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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, November 17, 1904, Image 6

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CHARLES CLARK
It is not hard for two young people
of opposite sex to get acquainted when
each desires to entertain the other and
they have at least one well defined
taste in common. Albert did not talk
much, but adroitly induced Telly to do
most of it. In the hour they passed
together he discovered that two im
pulses were nearest her heartthe first
and strongest her devotion to Uncle
Terry, and after that a desire to paint.
I "I do not ever hope to do much," she
admitted rather pathetically. "I never
have taken lessons and maybe never
!shall. rther to let me go away, and all I can
do is to work blindly. I often sit for
hours trying to put things I see on can
vas, only to fail utterly and begin all
over again. I should not mind it if I
could see that I made any progress, but
I do not. I can't let It alone, though,
for the most happy hours I have are
when I'm painting."
"You certainly have perseverance,"
responded Albert encouragingly, "and
the pictures you have shown me seem
very lifelike. I wish I could do as
well. You have done good work for
one self taught as you are, and you
have no reason to be discouraged."
Then "Uncle Terry came in and an
nounced dinner. It was rather a state
affair for the Terry household, and the
table bore their best dinner service,
with a vase of flowers in the center.
"I hope ye feel hungry," said Uncle
Terry as he passed a well filled plate
to Albert, "fer we live plain, an' it's
good appetite as makes good vittles. I
s'pose ye are used to purty high livin'."
"Whatever tastes good is good," re
plied Albert, and, turning to Aunt Lis
sy, he added, "This fried lobster beats
anything I have tasted for a long
time."
When the meal was over he handed
the box of cigars he had brought to his
host with the remark, "Please accept
these, Mr. Terry, and when you smoke
them think of the forlorn fellow you
found by the wayside."
"I've got to leave ye to the tender
marcies of the wimmin folks," said Un
cle Terry, after thanking Albert, "for
I've got work to do, and tonight we'll
have a visit. I hope you'll be willin'
to stay with us a day or two," he added,
"an' tomorrow I'll take ye out fishin'."'
"I will stay until tomorrow, thank
you," replied Albert.
"I should like to row up to where I
was left boatless yesterday," he said
to Telly after Uncle Terry had gone,
"and finish the sketch I began and also
try to find the cushions I dropped in
the woods. May I ask you to go too?"
"I should be glad to if mother can
spare me," she answered.
When he rowed out of the little har-,
bor where he had left his boat Tellyi
sat in the stern holding the tiller ropes!
and shading her winsome face was the,
same broad sun hat he had seen on the
rock beside her the evening before. It
was a long four mile pull, but he was
unconscious of it, and when he helped
his companion out and secured the boat
he said: "Now, I am going to ask a
favor of you, Miss Terry. I want you
to stand in just the position I first saw
you and let me make a sketch of you.
You were leaning on a rock and resting
your head on one hand."
Telly looked puzzled.
"You did not know I saw you out on
the point last evening, did you?" he
added, smiling. "I stood and looked at
you for five minutes and then walked
away. I did not know who you were
then or that I should meet you later.
If J- had I would not have been BO
rude."
The color came to Telly's face at
his evident admiration, but she did not
say no to his proposal, and stood pa
tiently in the position he wished while
he. made the sketch. "There," he ex
claimed when it Avas finished, "I shall
transfer that to canvas when I go back,
and whenever I look at it I shall recall
this day andyou."
"Will you need the picture for that?"
she replied with a smile.
"That sounded like Alice," he said,
and added hastily, "Alice is my only
Bister, and I think more of her than of
any other woman living."
Telly sat on the boat's cushions in a
shady nook and watched Albert finish
sketch and then listened to his
talk. He told her all about his home
and sister and Frank as well. In a
way they exchanged a good deal of
personal history of interest to each
other. Then they gathered flowers, and
Telly insisted on decorating the boat
.When it was done she wanted him to
make a sketch of it for her. "Draw
yourself as holding the oars," she said,
"and I will try to paint a picture from
the sketch to remember you by," she
added with a smile.
Then, as the sun was getting low,
they started for home. The breeze had
,vanished and the sea was like glas.
,Only the long ground swells barely
lifted their boat and made the shad
lows of the trees along the shore wave
an, fantastic undulations. When they
reached the Cape Telly said: "You had
better go around to the cove where fa
ther Seeps his boats. It's nearer to
the house, and there is a float there
where you can pull your boat out"
She waited until he had done so, and
then stooped and selected a few of the
flowers with whfch they bad decked
the boat "I am going to paint them,"
Bhe said quietly as she turned and fol
lowed Albert up to the bouse.
