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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, May 26, 1904, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1904-05-26/ed-1/seq-6/

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CHAPTER III.
BOHFE was awakened a long
time before daylight by the
ringing of a noisy bell. He
dressed, shivering, arid stum
bled downstairs to the round stove, big
as a boiler, into which the cripple
dumped huge logs of wood from time
to time. After breakfast Thorpe re
turned to this stove and sat half dozing
for what seemed to him untold ages.
The cold of the northern country was
initiating him.
Men came in, smoked a brief pipe
and went out. After a time he himself
put on his overcoat and ventured out
into the town. It seemed to Thorpe a
meager affair, built of lumber, mostly
unpainted, with always the dark, men
acing fringe of the forest behind. The
great sawmill, with its tall stacks and
its rows of water barrelsprotection
against fireon top, was the dominant
note. Near the mill coughed a little
red painted structure from whose stove
pipe a column of white smoke arose,
attesting the cold, a clear hundred feet
straight upward, and to whose door a
number of men were directing their
steps through the snow. Over the door
Thorpe could distinguish the word "Of-
fice." He followed and entered.
In a narrow aisle railed off from the
main part of the room waited Thorpe's
companions of the night before. The
remainder of the office gave accommo
dation to three clerks. One of these
glanced up inquiringly as Thorpe came
in.
"I am looking for work," said Thorpe.
"Wait there," briefly commanded the
clerk.
In a few moments the door of the
inner room opened and Shearer came
out. A man's head peered from within.
"Come on, boys," said he.
The five applicants shuffled through.
Thorpe found himself in the presence
of a man whom he felt to be the natu
ral leader of these wild, independent
spirits. He was already a little past
middle life, and his form had lost the
elastic vigor of youth. But his eye
was keen, clear and wrinkled to a cer
tain dry facetiousness, and his figure
was of that bulk which gives an im
pression of a subtler weight and power
than the merely physical. You felt his
superiority even when he was" most
comradely with you. This man Thorpe
was to meet under other conditions,
wherein the steel hand would more
plainly clink the metal.
He was now seated in a worn office
chair before a littered desk. In the
close air hung the smell of stale cigars
and the clear fragrance of pine.
"What is it, Dennis?" he asked the
first of the men.
"I've been out," replied the lumber
man. "Have you got anything for me,
Mr. Daly?"
The mill owner laughed.
"I guess so. Report to Shearer. Did
you vote for the right man, Denny?"
The lumberman grinned sheepishly.
"I don't know, sir. I didn't get that
far."
"Better let it alone. I suppose you
and Bill want to come back too?" he
added, turning to the next two in line.
"All right report to Tim. Do you
"We are a very busy firm here," he said.
want work?" he inquired of the last of
the quartet, a big, bashful man, with
the shoulders of a Hercules.
"Yes, sir," answered the latter, un
comfortable.
"What do you want?"
"I'm a cant hook man, sir."
"Where have you worked?"
"I had a job with Morgan & Steb
blns on the Clear river last winter."
"All right we need cant hook men.
Report at 'seven,' and if they don't
Want you there go to 'thirteen.'"
The man went out. Daly turned to
Thorpe with the last flickers of amuse
ment in his eyes.
"What can I do for you?" he in
quired.
"I am looking for work," Thorpe re
plied.
"Blazed
Copyright, 1902, by Stetvart Bdtttard XOhile
By STEWART
EDWARD
WHITE
"What kind of work?"
"Any kind, so long as I can learn
sumething about the lumber business."
The older man studied him keenly for
a few moments.
"Have you had any other business
experience?"
"None." "What have you been doing?"
"Nothing."
The lumberman's eyes hardened.
"We area very busy firm here," he
said, with a certain deliberation. "We
do not carry a big force of men in any
one department, and each of those men
has to fill his place and slop some over
the sides. We do not pretend or at
tempt to teach here. If you want to
be a lumberman you must learn the
lumber business more directly than
through the windows of a bookkeeper's
office. Go into the woods. Learn a few
first principles. Find out the differ
ence between Norway and white pine
anyway."
After his speech the business man
whirled back to his desk.
