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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, August 24, 1905, Image 3

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LIFE ON A WARSHIP.
Why the Men Are Allowed to Indulge
In Athletic Sports.
To see a thirteen inch gun loaded
and fired is a sight not to be forgotten.
The projectile is thirteen inches in
diameter, about three feet in length
and weighs 1,100 pounds. The powder
charge for target practice is 250
pounds. The cost for each shot is
about 500. When all is ready on the
range the signal siren sounds, there is
a blinding flash, a roar like thunder
and a jarring shock. Then you hear
the whining screech of the shell, for
all the world like a fast express round
ing a sharp curve. The projectile is
visible almost from the time it leaves
the gun. You see it rip through the
target and strike the water beyond,
throwing up a column of liquid many
feet high. The shell skips, much like
the flat stone "skipper" of our boy
hood, and again a column of water
shoots up two miles or more farther
out, to be repeated time and again.
The shell in its flight can be watched
without the aid of glasses for eight
miles or more in clear weather.
"While the life of a sailor, from cap
tain down to apprentice, is an almost
continual round of work, some time is
found for athletic' sports, such as
boat racing, football and baseball. The
object of this is to give the men rec
reation and at the same time to foster
the spirit of competition. Besides, it
makes the men easier to manage. The
ship with a strong football or baseball
team or the fastest race boat almost
invariably has a happy and easily
managed crewa crew that will swear
that its officers are the finest men in
the world, and likewise the officers
swear by such a crew. Some ships
have training tables for their athletic
teams, the expense usually being de
frayed by the officers. The team or
boat crew, as the case may be, is
petted by the officers and idolized by
the crew, and for some time before a
hard contest the men are excused from
various' duties in order that they may
give more time to training.
Every battleship and cruiser has its
race boat, purchased by contributions
from officers and men. The prices paid
for these boats is, as a rule, contingent
upon their winning certain specified
races. The builders are willing to take
a chance, knowing that the crew will do
its best to win. For a winning boat the
price is often as much as 1,000, while
for a boat that proves less speedy the
builder will accept $500 or less. On the
result of a fleet boat race as much as
30,000 has been known to change
hands, and large sums are also
wagered on baseball and football
games. This is, of course, contrary to
the letter of the regulations but the
sporting instinct is as strong in the
navy as elsewhereand it is not always
possible to hold down the lid.Leslie's
Weekly.
The End of the World.
That the earth will eventually dry up
and all living things will die of thirst
is the theory of a scientific writer. He
says that in both Africa and Asia, and
indeed in all the great levels of the
world, the water beds are drying up.
Many lakes well known during the his
torical period have entirely disappear
ed, while others are shrinking rapidly.
"Explorations in central Asia have
proved that for centuries a zone stretch
ing from the east to the southeast of
this part of the czar's dominion has
been drying up. Deserts are gradually
spreading, and reports show that it is
only in the neighborhood of mountains,
round whose brows vapors condense
and fall, that irrigation can be carried
on or life itself can be preserved."
Just What He Meant.
An American in London once attend
ed a dinner where Henry Arthur Jones
told a story about Beerbohm Tree.
"Mr. Tree," said the playwright, "met
a friend of his one afternoon in Regent
street.
"The two stood and conversed a little
while, and then Mr. Tree said:
'Have you been down to see me act
lately, my boy?'
'No too poor,' said the other.
'Too poor,' Mr. Tree exclaimed.
'Why, you spend enough on wine and
cigars'
"But the other, nettled, interrupted.
'I don't mean I'm too poor. I mean
you're too poor,' he said."
Cramp In the Less.
People who are subject to cramp in
the legs should always be provided
with a good strong piece of cord, espe
cially in their bedrooms. When the
cramp comes on take the cord, wind it
round the leg over the place where it
is cramped, take an end in each hand
and give it a sharp pull, one that will
hurt a little, and the cramp will cease
instantly. People much subject to
cramp in bed have found great relief
from wearing on each leg a garter of
wide tape which has several thin slices
of cork stitched on to it.
The Tools Lacked.
"Why don't you go to work?" said a
charitable woman to a tramp before
whom she had placed a nicely cooked
meal.
"I would," replied the vagrant, "if I
had the tools."
"What sort of tools do you want?"
asked the hostess.
"A knife and fork," said the tramp.
Tit-Bits.
W Eat Too Fast.
"The trouble is that we eat too fast,"
said the man who worries about health.
"That's right," answered the man
who worries about money. "Some of
us eat so faut that our incomes can't
keep up with our grocery bills."Wash
ington Star.
He who comes up to his own idea of
greatness must always have had a very
low standard of it in his mind.Haz
litt.
ma wm
Snobs and Automobiles.
There is a class of snobs who ap
parently regard the fact that they
have wealth, enough to possess a
motor car as a sort of a patent of
nobility authorizing them to drive at
will over things that walk.' It is this
class which is doing so much to in
jure automobiling. It would seem
that the motor car is a coming institu
tion. While today it is the plaything
of the rich, there is every reason to
believe that in the near future it will
be an article of service to all classes
of people. It is swift, and can be
made quite, and it is cleanly. The
universal use of the motor car instead
of the horse would remove the great
est part of the dirt that accumulates
upon the street. It would do away
with the noise of horse and driver.
But before the automobile can be
come popular among the poeple the
class of snobs referred to must be
done away with. We wish that police
departments had the courage and the
ability to enforce existing ordinances.
If these proved insufficient city coun
cils should pass ordinances reducing
the speed limit to four miles per hour.
