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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, April 07, 1904, Image 4

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THE PRINCETON UNION
BY R. C. DUNN.
Published Every Thursday-.
TERMS$1.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.
$1.25 I NOT PAID IN ADVANCE.
OFFICE: FIRST ST.. EAST OF COURTHOUSE.
O. 1. STAPLES,
Business Manager.
0E0. F. WRIGHT.
Editor.
This is the time of the year that
farmers go to seed.
The Breckenridge Telegram issued
a ery handsome Easter cover with its
paper last week.
The Hennepin county grand jury has
started after Dr. Ames again. ''An
the cat came back."
Get out, Mr. Pillar-to-Post man, you
are getting hollow. Come back some
time when ou are feeling well.
Among our new exchanges is the
Winthrop News, which is now all home
print and is a clean and bright paper.
Duluth should put that police exhibit
for the world's fair in the curio shop.
It has no place in an industrial expo-
sition.
The Osseo Review is the name of a
new paper that has been established
at that place by A. Hechtman. It
is a newsy little paper.
The Belle Plain Herald issued a
very attractive Easter edition last
week, doing a very clever bit of color
work on some Easter cuts.
The far-east war heads have been
reduced from scare to common. The
war correspondents have as yet notcomes
succeeded in getting to the front.
The dairy maid must go. They have
a milking machine that is going to
do the business in a short time. There
will be less cream than ever then. Oh,
my, let's turn Pop.
The Appleton Press had better hire
an exchange editor to keep tab on the
Union's reciprocity remarks. N
comments were ever made in this pa
per on the reciprocity resolutions of
the late State convention.
They say that Cuba is to be the new
home of the trusts. Might as well
start right Cuba, for Uncle Sa
will have the island some of these
days when it will have to conform to
the laws of the people.
It is always well for \oung men to
take advice but at the same time it is a
mighty good idea to lay in a stock of
good hard horse sense. There is some
advice that you can onlj get by expe
rience and it comes pretty high at
times.
We are in receipt of a verj hand
some map of Morrison county which
has been issued by the Little Falls
Transcript. The map shows the own
ership of all the land the county
and reflects much enterprise on the
part of the Transcript.
Postmaster General Payne is said
to be on the verge of a complete col-
lapse because of the recent postoffice
scandal, and is weary of state affairs.
Not so with one Perry Heath late of
the postoffice department. He seems
to wear scandal shields.
A New York woman appeared before
the tax commissioners of New York
city and asked to have her assessment
raised $7,000. Her request has broken
all records of that office. Now just
watch a whole lot of rich old duffers
follow suit all over the country.
Congressman Bede in a lecture in
the city of Washington the other day
stated that the menace to home life in
the city was the modern flat. The con
gressman said that there are too many
sharps in our flats and that here on
this earth it is well to grow sidewise.
The grand duke of Oldenburg is
traveling incognito in this country for
his health. Might as well unmask,
duke, there are very few who would
annoy you by paying homage to you.
We have a few distinguished citizens
in our own country that walk and
ride with the plebians.
Two of the Union exchanges came
out last week with good land supple
ments for their respective localities.
The Sandstone Courier issued a Bruno
edition containing a fine writeup of
Pine county, while the Long Prairie
Leader issued an eight-page supple
ment for Todd county.
Over in the little city of Isanti they
have just organized a new council and
have appointed committees on judi
ciary#, health, fire and water, gas and
light, buildings and real estate, police,
railroads, license, local assessments,
printing and streets and alleys. That
sounds like business provided the com
mittees act.
An American war charity to be
called the Perry Memorial Relief
Fund, has been organized in the city
of Tokio, Japan, in commemoration
of the fiftieth anniversary of the sign
ing of the Perry treaty between Amer
ica and Japan, an event that has
proved to be one of the greatest in the
later events of the world's history. A
fund of nearly $40,000 was subscribed.
Here is something that sounds like
house cleaning and is a mighty good
omen of prosperity: The Milaca
Times says:
One of the brightest signs of a
prosperous future for Milaca is
the dissolving of petty factional
differences, and the harmonious
union of the citizens in an attempt
to better the welfare of the town.
