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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, May 05, 1904, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1904-05-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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THOUSANDS KILLED
ON THE YALU HIVE
PASSAGE OF THE STREAM SA!D
TO HAVE BEEN COSTLY TO
JAPANESE ARMY.
FOUR THOUSAND MEN SLAIN
GENERAL KUROPATKIN SO ESTI-
MATES THE DEATH LSST OF
KUROKI'S FORCES.
RUSSIAN LOSS NOT STATED
BUT EIGHT HUNDRED WOUNDED
SOLDIERS HAVE REACHED
FENGHUANCHENG.
St. Petersburg, May 4.The emperor
has received a telegram under Tues
day's date from General Kuropatkin,
giving General Zassalitch's report,
dated Tuesday, on the fight of May 1,
which says that the battle was fought
under the following circumstances:
"The Twelfth and Twenty second
regiments and the Second and Third
batteries of the Sixth brigade of artil
lery were engaged in the battle, which
began with heavy cannonading of our
right flank by siege guns at Wiju and
field batteries in the distance.
"After a lull the fighting was re
sumed with extraordinary violence
against the left flank of our main po
sition at Turencnen and our position
at Potietinsky. A fusillade was also
begun by small parties of Japanese
across the Ai river.
"The situation of the defenders'
position became increasingly difficult,
especially at Potietinsky, which was
bombarded on the front and on both
flanks.
"Thirty Japanese guns were pitted
against our battery at Potietinsky,
which, after having silenced the
enemy's mountain battery, directer1
its
fire on the Japanese infantry and sus
tained few losses so long as it was not
obliged to take up another position,
owing to the withdrawal of our in
fantry from the bank.
"The Japanese under our fire made
continual attacks with fresh troops
but without having recourse to the
bayonet.
Heaps of Dead Japanese.
"Japanese bodies lay in heaps at
the river fords.
"Simultaneously with the attack at
Potietinsky an attack was being made
on our left flank at Turencnen and the
Russian trenches had to be abandoned
under the Japanese enfilading fire. Our
reserves several times mingled with
the first line, thus enabling it for a
long time to maintain its position.
"Finally all of the supports were
brought into the firing line, but owing
to the great distance from our main
reserve it was impossible for them to
reach the advanced force in time and
our men retired from the principal po
sition to another position in the rear
of Turencnen, followed by the con
centrated fire of the Japanese, who
could not make up their minds to de
scend from the crest they occupied
and face the fire of our batteries at
Poulemetts They dug fresh trenches
and opened a heavy artillery fire on
our new position and began to turn
our left flank toward Chingow
'Two battalions of the Eleventh
regiment and the Third battery of the
Third brigade of artillery belonging to
the main reserve were ordered to
Laotunhou. They occupied a posi
tion with a double firing line, thus
permitting our advanced line, which
had suffered heavily, and our wounded
to retiie
"A battalion of the Eleventh regi
ment, both flanks of which were re
peatedly turned by the enemy, ad
vanced with fixed bayonets, preceded
by buglers to clear a passage. The
Japanese, however, declined a hand to
hand conflict and recoiled.
"In front of the regiment a chaplain
bearing a cross was struck by two
bullets.
"It was only by advancing or the
Japanese with the bayonet that the
Eleventh regiment was able to retire.
"On the arrival of a battalion of the
Tenth regiment the troops were able
to beat a retreat.
Russians Lost Heavily.
"The losses of the Eleventh and
Twelfth regiments were very great,
but they are not yet exactly known!
In the Eleventh, the killed included
Colonel Laming and Lieutenant Colo
nels Dometti and Raievski. The
Twlefth lost nine company command
ers killed or wounded
"The Second and Third batteries of
the Sixth brigade, having lost the
greater number of their men and
horses, were compelled to abandon
their guns after rendering them use
less. For the same reason six guns
of the Third battery of the Third bri
gade of artillery and eight Poulemettes,
which could not be brought away,
were also disabled The mountainous
nature of the country made it impos
sible to save the guns by means of
drag ropes."
General Kuropatkin then says:
"Up to the present 800 wounded, in
eluding fourteen officers, have been
brought to the hospital at Fenghuan
cheng. Their eventual transportation
elsewhere is assured.
"Japanese cavalry appeared to the
southeast of Fenghuancheng, but see
ing two companies with two guns op
posite to It, it did not venture to ap
proach.