It would greatly relieve those who are
irritated by dodging autos qn crowded
thoroughfares if our municipal judges
would, in cases where there was no
doubt as to gross violation of the
rate of speed ordinances, give the
offenders a straight sentence of thirty
days at the rock pile. These fellows
have no regard for others, and it
would be a sort of soothing balm to
many of us to feel that they were
working off their reckless depravity
in a way that could not injure others.
It does seem as though consideration
of ordinary decency and humanity
would lead the owner and driver of a
machine, who had already killed or
maimed a person, to restrain his zeal
and speed sufficiently at least to keep
within the speed limit. There are
quarters in which those considera
tions have no place, and it is such
people who should be taught a proper
lesson by magistrates who have the
courage and determination to enforce
the law. These reckless drivers of
motor cars are doing much to defer
indefinitely the popular establish
ment of the automobile as a thing of
use as well as a pleasure. In France,
where the motor car has reached its
highest development, drivers of ma
chines must go through a regular
course of instruction before taking a
machine through the crowded streets.
Those who are interested in automo
biling should interest themselves in a
movement looking toward the better
instruction of those entrusted with the
handling of machines. They should
start a movement among the owners
of machines looking toward the pro
hibition of women and children from
operating them. The automobile can
easily become a more destructive
agent than a railroad locomotive.
The man who handles a powerful
motor car should have some qualifica
tions for his work. He must learn to
control not only his machine but him
self. A great many of the drivers
cannot control themselves. They
must be taught, even though it become
necessary to send them to the rock
pile.
Had Never Heard of it.
A certain newspaper man in Iowa
relates an experience that might shed
some light on the mail order business.
He was at the town depot and saw a
farmer friend receive a set of harness
from Chicago. He attempted to prove
to the latter that he was making a
mistake, as any one of the local deal
ers would furnish him the same or bet
ter goods just as cheap, and the profit
would be kept at home. "But, "said
the farmer "this is the first time I have
heard that there is a harness shop in
this town. I have taken your paper
for five years and have never seen a
line of advertising in it about such
an institution in all that time. But
you can bet the Chicago house has
kept me posted."Aleaxndria Citizen.
Railroad Tracks Creep.
The rails on a track that appears
to be well laid often begin to move
lengthwise, so slowly that their mo
tion is imperceptible, until its results
have accumulated, but with such great
force that nothing will stop it. The
onward movement of the rail tears up
spikes and shears off steel bolts.
The motion is always in the direction
of traffic and is due to the moving
trains. To prevent this is still a
question unanswered, but golden
grain belt beer will prevent ill health.
Get a case for home use. Order of
your nearest dealer or be supplied by
Henry Veidt, Princeton.
Pubic is Aroused.
The public is aroused to a know
ledge of the curative merits of that
great medicinal tonic, Electric Bitters,
for sick stomach, liver and kidneys.
Mary H. Walters 0^546 St. Clair Ave.,
Columbus, O., writes: "For several
months, I was given up to die. I had
fever and ague, my nerves were
wrecked I could not sleep, and my
stomach was so weak, from useless
doctors' drugs, that I could not eat.
Soon after beginning to take Electric
Bitters, I obtained relief, and in a
short time I was entirely cured."
Guaranteed at C. A. Jack's drug
store price 50 cents.
Senator George Laybourn of Du
luth was married at Minneapolis on
Monday afternoon, the bride being
Miss Charlotte J. Holton of Washing
ton, D. C. ''-'---:*v'^,X-^
While threshing near La Crescent
one of John Welch's separators blew
up. Edward Selks and Benj. Lipps
sustained serious injuries about the
arms and body, while others escaped
as though by a miracle.
The cornerstone of the new Catholic
church at Perham has been laid by
Bishop Trobec of St. Cloud. It will
be built of pressed brick, wiht stone
trimmings, will cost about $40,000 and
be one of the finest in the diocese.
At LeSueur during the performance
of a play in a tent by the Orris-Ober
Stock company, a section of the seats,
closely packed with 250 people, col
lapsed, severely injuring many per
sons, who were pinned down beneath
the broken and tangled boards.
According to advices from Crooks
ton, the work of surfacing the Great
Northern roadbed from Crookston to
the Canadian line with three feet of
gravel, which has been in progress
for several weeks past, will be com
pleted this week, and the road will
then have one of the speediest pieces
of track in the entire country in the
stretch from the twin cities to Winni
peg.
Edward Haar, a farmer living near
St. Joseph, was fatally injured by
lightning during the terrific storm
Sunday afternoon. Haar was at work
on ft grain stack when the bolt struck
him. It split open his head, ran
through his right breast, down his
leg and out through his foot. He was
knocked from the stack, which burned,
and neighbors found the dying man
with his clothes burning beside the
stack. He leaves a wife and three
young children.
Lars Flatness of Albert Lea, who
disappeared two weeks ago, has not
been heard from and his whereabouts
is a mystery to all. His brother and
sister came from Worth county, Iowa,
and made some inquiry. The suicide
theory is being abandoned as no trace
of the body can be found. Mr. Flat
ness was about thirty-five, of me
dium height, and wore dark clothes.
The death of his wife and some finan
cial troubles are believed to have un
balanced his mind.
Mrs. Christina Bohn, who recently
begun a suit against the city of
Winona for $10,200 damages for in
juries alleged to have been received
by being run down by a bicyclist on
the sidewalk in front of her home, is
dead as the result of injuries then re
ceived. It is probable a new action
will now be begun by her heirs and
this will determine whether the city
can be held liable for a failure to en
force the ordinance prohibiting bicy
cle riding on sidewalks.
Bee-Keeping Notes.
Bees store pollen at the side of the
brood nest in the coolest part of the
hive. The honey is always stored
above the brood in the warmest part
of the hive.
The bee is almost helpless when she
issues from her cell, but in two weeks
is full grown, and able to do a full
day's work. