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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, February 25, 1904, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1904-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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LAND AT CHEMULPO
FORTY THOUSAND MORE JAPA-
NESE TROOPS ARE DISEM-
BARKED IN KOREA.
OTHER PORTS ARE OCCUPIED
BROWN MEN LAND AT PIGEON
BAY AND TALIENWAN AND
FIGHT RUSSIANS.
PANIC AT PINYAN6, KOREA
REGARDED AS HERALDING THE
NEAR APPROACH OF THE
OPPOSING ARMIES.
London, Feb. 24.Cabling from
Chefoo on Feb. 23 a correspondent of
the Morning Post says 40,000 more
Japanese troops have landed at Che
mulpo, and that he has received in
formation that some Japanese have
landed at Pigeon Bay, others at Ta
lienwan, and that an engagement oc
curred the night of Feb. 12.
The correspondent at Seoul of the
Daily Mail reports a panic at Ping
yang, Korea, which is regarded as
heralding the approach of the oppos
ing armies.
Paris, Feb. 24.A report from Port
Arthur says the Japanese have de
throned the emperor of Korea and an
nexed the country.
It is claimed here that France, on
behalf of Russia, has purchased the
entire Chilean navy.
JAPANESE OFFICERS EXECUTED.
Hanged From Cirders of Bridge They
Were Trying to Wreck.
St. Petersburg, Feb. 24.The Japa
nese who were hanged by Russian
soldiers in Manchuria for attempting
to blow up the railroad bridge over
the Sangari river were disguised as
coolies. They were arrested just as
they were about to make the attempt.
Inquiry revealed that they were Japa
nese officers of the general staff,
namely, Colonel Assai of the engineers
and Lieutenants Zoneloiascha and
Kaeurta of the sappers. They were
at once hanged from the girders of the
bridge.
The newspapers of Port Arthur
dated Feb. 4 reached St. Petersburg
Tuesday, indicating that they were
less than three weeks in transit.
Troop trains probably require a longer
time, on account of the difficulties at
Lake Baikal, where provisions and
troops are crossing both on ice trains
and sledges. But the cold is exceed
ingly severe. Tuesday 36 degrees be
low (fahrenheit) was recorded at Ir
kutsk and other places. Stories of
the sufferings of the troops in the
crossing of the lake are persistent.
Some reports say 600 men were fro
zen but, these lack confirmation, offi
cial or otherwise. The telegraph is
working well. One line, devoted ex
clusively to government business,
runs direct to Irkutsk, whence, with
a single relay, it connects with St.
Petersburg. The czar recently stood
at the telegraph key and talked with
Viceroy Alexieff, practically uninter
rupted.
BOMBARDED PORT ARTHUR.
Japs Shelled the Fortress and Caused
Slight Damage.
London, Feb. 24.According to the
Standard's correspondent at Seoul,
the Japanese bombarded Port Arthur
at intervals between Feb. 8 and Feb.
14, causing, however, only slight dam
age.
The report is confirmed, the corre
spondent continues, that seventy miles
of railroad track and some important
bridges have been destroyed between
Harbin and Vladivostock.
If the latter report is true it would
be a great advantage to the Japanese,
as Vladivostock is known to be very
badly supplied and it therefore could
not iong resist a Japanese attack.
Special dispaptches from St. Peters
burg give various sensational reports
of a political nature.
The telegraph, for instance, says the
Russian government has ordered its
ambassador at Constantinople to ob
tain the permission of the porte for
the exit of the Black Sea fleet but M.
Zmovieff, the ambassador, declined to
make this request and was able to
give the Russian foreign office conclu
sive reasons for his refusal.
NEW ATTACK DENIED.
Japanese Torpedo Boates Are Always
Repulsed at Port Arthur.
Paris, Feb. 24.In a dispatch from
Harbin, Manchuria, a correspondent
of the Matin says ambulances are be
ing sent in there from all parts of
Russia, and that the Baltic railroad
has furnished a sanitary train for 200
wounded.
A dispatch from Port Arthur pub
lished in Paris this morning denies
categorically the reports of a new at
tack by Japanese torpedo boats, and
says they have been repulsed with
loss every time they appeared in the
roadstead.
The Russian colony at Seoul has
taken refuge in the legation at Che
mulpo and in the offices of the Rus
sian East China company, which is
guarded by sailors.
Eighty-two women are following
courses in ambulance work at the cen
tral hospital there. A number of vol
unteers are coming into Port Arthur.
Lamsdorff Wants to Resign.
Paris, Feb. 24.The Paris edition of
the New York Herald asserts that
Foreign Minister Lamsdorff wants to
resign and that M. Witte will succeed
him.
CIRCULAR TO THE POWERS.
Russia Formally Protests Against Ac
tions of Japan.
St. Petersburg, Feb. 24.Foreign
Minister Lamsdorff has sent the fol
lowing circular to Russian representa
tives abroad:
"Since the rupture of the negotia
tions between Russia and Japan the
attitude of the Tokio cabinet has con
stituted open violation of all custom
ary laws governing the mutual rela
tions of civilized nations. Without
specifying each particular violation of
these laws on the part of Japan, the
imperial government considers it
necessary to draw the most serious
attention of the powers to the acts of
violence committed by the Japanese
government with respect to Korea.
The independence and integrity of
Korea, as a fully independent empire,
has been fully recognized by all the
powers, and the inviolability of this
fundamental principal was confirmed
by article one of the Shimoneseki
treaty and by the agreement especial
ly conclude for this purpose between
Japan and Great Britain on Jan. 30,
1902, as well as by the Franco-Rus
sian declaration of March 16, 1902.
"The emperor of Korea, foreseeing
the danger of a possible conflict be
tween Russia and Japan, addressed
early in January, 1904, a note to all
the powers declaring his determina
tion to preserve the strictest neutral
itv. This declaration was received
with satisfaction by the powers and
it was ratified by Russia.
Violated International Law.
"In disregard of all these facts, in
spite of all treaties, in spite of its ob
ligations, and in violation of the
fundamental rules of international law,
it has been proved by exact and fully
confirmed facts that the Japanese
government, first, before the opening
of hostilities against Russia, landed
its troops in the independent empire
of Korea, which had declared its neu
trality second, with a division of its
fleet it made a sudden attack on Feb.
8, that is, three days prior to the decla
ration of war, on two Russian warships
in the neutral port of Chemulpo. The
commanders of these ships had not
been notified of the severance of
diplomatic relations, as the Japanese
maliciously stopped the delivery of
Russian telegrams by the Danish ca
ble, and destroyed the telegraphic
communication of the Korean govern
ment.
"Third, in spite of international law
and shortly before the opening of hos
tilities, the Japanese captured as
prizes of war certain Russian mer
chant ships in neutral ports of Korea.
"Fourth, Japan declared to the em
peror of Korea, through the Japanese
minister at Seoul, that Korea would
henceforth be under Japanese adminis
tration and she warned the emperor
that in case of his non-compliance,
Japanese troops would occupy the
palace.
"Fifth, through the French minister
at Seoul she summoned the Russian
representative at the Korean court to
leave the country."
The above are alleged to be viola
tions of International law and Russia
asks her representatives to present
the facts to foreign governments as
her protest against Japan's actions.
RUSSIANS ARRIVE AT CHONJU.
Hundreds of Cossacks Descending Up
on Pingyang, Korea.
London, Feb. 24.In a dispatch
from Tokio a correspondent of the
Times says some hundreds of Cos
sacks reached Chonju, thirty miles
south of the Yalu river, the afternoon
of Feb. 20. Thirty troopers crossed
the river at Kanzan the same evening,
thus arriving within forty-five miles
of Pingyang, Korea.
It is understood the diet will meet
the middle of March for the introduc
tion of the war budget.
The rumor that the Russian Vladi
vostock squadron has again put to sea
lacks confirmation.
A correspondent of the Times at
Weihaiwei says he hears that all the
mechanics at Port Arthur, Dalny and
Vladivostock are Chinese, and that it
is impossible for the Russians to re
pair their damaged warships.
NOT YET CROSSED THE YALU.
But Russian Scouts Have Penetrated
South of Wiju.
Tokio, Feb. 24.Reliable reports
from Northern Korea indicate that
the Russians have not yet crossed the
Yalu river. Their scouts have, it is
rumored, penetrated into the country
south of Wiju, but the main force
still remains north of the river. The
Japanese seem to be confident that the
Russians are unable to assemble a
sufficient force to attempt a move
ment into Korea The Russian
strength north of the Yalu is variously
estimated from 20,000 to 40,000 men.
WILL ACT IN CONCERT.
Foreign Consuls to Preserve Neutral
ity of Newchwang.
Yinkow, Feb. 24.The consuls have
decided on concerted action looking to
the neutralization of Newchwang.