"The transportation of the wound
ed by hired Chinese bearers to Feng
huancheng was very difficult. Two
wheeled carts and horses lent by the
cavalry were also utilized for this pur
pose. Most of the wounded, however,
arrived on foot, assisted by their com
rades and reached Fenghuancheng
within twenty-four hours.
"Lieutenant General Zassalitch de
clares that the troops retained their
morale, notwithstanding tt ir heavy
losses, and are ready for fresh en
gagements.
"The Japanese losses were very
heavy at the passage of the Ai river,
at their position at Turenchen and on
the hill occupied by the two battlions
of the Eleventh regiment
"According to the statements of par
ticipants in the battle at least 3,000 to
4,000 were killed."
FELL INTO AN AMBUSCADE.
Japs Trapped Zassalitch by Intercept
ing a Telegram.
London, May 4.A special dispatch
from St. Petersburg asserts that Gen
eral Zassalitch fell into an ambuscade
owing to the Japanese intercepting a
telegram from General Kuropatkin.
Seoul advices say the Ja-3 captured
48 guns. 30 officers and over 500 men
on the Yalu.
Kuropatkin is recalling troops from
around Gensan and the Russians are
said to be ready to quit Dalny.
The Japanese fleet is off Port Arthur.
WAR O N IN EARNEST
RUSSIANS REALIZE THAT THE
CONFLICT HAS ENTERED A
SERIOUS STAGE.
St. Petersburg, May 4.St. Peters
burg is electrified by the sensational
news of fighting on land and sea.
From General Kuropatkin conveying
General Zassalitch's report came
graphic details of the battle of Turen
chen, as the combat on the banks of
the Yalu is officially designated,
which show the savage character of
the fighting displayed by the Russians
in their effort to hold a position com
manded by the Japanese, and their
orderly retreat to Fenghuancheng,
where they are now entrenched, con
ducting en route a brilliant rear guard
engagement, in which they inflicted
heavy loss on the enemy.
Viceroy Alexieff command of Port
Arthur has been signalised by the re
pulse of another desperate attempt by
the Japanese to close the entrance to
the harbor.
Adding to this quota of the war news
the official report of the appearance
of a number of Japanese snips oft
Kaipmg, and Siniuchen, on the west
coast of the Liaotung peniusula. below
Newchwang, foreboding the disem
barkation of Japanese troops with the
intention of cutting off Port Arthur,
this war may now be said to have be
gun in deadly earnest.
Dwarfed by Yalu River Fight.
Important as was Alexieff's achieve
ment, in spite of the magnitude of the
attempt of the Japanese, who this
time sent in ten fireships to block the
Port Arthur entrance, it is dwarfed by
the details of the fighting on the
Yalu, showing the severe losses suf
fered by the Russians' who have re
moved 800 wounded alone to Feng
huancheng, while it is estimated that
the Japanese loss is between 3,000 and
4,000.
If this statement of the Japanese
loss is correct, the Russian authori
ties say that General Zassalitch must
be
givenhis
credit
part
fortocarryingthout rf
that
orders make cross
ing or the Yalu as costly as possible
to the enemy.
Zassalitch's report indicates that
the Japanese began the battl* by
shelling the right flank and attract
ing attention to that point, and then
a flanking movement to the left began
in force Unfortunately Zassalitch
had only 10,000 men, of whom 2,000
were unable to participate in the fight
ing, as they were occupying Antung,
and General Kuroki, appreciating the
inability of his opponent to bring up
reserves, threw his weighty force up
on the points selected for attack.
The Japanese had from 35,000 to
40,000 men, besides the greater quanti
ty of guns, many of them being of
heavier caliber than those of the Rus
sians. Thus outnumbering the Rus
sians actually engaged more than five
to one, the Japanese succeeded in
Flanking Two Russian Battalions
on both sides and enveloping them on
the rear. The latter, with music play*
ing a martial air and with fixed bayo
nets, a priest holding aloft a cross
charged and the Japanese opened be
fore them, after which they succeeded
in reaching the supports.
It was one of the most gallant ac
tions of a bloody day.
Because of the weakness of the
Russians, they were unable to hold
their positions. Enfiladed by the
enemy's fire, men and horses began to
fall, a few mounts only surviving
Three batteries lost their guns
No such determined stand as that
made by troops was intended by Ger
eral Kuropatkin, but their tenacity in
holding their positions, it is said, is
worthy of the highest traditions of the
Russian army.