Now that is the way to talk. All
hands pull together and there is sure
to be something doing.
"Sitschass" is a Russian expression
which means that time is cheap and
things will come by and by. The
Muscovite is not built on the strenuous
order. He gets around to his office at
nine in the morning and leaves at
three in the afternoon and when it
to dispatching mail at long dis
tance the slowest trains are always
used. For the last quarter of a cen
tury the duma or city council of St.
Petersburg, has been trying tb get a
start on a system of drainage canals
for the city, but as \et little has been
accomplished. But then it will come
in time. This may account for some
of the delay of the Russians in the
present war with Japan. The Rus
sians have not woke up yet and what
seems to be a fact, it doesn't look as
if they were going to wake up.
At a memorial meeting in honor of
Peter Cooper, founder of the Cooper
Union in New York city, Andrew Car
neige delivered an address in which
he said: "It is not to the millions, or
by the millions, that the greatest ad
vances are won. It is to the individ
ual that we owe the divine impulse.
The distribution of wealth is the great
est problem of the age. No revolution
ever did much or any good in this
world: no true evolution ever failed
to do anything but good. I would not
wish to be understood as putting down
life as a mere pursuit of money. I
think that a man who has entered any
profession is working for the ad\ ance
ment of the race. The successful cap
tain of industry is not of that low type
who seeks the hoarding of dollars as
his life work. The money which
reaches bev ond his wants he seeks to
find use for in the bettering- of others."
The Minnesota branch of the Na
tional Farmers' Exchange seems to be
making some progress towards getting
things in shape for the handling and
marketing of farmers'grain and live
stock. The president of the Minnesota
exchange says that the exchange will
build fully a hundred farmers' eleva
tors this State the coming year
which will make the total number of
farmers' elevators in the State 240.
Nealy all the $500,000 capital has been
subscribed. Where farmers have ex
ercised business care and judgment in
the erection of elevators and ware
houses throughout the country they
have been successful in combatting the
competition of the "line" trusts for
they are nothing else but combines and
trusts with "ring" prices and all that
goes to make a quiet little deal for the
gentlemen who control such business
enterprises. Wherever the farmers
get a good hold and hang together
they soon receive due recognition, but
it is a big fight they have on their
hands at the present time though not
wholly without successful solution.
With the farmers and the stockmen of
the country fully aroused as to condi
tions there is bound to be something
doing sooner or later and it is pretty
apt to be sooner. Just as soon as the
farmers and stockmen of the country
get into the practical business ways
look out for a revolution in the
affairs of commerce.
The State central committee will
meet the latter part of the present
month and make the call for the State
convention which will be held in all
probability early in July. In the
meantime there will be all kinds of
opportunities for more investigations
and annoymous letter writing.
The Clearwater Herald says that the
Princeton editor called the Anoka
editor a bull dog. We presume that
the Clearwater scribe alludes to Mr.
Pease. The editor of the Union who
is writing these lines at the present
time would like to remark that the
Clearwater editor is a white-livered
prevaricator.
Red River Valley farmers who have
organized the Red River Valley Po
tato Growers' association will adver-
tise the Red River potato extensively
throughout the south. Come along,
brother, jump right on the Princeton
potato band wagon which has traveled
all over the country north and south
with great success.
The defeat of Editor Pease at the
Duluth convention has naturally
enough inspired some editorials of
condolence that have appeared in
many Eighth district papers. It is all
very natural and shows a true spirit
of journalistic brotherhood, but when
all the facts in the case are known the
comments are somewhat different. The
Union made some comments on the
Pease episode two weeks ago and gave
a frank statement of the case and
wishes to state that there was no un
derhanded or unfair tactics adopted
at all in the Duluth convention to de
feat Mr. Pease. The truth of the
whole matter is he placed his friends
in a very embarrassing position even
his own delegation that was loyal to
him could realize that from the start
Mr. Pease had very little show. The
Anoka man is old enough by this time
to realize that honors like the Duluth
convention conferred never go begging
and there were several aspirants for
those honors and they were not back
ward about asking for them as Mr.
