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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 05, 1905, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1905-01-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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State News.
M.
Mankato dedciated its new
C. A. building Monday.
The storm at Sherburn last week
was the worst known in twenty years.
Armeen J. Boen died of aconite
poisoning at Albert Lea. His wife is
^suspected.
Duluth public school opened on
Monday regardless of New Year's
celebration.
K. T. Quale, a merchant of Pelican
Rapids, was found dead in bed from
heart failure.
Gunder Gunderson, a farmer at Bat
tle Lake dropped dead while walking
with a neighbor.
Edward Lanctot, of Crookston, aged
seventy-four, is dead of old age. He
was the oldest resident in the valley.
The body of Anna Olson was found
in a snow drift a mile east of Monte
video after Tuesday's storm of last
week.
The Commercial hotel at Long
Prairie was completely destroyed by
fire on Wednesday of last week. Loss
$7,000 insurance, $3,200.
reserve by the various lumber com
panies, which are removing ninety-five
per cent of the pine on the reserve,
under the provisions of the Morris
law.
The body of an unidentified man
was found on the Northern Pacific
track at Freeman station. Both legs
and one arm were cut off and the face
was crushed.
At a special meeting of the inde
pendent school district of Appleton it
was voted almost unanimously to is
sue bonds for $13,000 for the erection
of a brick school house.
The Pioneer hotel, one of the oldest
structures in Pine City, was destroyed
by fire last week $4,500 insurance
was carried on the building and the
contents were insured for $1,500.
The village of McKinley was visited
by a fire that burned the saloon of
Herman Milbrook, value $3,000, the
clothing store of Lippman Bros.,
value $3,500, and a candy store.
Eugene S. Bruce, lumberman and
inspector for the bureau of forestry,
Washington was at Cass Lake last
week looking over the work being
done on the Minnesota national forest
Jacob Wise, last Thursday night at
the Merchants' hotel in Bemidji stab
bed John Suckert four times in the
breast. The men are farmers and
were said to be intoxicated. Suckert
will recover.
Judge Grindeland has decided the
Moreau and Hanson contest case for
the office of county treasurer of Red
Lake county in favor of Hanson
(Dem). The recount gives Hanson
twenty-seven majority.
Louis Erickson, aged twenty, was
accidentally shot and killed by his
younger brother while out hunting
rabbits near Rock Creek. The
younger boy was walking behind
Louis and carried an old shotgun at
half-cock.
After a trial lasting ten days the
jury at Albert Lea agreed upon a ver
dict of $8,478 for the plaintiff in the
case*of W. H. Neibuhr against W. F.
Gage. A stay of forty days was taken
by the defendant and a new trial will
be asked for.
Anton Horsak. pricipal witness for
the Koch defense and the man whocase
saw the murderer mount the stairs
leading to Dr. L. A. Gebhard's office
a few minutes before the dentist was
murdered, has been poisoned by sau
sages, but not fatally. The poison
ing is another mystery to the myste
rious murder.
A verdict of murder in the first
degree was returned against Joseph
Guilmette of Crookston, atfer the jury
had been out two hours. Guilmette
was convicted of killing Joseph Mon
geon, Oct. 17 last, on the track near
Mentor, and dragging the body into
the woods. The two were companions.
The defense attempted to establish an
alibi. It was the most celebrated
murder trial ever held in Northern
Minnesota and lasted eight days.
At a special meeting of the State
board of pardons at the new State
capitol last week, Nathaniel W. King,
former city detective of Minneapolis,
was given a full pardon. King im
mediately left for Cleveland, Ohio,
where a position in the secret service
of the Erie railroad awaits him. It
-is understood that the place was se
cured for the old detective through
the good offices of F. W. Underwood,
president of the Erie, who is a former
Minneapolis man.
John McKusick, a farmer who lives
seven miles west of Bemidji tells an
exciting experience with a bull moose.
The huge beast entered his yard, tore
down the fence, broke the clothes line
and created havoc generally, leaving
just in time to escape the bullet of a
rifle which the homesteader had bor
rowed from a neighbor. The moose
did not seem in the least timid, but
acted as if he was monarch of all he
surveyed, and in fact the result of hismedicine
visit was proof of this, as after his
departure Mr. McKusick made an in
ry$ ventory of what had escaped the anger
of the beast and found that he was shy
just half a bushel of rutabagas, a
fence, a clothes line upon which hung
numerous articles of wearing apparel,
besides other smaller articles which
had been destroyed.
Silas O. Lum, an old resident of
Minneapolis, died in that city last
week. He was born in Jefferson
county, New York, in 1829, and at
the age of twenty-one, with other
young men at the of his neighbor
hood, went to California, the gold
fever being then at its height. From
there he went to supposedly better
fields in Australia, returning home in
1854. In that year he came to Minne
sota, traveling by boat and stage, and
took a pre-emption the land around
Minneapolis being thought doubtful
on account of Indian rights. The
land office was at Stillwater, and with
other settlers he was obliged to walk
across to make his filing. When
Anoka county was organized he be
came a member of its first board of
commissioners and resided at Anoka
until 1866, when he moved to ^Minne
apolis.
A Remarkable Wedding:.
A Sb. Cloud correspondent says
under date of Dec. 28th: A rather
remarkable wedding was celebrated
at the cathedral in St. Cloud to-day.
Miss Mary B. Gans was married to
J. Leslie Morton a northern Pacific
passenger conductor, Rev. Peter Gans.
a brother of the bride, assisted by
Rev. Dr. Leo P. Gans, also a brother
of the bride performed the ceremony.
Miss Gans was attended by Miss
Anna Gans, her sister, and Miss
Catherine Morton, sister of the
groom, while the groom was attended
by Dr. E. M. Gans and Norbert Gans,
brothers of the bride. Hubert Gans,
Nestor Gans and Prof. John Gans,
all brothers of the bride, were the
ushers.
At the wedding breakfast that fol
lowed at the Gans homestead at Waite
Park the entire family sab down.
There were Mr. and Mrs. Mathias
Gans, the father and mother, who are
among the oldest settlers in Stearns
county, and eleven boys and the two
girls of the family. There have been
thirteen children born to the couple
and all are a live and well. Mr. Gans,
the father, is well along in years and
was seriously ill a short time ago.
His life was despaired of. but he re
covered.
A Bath Nearly Killed Him
Hank Brown, a prisoner in the
county jail atOwatonna, is recovering
from the effects of a bath which al
most caused his death.
Brown has been a character about
local salopns and lived a rough life.
He was arrested for stealing grain
from his employer, and when he ar
rived at the jail Sheriff Misgen in
sisted that he take a bath. Brown
pleaded on his knees to be excused
from the awful ordeal, but his entrea
ties were not considered, and he was
given a good warm bath.
Soon after he came out of the tub he
was taken violently ill. Perspiration
flowed from every pore in his body in
great drops, and he became delirious.
The county physician was summoned
and Brown has been under his care
since. It is believed that he will sur
vive the effects of the bath, whieh was,
to all evidences, his first in a long
period.
Chronic Catarrh Cured.
Your druggist absolutely guaran
tees Bunsens Catarrh Cure to cure any
of catarrh and he will refund
your money where it fails to cure any
case of chronic catarrh, no matter of
how long standing. One application
gives ease and rest. Bunsens Catarrh
Cure contains no narcotic and is theing
only catarrh cure sold on a positive
guarantee. Bunsen's Catarrh Cure,
no cureno pay. Price 50 cent. For
sale by C. A. Jack.
Consumption*!* Roll of Honor.
Dr. John Huber, writing on the
history of consumption in the Medical
Record, mentions the following more
or less gveat persons AVIIO have died us
its \k'ims. a ie lia^hkirisoff. X.nie
Bk-li.il. II Bmmor. Fncninch Cho
pin. Steph en Cran e. .lohu God.n.iu.
