," said he to
Lucy Ann.
The girl rose with a quaint little sigh.
It was pieasanter no doubt to sit there
under the shade of the trees and be a
model for a handsome young artist,
pieasanter even to envy Miss Jones'
beauty and pretty clothes and unattain
able refinement of manner, than to toil
in Mrs. Witherspoon's kitchen. I pitied
HBssrBssja?
her with hearty sincerity, exercising
therein a virtue not my own, for such
merit is no more mine than is the
money that I spend. I have them both
from my father, and my real nature
goes back to some selfish anthropoid
that lived in a tree and was perfectly
satisfied so long as he had cocoanuts
enough to fill his own stomach.
"What! More cake?" exclaimed
Trask, addressing Lucy Ann in a fine,
cheery tone. "Really you mustn't make
it ao good. We eat it too fast. I ad
jvlse you to make a nice soggy one this
morning."
"I guess you don't know my aunt,"
said Lucy Ann.
"Miss Witherspoon," said I, removing
my hat with reverence, "did you make
the cake that we had with our Ice
cream last evening?"
It is a great thing to mean what you
say. If I had not vitally believed that
that cake was the best ever baked
since the world began, I could not
have pleased this poor child. She would
have seen straight through me. As it
"was, she gave me a quick glance of
gratitude
"Yes," said she. "I made it."
"Lucy Ann makes all the cake." said
Trapk. "She is an incomparable
artist."
"In that case," said I, "it is fitting
that I should carry my hat in my hand
all the way back to the housethat Is,
if Miss Witherspoon will let me walk
with her."
[TO E CONTINUED.]
The Year's Trade.
In its annual review of the business
year of 1903, Bradstreet's says:
Nineteen hundred and three was a
year of irregularity in speculation,
distributive trade and industryin
some cases of severe strains, variously
applie dand as differently withstood.
The tests were well withstood, and,
while excesses occurred, the course of
events so far has proved that the gen
eral trade foundation was essentially
sound and that the structure reared
upon it was in the main well built.
The stock market liquidation, though
slow," has been apparently thorough,
and while many weak spots have been
found, ordinary trade has had some
opportunity to gradually readjust it
self to changed conditions of supply
and demand without the imperilment
which would have followed a specula
tive crash, such as has been freely
predicted would close the present
period of prosperity.
Among the causes leading to unset
tlement in stock speculation, and later
in important industries, the report
gives the injury of sentiment growing
out of disclosures of overdoing, to put
it mildly, in industrial stock fluctua
tions, scaricty in money supplies due
to absorption by these flotations, and
to heavy borrowings by railroads the
feeling that a subsidence of the ram
pant activity of preceding years was
inevitable, but chiefly the effects of
enhanced cost at which business was
done.
High-priced raw materials increased
transportation rates, enlarged costs
of manufacture, and last, but not
least, the manifest determination of
labor to get all that the traffic would
bear, all tended to check consumption.
Summarizing the year's develop
ments, the review calls attention to
the excellent condition of trade and
industry during the first quarter and
the multiplication of labor troubles
during the second quarter, June 1 see
ing the largest number of men out of
employment in many years. The high
price of cotton caused the more or less
constant idleness of 2,000,000 spindles
and 100,000 operatives in the middle
of the year.
Clearances reflected dullness in stock
speculation and showed decreases
from 1902 and 1901. November and
December showed a more optimistic
tone in general business, though
trade in dry goods was unsettled by
the enormous advance in cotton.
Trade as a whole was probably in ex
cess of 1902. The wheat crop was
slightly less than that of 1902 and corn
and cotton were affected by the late
spring floods and early frosts, the
yields of the country's crops as a
whole falling behind 1902.
The price of corn has been below
that of 1902, but high prices of cotton,
coupled with the improved quality of
most crops, insure a financial return
to the farmers above that of 1902.
Manufactui'ing industry was fever
ishly active early in the year, iron
and steel leading. Curtailment, fol
lowing a forty per cent reduction in
prices, cut down the output, and a
liberal export movement'started.
Shoe manufacturing was active and
shipments from eastern centers ex
ceeded 1902 by fifteen per cent and
1901, the best on record, by four per
cent.
Gross railway earnings and net re
ceipts gained ten per cent over 1902.
A disquieting feature in the business
mortality was the largest number of
heavy manufacturing suspensions.
Immigration was the largest ever
known.
The strength of agricultural imple
ments makes for confidence in good
trade in the country's basic indus
try. Building operations bear a bet
ter appearance. Free exports of ex
cessive manufactures and minerals
are to be expected, but as yet no evi
dences exist of overprodutcion. The
United States to-day is in a far
stronger position than it was ten or
even five years ago, and we owe less
abroad than ever before.
THtfKsm^
INDEPENDENCE MINE CASE.
^federal Court Decides in Favor of
Defendants.
Denver, Jan. 6.In the case of the
Stratton Independence Mining com
pany of London against the executors
of the estate of the late Winfield
Stratton, the Cripple Creek millic*
aire, claiming $6,000,000 damages te
alleged "salting' of the Independent
mine before its sale to the English
company, Judge Riner in the United
States court Tuesday decided for the
defendants. The main grounds for the
defense were:
First, that the sale was made by
Mr. Stratton to a company of which
he was a member, payment being
made in stock, it being held that a
man cannot defraud himself.
Second, the mine has produced $10,-
000,000 in gold since the sale, which is
more than the selling price.
Judge Riner held that any one of
the grounds for defense is sufficient.
The attorneys for the plaintiff were
given permission to present Arguments
on a bill of exceptions.
COMMON DIVIDEND PASSED.
Arrested for Forging Notes.
St Joseph, Mo., Jan. 6.J. E. Mar-tricts
cell cashier of the Bank of Highlands,
Kan has h~en arrested on a Grand
Island train at Troy, Kan., charged
with forging notes aggregating $30,-
000.
TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES
Burglars dynamited the safe of the
Ambridge, Pa., postoffice Tuesday and
got away with $300 in cash and stamps.
Abncr J. Wilson of Boone, Ia has
been appointed permanent receiver ot
the failed First National Bank oi
Storm Lake, la.
John Redmond, leader of the Irish
parliamentary party, says that when
parliament reassembles the Irish party
will continue its fight for home rule.
Mayor McClellan of New York has
requested the fire commissioner to
have an inspection made of all the
theaters and public halls in the five
boroughs.
Governor L. F. C. Garvin of Rhode
Island was Tuesday inaugurated for
his second term, and new state officers
were installed and the general assem
bly organized.
Marvin Hart of Lo. sville, anJ
George Gardner of Lowell, boxed fif
teen rounds to a draw at Boston Tues
day night Over 5,000 people witness
ed the bout.
MARKET QUOTATIONS.
Minneapolis Wheat.
Minneapolis, Jan. 5.WheatMay,
85%c: July, 85%c. On trackNo. 1
hard, 85%c No. 1 Northern, 84%c
No. 2 Northern, 82%c No. 3 North
ern, [email protected]
St. Paul Union Stock Yards.
St. Paul. Jan. 5.CattleGood to
choice steers, [email protected] common to
fair, [email protected] good to choice cows
aad heifers, [email protected]: veals, [email protected]
4.50 Hogs$4.2504.75. SheepGood
to choice yearling wethers, $4.
4.35 good to choice lambs, $5.
5.35.
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Jan. 5.WheatTo arrive
No. 1 hard, 85c No. 1 Northern,
83%c No. 2 Northern, 81c. On track
No. 1 Northern, 83%c No. 2 North
ern, 81c No. 3 spring, 78c May, 85c
July, 84c. FlaxIn store, on track
and to arrive, $1.01% May, $1.05%
July, $1.06%.
Chicago Union Stock Yards.
