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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, November 17, 1904, Image 2

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POISON IVY.
It May Be Known by Its Three Leaf
lets and White Berries.
Frequently a person is puzzle*! to
know whether a vine with which he
comes in contact is poison ivy or Vir
ginia creeper. The poison ivy has three
leaflets and white berries, while the
creeper has fn and purple berries.
The only way to prevent a bad case
of poisoning from the ivy is to begin
treatment as soon as the itching sen
sation becomes apparent. If the case
is allowed to continue until the pus
tules break the patient is pretty sure
to suffer for a week or more. A good
remedy is the extract of grindella,
which if used in time by rubbing on
the affected parts every five minutes
will give relief. Sugar of lead salve is
also a standard remedy.
If a person who has touched poison
ivy will wash the exposed part thor
oughly with soap as soon after as pos
sible poisoning can generally be pre
vented. The poisonous principle in the
ivy is a corrosne essential oil which
is \ery volatile. It is not necessary to
touch the ivy in order to be poisoned.
Passing near it may be sufficient, and
when i\y is burned the smoke is also
poisonous
Man} people are not at all sensitive
to poison ivy and can handle it without
fear, while to others a mere breath of
it is sufficient to cause troublesome
eruptions. Poison oak and poison ivy
are the same thing. The plant has a
peculiar way of changing its habit of
growth according to local conditions.
Pathfinder.
SUPERSTITIONS.
Things That Some People Imagine
Are Signs of Bad Lack.
Some people otherwise sensible will
draw back rather than walk under a
ladder. Even strongminded women
hesitate to show their contempt of this
superstition when they hear that it
prevents tne single from marrying for
that year and to the married it be
tokens death. The Dutch hold that it
was a sign that you would be hanged
because of the important part which a
ladder used formerly to play in the
last act of the law. A Scotch tradition
holds it lucky to wish when going un
der a ladder.
To miss the mouth in eating and drop
one's victuals is a sign of approaching
sickness. Every time one turns a loaf
upside down a ship is wrecked. On
this the Dutch say, "If a loaf lies topsy
turvy it is not good." Scott In "The
Tales of a Grandfather" says, "Never
turn a loaf in the presence of a Mon
teith." Hazlitt in his "English Prov
erbs" quotes, "Are there traitors at
the table that the loaf is turned the
wrong side upward?"
That ill fortune attended the spilling
of salt is an idea arising from the be
lief of the ancients that salt was In
corruptible. It was therefore made the
symbol of friendship, and if it fell cas
ually the ancients thought their friend
ship would not be of long duration. In
Leonardo da Vinci's "Last Supper" the
betrayer is represented in the act of
spilling salt
Traits of Apes.
It has been observed that if the tame
dog is taken back to the wild state he
loses his voice. These "sounding
voices" are produced in the animal's
throat in away similar to human lan
guage, but ai*e not "voices" proper nor
"languages" proper, and yet they are
full of psychological expression and re
veal the animal's psychic states. If we
tickle a chimpanzee in the armpit the
touch produces a grin on the face sim
ilar to that of a man under like cir
cumstances. He also emits laughter
like sounds. The same is the case with
the orang outang The gorilla knits
the brow when angry, just like men.
We often observe in apes a complete
change in the facial muscles when
something is going to happen, be it
agreeable or disagreeable. It Is so also
with the child. In apes there is evi
dently the same connection between
the facial muscles and vocal muscles
as in man.
How a County Got Its Name.
Prenchtown. in Antelope county,
Neb, recen ed its name from the num
ber of French settlers in the vicinity.
The county itself received its name
from a party of Platte county settlers.
They were chasing a band of Indian
cattle thieves across what is now An
telope county when they became so ex
hausted for lack of food that they
could not go farther. At this critical
time an antelope appeared in sight and
was shot, thus possibly saving the
lives of the hunters. One member of
this party was in the legislature that
named the territory, including the
scene of this incident, and the county
was named Antelope at his suggestion.
Nebraska State Journal.
His Convincing Manner.
"Do youawbelieve in the aw
theory of evolution, Miss Wisethat
we allawspring from apes, don't
you know?"
The beautiful girl hesitated. "I never
used to," she replied finally.
"Perhaps Iawcould convince you,"
he suggested.
"You have already," she answered.
New York Press.