Pease was. Is he so great and popu
lar that his mere word spoken at ran
dom should take precedence over other
men's wishes and aspirations. His
long and honorable service as an
editor might have entitled him to ari
election as one of the district delegates
but he presumed too much altogether.
As the Milaca Times says:
If Editor Pease had used as
much energy before the convention
as he is now wasting in cussing its
results he might have been a dele
gate to the National Republican
convention.
Another comment that Mr. Pease
might read with some profit is the fol-
lowing from the Alexandria Post-
News:
There are few publishers in the
State possessing as many warm
personal friends as Bro. Pease, of
the Anoka Union, and they regret
his bitter disappointment of last
week, in failing to secure a dele
gate's place in the national con
vention. They will also regret his
bitter resentment of that defeat.
Shavings.
The plowman usually shares the
glories of the scene.
Band musicians are horn-y handed
sons of toil.
The Russians are
"czard luck, this."
THUBSDATV ^PB
but of
exclaiming,
Laborers and bass-ball players vv
soon be out on strikes.
ill
A poor dentist is not looked upon
with favor by a gum manufacturer.
It blows so hard in parts of the west
that the inhabitants really have the
blues.
on
"This cigar is like a heavy load
a rough road" said Snipe, "it draws
hard."
Two dogs gnawing on the leg of a
carcass might be said to be a joint
affair.
A minister's record of marriages is
figured the same as a ship's speed
by knots.
Speculators are pretty smooth, but
sometimes the market goes against
their grain.
Oldlaw"I see by the papers that a
man named Arson has been found
guilty of murder and the judge gave
him a life sentence, but afterwards the
judge was arrested, tried and sent to
prison."
Younglaw"Impossible! Bu what
were the charges against the judge?"
Oldlaw"He was found guilty of
committing arson."
*v^r7^1904.il
POLITICAL COMMENT
Prospects Grow Brighter.
As time goes on Dunn's prospects
are growing brighter. His record as
State auditor show what sort of a
business man he is and what we may
expect of him when he is governor.
Collins still has his record to make,
and between the two the people are in
clined to take to Dunn.Elmore Eye.
As to "Veneering."
Some of the Collins papers say that
Bob Dunn is not fit to be governor
because he is not polished enough. He
may not be an aristocrat who has as
sociated with the silk-hat crowd all
his life, but he is "polished" enough
to suit the common people, and they
are the people who intend to see that
he is nominated for governor.Les
ter Prairie News.
No Band-Wagon Campaign.
Dunn's is no band-wagon campaign
a regular and orderly movement
the Republican party for honest
government. The people have brought
out Dunn, Van Sant brought out Col
lins, and Eddy brought out himself.
New people are added daily to Dunn's
cause and Dunn will win.Rush City
Post.
Personal-Letter Stage.
With Judge Collins the governorship
contest is in the last stages he has
commenced writing personal letters to
friends and acquaintances. An the
convention is still several months
hence!Staples World.
Cheap Political Kot.
Up here in Mille Lacs county where
Bob Dunn is best known as a neigh
bor the attempts of Judge Collins'
boomers to belittle his character as a
man can be accurately measured as
the cheapest kind of political rot.
Milaca Times.
Jnst a Lot of Noise.
The Collins forces are making a lot
of noisebut that's all.Winthrop
News.
A Political Enigma.
How Va Sant ever could throw
over Bob Dunn, who worked so hard
for him in political campaigns, and
take up with Colilns, who openly de
spised him, is a political enigma.
Echo Enterprise.
Encouraging Reports.
Bob Dunn has recently returned
from a trip south where he has been to
rest up and get in shape for the stren
uous work of the campaign. On his
return to St. Paul he is met with most
encouraging reports from all sections
of the State that were received during
his absence.Osakis Review.
Collins' finis.
The Republican campaign for gov
ernor will soon be on in dead earnest.
Collins steps down from the supreme
court bench to-morrow at midnight.
He will begin his campaign as a pri
vate citizen on Friday, an unlucky day
for the little judge.Cambridge Inde
pendent.
Works and Not Words.