Chicago, Jan. 5.CattleGood to
prime steers, [email protected] 5.55 poor to me
dium, [email protected]: stocked and feed
ers, [email protected] cows, [email protected]
heifers, [email protected] calves, [email protected]
7.25. HogsMixed and butchers, $4.65
@5.00 good to choice heaw, [email protected]
5.05 rough heavy, [email protected] light,
[email protected] SheepGood to choice
wethers, [email protected] Western sheep,
[email protected] native lambs, [email protected]
Western, $4.75g6.10
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Jan. 5.Wheat Jan.,
82%c May, 86%c July, 81%c Sept.,
78%c. CornJan., 424c May, 46%c
July, 45%c Sept., 45%c. OatsJan.,
36Hc May, 39%c July, 36%c. Pork
Jan., $12.70 May, $13.10. Flax
Cash, Northwestern, $1.04 Southwest
ern. 98%c Jan., 98%c May, $1.03.
ButterCreameries, [email protected]%c dair
ies, [email protected] [email protected] Poultry
Turkeys, 12c chickens, lie springs,
lie.
Don'?1
Its
But steel Preferred Stock Pays
Regular Dividend.
New York, Jan. 6.The dividend on
united States Steel common was
passed at the quarterly meeting of the
directors Tuesday, but the regular
one and three-quarters was declared
on the preferred stock. This was
piactically what Wall street expected.
At the previous quarterly meeting
the common dividend was cut from a
4 to a 2 cent basis.
The statement of eg lings for 1903
shows a great shrinka? in the busi
ness of the corporation. Net earnings
(December estimated) aggregate $108,-
979.012, as against $133,308,763 in
1902
RESULT OF COLD SNAP.
Ten Persons Perish and Several Oth
ers Frozen in New York.
New York, Jan. 6.Ten deaths and
nineteen persons in hospitals was thesession
result of the zero weather in this city
up to 6 o'clock last night. The weather
has moderated some. At 6 o'clock
Tuesday morning it was 7 below.
Trains from every direction are late
or abandoned on account of the strong
wind and drifting snow.
Dispatches from every section of the
state tell of record-breaking cold
weather. At a number of points with
in twenty miles of this city the ther
mometers marked 20 and 30 degrees
below zero at dawn Tuesday.
Tug and Barges Safe.
^Newport News, Va., Jan. 6.The tug
Navigator and her tow, the barges
Liberty and New Jersey, supposed to
have been lost in the storm Saturday,
were towed into Hampton Roads at
night after a terrible experience with
a northern gale.
t&t
Fan at Home.
afraid of a little" fun at
home, good people. Dont shut up.
your houses lest the sun fade your
carpets, and your heart lest a laugh
should shake down some of the musty
cobwebs there. If you want to ruin
your sons let them think that all mirth
and social enjoyment must be left on
the threshold when they come home at
night. When once home is regarded
as only a place to eat, to drink and
to sleep, the work is begun which ends
in gambling houses and degradation.
Young people must have fun an relax
atino somewhere. If they do not find
it at their own hearthstones, it will be
sought in others, perhaps less profit
able places. Therefore let the fire
burn brightly at home, ever delight
ful with all those little arts that par
ents so artfully understand. Don't
repress the buoyant spirit of merri
ment around the lamp and firelight of
home that blot out the remembrance
of many a care and annoyance during
the day: and the be-*t safeguard they
can take with them into the world is
the unseen influence of a bright and
domestic sanctum.Ex.
The third annual meeting of the Min
nesota Rural Telephone Co. will be
held at the office of Dr. Armitage on
the eleventh day of January, 1904, at
2 o'clock p. m. AH shareholders are
requested to be present.
2-3t T. L. Armitage, Pres.
School District Notice.
Whereas, A petition dulv signed and
the signatures thereto duly acknowl
edged, has been duly presented to the
board of county commissioners of
Mille Lacs county, Minnesota, at a
of said boai'd held on the 19th
day of November, A. D. 1903, asking
for the formation of a new school dis
trict to be composed of the following
described territory, to-wit: Sections
numbered 22, 23. 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29,
30, 31, 32. 33. 34, 35, and 30, of town
ship foi*ty (40), nortlj of range twenty
-seven (27), west of the fourth princi
pal meridian: also sections 1. 2, 3, 4,
5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,11,12, 13, 14. 15. 16, 17,
18, 22, 23, and 24. of township thirty
nine (39), north of range twenty-seven
(27), west of the fourth principal mer
idian, in the township of 40-27 and
Page, county of Mille Lacs and State
of Minnesota. And the petitioners
furthermore represent:
1st. That there ai'e forty-six per
sons now residing within the bound
aries of the proposed new district, and
no other or greater number: and that
there are seventeen children of school
age residing therein.