"Have you anything for me to do in
the woods, then?" the other asked
quietly.
"No," said Daly over his shoulder.
Thorpe went out He had made the
elementary discovery that even in chop
ping wood skilled labor counts. He
did not know where to turn next, and
he would not have had the money to
go far in any case so, although Shear
er's brusque greeting that morning had
argued a lack of cordiality, he resolved
to remind the river man of his prom
ised assistance.
That noon he carried out his resolve.
"Go up and tackle Radway," said
Shearer. "He's jobbing for us on the
Cass branch. He needs men for road
ing, I know, because he's behind. You'll
get a job there."
"Where is it?" asked Thorpe.
"Ten miles from here. She's blazed,
but you better wait for the supply
team Friday. If you try to make her
yourself you'll get lost on some of the
old logging roads."
Thorpe considered.
"I'm busted," he said at last frankly.
"Oh, that's all right," replied the
walking boss. "Marshall, come here."
The peglegged boarding house keeper
stumped in.
"What is it?" he trumpeted snuff
ingly.
"This boy wants a job till Friday.
Then he's going up to Radway's with
the supply team. Now, quit your hol
lering for a chore boy for a few days."
"All right," snorted Marshall. "Take
that ax and split some dry wood that
you'll find behind the house."
"I'm very much obliged to you," be
gan Thorpe to the walking boss, "and"
"That's all right," interrupted the lat
ter. "Some day you can give me a
job."
CHAPTER IV.
OR five days Thorpe cut wood,
made fires, drew water, swept
floors and ran errands. At the
end of the week he received $4
from his employer, dumped his va
lise into a low bobsleigh driven by a
man muffled in a fur coat, assisted in
loading the sleigh with a variety of
things, from Spearhead plug to raisins,
and turned his face at last toward the
land of his hopes and desires.
The long drive to camp was at once a
delight and a misery to him. First his
feet became numb, then his hands, then
his nose was nipped, and finally his
warm clothes were lifted from him by
invisible hands, and he was left naked
to shivers and tremblings. He found it
torture to sit still on the top of the bale
of hay, and yet he could not bear to
contemplate the cold shock of jumping
from the sleigh to the ground. The
driver pulled up to breathe his horses
at the top of a hill.
"You're dressed pretty light," he ad
vised. "Better hoof it a ways and get
warm."
The words tipped the balance of
Thorpe's decision. He descended stiffly,
conscious of a disagreeable shock from
a 8ix inch jump.
In ten minutes the wallowing, slip
ping and leaping after the tail of the
sled had sent his blood tingling to the
last of his protesting members. Cold
withdrew.
After a little while they arrived by
way of a hill, over which they plunged
into the middle of the camp. Thorpe
saw three large buildings, backed end
to end, and two smaller ones, all built
of heavy logs, roofed with plank and
lighted sparsely through one or two
windows apiece. The driver pulled up
opposite the space between two larger
buildings and began to unload his pro
visions. Thorpe set about aiding him
and so found himself for the first time
in a "cook camp."
It was a commodious building. One
end furnished space for two cooking
ranges and two bunks placed one over
the other. Along one side ran a broad
table shelf, with other shelves over it
and numerous barrels underneath, all
filled with cans, loaves of bread, cook
ies and pies. The center was occupied
by four long bench flanked tables, down
whose middle straggled utensils con
taining sugar, apple butter, condiments
and sauces and whose edges were set
with tin dishes for about forty men.
The cook, a rather thin faced man
With a mustache, directed where the
^w^^^^l^^j^l^wH#fr Ayjggfii&^ss
i^i^^^^THE PTtlKCBTON ITNlONrWTHUBSBAY, MAY 26, 1904.
provisions were To be stowedTand the
"cookee," a hulking youth, assisted
Thorpe and the driver to carry them in.
In a few moments the task wag fin
ished, with the exception of a half doz
en other cases, which the driver desig
nated as for the "van." The horses
were unhitched and stabled in the
third of the big log buildings. *The
driver indicated the second.