Thus far the strongest pronounce
ment made by any candidate for gov
ernor relative to the enforcement of
the law against the merger, which has
now been declared illegal, has been
made by Bob Dunn. At, Bob is about
the only State official that has
acof
tually made Ji Hill and the other
twin city corporation skinners come
to time before, his statement of what
he will do carries some weight with
it. Bob made Jim Hill's railroad give
back the State 43,000 acres of land.
What he has done is some assurance
of what he is liable to do again.
Slayton Gazette.
Ssouthern Minnesota Sentiment.
A well known traveling man, who
makes many of the southern towns in
the State says that the Dunn sentiment
in that part of the State is growing
stronger every day. This is what is
being reported from all parts of the
State.Grant County Review.
Red River Valley Sentiment.
There isn't a county in the Red
River Valley but what from one to a
dozen farmers can testify that while
State Auditor Bob Dunn never sold a
farmer's land away from him because
he was behind in his payments and
unable to meet themand he could
have done so had he desired. He isn't
built that way. Mr. Dunn is making
his own campaign for governor. He
has not been "selected" by any set or
clique of men to make the racebut
he will be selected by the Republican
party as its candidate at the coming
State convention because the people
want himand the politicians don't.
Norman County Index.
Solid Support.
The Pioneer Press, printed in St.
Paul for nearly fifty-two years is for
Dunn for governor. The Pioneer
Press is and has always been a conser
ative paper, says the Spring Valley
Sun. We believe the editorials in the
Pioneer Press are more thoroughly
read and digested by the thoughtful
and intelligent voters of the State than
any other paper in the twin cities. We
believe the editorials in the Press
carry more weight than those of any
other paper in the northwest. We be
lieve the Press has a larger number
of readers over fifty years of age than
any paper which circulates in Minne-
sota. who
past
They the
The Press is for Dunn. Those
read the Press editorials for the
twenty-five years, are for Dunn,
are for Dunn for they believe in
Press. The Press is honest in its
opinions.Adams Review.
For a Purpose.
The Republican State Central com
mittee will meet in St. Paul the latter
part of this month for the purpose of
selecting the time and place where Bob
Dunn will be nominated for governor.
-The Virginian.
"The Other Fellow's" Chance.
The Minneapolis Journal claims that
Collin men among the delegates to the
late State convention, were in the
majority. If conventions were con
ducted throughout the State as was
the Faribault county convention, there
is little wonder. The gubernatorial
question was not raised. The average
Dunn man preferred to let "the other
fellow" go this time.Kiester Courier.
The Interests of the People.
In this age of graft, boodling and held'^^
.difference on the .art of mih-- indifference on the part of manv pub
lic officials, it is indeed refreshing to
findonce in a whilea man who be
lieves he is in office to further the in
terests of the people he represents and
not his own personal interests. Bo
Dunn was always honest enough to
stand up for the rights of the people
of the State and fight for those rights.
He will do the same as governor.
Roseau Region.
Eddy's Easter Suit.
Fra nk Eddy has bought a new suit
of clothes and has brushed up consid
erable like. The next thing we know
he will discard his gum shoes and de
velop a kangaroo walk.Thief River
Falls Press.
More Convention Echoes.
The Collins papers are attempting
to make much of the fact that there
was so much of Collins sentiment and
so little Dunn sentiment at the recent
State convention at Minneapolis. We
can very easily explain that little
matter: Dunn and his followers
rightly contended that the convention
was a national matter and that no
State matters should be injected to
disturb the equanimity of the occasion
and therefore kept out of all sem
blance of making an impression. We
admire Mr. Dunn the more for taking
that stand.Stewartville Times.
The Reason Why.
C. A. Smith is one of the Collins
boomers in Minneapolis. I seems as
though we had heard something of
Smith before. O yes, he is the mil
lionaire lumberman that Bo Dunn
brought suit against when he was
State auditor and whom he made pay
back into the State treasury for lum
ber that he manufactured from timber
stolen from State school lands and
sold at a big price to the farmers of the
State. Good reason why he should
work against Dunn.Slayton Gazette.
In the Cheney Class.
We wonder what consolation there is
in it for the Wadena Pioneer Journal
editor to call the Detroit Standard
"one of Heatwole's string of papers."
Editor Eastman knows he is telling a
falsehood when he makes such a state
ment and the readers of his paper at
large, long ago, have tumbled on to
the fact that the man has lost all
regards for the verity and reliability
his utterings in political matters.
Truth compels us to place Eastman in
the ranks of modern fiction writers,
and as a politician incidents of the
past will bear out the assertion that
he is a forlorn hope.Detroit Stand
ard.
A Prediction.
The Age wishes to make the predic
tion right now that Bob Dunn will not
lose a single delegate from the Eighth
congressional district and that he will
be nominated on the first ballot.Ait
kin Age.
By a Large Majority.
By a large majority, the papers of
Minnesota have endorsed Bo Dunn
for the Republican nomination for
governor and none of them have had
to search for good reasons for that
endorsement nor have they had to ex
aggerate his good qualities for the
place.Grand Rapids Magnet.
Swallows and Martins.
"One swallow doesn't make a sum-
mer," neither will one Martin make a
Republican candidate for governor.
Aitkin Republican.
A Fruitless Effort
As a good name is rather to be
chosen than great riches so is a good
record of greater value in a political
contest than great promises. I all
the attacks which have been made
upon the Hon. R. C. Dunn, candidate
for the Republican nomination for
governor, none has been able to as
sail or despoil his record as State
auditor, which covers a period of eight
years.Alexandria Post-News.
Theatre That Would Not Burn.
The Washington Post says that "the
Pacific ocean is becoming a new thea
tre of action." One excellent advan
tage in using an ocean for a theatre is
that it cannot burn up.Rochester
Post-Express.
Makes Friends.
Unjust and infamous persecution al
ways makes a man friends. Anony
mous and scurrilious attacks have
only strengthened Mr Dunn's cause
before the people, and the confession,
of Sam. Johnson that "unless some
thing is found. Mr. Dunn will be the
next governor," hae made thousands
who were indifferent Mr. Dunn's
warm friends and supporters.Spring
Valley Sun.
Enough to Disgust.
The mud-throwing of the managers
of Judge Collins' gubernatorial cam
paign is enough to disgust all fa!
minded men with politics.Brainer
Tribune.
Would Help Some.
Those who are well posted regarding
the political situation in Hennepin
county claim that Dunn will carry
every ward in the city of Minneapolis.
That would help some. Royalton
Banner.
Down Heron Lake Way.
While we have not one word to say
against Judge Collins or Hon. Frank
Eddy, we
desirU
on
wi strongly advocateno
to state from
untifh.thaePrnominatin^
convention i
omm
in
thlJ
el
convention
the candidacy of Robert C. Dunn for
governor because we believe him to
be eminently fitted to fill that honor
able and responsible position.Heron
Lake News.
With a Cap P.
It is possible that our friend Gran
ville S. Pease, of the Anoka Union, is
too much inclined to look 'at the gu
bernatorial struggle from a personal
standpoint.Duluth News-Tribune.
The Ortonville Convention,
The newspaper fraternity of the
Seventh district was well represented
at the congressional convention held
in this city yesterday, and the way
they talked Bob Dunn for governor
was a eaution. In fact the entire con
vention was Dunn's.Ortonville Her
ald-Star.
For Sale.
One mower, one hay rake, one shoe
drill seeder, one disk, one drag. Ca
be seen at M. Jaax's residence.
Will sell cheap. James LePage.
PETER MOEGER
Merchant
Tailor^
Has opened a tailor shop in the
building on First street, fourth
door from Citizens State bank,
where he is prepared to take
your order for
Fine TaiIor=made
Suits
and Overcoats.
Having been in the tailoring
business for thirty*five years
he can give all customers the
benefit of his long experience,
and can quote you prices that
will surprise you.
All kinds of cleaning
and pressing sttended
to promptly.
ii mi i """xi ~u i~*n_ ~**i ~"ii.
Good
Goods
It pays to buy
a good article.
Cheap Goods
are dear at
any price.
While I don't carry a
large stock of goods
though my aim is always
to carry the best the mar
ket affords in
Shoes,
Furnishing
Goods and
Groceries.
A.N.Lenertz.
^^^^^m0^^^^t^0^t^^^^0
a
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