2nd. That the following school dis
will be affected by" the forma
tion of said new school district, to
wit: District No. one (1). Mille Lacs
county, and district No. six (6), Mille
Lacs county.
3rd. That the number of children
of school age now residing in the said
districts so affected are as follows, to
wit: District No. one (1). 450 children
district No. six (6), 50 children.
4th. That the number of children
of school age to be taken by the form
ation of such school district from the
districts so affected, respectively,
are as follows, to-wit: From district
No. one (1), 8 children: from district
No. six (6), 9 children.
5th That the said proposed new dis
trict does not include the school build
ing of any existing school district.
Now. therefore, it is ordered that
said petition be heard by this board
at the session thereof commencing on
the 5th day of January, A. D. 1904, at
the office of the county auditor, in the
village of Princeton, in said county.
And it is further ordered, that 'no-
tice of the time and place of such hear
ing be given by posting a copy of this
order in one public place in each of
the school districts to be affected by
said petition, and by the county
auditor mailing to the clerk of each
of said school districts a copy of this
order, at least ten days before the time
appointed for such hearing, and that
a copy of said notice be published in
the following named newspaper, to
wit: The Princton Union.
GEORGE H. DEANS,
Chairman Board of Countv Commis
sioners of Mille Lacs Countv, Minn.
Attest"
E.' E. WHITNEY, County Auditor
and Ex-officio Clerk of Board.
(Auditor's Seal.)
Hotice.
Persons holding county orders and warrants
numbered as follows
COUNTY REVENUE.
2612 2613 2614 2615 26162617 2618 2619 2620 2621
2622 2242 2250 2623 2625 2626 2627 5628 2629 2630
2631 2632 2633 2634 2635 2636 2637 2638 2639 2640
2641 2642 2643 2644 2645 2646 2647 2648 2849 2650
2651 2652 2653 2654 2655 2656 2657 2a58 2659 2660
2661 2664 2665 2669 2670 2666 2667 2668 2672 2673
2675 2662 3663 2624 2700 2724 2710 2728 2711 2713
2723 2683 2731 2732 2527 2681 2559 2709 2707 2712
2678 2705 2682 2698 2704 2254 2247 2101 2557 2558
2695 2736 2737 2734 2739 2743 2741 2742 2s!20 2744
2738 2735 2696 2697 2089 2411 2708 4857 2703 2727
2718 2769 2730 2753 2702 2307 2765 2754 2755 2680
2529 ^764 1870 2402 2761 2762 2766 2763 2768 2769
2248
COUNTY POOR.
3341 3336 3456 3511 3458 3603 3605 3604 3606 3665
3610
Will please present the same to the county
treasurer at Princeton, Minn., lor payment, as
interest on above numbered orders will cease
thirty days from and after this date.
Dated Dec 10,1903
K. H. BURRELL,
Countv Treasurer. Mille Lacs Co
First publication Dec. 31.1903.
STATEe
OF MINNESOTA. COUNTY OF
Mill Lacs ss. In Probate Court.
Special Term, December 30th, 1908.
in the matter of the estate of Flora A Couch,
deceased
On reading and filing the petition of E. A.
Briggs, administrator of the estate of Flora A
Couch. deceased, representing, among
other things, that he has fully administered
said estate, and praying that a time and plac
be fixed
forrescue
examininigd and account be examinede,
allowinge
the ac
count ofth hies administration, and for the assign-
*l
*ii
osfa said estate to th parties
d,ered,!
tna
entitled thereto by law*
1 and petition heard, by this court, on Fri
day, the 22nd day of January. A. 1904. at 2
clock M.. at the probate office in the village
of Princeton in said county.
And it is further ordered, that notice thereof
be given to all persons interested by publish
ing this order once in each week for three suc
cessive weeks prior to said day of hearing, in
the Princeton UNION, a weekly newspaper
printed and published at Princeton in said
county.