"Better go into the men's camp and
sit down till th' boss gets in," he ad
vised, i
Thorpe entered a dim, overheated
structure lined on two sides by a dou
ble tier of large bunks partitioned
from one another like cabins of a boat
and centered by a huge stove orer
whiefc hung slender poles. The latter
were to dry clothes on. Just outside
the bunks ran a straight, hard bench.
Thorpe stood at the entrance trying to
accustom his eyes to the dimness.
"Set down," said a voice, "on th' floor
if you want to, but I'd prefer th' dea
con seat."
Thorpe obediently took position on
the bench, or "deacon seat." His eyes,
more used to the light, could make out
a thin, tall, bent old man, with bare
cranium, two visible teeth and a three
days' stubble of white beard over his
meager, twisted face.
He caught, perhaps, Thorpe's surpris
ed expression.
"You think th' old man's no good, do
you?" he cackled without the slightest
malice. "Looks is deceivin'." He
sprang up swiftly, seized the toe of his
right foot in his left hand and jumped
his left foot through the loop thus
formed. Then he sat down again and
laughed at Thorpe's astonishment.
"Old Jackson's still purty smart,"
said he. "I'm barn boss. They ain't a
man in th' country knows as much
about hosses as I do. We ain't had
but two sick this fall, an' between you
an' me they's a skate lot. You're a
greenhorn, ain't you?"
"Yes," confessed Thorpe.
"Well," said Jackson reflectively, but
rapidly, "Le Fabian, he's quiet, but
ban and O'Grady, he talks loud, but
you can bluff him and Perry, he's only
bad when he gets full of red likker
and Norton, he's bad when he gets
mad like, and will use axes."
Thorpe did not know he was getting
valuable points on the camp bullies.
At dark the old man lit two lamps,
which served dimly to gloze the shad
ows, and thrust logs of wood into the
cast iron stove. Soon after, the men
came in. They were a queer, mixed
lot. There were active, clear built,
precise Frenchmen, with small hands
and feet and a peculiarly trim way of
wearing their rough garments typical
native born American lumber jacks,
powerful in frame, rakish in air, reck
less in manner big blond Scandina
vians and Swedes, strong men at the
sawing an Indian or so, strangely in
contrast to the rest, and a variety of
irishmen, Englishmen and Canadians.
Ihese men tramped in without a word
and set busily to work at various tasks.
Some sat on the "deacon seat" and be
gan to take off their socks and rub
bers. Still others selected and lit lan
terns from a pendant row near the
window and followed old Jackson out
of doors. They were the teamsters.
"You'll find the old man in the office,"
said Jackson.
Thorpe made his way across to the
email log cabin indicated as the office,
and pushed open the door.
A man sat at a desk placing figures
on a sheet of paper. He obtained the
figures from statistics penciled on three
thin leaves of beechwood riveted to
gether. In a chair by the stove lounged
a bulkier figure, which Thorpe con
cluded to be that of the "old man."
"I was sent here by Shearer," said
Thorpe directly. "He said you might
give me some work."
So long a silence fell that the appli
cant began to wonder if his question
had been heard.
"I might," replied the man dryly at
last.
"Well, will you?" Thorpe inquired,
the humor of the situation overcoming
him.
"Have you ever worked in thewoods?"
"No."
The man smoked silently.
"I'll put you on the road in the morn-
ing," he concluded, as though this were
the deciding qualification.
One of the men entered abruptly and
approached the counter. The writer at
the desk laid aside his tablets.
"What is it, Albert?" he asked.
"Jot of chewin'," was the reply.
The scaler took from the shelf a long
plug of tobacco and cut off two inches.
"Ain't hittin' the van much, are you,
Albert?" he commented, putting the
man's name and the amount in a little
book. Thorpe went out after leaving
his name for the time book, enlightened
as to the method of obtaining supplies.
He promised himself some warm cloth
ing from the van when he should have
worked out the necessary credit.
At supper he learned something else
that he must not talk at table. For
one thing, supper was a much briefer
affair than it would have been had ev
ery man felt privileged to take his will
in conversation, not to speak of the ab
sence of noise and the presence of
peace. Bach man asked for what he
wanted.
"Please pass the beans," he said,
with the deliberate intonation of a
man who does not expect that his re
quest will be granted.