Nothing to Retract.
Mrs. Counterhop (with an injured
air)-You told me before we were mar
ried that you were the highest salaried
clerk In the store. Mr. Counterhop
(equally Injured)So I am. I'm two
filches and a half higher than any oth
er? salaried clerk In the whole estab-'
ilshmentChicago Tribune.
A Mean Retort.
IJrs. NaggerPerhaps you recall It,
[was on a railroad train that we firstj
ctnet and Mr. NaggerYes, but If s'
|too late now for me to sue the compa
Byv for damages.Philadelphia Ledger.
LENGTHY SERMONS.
Vive or Six Hoars at a Stretch and
Divisions Up to "Eighty-sixthly."
No English congregation would have
listened to such sermons as used to be
popular in the Presbyterian churches
of Scotland. There is indeed a story
told of a dissenting preacher named
Lobb in the seventeenth century who,
when South went to hear him, "being
mounted up in the pulpit and naming
his text, made nothing of splitting it
up into twenty-six divisions, upon
which separately he very carefully un
dertook to expatiate in their order.
Thereupon the doctor rose up, and,
Jogging the friend who bore him com
pany, said, 'Let us go home and fetch
our gowns and slippers, for I find this
man will make night work of it.'"
But Mr. Lobb himself was humane
In the pulpit as compared to a certain
Mr. Thomas Boston, to whose sermons
Bir Archibald Geikie has drawn atten
tion in his "Scottish Reminiscences."
Mr. Thomas Boston, who wrrote
a book
called "Primitiae et Ultima," was min
ister of the gospel at Etirick. In a ser
mon on "Fear and Hope, Objects of
the Divine Complacency," from the
text Psalm cxlvii, 11, "The Lord tak
eth pleasure in them that fear him and
In those that hope in his mercy," Mr.
Boston, "after an Introduction in four
sections, deduced six doctrines, each
subdivided into from three to eight
heads, but the last doctrine required
another sermon which contained 'a
practical improvement of the whole,'
arranged under eighty-six heads. A
sermon on Matthew xi, 28, was subdi
vided into seventy-six heads.' On this
text, indeed, Mr. Boston preached four
such sermons.
It is more than doubtful whether any
brains or hearts south of the Tweed
could have stood the strain of such,
discourses. But a Scotch preacher,
not in the present degenerate age, has
been known to preach from five to six
hours at a stretch, and sometimes
when one preacher had finished his
sermon another would begin and there
would be a succession of preachers
delivering sermon upon sermon until
the unhappy congregations were kept
listening to "the word" for as many
as ten hours without a breakBishop
Willdon in the Nineteenth Century.
LOVE.
Love is kindly and deceitless.
Teats.
Love can sun the realms of night
Schiller.
Love's a thing that's never out of
season.Barry Cornwall.
They do not love that do not show
their love.Shakespeare.
He that shuts out love in turn shall
be shut out by love.Tennyson.
The greatest miracle of love is the
cure of coquetry.La Rochefoucauld.
Love is master of the wisest it is
only fools that defy him.Thackeray.
Love never dies of starvation, but
often of indigestion.Ninonde l'Enclos.
The magic of first love is the igno
rance that it can ever end.Beacons
field.
Man's love is of man's life a thing
apart 'tis woman's whole existence.
Byron.
It is impossible to love a second time
when wo have once really ceased to
love.La Rochefoucauld.
Everyday Swindlers.
"There it goes again," said the trol
ley conductor as he rang the bell to
let off a passenger who had only rid
den for a square.
"You'd be astonished," continued the
knight of the bell strap, "to know how
many people try to beat the trolley for
a free ride when they want to make a
call a square or two away from home.
"They hop on the car, wait till it has
started and then want to know if the
car doesn't go to some place which they
know it doesn't come within a mile of.
In this way they get their ride for
nothing and go on their way in the be
lief that they have fooled the conduc
tors'Philadelphia Press.
Discretion a Failure.
"I was at the husking bee one day.
Great fun."
"Find a red ear?"
"Yes." "Kiss the prettiest girl?"
"Nope. Didn't dare. All the pretty
girls were engaged to husky farmers."
"What did you do?"
"Kissed the homeliest girl."
"Did that give satisfaction?"
"Not a bit of it. Each of the husky
farmers felt that I had personally
snubbed his best girl." Cleveland
Plain Dealer.
More Likely to Get It.
NocashWonder where I can bor
row some money?
HarduppWhat do you want it for?
"Oh, I've got a sure thing in the fifth
face tomorrow."
"You don't want money you want
to borrow trouble."Cincinnati Trib
une.
Musical Taste.
"Say, pa!"
"Well, what?"
"Why does that man in the band
run the trombone down his throat?"
"I suppose it is because he has a
taste for music."Town Topics.
Interpreted.
"She told me," said the young man
who had consulted a fortune teller,
**that I was born to command."
"Well, well," exclaimed Henpeck,
"she means, then, that you will never
be married."
One-half of our life is spent in mak
ing experiments the other half in re
gretting them.Brown Book.
ftis better for a young man to blush
toast to turn pale.Cicero.
PROLATE SPHEROIDS.
Why Yon Can't Crush an* Egg
Lengthwise Between the Palms.
If the fingers of the two hands are
interlocked, and an egg taken length
wise between the palms, it will be
found impossible to crush it with the
greatest force that can be exerted. If,
however, the pressure is applied along
the short axis of the egg, it can be
crushed with ease.
This is directly due to the character
istic shape of the egg, which is known
as a prolate spheroid. It is clear that
when pressure is exerted on the two
ends the tendency is to bring them to
gether and cause the spheroid to be
come a perfect sphere. But the sphere
so produced would contain a larger
volume than the original spheroid
hence when the egg is compressed
lengthwise there is a tendency to in
crease its holding capacity and, as the
shell is air tight, to produce a vacuum
in its interior.
Thus the whole weight of the at
mospheresome fifteen pounds to the
square inchcomes into play to pre
vent the change of shape and supports
the egg against any attempt to crush
it Along the short axis, however, the
egg can easily be crushed, as the
tendency is here to diminish its ca
pacity, and the atmospheric pressure
does not come into play.
CAIN COLORED HAIR.
Yellow or Red I|eads or Beards Once
Looked Upon as Deformities.
Yellow or red hair was anciently in
England esteemed a deformity, and a
red beard was especially odious and
an infallible token of an evil disposi
tion. This foolish prejudice possibly
originated in an aversion to the red
haired Danish invaders.
The common tapestry representa
tions of Cain and Judas, to whom red
hair and beards were invariably al
lotted, probably for no better reason
than that the color was thought ugly,
intensified this feeling. The devil him
self was sometimes thus represented.
'Dryden, in a fit of spleen, described
his publisher, Jacob Tonson, "with two
left legs and Judas colored hair," and
in the same attack he speaks of him
as "freckled fair," where red is evi
dently meant.
Shakespeare's reference in the "Mer
ry Wives of Windsor" to "Cain col
ored" hair is in later copies "cane col-
ored," just as his "Abraham colored"
in the folio "Coriolanus" becomes "au-
burn," from which, indeed. It was
doubtless corrupted. Hall's "Satires"
speaks of
goodly, long*, thick, Abraham colored
beard.
Liverpool Mercury.
WASHING TALLIES.
The "Way They Kept Laundry Lists
In the Olden Days.
The washing tally, dating back to
the times of Charles I., was formed of
a piece of beech wood five and* a half
inches long, four and a half inches
wide and half an inch thick and cov
ered with linen at the back and sides.
In front the names of the different ar
ticles, such as "ruffes," "bandes,"
"cuffes," "bootehose," "pillowberes,"
"handkercher," "sockes," were printed
from copperplate and protected by a
sheet of horn.
The tally was divided into fifteen
squares, in each of which was a dial
numbered from 0 to 12 and a circular
brass indicator fastened by a small
central pin so as to revolve. Each of
these indicators was pierced near its
outer edge with a round hole, through
which one number of the dial was visi
ble. By this very simple method the
number of each article sent to the
wash was easily shown, so that an ac
curate account could be keptLondon
Standard.
An 111 Fated Expedition.
At Pointe Les Monts, in the gulf of
St. Lawrence, is a lighthouse the keep
er of which recently turned out of the
sand an old style sword bearing on Its
blade the date "1711." It is undoubted
ly a relic of the ill fated expedition of
Admiral Walker, who left England in
1711 with 11,000 men and a large fleet
to take Quebec and Montreal. When
he got off Seven islands he was over
taken by a dense fog and a "great storm
arose. He refused to take the advice
of a French pilot, and as a result the
British ships were dashed to pieces on
the rocks off Egg island, and next
spring 900 bodies were lying there.