They will, however, endeavor to se
cure an expression of Russian official
opinion before acting further.
An authoritative Japanese report
says that 100 Japanese refugees sent
to Po^t Arthur had pot been account
ed for up to Feb. 19. Persistent re
fusal of official information compli
cates United States Consul Miller's
difficulties.
Sails Under Sealed Orders.
Genoa, Feb. 24.The United States
cruiser Brooklyn, with Rear Admiral
Cotton on board, left here Tuesday
going in an easterly direction. She
leaves under sealed orders, which are
to be opened only when she is at sea.
Sick Woman Beaten by a Negro.
Wichita, Kan., Feb. 24.A negro en
tered the home of Mrs. A. L. McPher
son, a white woman, who lay sick, and
when she refused to give him food
beat her senseless with a stove handle.
Later Gray Robbins, whom Mrs. Mc
pherson identified as her assailant,
was placed under arrest. The wo
man's condition is critical.
Clement Griscom Resigns.
New York, Feb. 24.Clement A.
Griscom resigned Tuesday as presi
dent of the International Mercantile
Marine company, and J. Bruce Ismay,
the managing director of the White
BUr line, was elected to succeed him.
MAY OPTION REACHES A RECORD
PRICE AND THEN MAKES A
RAPID DESCENT.
DROP OF OVER FIVE CENTS
HEAVY TRANSACTIONS AND WIDE
RANGE OF PRICES DURING
THE EXCITEMENT
Chicago, Feb. 24.With the sudden
ness of a culprit jerked from a scaf
fold the May option of wheat Tuesday
fell 5%c, kicking up and down for
nours in spasms that were heart
breaking. Trading was on an enor
mous scale Fears of European com
plications in the Russo-Japanese war
forced the price up to a new high rec
ord mark, $1.08%, but tremendous
liquidation caused a headlong dive to
$1.03%. Compared with Saturday's
close, final figures were down l%c.
July closed l%c lower. May corn was
off l%@li4c. oats lc, and provisions
[email protected],ic.
Wild excitement marked trading in
the wheat pit from the very start.
Buying orders appeared to come from
all directions at the opening. The
cause was sharp advances in foreign
grain markets. A rumor that the Eng
lish fleet had been ordered to inter
cept any attempt by the Russian fleet
to pass the Dardanelles furnished an
additional motive to many traders.
The May delivery was in more active
demand than the deferred futures, and,
as a result, initial sales on that option
were at an advance of %@2% over
Saturday's closing figure, at $1.06%
1.08%.
The wide range of prices showed
more plainly than anything else the
excitement under which the market
opened. While some brokers were
bidding $1.08% a bushel for wheat,
others almost by their sides were sell
ing that commodity for 2c a bushel
less. The volume of trading the first
few minutes was enormous. Hun
dreds of thosuands of bushels were
sold on the advance and under this
heavy profit-taking the price of May
fell an even 4c from the high point to
$1.04%. Many stop loss orders were
reached on the way down which added
to the weakness. Shorts in the May
option took advantage of the break to
cover, and the buying from this source
caused a recovery to $1.06%. Within
the last fifteen minutes another flood
of selling orders appeared in the pit.
The result of this renewed attack was
a break in May to $1.03%, a decline of
5%c from the high point. The close
was weak with May at $1.04. July
closed at 93%c.
WILL HOLD JOINT CONVENTION.
Two Wings of Populist Party Heal
Their Schisms.
St. Louis, Feb. 24.After two days
and two nights of animated debate
and discussion by national committees
representing the fusion and the middle
of-the-road wings of the Populist party
in an endeavor to agree upon a place
and date for holding the national con
vention, schisms were finally healed
and the two political factions late
last night agreed to hold in joint con
vention the People's party national
convention in Springfield, 111., on July
4. J. A. Parker of Louisville, chair
man of the middle-of-the-roaders, and
J. H. Edminston of Lincoln, Neb.,
chairman of the fusionists, asserted
that all party differences were now
things of the past and the national
convention would nominate a straight
Populist ticket. The nominees of the
national convention will be submitted
to the party for direct endorsement.
CELEBRATED ON THE ISTHMUS.
News of Ratification of Canal Treaty
Pleases Isthmians.
Panama, Feb. 24.A cablegram from
the Associated Press brought to Presi
dent Amador the first news of the rati
fication of the Panama canal treaty by
the American senate. The informa
tion was received by all officials with
great satisfaction. The news rapidly
became public and was received every
where with expressions of gratifica
tion. Celebrations in honor of the
event were held on both sides of the
Isthmus.