Besides the beans were fried salt
pork, boiled potatoes, canned corn,
mince pie, a variety of cookies and
doughnuts, and strong green tea.
Thorpe found himself eating ravenous
ly of the crude fare.
That evening he underwent a cate
chism, a few practical jokes, which he
took good naturedly, and a vast deal
of chaffing. At 9 o'clock the lights
were all out. By daylight he and a
dozen other men were at work hewing
a road that had to be as smooth and
level as a New York boulevard.
Thorpe and four others were set to
work on this road,, which was to be
cut through a creek bottom leading, he
was told, to "seventeen." He learned
to use a double bitted ax.
From shortly after daylight he work
ed. Four other men bore him compa
ny, and twice Radway himself came
by, watched their operations for a mo
ment and moved on without comment.
After Thorpe had caught his second
wind he enjoyed his task, finding a
certain pleasure in the ease with which
he handled his tool.
At the end of an interminable pe
riod a faint, musical hallo swelled,
echoed and died through the forest,
beautiful as a spirit. It was taken up
by another voice and repeated. Then
by another. Now near at hand, now
far away, it rang as hollow as a bell.
The sawyers, :he swampers, the skid
ders and the team men turned and
put on their heavy blanket coats.
Down on the road Thorpe heard it,
too, and wondered what it might be.
"Come on, bub. She means chew,"
explained old man Heath kindly.
Thorpe resumed his coat and fell
in behind the little procession. After
a short time he came upon a horse and
sledge. Beyond it the cookee had
built a little camp fire, around and
over which he had grouped big fifty
pound lard tins half full of hot things
to eat. Each man as he approached
picked up a tin plate and cup from a
pile near at hand.
The cookee was plainly master of the
situation. He issued peremptory or
ders. When Erickson, the blond Swede,
attempted surreptitiously to appropri
ate a doughnut the youth turned on
him savagely and shouted:
"Get out of that, you big towhead!"
The men ate, perched in various at
titudes and places. Thorpe found it
difficult to keep warm. The violent ex-
*I don't know which of you boys is
coming first," said he quietly.
ercise had heated him through, and
now the north country cold penetrated
to his bones. He huddled close to the
fire and drank hot tea, but it did not
do him very much good. In his secret
mind he resolved to buy one of the
blanket mackinaws that very evening.
The newcomer's first day of hard
work had tired him completely. He
was ready for nothing so much as his
bunk. But he had forgotten that it
was Saturday night. His status was
still to assure.
They began with a few mild tricks.
Shuffle the brogan followed hot back.
Thorpe took all of it good naturedly.
Finally a tall individual with a thin,
white face, a reptilian forehead, red
dish hair and long, babboon arms sug
gested tossing in a blanket. Thorpe
looked at the low ceiling and declined.
"I'm with the game as long as you
can say, beys," said he, "and I'll have
as much fun as anybody, but that's
going too far for a tired man."
The reptilian gentleman let out a
string of oaths whose meaning might
be translated, "We'll see about that!"
Thorpe was a good boxer, but he
knew by now the lumber jacks' meth
od of fighting anything to hurt the
other fellow. And in a genuine, old
fashioned, knock-down-and-drag out
rough and tumble your woodsman is
about the toughest customer to handle
you will be likely to meet. He is
brought up on fighting. Nothing pleases
him better than to get drunk and, with
a few companions, to embark in an
earnest effort to "clean out" a rival
town. And he will accept cheerfully
punishment enough to kill three ordi
nary men.
Thorpe at the first hostile movement
sprang back to the door, seized one of
the three-foot billets of hard wood in
tended for the stove and faced his op
ponents.
"I don't know which of you boys is
coming first," said he quietly, "but he
is going to get it good and plenty."
If the affair had been serious these
men would never have recoiled before
the mere danger of a stick of hard
wood. But this was, a good natured bit
of foolery, a test of nerve, and there
was no object in getting a broken head
for that. The reptilian gentleman alone
grumbled something profane.
"If you hanker for trouble so much,"
drawled the unexpected voice of old
Jackson from the corner, "mebbe you
could put on the gloves."