John Paul Jones, .loliu Keats. Dr ltene
T. Laennno. Siduej Lanier, .)u!e=s
Bastion Lepage. Lthell.eit Newii. ilcu
ry Tun-ell Elizabe th Felix It ache],
Frjediich Schiller, John Sterling. Lau
rence Sterne, Itobevt Louis Sttnon ou.
Henry Timro u. Carl Maria \on We\,er,
Artemus Ward. Henry Kirk White and
Barneli Spmoz a.
Reeipe Wanted.
Young Mrs. A iuton looked over the
fence that separates her hack yard
from Mrs. Hardy's, and her pretty face
was troubled, says the Chicago News.
"Mrs. Hardy:" she called softly.
"Yes. What is it?" and Mrs. Hardy's
matronly figiu-c appeared in her kitch
en door.
"I'm so sorry to trouble you," Mrs.
Vinton went on, "but will you tell me
some good way to ^ook clay pigeons?
Jimmy has just sent me word that he
is going out to shoot some. He's
bound to bring a lot home, and I
haven't the remotest idea how to pre
pare them."
Greatly in Demand.
Nothing is more in demand than a
which meets modern require
ments for a blood and system cleanser,
such as Dr. King's New Life Pills.
They are just what you need to cure
stomach and liver troubles. Try
them. At C. A. Jack's drug store,
25 cents, guaranteed.
tfna&te i?i^^lJji^l^i^*ifel^gfe^fe&^
BOX OFFICE TRICKS.
THE BERTH OF A THEATER TICKET
SELLER IS NOT A SINECURE.
Why the Man Who Sit* Behind the
Wicket Must a Good Judge of
Hunan NatureThe Art of "Dress-
ing:" a Light House.
To the average theater goer the man
who sits behind the wicket in the box
office and sells tickets seems to have
one of the sinecures of earth. True, he
has to answer many fool questions and
deal with many fool persons who are
often ugly because others with more
foresight lune picked up early all the
good seats. He has to handle diplo
matically the woman who -wants dollar
seats for 7o cents and with the other
fellow who wants "first row, center,"
after the play has begun and that has
been sold for a week ahead. But all
these things seem but his share of the
minor ills of earth. Outside of them
apparently his job is what is generally
known as a "snap."
But the mau in the box office has
other things to do besides sell tickets.
True, that is where he comes in con
tact with the general public, and that
is all that is usually thought about his
duties. But at the same time he is
serving the public he is working for
two masters behind the scenes, the
proprietor of the house and the mana
ger of the attraction, and he must
serve them equally, while their inter
ests sometimes conflict sharply. Fur
thermore, he must serve them as
against the public if need there be, and
it keeps him hustling to hold his job
to do it too.
The man behind the wicket is a good
man if he can make you buy a seat
that costs you more than you intended
to invest to see that particular "show"
all attractions in a playhouse are
"shows" in the parlance, be they opera,
comedy or vaudeville. Now, most men
think they know what they are going
to get when they visit a theater, and
they especially have the price fixed in
their minds. Perhaps, psychologically
speaking, they are stronger minded
than the house treasurer. Then they
do get what they want, and he never
questions it. But the average man is
not. The treasurer is trained in ticket
selling. It is his daily routine, while
it is an occasional act on the man's
part. Hence he is fortified for the pub
lic, and the latter is not for him, and
so when the people step up, especially
if it is rather late and there is some
thing of a rush, a clever ticket man
can easily get the extra price out of
them for a higher selling seat.
How does he do it? Largely by the
power of suggestion. He implies that
you want it, for instance, when you go
up. In other words, he puts the ques
tion as to what priced seat by asking
you about the higher ones before he
mentions the lower ones, and when he
does refer to the latter, at your sugges
tion, he does it rather apologetically.
He has the higher rate tickets in his
hand, and if you do not take them he
reaches to the rack for the others, and
all the time the line is waiting, those
back of you are scowling, if not mak-*
ing remarks, and every one within ear
shot of the window knows that you
have refused the higher seats for the
lower priced ones. This is embarrass
ing. Especially is it so if a girl is with
you, waiting just outside the rail that
separates the mob from the line, and
the chances are 10 to 1 that you will
take the cue, involuntarily, and pay a
quarter more, when you had no inten
tion of doing so when you approached
the clever man in the box.
That Is one way. It doesn't require
any falsehood. It does require a good
knowledge of human nature. Some men
wouldn't "stand for" that. They would
be offended, and it might hurt the
house. That Is for the treasurer to
beware. He must "size up" his cus
tomers and act accordingly.
There is a great gain in time in sell
without a chart A man will then
step up and ask for a "good seat"
about a certain place. Running
through his lists, the seller finds him
something very near there, and he is
satisfied. That one man is finished in
a few seconds. It would take minutes
if the sheets were there. Time is im
portant when the orchestra is playing
and the curtain about to go up.
Still further, the absence of a chart
enables the seller to "dress" his house,
provided the sale is light, and to keep
out "singles" if it is heavy. "Singles"
are seats left alone when the adjoining
pairs have been selected from a chart.
"Singles" are hard to sell because very
few persons attend a theater alone. Al
most all seats are sold in pairs. A
treasurer with a bunch of "singles" on
his hands, even with a house threaten
ing to sell out, is "up against it," for
often he will lose sales that would
have meant capacity but for the fact
that he cannot place a couple in ad
joining seats, though he may have sev
eral odd ones left.
"Dressing" a house is the avoidance
of this condition in one sense, but it
applies to light houses generally. When
a show is not doing well it is up to the
box office to make the house look full
even though it be only partly solid.
He does this by scattering the crowd.
Instead of selling a section solid and
leaving adjoining sections vacant he
sells a few here, a few there, and thus
the empty spaces are not concentrated.
Men usually dress a house from the
center out. They will sell a good part
of the center section, scattering, and
then will work out on the left and
jright. This is because seats on the ex
treme edge of the house are not so
good, and people expect them to be va
cant except in a heavy house anyhow
and do not notice them so soon! He
knows his house like a book, and he
knows early in the day whether or not
he will have a crowd. Hence he acts
accordingly.Kansas City Journal.
THE PEIKCBTON TTNtON: TBJjmDAY7 JANTJARY 5, 1905.
MMJP
IPREYER'S PREDICAMENT.
A Ludicrous Incident I the Life of
i |the Famous Painter. :M $
John W. Preyer, the famous painter
of still life, was a remarkably small
specimen of the genus homo, differing,
however, from ordinary dwarfs in the
symmetry and exact proportion of all
the parts of his diminutive frame.
When between twenty and thirty
years of age his fresh, ruddy and
beardless face and the shrill and boy
ish tone of his voice caused people to
take him for a child of about eight at
the ms,t This illusion was stil fur
ther heightened by his dress, a short
black \el\et jacket Avith a large turn
down collar, over which his smoothly
parted hair hung in thick clusters.
When about this age Preyer paid a
visit tv Munich in order to inspect the
art treasures in that city and also to
visit his oltl patron. Master Cornelius,
a former president of the Dusseldorl
academy. When Preyer called at the
house of the latter he had gone out.
and the sen ant who had answered the
door ran to tell her mistress that a lit
tle bo.\ A\aH waiting outide to see the
mastei The lady went to speak to the
visitor
"What is it you want, my child?" she
asked 1he pa.uter, who at the approach
of the lady took oft' his A elvet cap and
made a deep bow, saying in a shrill
voice:
"I Avjsh to speak to Mr. Cornelius."
"He is not at home at present, but if
you AVIII step inside you can wait for
him. lie will not be long."
So saying, she took the little fellow
into the parlor and ottered him a stool
to sit on. In a short time the fair
hostess became quite charmed Avith
her youthful visitor, and at last she
lifted him on her lap and listened with
intense delight to the innocent prattle
of the clever "child." Suddenly the
door opened, and Cornelius himself ap
peared Taking in the situation at a
glance, he cried:
"Ah, good morning, Mr. Preyer.
HOAV on earth did you get here?"
"Mr. Preyer!" And Avith a shriek
Mrs. Cornelius jumped up, tumbled
Preyer on the floor and fled into the
next room, while Cornelius and Preyer,
after the latter had picked himself up
again, laughed till the tears streamed
down their cheeks. The former had
some difficulty in getting his wife to
come back again. At last she muster
ed sufficient courage to allow herself
to be formally introduced to the
strange visitor, Avho Avas retained as a
guest to dinner, over Avhich the amia
ble hostess presently regained her for
mer self possession.
Mistakes I Stamps.
By a simple error in the printing of a
set of stamps the value is enormously
increased to collectors. A short time
ago a Dutch stamp was printed yellow
instead of blue. A Aveek later these
stamps were sold at a great premium.
A New Zealand stamp some years ago
was printed upside down, and it is now
worth a large sum. Among English
stamps the old red penny, with the
plate No. 235, is valued by collectors,
and the small pink halfpenny, with
plate No. 9, is not worth less than $20.
It Is said that the plate of the latter
was 'broken soon after it came into use
and was never replaced hence the
value of the few stamps printed from
it. It is always a question with ama
teurs whether to buy their stamps used
or unused. But it is safe on a great
occasion, such as a jubilee or exposi
tion year, to buy them with the post
mark.
To Work is Honorable.
There has existed and still exists to
some extent a false sentiment that la
bor is degrading or belittling. The con
trary is true. An ideal condition of so
ciety can come only when every mem
ber of it recognizes that he is bound to
exreise whatever skill or strength or
faculty he possesses to its full capac
ity not selfishly or for the sake of gain
merely, but for his own happiness and
development and for the benefit of all.
And there should be no restriction on
any one, either legal or social or
through association, in regard to his
labor or its fruits. If by patient appli
cation or natural endowment a man
possesses more skill than his fellow or
if he chooses to be more industrious he
is entitled to the full benefit of it
Cincinnati Enquirer.
A Wonderful Memory.
Some years ago there was a strolling
player at Edinburgh of the name of
William Lyon, who had a most aston
ishing memory. He one evening made
a bet of a bowl of punch that he would
at the rehearsal next morning repeat
the whole of the Daily Advertiser from
beginning to end. Being called on the
next day, he handed the newspaper to
a gentleman present to see that he re
peated every Avord correctly. This task
he accomplished without making the
slightest error, through all the varieties
of advertisements, price of stocks, acci
dents, etc.
Nothing: Doing:.
"Dear," said the poet's wife, notic
ing his abstracted look, "you are wor
ried about something."
"Weller yes," replied the poet.
"Tell me. What have you on your
mind?"
"Nothing. That's what worries me."
Exchange.
Prediction Fulflled.
Farmer WThiffietreeBilli
Perkins' son
Dan has got a political job. Farmer
MedtlersGosh. I alters said that feller
'd grow up ter be a loafer!Puck.
Helping: the Cook.
Boarding MistressWhat are those
boarders grumbling about now? Serv
antThey're roasting the beef.New
York Press.
Sin has many tools, but a lie Is the
handle which Pts tliein all.Holmes
i^mMei KCC, ,-A^.4 fi^-&% iditSik
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
PRINCETON. MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
Hie. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment. Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Only non-contagious diseases admitted
Charges reasonable.
Trained Nurses furnished for sickness
in private families.
Staff of Physicians and Surgeons,
H. C. COONEY, M. D.
Chief of Staff.
N. K. WHITTEMORE, M. D., H. BACON, M. D.
R. B. HIXSON, M. D., G. ROSS CALEY, M.D.,
D. K. CALDWELL. M. D., A. G. ALDBICH. M. D.
MISS EMMA NORDSTROM, Supt.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
R. D. A. McRAE DENTIST
Office in Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON,
ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore
Tel.Rural, 36.
Princeton, Minn.
ISS HATTIE TEMPLE,
EXPERIENCED NUBSE.
Tearm reasonaDie. Residence in Mrs. Soule's
house, south of Northwestern hospital,
Princeton, Minn.
JLVERO MCMILLAN,
LAWYER.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
A ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office In Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
KALIHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A C. SMITH,
Dealer in
FRESH AND SALT MEATS,
Lard, Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Telephone 51.
Princeton, Minn
A. ROSS,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR.
Will take full charge of dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer In Monuments of all kinds.
E A. Ross, Princeton. Minn. Telephone No. 30.
R.
E. LYNCH,
RELIABLE WELL DRILLER.
Twenty years in the well business. Can give
perfect satisfaction. If you want a good well
callon or address R. LTBC H,
Zimmerman, *'Minn.
The Rural
Telephone Co.
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE.
Lines to Dalbo, Cambridge, Santi
ago and Qlendorado.
^P~ Good Service in Princeton and to all
adjoining points.
Patronize a Home Concern.
Service Day and Night.
FRANK PETERSON. N, M. NELSON.
PETERSON & KELSO!,
Blacksmiths
and wagon makers.
Wagons and Buggies manufactured
and repaired.
Satisfaction also guaranteed in all other
lines of our business.
Shops next to Starch Factory,
Princeton, Minn.
A Voting Contest
Given by the enterprising mer
chants of Princeton by which a
$400
Wesley Piano
Will be given away absolutely
FREE
to the organization or lady voted the
most popular by Jan. 30,1905. The fol
lowing merchants Issue ballots with
every 25c cash purchase. All ballots
must be marked with the name of mer
chant issuing same or they will not be
counted: E. B. Anderson, General Store.
B. D. Grant, Hardware and Stoves.
F. S. Walker. Groceries.
Scheen's, Confectionery, Fruits, Cigars
and School Supplies.
M. Brands. Clothing, Shoes and Gents'
Furnishings.
The Princeton Drug Co., Drugs.
S. Long, Shoes.
Princeton Roller Mill Co., Flour and
Feed (Retail).
Miss Anna Sadley, Milliner.
Gillespie. Stoneburg& Co., Harness and
Saddlery. Wm. Neely, Mngr.
Piano on exhibition at Mark's
Great Bargain Store. Ballot box
located at the Princeton Drug
Co.'s store.
MRS. ANNIE EWING.
Agent for Wesley Pianos.
(f) Stop on signal.
MINN
apaWHK.W, ^^?#^a \^g
Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND DTJLUTH.
GOING SOUTH. GOING NORTH.
Leave.
Duluth. 6:20 a.m.
Brook Park.. 9:15 a.m.
Mora 9:35 a.m.
Ogllvie 9:48 a.m.
Milaca 10:20 a.m.
Pease (f) 10:30 a.m.
L. Siding (f) .10:40 a.m.
Brickton (f) .10:45 a.m.
Princeton10:55 a m.
Zimmerman. 11:10 a.m.
Elk River. ...11:35 a.m.
Anoka 12 00 a.m.
Minneapolis. 12:40 p.m.
Ar. St. Panl. 1:05 p.m.
Leave.
St. Paul 2:35 p.m
Minneapolis. 3:05 p.m.
Anoka 3:45 p.m.
Elk Eiver.... 4:07 p.m.
Zimmerman. 4:25 p.m.
Princeton 4:42 p.m.
Brickton (f). 4:47 p.mr
L. Siding (f). 4:51 p.m
Pease (t).
Milaca
Ogilvie Mora Brook Park.
Ar. Duluth
Tuesa yFREIGHT.
Tvm
Thursda and Saturday.
EAST
POTATOES.
Rose Burbanks Triumphs
Ohio
i
5:01 p.m
5:80 p.m
5:45 p.m
6:02 p.m,
6:25 p.m
9-25 p.m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST.
Le. Milaca |10:18a.m.
Sj^SS?" 10:23a.m.
Ar. St. Cloud 11:16 a.m.
GOING EAST.
Le. St.Cloud I 4:00p.m.
Foreston 4.54a
Ar. Milaca. Siooji.m.
WAYd
Le
10:45 a. m.
12:30 p. m.
2:45 p. m.
5:00 p. m. Milaca.
Princeton Elk River..
Ar. Anoka
GOING WESTMonday, Wednesday'and Fridav.'
*if- 4%0]%.
110:00a. m.
ElkHiyer 11:35a.m.
Princeton 1 won
Ar. Milaca .."I *w:
Train No. 7 leaves Elk River going west at
9.18 p. m.. and train No. 8 leaves Elk River eo
mg east at 6:34 a.m. "-*uvcrgo
MILLE LACS COUNTY,
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookO. E. Gustafson Princeton
Borgholm-J. Herou .Bock
Greenbush-R. A. Ross Princeton
Hayland-Alfred F. Johnson.. Milaca
Isle HarborOtto A. Haggbere TRIP
Milaca-Ole E. Larson.. Milaca
MileR. N.Atkinson
ttW^A36^1
ir?S
BobbinsC. N. Archer Vlapiand
South Harbor-Chas. Freer... ...V." V. Cove
East Side-Geo. W. Freer Op'stead
Onamia-G. H. Carr Onamia
Page-August Anderson Pait
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
JT. M.Neumann Forpstnn
J.C. Borden PrincItoS
Geo. E. McClure 7. \\\'.".V.^iK
,_. WMOHBOBIHG TOWNS.
BaldwinH. B. Flsk Princeton
BlueHill-Chas. D. Kalihep '.'.PriScltoS
Spencer Brook -G O. Smith. ..Spencer Brook
Wyanetfr-Ole Peterson .T Wyanett
Livonia-Chas^E. Sawnson Zimmerman
S
1 V~f' W.Groundrey SantiagS
DalboAndrew Peterson Dalbo
Grain and Produce Market.
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern i
What, (new) No 2 Northern 1
Corn (new)
Oats
Rye Beans (hand picked)
.'.\'.".'[email protected]@ Wlldha
62
4
75
15
18
60
l#
Princeton Roller Hills ml Eleyator.
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern $1 07
Wheat, (new) No.2Northern 1.04
Corn(new) Oats-
RETAIX.
Vestal, per sack
Flour, (100percent)per sack.....'.". 3
Banner, per sack..... 2JS
Rye flour. f-S
Wholewheat (101b. sack).. j
Ground feed, per cwt JS
Coarse meal, per cwt
Middlings, per cwt t"
Shorts, per cwt S
Bran.percwt Zg
All goods delivered free acywhere in Princeton
FRATERNAL -:-IiOIG
N O. 92^^. &A.M.
Regular communications^ and 4th
Weeneeday of each month.
T* B. D. GRANT, W. M.
FRBD KEITH, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE.
N O. 93, of
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
ning at 8 o'clock.
Tnm Ar
IP
FRANK PETERSO N, C. C.
JOHN A GRAHKK, K. R. & S.
O
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, In the
Maccabee hall.
TIT r, r^
N
-NELSON. Com.
W G. FREDERICKS. R.
Hebron Encampment.
No.42,I.OO.F.
Meetings, 2nd and 4th Mondays
at 8 clock p. M.
rw TKT
SAUSSER, C.
D. W. SPAOTJ)ING, S. W.
Jos. CRAIG, Scribe.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O O.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 7*30
E. E. WHITNET, N. G.
ROBE RT KING, R. Sec.
PRINCETON CAMP, W A.
No. 4032.
Regular meetings 1st and 3rd Saturdays of
each month at 8:00 p. M in the hall at Brick
yards. Visiting members cordially
invited.C-V'M
CHAS.A.OAKEs,Clerk
FRBE
CRAVENS & KALIHER, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a Jloments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty
IJ.2 East Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minn.
Bes* facility, best location, best courses of study
and lis young people for best payiar posKuws is
shortest possible time. Write for free Catatonic
Good Table Board, tl,85 per week.
If
i
,*H
-m

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