Copyright, 1900. by LEE SSL SHETA'R'D
I would not think of asking fa-
Sler'
J.W.......-W ...*V.*.'-..U-.^J^J
Uncl Terry!^
CHAPTER XXIII.
NCLE TERRY and Albert had
just seated themselves on the
point that evening when Tel
ly came out with a thick gray
shawl and wrapped it around her fa
ther's shoulders. "It's a little chilly to
night," she said, "and I think you need
it." Then, turning to Albert, she
added, "Wouldn't you like one, too,to
Mr. Page?"
"I would, thank you," he answered,
"if you have another to spare."
He would have answered yes if she
bad asked him to put on woolen mit
tens. She returned to the house and
came back, this time bearing a white
zephyr wrap, and handed it to Albert
"I witl bid you good night now," she
said, "for I presume you will sit here
long after bedtime."
Uncle Terry's eyes followed her back
to the house, and then he turned to
his guest
"I s'pose ye'd rather be talkin' to
Telly than me out here in the moon
light" he said bluntly, "now that ye've
'got a little acquainted. It's the way
o''young folks."
"I've had a very pleasant visit with
your daughter this afternoon," re
sponded Albert "She was good enough
to go with me to where I got left yes
terday. I wanted to finish the sketch
I began there." Uncle Terry made no
answer, but sat puffing away at one
of the cigars Albert had given him.
"Mr. Page," said Uncle Terry at
last, "I've worried a good deal since
llast night 'bout what ye told me, an'
I've made up my mind to tell ye the
hull story an' trust,ye with what no
one else knows. To begin with, it's
nineteen years ago last March when
thar war a vessel got afoul o' a ledge
jest off'n the p'int here in a snowstorm,
an' all hands went downthat is, all
but a little yearlin' baby that cum
ashore tied up 'tween two feather
beds. I fished her out o' the surf, an'
liissy an' me has taken care on her
ever since, an' today she's worth a
thousand times more'n she cost. How
much she thinks b' me I'll let ye jedge
by the way she thought 'bout my
comfort tonight There was a few
trinkets came ashore with herpicture
o' her father an' mother, we knew, an'
a locket an' ring an' some other things
so we knowed her name an' whar
she cum from.
"Since then we have never heard a
word from no one regardin' her people,
loir whether any was livin', till last win
ter I cum across a notice in a paper
sayin' information was wanted 'bout
an heir to an estate in Sweden, an' tell
ln*facts that made me sure Telly was
the one wanted. The notice was signed
by that lawyer, Frye, that I asked ye
'bout, an' I went to see him. He want
Jed proofs an' all that an' I gave 'em
to him, an', wussen that, he wanted
money, an* I gave that to him. He's
kep askin' fer money ever since, an* I,
ike a fool, kep' sendin' it, in hopes if
Telly had anything comin' she'd git
dues. I've sent him the locket an'
"Draw yourself as holding the oars."
things that belonged to her, an' all
Fve got so far is letters askin' fer
more money an' tellin' 'bout expenses
an' evidence an' witnesses' fees an'
bonds to be filed. Lissy an' Telly
)know 'bout the case, but they don't
know how much money I've paid out,
an' I don't want they should. That's
the hull story, an' now as ye're a law
yer, an' I b'lieve an honest one, I ask
ye what's best to be done."
"I see now, Mr. Terry, why you dis
trust lawyers, and I do not wonder at
it. To the best of my belief, you have
been swindled in the most outrageous
manner by Frye. He no doubt is act
ing for some law firm who have in
structed him to find an heir, if there
Is one, to this estate, and they would
naturally advance all expense money.
I)o you know the vessel's name, where
Bhe sailed from and who her master
was?"
"She was a square rigger, an' the
master's name was Peterson. In the
newspaper piece the name was Neils
Peterson, who cum from Stockholm,"
answered Uncle Terry. "I've got it in
wallet now, an' on the locket was
letters E. P., an' on apiece o' paper
that was pinned to the baby's dress
was the name Etel!^ Peterson."
"And did you send these proofs to
Ssye?" asked Albert auick!?.
6 THE PBrarCETON UNION: THUBSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1904.
1
"I sent 'em six months ago," was the
reply, "an' I've jest 'bout made up my
mind I was a fool to 'a' done it, an' a
bigger one to kSep sendin' money."