It is a cause of sati?jn-t-o to the
authorities that in sr^ che severe
Russian loss General Zassalitch had
sufficient strength to sharply bite the
pursuing enemy, who lost 300 in this
movement alone.
General Zassalitch's retirement is
especially noteworthy because it was
encumbered by such a large number
of wounded. Had the Japanese been
able to bring up the entire cavalry
strength of their army the day might
have been a far blacker one for Zassa
litch
Major General Kashtalinsky is alive
and General Zassalitch was not wound
ed, but the colonels, lieutenant colonels
and a maiority of the company com
manders of the Eleventh, Twelfth and
Twenty-second regiments were either
killed or wounded.
Killed by a Street Car.
St. Paul, May 4.Adelaide Henle, a
three-year-old daughter of Joseph
Henle, a harnessmaker, was struck
by a Fort Snelling car on West
Seventh street Tuesday evening while
playing tag and was run over and in
stantly killed.
FALL OF NEWCHWAKG
JAPS REPORTED TO HAVE CAP-
TURED CITY AND PUT RUS-
SIANS TO FLIGHT.
NOT OFFICIALLY CONFIRMED
NOT UNLIKELY, HOWEVER, THAT
THE JAPANESE MAY SOON
MAKE AN ATTACK.
Shanghai, May 4.The Japanese are
reported to have occupied Newchwang.
London, May 4.The Chefoo corre
spondent of the Daily Chronicle cables
the following under Tuesday's date:
"The Japanese landed troops and
attacked and captured Newchwang
last evening, the Russians falling back
to protect the railway."
St. Petersburg, May 4.Lieutenant
General Sakharoff, in a dispatch dated
May 2, to the general staff, says:
"On May 1, two vessels, apparently
torpedo boats, approached to within a
distance of about six kilometres from
the coast to the west of Siniuchen,
west of Haichu. At first two steam
ers were observed cruising near the
coast until 3 p. m. Then a squadron
of ten vessels was sighted steaming
toward the northwest.
"No ships were sighted in the neigh
borhood of Yinkow."
JAPANESE REPELLED
RUSSIANS FOIL ANOTHER AT-
TEMPT TO BLOCK PORT AR-
THUR HARBOR.
St. Petersburg, May 4.High Ad
miral Grand Duke Alexis has received
the following official telegram from
Viceroy Alexieff, dated May 3, report
ing the Japanese attempt to block
Port Arthur early Tuesday morning:
"I respectfully report to your high
ness that a fresh attack was made by
the enemy last night with the object
of obstructing the entrance to the
port, and that it was successfully re
pelled.
"At 1 o'clock this morning five tor
pedo boats were perceived near the
coast from the Eastern batteries. Un
der the fire of our warships and the
batteries they retreated southward.
"At 1:45 o'clock the first fire ship,
escorted by several torpedo boats, was
sighted and we opened fire upon it
from the batteries and the warships.
Three-quarters of an hour afterwards
our searchlights revealed a number of
fireships making for the entrance to
the harbor from the east and south
west. The coast defense vessels
Otvashni and Gremieshchi and the
gunboat Giliak repulsed them by a
well directed fire.
Eight Ships Sunk by Russians.
"Altogether eight ships were sunk
by our vigorous cannonade, by white
head torpedoes launched from our
torpedo boats and by the explosion of
several submarine mines. Further, ac
cording to the reports of the officers
commanding the batteries, and the
gunboat Giliak, two Japanese torpedo
boats were destroyed.
"After 4 o'clock a. m. the batteries
and warships ceased fire, subsequently
firing only at intervals on the enemy's
torpedo boats, which were visible on
the horizon.
"All the fireships carried quick
firing guns with which they maintained
a constant fire
"Up to the present thirty men. in
cluding two mortally wounded officers
who took refuge on a launch, or were
rescued from the fireships by us, have
been picked up. The inspection of
the roadstead and the work of saving
the enemy's men was hindered by the
heavy sea running. We suffered no
casualties with the exception of a sea
man belonging to the torpedo boat de
stroyer Boevoi.
"On the appearance of the first fire
ship accompanied by the enemy's tor
pedo boats, 1 boarded a launch and
proceeded to the Otvashni to take im
mediate measures for repulsing the
fireships. With me were General Zah
linski and Captain Eberhardt of the
naval general staff. General Stoessel
was on the fortifications at the same
time, and General Loschinsky, chief of
the defence force of the forts, was on
board the Giliak."-
SMITH AGAIN ELECTED.