COCKRAN GOES TO CONGRESS.
Elected to Fill Place Vacated by
George B. McClellan.
New York, Feb. 24.W. Bourke
Cockran was elected a member of
congress Tuesday at the special elec
tion held in the Twelfth congressional
district to fill the place made vacant
by the resignation of Mayor George B.
McClellan. Mr. Cockran had practical
ly no opposition, the Republicans not
having any nominee.
Squadron Goes to Lisbau.
St. Petersburg, Feb. 24.The Rus
sian squadron under the command of
Admiral Wirenius, composed of the
battleship Osalbyia, armored cruiser
Dmietri Donskoi, cruiser Aurora and
five torpedo boats, which has been or
dered to return north immediately
from Jibutil, French Somaliland, will
go to Lisbau, Courtland, on the Baltic,
and not to Kronstadt, as previously re
ported.
Conductor Killed In Wreck.
Knoxville, Tenn., Feb. 24.The af
ternoon northbound train on the Knox
ville and Augusta railway jumped the
track near Grady, Tenn. The engine
and three cars left the track. Conduc
tor T. M. Nipper was killed, J. J.
Graham fatally, and W. D. Seator and
Arthur Watson seriously hurt.
Burned to Death in Jail.
Guthrie, Okla., Feb. 24.Carl Black
and Cecil Hoggett, two young men,
were burned to death in the city jail
at Mountain View about 2 o'clock a.
m. They had been arrested for drunk-1
enness and it Is thought their bedding
caught Are from a cigarette.
THE PBINCETON UNION: THTTOSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1904.
CRAVENS & KALIHER, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a floments' Notice.
CommercialTravelers' Trade a Specialty
EREE!
Fountain Pen
14-Kt.Solid Gold
TO NEW
Pioneer Press
Subscribers.
Jewelers Sell It for $1.50.
This Is a rich 'quality hard rubber,
highly polished Fountain Pen screw
section, and fitted with an Improved
Feeding Device, allowing the ink to
flow easly without blotting. The gold
nibbed pen is 14-Kt. fine, iridium
pointed The complete Fountain Pen
is Fully Guaranteed by the manufac
turers and will be exchanged by them
if not entirely satisfactory. Bach
box contains a single pen and a guar
antee. If the pen is not absolutely
perfect, send it back to the factory
and get one that is. It will not cost
you a cent.
The Pioneer Press
St. Paul, Minn.
Gentlemen: Send to me, absolutely
free and postpaid, a guaranteed solid
gold-nibbed Fountain Pen. Enclosed
herewith find $1.60 in advance for
subscription to the Daily and Sunday
or Weekly Pioneer Press.
Name Street Town
State
E' K*i %nfu\l JMML 4
S. Winsor of route 2, Wyanett. is
agent for the best grubbing machine
outthe Swenson all-malleable iron
every casting warranted one year,
flaw or no flaw. 10-2t
|n?mmmmmmmmmmmmn?mmmH!n!mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmff!mmn!^
They are used for Spring
Overcoats, are very dressy
and guaranteed rain-proof,
at the popular price of
$12.50
Jesmer's Dept. Store
We are agents for the Peerless Patterns.
TltmUtUUiiUiUUliUiUiUUUUiUUiiUUUUUUUiUiUiUiUiUUiiiUUiiUUiiUUiUiUiiUUiiUUtU^
Make Your
Bread with
KETTELH0DT_il_i'C~u|-,i-l---~**
THe Bargain Merchant
Is always at your service
with bargains in.
Staple and Fancy Groceries
Dry Goods, Hats, Caps, Boots and
Shoes, Crockery, Glassware, etc.
All Fruits in Season. Highest market price paid for Farm Produce.
We sell our goods. We do not keep them.
F. T. KETTELHODTt
PRINCETON, MIN N.
2 ft
Fo
*K-^**^^ any Grocery in town
It makes more and better loaves
than any other flour you can buy.
Princeton Roller Mill Co.
J. A. JETSINGA,
-Dealer in-
General Merchandise
Dry Goods, Hardware,
Groceries, Flour and Feed,
Boots and Shoes, Patent ilediclnes,
Gents' Furnishings, Crockery and Glassware.
Highest market prices paid for butter and eggs
and all kinds of country produce.
PEASE, MINNESOTA.
'9W
-4
a
lb-Sac
100#9Hour8ar
1
3

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