"It would have been all right" an
swered Albert after a pause, "if you
had put them into an honest man's
hands. As it is you are lamein fact,
utterly at the mercy of Frye, who is
robbing you." Then, after thinking a
moment, he added: "I will gladly do
what I can to help you, Mr. Terry,
and at no cost to you for my own serv
ices. The first step must be to get
possession of these material proofs, the
next to find what firm has employed
Frye. We are helpless until we get
possession of those proofs."
"Ain't my word an' Lissy's as to
savin' the baby no 'count?" asked
Uncle Terry.
"Very good, so far as it goes, but
really no proof that the child you
saved is the one wanted for this in
heritance. In the matter of a legacy
the law is very exacting and demands
absolute proof. No, the only way is
use duplicity and trick Frye or ask
him to name his price and pay it, and
as the estate may be large his price
will naturally be extortionate."
Albert thought a moment and then
added, "Has Frye ever written you
admitting he has received or has those
proofs in his possession?"
"Not a word," answered Uncle Ter
ry. "All he writes is: 'Your case is
progressing favorably. I need so much
more money,' an' I send it an' lay
'wake nights worryin'."
"How long since he has sent for
money?" asked Albert
"'Bout a month, I reckon," replied
Uncle Terry.
"I confess, Mr. Terry, I am stump-
ed."
After a pause Albert asked Uncle
Terry:
"How does yourI mean, how does
Telly feel about this matter, Mr. Ter
ry, for I suppose she knows the story?"
That's suthin' I hate to talk 'bout,
but ag ye're likely to see more o' us
an' more o' Telly it's better ye know it
all. When she was 'bout ten we told
her the story an' showed her the
things we'd kep' locked up. She didn't
Beem to mind it then, but as she's grow
ed older it sorter shadders her life, as
It were. We used to ketch her lookin'
at the things once in awhile an' eryin'.
When I sent 'em to Boston she took on
a good deal an' ain't been the same
Bence. We try to keep her from think
In' 'bout it all we can, but she's curis
In her ways, an' I've thought she was
kinder 'shamed, an' mebbe broodin'
over it makes it wuss."
"You do not mean that you fear she
would make away with herself in a fit
of melancholy, do you?"
"I dunno what to think," was the an
swer, "only I hate to have her out o'
Bight much, an' the more lovin' she is
the more I worry."
"One thing please promise me," said
Albert when they had started for the
iouse, "do not hint either to her or
your wife that you have told me any
thing about this matter. I will do all
that can be done and consult only with
you in private."
CHAPTER XXIV.
N the morning Albert followed
Uncle Terry around the cir
cuit of his lobster traps in the
Gypsy's boat with Telly as a
companion, and watched the old man
hauling and rebaiting those elongated
coops and taking out his prizes. The
day was a perfect one, the sea just ruf
fled by a light breeze, and as her first
timidity had now worn away, he found
Telly a most charming companion. It
Was an entirely new experience to him,
fcnd the four hours' pull in and out of
the island coves and around isolated
ledges where Uncle Terry set his traps
passed all too quickly.
"Do you know," said Albert when
they had returned to the little cove
where Uncle Terry kept his boats and
as he sat watching him pick up his
morning's catch and toss them one by
one into a large car, "that the first man
who thought of eating a lobster must
have been almost starved? Of all crea
tures that grow in the sea there is
none more hideous, and only a hungry
savage could have thought them fit for
food."
"They ain't overhansum," replied
Uncle Terry, "but fried in pork fat
they go middin' good if ye're hungry."
That afternoon Telly invited Albert
to row her up to a cove, at the head of
which was a narrow valley where
blueberries grew In profusion. "I want
to pick a few," she said, "and you can
make a sketch of the cove while I do."
Helping her picking berries proved
more attractive, and when her pail
was full Albert made a picture of her
sitting in front of a pretty cluster of
small spruce trees, with the pail be
side her and her sun hat trimmed with
ferns.
"Your city friends will laugh at the
country girl you found down in Maine,"
she remarked as she looked at the
sketch, "but as they will never see me,
I don't care."
"My friends will never see it," he
answered quietly, "only my sister.
Afld I am going to bring her down
here next summer."
"Tell me about her," said Telly at
once. "Is she pretty?"
"I think so," replied Albert "She
has eyes like yours, only her hair is
not so light She is a petite little body
and has a mouth that makes one want
to kiss her."
"I should like to see her ever so
much," responded Telly, and then she
added rather sadly, "I've never had a
girl friend in my life. There are only
a few at the Cape of my age, and I
don't see much of them. I don't mind
it in the summer, for then I work on
my pictures, but in winter it is so lone
some. For days I do not see any one
except father and mother or old Mrs.
Leach."
"And who is Mrs. Leach?"
"Oi. aarrtS 8 DOOt Old SOUS WhO llVCS
^^^feaib&y&yj! l^^^^mMi^^^J^M. r'
alone and works on the fish racks.
She is worse off than I am."
It was a little glimpse into the girl's
life that interested Albert, and, in the
light of what he knew of her history, a
pathetic one. Truly she was alone in
the world, except for the two kindly
Bouls who made a home for her.
"You will go away tomorrow, I sup-
pose," she said with a faint tone of
regret as they were rowing home.
"Father said your boat was coming
after you today."
He looked at her a moment, while a
Blight smile showed beneath his mus
tache. "I suppose I shall have to," he
answered, "but I should like to stay
here a month. I've not made a sketch
Df your house, even."
"I wish you would," she said with
charming candor, "it is so lonesome
here, and then maybe you would show
me a little about painting."
"Could you endure my company
every day for a month?" he asked,
looking her full in the face.
"I don't believe you could endure
ours," she replied, dropping her eyes,
and then she added quickly: "There is
a prayer meeting tonight at the Cape.
Would you like to go?"
"Most certainly," he answered.
Albert had expected to see the Gypsy
In the harbor when they returned that
afternoon, but was happily disappoint
ed. "I hope they will stay at Bar Har
bor a week," he thought.
That evening when Telly appeared,
ready to be escorted to the prayer
meeting, he was certain that no fairer
girl was to be found anywhere.
She was dressed in simple white, her
masses of sunny hair half concealed by
a thin blue affair of loosely knitted
wool and had a cluster of wild roses at
her throat. It was a new and pleas
urable experience to be walking beside
a well dressed young man whose every
look and word bespoke enjoyment of
her society, and she showed it in her
simple, unaffected way.
That evening's gathering was a unique
one in Albert's experience and the re
ligious observances such as he never
forgot The place was a little square,
unpainted building, and when Telly
and he entered and seated themselves
on one of the wooden settees that stood
in rows not over a dozen people were
there. On a small platform in front
was a cottage organ and beside it a
small desk. A few more entered after
they did, and then a florid faced man
arose and, followed by a short and
stout young lady, walked forward to
the platform. The girl seated herself
at the organ, and the man, after turn
ing up the lamp on the organ, opened
the book of gospel hymns and said in
a nasal tone, "We will naow com
mence our sarviees by singin' the Forty
third Psalm, and all are requested to
rise an' jine." In the center of the
room hung a large lamp, and two more
on brackets at the side shed a weak
light on the gathering, but no one
seemed to feel it necessary to look for
the Forty-third selection.
Albert and Telly arose with the rest,
and the girl at the organ began to chase
the slow tune up and down the keys.
Then the red faced man started the
singing, a little below the key, and the
congregation followed. Telly's voice,
clear and distinct, joined with the rest.
A long prayer, full of baiting repeti
tions, by the man at the desk followed,
and then another hymn, and after that
came a painful pause. To Albert's
mind it was becoming serious, and he
began to wonder how it would end,
when there ensued one of the most
weird and yet pathetic prayers he had
ever listened to. It was uttered by an
old lady, tall, gaunt and white haired,
who arose from the end of a settee
Close to the wall and beneath one of
the smoke dimmed lamps. It could not
be classed as a prayer exactly, for
when she began her utterance she look
ed around as if to find sympathy in. the
assembled faces, and her deep set pierc
ing eyes seemed alight with intense
feeling. At first she grasped the back
of the settee in front with her long,
fleshless fingers, and then later clasped
and finally raised them above her up
turned face, while her body swayed
with the vehemence of her feelings.
Her garb, too, lent a pathos, for it was
naught but a faded calico dress that
hung from her attenuated frame like
the raiment of a scarecrow. It may
have been the shadowy room or the
mournful dirge of the nearby ocean
that added an uncanny touch to her
words and looks, but from the moment
she arose until her utterance ceased Al
bert was spellbound. So peculiar and
yet so pathetic was her prayer it shall
be quoted in full:
"O Lord, I come to thee, knowin'
I'm as a worm that crawls on the
airth like the dust blown by the
winds, the empty shell on the shore,
or the leaves that fall on the ground.
I come poor an' humble. I come hun
gry an' thirsty, like even the lowliest
o' the airth. I come an' kneel at thy
feet believin' that I, a poor worm o'
the dust, will still have thy love an'
perfection. I'm old an' weary o' wait
in'. I'm humble an' bereft o' kin. I'm
sad an' none to comfort me. I eat the
crust o' poverty an' drink the cup o'
humility. My pertector an' my staff
have bin taken from me, an' yet fer
all these burdens thou in thy infinite
wisdom hev seen fit to lay on me I
thank thee. Thou hast led my feet
among thorns an' stuns, an' yet I
thank thee. Thou hast laid the cross
o' sorrow on my heart an' the burden
o' many infirmities fer me to bear, an'
yet I bless thee, yea, verily shall my
voice be lifted to glorify an' praise
thee day an' night, for hast thou not
promised me that all who are believers'
in thy word shall be saved? Hast thou
not sent thy Son to die on the cross fer
my sake, poor an' humble as I am? An'
fer this, an' fer all thy infinite marcy
an' goodness to me, I praise an' thank
thee tonight, knowin' that not a spar
rer falls, without thy knowin' it, an'
that even the hairs o' our heads are
numbered.
"I thank thee. O Lord, fer the sun-
"r"^' J3i
PETER HOECEB
Merchant
Tailor &
35 years in the business
NEW
Fall and Winter
STYLES
Just received and now ready for
inspection. They include all the
latest patterns for suits and
overcoats, and you are invited
to call and look them over.
Just as good stock as any city
tailor carries and prices lower.
All kinds of cleaning
and pressing attended
to promptly.
SPECIAL, ATTENTION given to
cleaning and pressing lames suits.
Over Sjoblom & Olson's Saloon,
Main Street.
PRINCETON, MINN.
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
PRINCETON, MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
life. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment, Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Only non-contagious diseases admitted.
Charges reasonable.
Trained Nurses furnished for sickness
in private families.
Staff of Physicians and Surgeons,
H. COONEY, M. D.
Chief of Staff.
N. K. WHITTEMORE, M. D., H. BACON, M. D.,
R. B. HIXSON, M. D., G. ROSS CALET, M. D.,
D. K. CALDWELL. M. D., A. G. ALDRICH. M. D.
MISS EMMA NORDSTROM, Supt.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
pvR. D. A. McRAE DENTIST
Office Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON, MINN
Q.ROSS
CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SVBGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drug Store
Tel.Rural, 36.
Princeton, Minn.
ISS HATTIE TEMPLE,
EXPERIENCED NUBSE.
Tearm reasonaDie. Residence in Mrs. Soule's
house, south of Northwestern hospital,
Princeton, Minn.
JLVERO MCMILLAN
LAWYER.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
J.A.
ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
M. KALIHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH BOOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A SMITH,
Dealer in
FRESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Telephone 51.
Princeton, Minn.
A. ROSS,
FUNEBAL DIBECTOB.
Will take full charge of dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer In Monuments of all kinds.
E A. Ross, Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
R.
E. LYNCH,
RELIABLE WELL DBILLEB.
Twenty years in the well business. Can give
perfect satisfaction. If you want a good well
call on or address R. W. LYNCH,
Zimmerman, Minn.
Smoke
Princeton-Made
A
Cigars and
Stogies.
"Princeton Stock," and "Little Pet," are
good smokes for 5 cents.
"Princeton Banner," a club house size
10 cent cigar, full Havana filler and Sumatra
wrapper.
Pittsburg and Wleelinj stogies.
JULIUS 5UGARMAN,
Princeton, [Minn.
Ohio
RP
Great Northern Railway. 1
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND DULUTH.
GOING SOUTH.
GOING NORTH.
Leave
Duluth 6:30
Brook Park.. 9:
Mora 9:35
Ogilvie 9:48
Milaca 10:20
Pease (f).... 10:30
L. Siding (f) .10:40
Brickton (f).10
Princeton ...10
Zimmerman. 11:
Elk River.... 11:
Anoka 12
Minneapolis. 12.40
Ar. St. Paul. 1:05
a.m.
(f) Stop on signal.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca
Foreston
Ar. St. Cloud
Le. St. Cloud
Foreston Ar, Milaca.
JOHN A GRAHBK, K. R. & S.
IPMaccabe.reeChall.t
I
Leave.
15 a.m. a.m.
a.m. a.m.
a.m. a.m.