The rest was farce. Thorpe was built
on true athletic linesbroad, straight
shoulders, narrow flanks, long, clean,
smooth muscles. He possessed, besides,
that hereditary toughness and bulk
which no gymnasium will ever quite
supply. The other man, while power
ful and ugly in his rushes, was clumsy
and did not use his head. Thorpe
planted his hard, straight blows at will.
Finally he saw his opening and let out
Jwith a swinging pivot bCow. The other
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
PRINCETON. MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
life. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience forthe treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment, Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Only non-contagious diseases admitted.
Charges reasonable.
Trained Nurses furnished for sickness
in private families.
Staff of Physicians and Surgeons,
H. C. COONEY, M. D.
Chief of Staff.
N. K. WHITTEMORE, M. D., H. P. BACON. M. D.
H. B. HIXSON, M. D., G. ROSS CALEY, M.D.,
A. G. ALDRICBC. M. D.
MISS AUGUSTA PETERSON, Supt.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SVBGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore
Tel.Rural, 36.
Princeton, Minn.
CLVERO L. MCMILLAN,
LAWYEB.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
I A.ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
M. KALIHER,
BABBEB SHOP & BATH BOOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A C- SMITH,
Dealer in
EBESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season:
Telephone 51.
Princeton,
A. ROSS,
FVNEBAL DIBECTOB.
d^)i
1 ii
ta n*
fu1
1
char
?1
e?of dead bodies when
and caskets of the latest styles
Coffln
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer in Monuments of all kinds.
E A. Ross, Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
Putnam Fadeless Dyes
color silk, wool or cotton perfectly at
one boiling. Sold by C. A. Jack, at
io cents per package.
LIVERY, FEED!
and Sale Stable.
Opposite Commercial Hotel.
I A. H. STEEVES, Prop.
First Class Rigs on
hand day or night.
Drafters and drivers
always on hand.
The Rural
Telephone Co.
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE.
Lines to Dalbo, Cambridge, Santi
ago and Qlendorado.
^F" Good Service in Princeton and to all
adjoining points.
Patronize a Home Concern.
Service Day and Night.
PRINCETON
Bottling Works
E. H. WITTE, Prop.
I desire to announce to the trade of
Princeton and surrounding towns that I
have opened my bottling works and am
now making for the trade all kinds of
Corbonated
Mineral and Soda Water, Gin
ger Ale, Birch Beer, Cream and
Lemon Soda, etc.
My goods are all noted for their
purity and sparkling qualities. S
Your trade solicited.
I
Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND DULUTH.
GOING SOUTH. GOING NORTH.
Leave.
Duluth. 6
Brook Park.. 9:
Mora 9:36
Ogilvie 9:48
Milaca 10:20
Pease (f) 10:30
L. Siding(f). 10:40
Brickton (f).10
Princeton.... 10:65
Zimmerman. 11:
Elk River.... 11:
Anoka 12
Minneapolis.12:40 Ar. St. Paul. 1:05
mo
M2
First publication May 19,1904.
Summons.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, I
County of Mille Lacs.
District Court, Seventh Judicial District.
John Goergen, Plaintiff,
,WT against Summons.
Nellie O. Goergen, defendant)
The State of Minnesota to above named de
fendant
You are hereby summoned and required to
answer the complaint of the plaintiff in the
above entitled action, which complaint has
been filed in the office of the clerk of said dis
trict court at his office at Princeton, in the
county of Mille Lacs, in said State of Minne
sota, and to serve a copy of your answer to said
complaint on the subscriber, at his office in
the village of Princeton, in the said county of
Mille Lacs, within thirty days after service of
this summons upon you, exclusive of the day of
such service and if you fail to answer the said
complaint within the time aforesaid, the
plaintiff in this action will apply to the court
for the relief demanded in the complaint.
Dated May 11th, A. D. 1904.
J. A. Ross
Attorney for Plaintiff, Princeton, Minn.
Leave.
20 a.m.
15 a.m. a.m.
a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m.
45 a.m. am.
10 a.m.
35 a.m.
00 a.m.
p.m. p.m.
St. Paul 2:35p.m
Minneapolis. 3:05
Anoka 3:45
Elk River.... 4:07
Zimmerman. 4:25
Princeton 4:42
Brickton (f). 4:47
L. Siding (f). 4:51
Pease (f).... 5:01p.m
Milaca 5:20
Ogilvie 5:45
Mora 6:02
Brook Park. 6:25
Ar. Duluth.. 9:25
p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.
p.m. p.m. p.m p.m p.m
p.m
p.m.
(f) Stop on signal.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca... Foreston
Ar. St. Cloud
GOING EAST.
Le. St. Cloud I 4:00p.m.
Foreston 4-54 S
Ar.Milaca tMlm.
10:18 a. m.
10:23 a. m.
H:15a.m.
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING EASTTuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Le. Milaca. |10:45a.m
Princeton la-qn^
ElkRiver a-SS" S*
Ar- Anoka .V.:"..-| Jig}""
GOING WESTMonday, Wednesday and Fridav
Le. Anoka Mn-nnr\
ElkRiver... liStS*
Princeton l-ionm
^Milaca iig&m.
Train No. 7 leaves Elk River eoingwestat
9.18 p. m.. and train No. 8 leaves Elk River eo-e
mg east at 6:34 a. m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
ssssss^-^ss^^
GreenbushR. A. Ross ......Bock
tele HarborOtto A. Haggberg
Milaca-Ole E. Larson
Mllo-R. N. Atkinson /./.V. IKJS EX
PrincetonOtto Henschpi
Robbins-C. N. Archer
South Harbor-Chas. Freer
East Side-Geo. W. Freer
mnn.
1v2?to2norestoo
Vinelandav2'VY
61
3
2
Onamia-G. H. Carr Opstead
Page-August Anderson.'.C'.'.' pg{S
Neum^n^
RE0I
3.C. Borden.".'. -Foreston
Geo. E. McClure ....'.'.."".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.V'"' MUan
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinH. B. Fisk o_i
SaSg^WaS? Zimmerman
E
9 IRITC:E1'03iT
Brain and Produce Market.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern
Wheat, No. 2 Northern...
Corn 8
Oats [email protected]
Rye 45
Barley -58
Beans, hand picked.".".'.'".'.' A W
Hay(baled ^:-.:i(@i
PRICES OF THE
Piinceton Roller Mills and Elerator.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern 1
Wheat, No. 2 Northern S
Corn. i 'By
Oats-. ^(l
45
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack 7
Flour, (100percent)per sack...". *2re
Banner, per sack
Rye flour
Wholewheat (101b. sack)..'..""!.' *"i
Ground feed, per cwt i ?i
Coarse meal, per cwt.... }*?n
Middlings, per cwt i'ix
Shorts, per cwt
1 -z
Bran. Der cwt
All goods delivered free anywhere in Princeton
FRATERNAL -.-LODGE
NO. 92, A. & A. M.
x8!2uand4tii
gal
rcomm,lmcatio
Wednesday of each- month.
A DICKEY, W. M.
W. E. J. GRATZ, Sec'y.
PRINCETON-:- LODGE,
NO. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
ning at8 o'clock.
JOHN A. GBAHE*.K.
& S
LAHS
N
O M.
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall.
J. C. HBRDLISKA, Com.
N. M. NELSON, R.
Hebron Encampment.
No. 4=2,1.0. O.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th
Mondays8' at 8 o'clock p. ic.
M. O. SATJSSER, P.
p. W. SPAULDING, S. W.
Jos. CBAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO.208,I.O. O.F.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at7:S
clock. M.J.JAAX, N.Q
W. G. FREDRICK, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.,
No. 403 2h.ed*-
-%eular.JJ.
and 3r Saturdays
neetln:^0s
at Bricklo
l8
at80pM
i
S-S yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
nA F. F. REEM, V.C
CHAS. A. OAKES, Clerk.
C
CRAVENS & KALIHER, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a floments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty
Licensed Mid-wife,
Twenty-five years practice. Call or?
MRS. CATHERINE HAGAN,
Zimmerman, Sherburne County, Minn.
6'
if

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