Dated at Princeton the 80th day of Decem
ber, A. D. 1903. By the court.
0 B. M. VANALSTBIN,
[Probate Seal Judge ot Probate.
First publication Dec. 81.103.
STATE O MINNESOTA, COU NTY OF
MilleLacsss. In Probate Court,
In the matter of the estate of Joseph
Mooney, deceased
The petition of Nels M. Peterson having been
duly made and filed in this court, representinir
among other things, that one Joseph Mooney'.
who resided last prior to his death at Miami
county, in the State of Ohio, died in the county
ot Miami, State of Ohio, prior to the yea 1877
seized of an estate oafi inheritancMooneyr
n*
i
in certain
Josep de
lands thes Millpetition., Lacs State of
fi^ISi0
ae ccounty ribe iofsai and that
ot
o.T Petitioner
hasnan interestst
deat
"P ena*
iin said lands,
State, and
more tha five year have elapsed
i
ceased and that administration has not been
Z&Sf ^?^l
estat
i
p^sjung that the descent of said lands and ot
te interest of said petitioner therein be bv
this court determined and said lands assigned
to such persons as may be entitled thereto by
law.
Now therefore, it is ordered that the said
petition be heard at a term of this court, to be
held at the probate office, in the village of
Princeton in said county of Mille Lacs. State
of Minnesota, on Monday the 25th day of Jan
uary, A. 1904, at 10 o'clock A.
It is farther ordered, that notice of said hear
ing of said petition be given by the publication
of this order once in each week for three suo
cessive weeks prior to said day of hearing in
the Princeton Union a weekly newspaper
princed and published Princeton in said
county
Dated December 30,1903
By the court.
M. VANALSTEIN,
[Probate Court Seal Judge cf Probate
CHAS. KEITH, Attorney for Petitioner.
First Publication Jan 7 1904
STATEe
OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OP
Mill Lacs ss. In Probate Court
Special term, December 22,1903.
In the matter of the estate of John T.
Sadley, deceased.
On receiving and filing the petition of Eliza
beth Sadley, of the county of Mille Lacs
representing, among other things, that John
T. D. Sadley, late of the county of Mille Lacs,
in the State of Minnesota, on the 12th day of
December, A. D. 1903 at the county of Mille
Lacs, died intestate, and being an inhabitant
of this county at the time of his death, leaving
goods, chattels and estate within this county,
and that the said petitioner is the widow of
said deceased, and praying that administration
of said estate be to Joseph W. Mossman and
Annie Sadley granted,
It is ordered, that said petition be heard be
fore this court on Monday, the 1st day oC
February. A. D. 1904. at 10 o'clock A. at the
probate office in the court house in Prince
ton, in said county.
Ordered further, that notice thereof be given
to the heirs of said deceased, and to all persons
interested, by publishing this order once in each
week, for three successive weeks, prior to said
day of hearing, in the Princeton Union, a
weekly newspaper printed and published at
Princeton in said countv.
Dated at Princeton the 22d day of December
A. D. 1903. By the court.
M. VANALSTEIN,
[Probate Seal.] Judge of Probate.
CHAS. KEITH,
Attorney for Petitioner.
First publication Dec. 17.1903.
STATEe
OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF
Mill Lacs.ss In Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Esau
Whitney, deceased
The petition of Hebert W. Whitney having
been duly made and filed in this court, repre
senting, among other things, that one Esau
Whitney, who resided last prior to his death
at Princeton, in the State of Minnesota, died afr
Princeton, in the county of Mille Lacs, State of
Minnesota, on the 24th day of August,
1865, seized of an estate of inheritance
in certain lands in- the county of Mille
Lacs, State of Minnesota, described in said
petition, and that said petitioner has
an interest in said lands, and that
more than five years have elapsed since the
death of said Esau J. Whitney, deceased,
and that administration has not been granted
or had of said estate in this State, and praying
that the descent of said lands and of the inter
est of said petitioner therein be by this court
determined and said lands assigned to such
persons as may be entitled thereto by law.
Now, therefore, it is ordered that the said
petition be heard at a term of this court, to be
held at the probate office, in the village of
Princet6n, in said county of Mille Lacs. State
of Minnesota, on Saturday, the 9th day of
Januarv, A. D. 1904, at 2 o'clock p. M.
It is further ordered, that notice of said hear
ing of said petition be given by the publication
of this order once in each week, for three suc
cessive weeks prior to said day of hearing,
the Princeton Union a weekly newspaper
printed and published at Princeton in said
county
Dated at Princeton the 14th day of Decem
ber. 1903. By the court.
B. M. VANALSTEIN,
[Probate Seal. Judge of Probate.
First Publication Jan. 7,1904.
STATEe
OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF
Mill Lacs.ss. In Probate Court
Special Term, January 6th. 1904
In the matter of the estate of Anna
Berglln, deceased
Letters of administration on the estate of
Anna Berghn, deceased, late of the
county of Mille Lacs and State of Minnesota,
being granted to France L. Berglin, and the
proper affidavit being duly made and
filed that there are no outstanding indebted
ness against the said estate.
It is ordered, that three months be and the
same is hereby allowed from and after the date
of this order, in which all persons having claims
or demands against the said deceased are re
quired to file the same the probate court of
said county, for examination and allowance, or
be forever barred.
It is further ordered, that the seventh day of
April, 1904. at 10 o'clock A. M., at a special
term of said probate court, to be held at the
probate office in the court house in the village
of Princeton in said county, be and the same
hereby is appointed as the time and place when
and where the said probate court will examine
and adjust said claims and demands.
And it is further ordered, that notice of such
hearing be given to all creditors and persons
interested in said estate by forthwith publish
ing this order once in each week for three suc
cessive weeks in the Princeton Union, a
weekly newspaper printed and published at
Princeton, in said county.
Dated at Princeton, this 6th davof Januar\
A. D. 1904 By the Court,
M. VANALSTEIN.
[Probate Seal.] Judge of Probate.
First publication Dec 31,1903.
STATEe
OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF
Mill Lacs.ss In Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Mary A.
Mooney. deceased.
The petition of Nels M. Peterson having
been duly made and filed this court repre
senting, among other things that one Mary A
Mooney. who resided last prior to her death at
Miami county, in the State of Ohio died at the
county of Miami, State of Ohio, prior to the
year 1877, seized of an estate of in
heritance in certain lands in the coun
ty of Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota, described
in said petition, and that said petitioner has an
interest in said lands, and that more than five
years have elapsed since the death of said
Mary A Mooney, deceased and that administra
tion has not been granted or had of said estate
in this State, and praying that the descent of
said lands and of the interest of said petitioner
therein be by this court determined and said
lands assigned to such persons as may be enti
tled thereto by law.
Now, therefore, it is ordered that the said
petition be heard at a term of this court to be
held at the probate office in the village of
Princeton in said county of Mille Lacs, State
of Minnesota, on Monday the 25th day of
January. A. 1904. at 10 o'clock A. M.
It is further ordered, that notice of said hear
ing of said petition be given by the publication
of this order once in each week for three suc
cessive weeks prior to said day of hearing, in
the Princeton Union a weekly newspaper
printed and published in said county.
Dated December 30th, 1903.
By the court,
B. M. VAN ALSTEIN,
[Probate Court Seal.] Judge of Probate
CHAS. KEITH,
Attorney for Petitioner.
Summons.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, i
County of MiUe Lacs.
The State of Minnesota to Ferdinand Stenhan
defendant:
You are hereby summoned to be and appear
before the undersigned, one ot the justices of
the peace in and for said countv, on the seventh
day of January, 1904, at two o'clock in the after
noon, at my office in the village of Princeton
in said county, to answer to Josie E. Skahen
in a civil action wherein the plaintiff claims the
sum of $76.75 with Interest thereon from the
24th day of November, 1903 at six percent per
annum Should you fail to appear at the time
and place aforesaid, judgment will be rendered
against you upon the evidenoe adduced by said
Josie E. Skahen for such sum as she shall show
herself entitled to.
Given under my hand this 14th day of Decem
ber, A. D 1903. C. H. CHADBOURNE
Justice ot the Peace.
,1
Tl
i

xml | txt