45 a.m.
55 a m.
10 a.m.
35 a.m.
00 a.m.
p.m. p.m.
St. Paul i,:35
Minneapolis. 3
Anoka Elk River
Zimmerman. 4
Princeton 4
Brickton (f)
L. Siding (f)
Pease (f)...
Milaca Ogilvie Mora 6
Brook Park. 6
Ar. Duluth.. 9
p.m
:05 p.m.
:45 p.m.
:07 p.m.
25 p.m.
42 p.m.
:47 p.m.
:51 p.m.
:01 p.m
:20 p.m
:4h p.m
.02 p.m
25 p.m
.25 p.m.
18 a. m.
23 a. m.
15 a. m.
GOING EAST.
GOING EAST-Tuesday, Thursday
Le. Milaca
00 p.m.
54 p.m.
00 p.m.
WAY FREIGHT.
andlO-dSa Saturday.m i
Princeton 12:30n"m
Elk River alls^S"
Anok a JlggS
GOING WESTMonday, Wednesday and Friday.
A^S
1 110:00a.m.
ElkRiver ll:35a.in
Princeton lMn
Ar- Milaca I:ggS:
Tram No. 7 leaves Elk River going west at
9.IB p. m.. and tram No. 8 leaves Elk River
goe
ing east at 6.34 a. m.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookO. E. Gustafson.. Prinet./Mi
Borgholm-J. Heron..... ....'.V ..j22
Oreenbush-R. A. Eoss Princeton
Hayland-AlfreaF.Johnson MilaSa
Isle Harbor-Otto A. Haggberg isle
Milaca-Ole E. Larson.. ^j^f
Milo-R. N. Atkinson ForestoS
Princeton-Otto Henschel \.PnncetoS
Robbins-C. N. Archer Vineland
South Harbor-Chas. Freer...
East Side-Geo. W. Freer bnstead
Onamia-G. H. Carr ........Onamia
PageAugust Anderson.. Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
ftS"1"1
r!S^rJ-
Foreston
rPO WM5?T, Princeton
Geo. E. McClure Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinH. B. Fisk Princeton
BlueHill-Chas. D. Kaliher\\\"..i .iPrfSotton
Spencer Brook-G O. Smith. SpencerBrook
Wyanetfr-Ole Peterson.. ...[.f"w52tt
Livoma-Chas. E. Sawnson
w-Groundrey. 7 TTsSSKSnZimmerma
Dalbo-Andrew Peterson ..Dalbo
Grain and Produce Market.
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern $i OR
What, (new) No 2 Northern '}D
Corn(old)
(new)
Oats
Rye Beans (hand picked) 7"."."."."
POTATOES
RoseJ Burbanks Triumphs 7
10
35 73
1 50
[email protected]
23 25
Princeton Roller Mills ana Etator,
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern si.08
wheat, (new) No. 2 Northern i .05
Corn(old) .....x.w
Corn (new)
Oats
35
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack 05
Flour, (100percent)per sack s.U
Banner, per sack i?c
Ryeflour. .77..." 245
Whole wheat (10 lb. sack) "35
Ground feed, per cwt l'os
Coarse meal, per cwt I'OS
Middlings, per cwt 1*05
Shorts, per cwt on
Bran,percwt 75
All goods delivered fre"e anywhere in Princeton
FRATERNAL LODGE
N O. 92, A. & A. M.
Regnlur communications, 2d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
C. A. DICKEY, W. M.
W. E. J. GKATZ, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday
oing at 8 o'clock.
J- LARSON, C. C.
O. M.
Tnt No. 17.
Regula meetings every Thurs
day evening a 8 o'clock, in the
HERDLISKA, Com.
N. M. NELSON. R.
Hebron Encampment.
No. 42,1.0.O.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Monday*
at 8 o'clock p. M.
M. O. SAT7SSER. C. P.
p. W. SPAUIJHNG, S. W.
JOS. CRAIG. Scribe.
.PRINCETON LODGE
NO.208,I.O. O.F.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7:80
E. E. WHITNEY, N. G.
ROBERT KING, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.
No. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
eacn month, at 8:00 r. M., In the ball at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially invited.
P. F. REEM, V.
CHAS. A. OAKKS, Clerk.
CRAVENS & KALIHER, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a iloments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty
Licensed Mid-wife.
Twenty-five years practice. Call "or
write
MRS. CATHERINE HAGAN,
Zimmerman, Sherburne County, Minn 4

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