Berlin and Noises.
Berlin is by far the quietest of the
world's big cities. No railway engine
driver may blow his whistle within its
bounds, and the driver of a road ve
hicle with squeaking or rattling wheels
la promptly apprehended and fined.
Street hawkers are forbidden to howl,
bawl, yell or emit other strange and
startling sounds, and pianos may be
played only during certain stated hours
of the day.
Sweet Revenge.
Aunt HannahHave you told any
one of your engagement to Mr. Sweet
ser? EdithNo. I haven't told a soul,
except Bessie Miller, who thought he
was going to ask her.Boston Tran
script.
Not Sick Dsy Since.
"Was taken severely sick with kid
ney trouble. I tried all sorts of medi
cines, none of which relieved me. One
day I saw an ad. of your Electric Bit
ters and determined to try that. Af
ter taking a few doses I felt relieved,
and soon thereafter was entirely cured,
and have not seen a sick day since.
Neighbors of mine have been cured of
rheumatism, neuralgia, liver and kid
ney troubles and general debility."
This is what B. F. Bass of Fremont,
N. C. writes. Only 50 cents, at C. A.
Jack's, druggist.
THE PBINCBTON UNION: THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1904.
mJSkM5l^*$h Si
*a
Come and see our beautiful Piano, given
away. Chance with 25c purchase.
Church Topics ats
4. 4. A. Sunday and Weekday
Announcements.
METHODIST.
Prof. Hill of Stillwater will occupy
the pulpit next Sunday morning and
evening.
On Sunday evening, November 20th,
Rev. Burns will preach at the Wheeler
school house at 8 o'clock. All are
invited to attend the service.
CONGREGATIONAL.
Topics next Sunday Morning,
"Thanksgiving:" There will be no
service in the evening as the Congre
gationalists will unite with the Meth
odists for evening service.
Sunday school at 11:45 a. m., and
prayer meeting every Thursday eve
ning in Circle room at parsonage.
LUTHERAN EMANUEL.
On next Sunday morning Rev. Frost
of Minneapolis will preach at the old
M. E. church in Princeton, and in
the evening at 7 o'clock he will preach
at the Berry school house.
SQUATTER HAS HIS KIGHTS.
State Supreme Court Passes Upon a Case
Involving Adverse Possesson.
The State supreme court in a decis
ion on an Olmsted county case, held
that a person who takes possession
of land in the belief that it is public
land, with the intention of claiming
it under the national homestead law,
may acquire title to it by adverse pos
session as aganst the true owner.
Andrew Burdetzke settled on a quar
ter section in Olmsted county fifteen
years ago in the belief that it was
public land. The land at that time
was the property of Thoeodore Mass
and L. L. Mathews, who did not as
sert their rights to it until Burdetzke
had occupied it for fifteen years. The
owners then sued to dispossess the oc
cupant and the trial court upheld his
title by adverse possession, and the
supreme court sustained him in it.
The syllabus, written by Chief Justice
Start, reads:
"Theodore Mass and L. L.
Mathews, appellants, vs. Andrew Bur
detzke, respondent.
"A person who takes possession of
land in the erroneous belief that it is
public land with the intention of hold
ing and claiming it under the federal
homestead law, may acquire title
thereto by adverse possession as
against the true owner. Order
affirmed."
Elk River Pioneer Dies.
Residents of Elk River will regret to
learn of the death of Adam Meek,
Sr., at his home in Bellingham,
Wash., October 26th. Mr. Meek lived
to the good age of eighty-four years,
six months and eighteen days. He is
survived by his wife, four sons and
four daughters, all of whom were with
him during his last illness excepting
Mrs. Alex Perry and Mrs. R. N. Bart
lett, both of Minneapolis. Mr. Meek
was well known in Elk River, having
lived here for many years.Elk River
Star-News.
Don't Know Any Better.
The fellow who stands on the street
corners or goes around talking about
his neighbors because they do not be
lieve politically as he does, hasn't
much standing in the community and
isn't worthy of much support or en
couragement from any body. We
have 'em in fact they are scattered
all over the world why? Nobody
knows.Stillwater Gazette.
wf^*^^^-i^^^^s^lSs^^iiSsas4ab%
Jackets
$12 Jackets will be $9i00
$9 Jackets will be Oil 5
$8 Jackets will be 6i00
$4 Jackets will be 3i00
Skirts
Ladies' Walking and Dress Skirts
at one-half price.
$9 Skirts for
$6 Skirts for
$2 Petticoats for
50 Infant's Knit Jackets, 75c
values, cut to
100 Misses' Fine Fancy Knit
Hoods, 75c values, cut to
Our stock of Men's, Ladies' and Children's Rub
bers and Overshoes is large and will sell at very low
prices to reduce stock.
Come and see our Men's Best Tailored Suits for
$10. If you can duplicate the same in the city we
will give you one free of charge.
Our Men's Pants are bargains. Each pair war
ranted and the prices must be the lowest.
Our Men's and Ladies' Fur Coats will be sold at
cost price, as we are overstocked.
Our Dress Goods department is the largest in the
city in up-to-date goods. Ask to see our 56-inch
Broadcloth and Venetian at 08
Mark'soreatBargain Store
Special Thanksgiving Offering of 25 per
cent Of from Our Lowest Prices
$4.50
2.98
.98
Some More Specials
.25
.39
Greaeach Bargai Store
FALL STOCK
ARRIVING.
Big line of Men's and
Boy's Ready-Made
Clothing. We can fit
all, both short and
tall, lean and fat.
Call and examine
stock.
and wagon makers.
Wagons and Buggies manufactured
and repaired.
Satisfaction also guaranteed in all other
lines of our business-
Shops next to Starch Factory,
Princeton, Minn.
1 PRINCETON
I Bottling Works
8 MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS
I Carbonated
Let the people get the habit of
drinking the
25 Ladies' Collaretts, $6.00 val-
Largest variety of Men's, Ladies' and
Children's Gloves, Mittens and Caps. Our
48c Cap-nothing to equal it in the city.
Look over our Blankets and Outing
Flannels.
All we ask of you is to look us over and
you will find that our prices are the lowest
in the city and customers receive courteous
treatment.
MARK'S
3**^^*WWWW%WWVW W wwwwwwwwwwww?
HARRY ENGLISH & CO.
THE
BIG STORE
FUMITURE.
Immense stock of
bedroom sets, chairs
rockers, tables, car
pets, rugs, mattres
ses and everything
to furnish your
home. A Pleased Customer
is our best Adver
tisement. Highest price paid
for farm produce.
I ZIMMERMAN, MINN.
FRANK PETERSON. N. M. NELSON.
PETiRSM & HEL50R,
Blacksmiths
PRINCETON POP
Order your supply from Prince
ton Bottling Works and you will
have the very best, such as Pear
and Champagne Cider, Root and
Birch Beer, Ginger Ale, Straw
berry, Lemon and Cream Soda,
etc. Everything that comes from
Princeton is good.
Princeton Bottling Works
E. H. WITTE, Prop.
A A
ues, cut to #Zi98
50 Reefers with Storm Collars, A A A
sizes up to 15, $5 values, cut to Zi98
50doz. Men's Heavy Overshirts,
75c values, while they last
O A
a 3 9
50 doz. Men's and Boys' Sweaters,
$1.00 values, cut to ,49
500 pair Men's, Ladies' and Children's
Shoes, $2.00 and $2.50 values,
will be closed out at $liUU
Men's Ulsters, all wool, $9.00
cut to DiUO
200 pairs Ladies' and Children's Stockings
at half price.
About 75 Infants' Cloaks will closed out
at less than manufacturers' prices.
tWAll our $15.00 Ladies' Tailored A
Suits cut to $ |aQ^
HATS, CAPS
and Gents'
Furnishings
of all kinds. The
latest spring styles
and novelties.
Berg's Store
Headquarters for
I Dry Goods
I Groceries
Boots and
Shoes
and full and com
plete stock of
General
Merchandise
All Fruits in their season
Your trade solicited.
John N. Berg,
Princeton, Minn.
Chamberlain's Stomach and Liver
Tablets are becoming a favorite for
stomach troubles and constipation.
For sale by Princeton Drug Co.
jiv
"Me

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