Leads Democrats to Victory in St. Paul
Election.
St. Paul, May 4.Mayor Robert A.
Smith, Dem., was re-elected here Tues
day by a majority estimated at from
3,000 to 4,000 over F. P. Wright, Rep.
Otto Bremer was re-elected treasurer
and Louis Betz was again chosen
comptroller. Both are Democrats. All
the Democratic assembly candidates
but one are probably elected and nine
out of the eleven aldermen are Demo
crats. The result was practically a
Democratic landslide.
South Dakota Republicans.
Sioux Falls, S. D., May 4.The Re
publican state convention to nominate
state and congressional tickets and to
select delegates to the national con
vention will meet here today. Fully
3,000 Republicans from all parts of the
state are here to attend as delegates
or spectators. The convention will in
struct for President Roosevelt. There
are five candidates for governor.
Brother and Sister Drowned.
Winnipeg. Man., May 4.Toby Les
paurence, aged .seventeen, and his sis
ter, aged eighteen, were capsized from
a boat into the La Salle river at Star
buck, Man., and drowned.
THE PRINCETON UNION: %HTJRSDAT, MAY 5, 1904.
Spring Suits
AlLjour $26.50, $27.50 and $30 Suits
offered at this sale for
$20.
These suits are man-tailored of the renowned
"L. Helprin" make. Are made of Scotch and
Glengarry novelty suiting, also voiles and cheviots.
$20 Suits for $15.
Ladies9
Dutch Defeat Atchinese.
Amsterdam, May 4.A dispatch to
the Handelsblad from Batavia, Java,
says that a Dutch column captured the
Atchinese position at Jjantoe after a
desperate fight in which 190 Atchinese
were killed. The Dutch lose 7 men
killed and 5 officers and 38 men
wounded.
Record Not Recognized.
Chicago, May 4.The board of ap
peals of the American Trotting asso
ciation at a meeting here Tuesday re
fused to recognize the record of 1:59%
claimed to have been made by Cres
ceus on the grounds of the Wichita
Fair association at Wichita last fall.
BackacheNo Cure, No Pay.
Your druggist will refund your
money if DeBell's Kidney Pills fail to
cure any kidhey, liver, bladder or uric
acid trouble or any disorders due to
weak kidneys, such as rheumatism,
lufnbago and Bright's disease. De
Bell's Kidney Pills is a new discovery
and is the only kidney remedy sold on
a positive guaranteeno cure, no pay.
Price 25 cents. For sale by C. A.
Jack.
Licensed Mid-wife.
Twenty-five years practice. Call or
write
MRS. CATHERINE HAGAN,
Zimmerman, Sherburne County, Minn.
*i mk^&e-^Av, J& i. t^J&S&mAi* h&ri* ^4&*'*<
|n!mmmmmmmmmmmmmmtnmff!mmmmmmmmm?m!?mmmmmmmmti?^ 1 JeSmer'S Semi-Annual
I Suit and Skirt Sale. 1
a
Reductions like the following will give
you notice that we mean to close out
all our Ladies' and Misses'
Cravenettes.
s Just a few left and to end this line will
sell at following figure.
$20.00 Cravenettes $15.0 0
1 $18.00 Cravenettes $13.50
Special Skirt Showing
Sr Oxford Grey Melton skirt, button and Af A
gr strap trimmed, $3.50 value at OliUQ
S Scotch mixture in blues and greys, nicely trimmed
J- with strap on hips worth much more than $2.25
Jesmer's Dep't Store,
W. P. CHASE,
Manager.
-&?
Full satin and tafetta lined garments 3
with lots of Iswing and dash in them. 3
$15.50 and $16.50 garments for 3
Exceptional values which we would 3
gladly have you notice. 3
$12.50 Suits for $10. 1
All wool suitings, full capes, steel but
ton and silk braid, trimmed full silk 3
lined jacket
Foley Bean Lumber
Company
Manufacturers and
Wholesale Dealers In
White Pine Lumber,
Lath and Shingles.
Also Sash, Doors, Mouldings and a Com
plete Stock of Building Material.
"JTTTT'J^*^** M^S-*
50 1
PRINCETON.
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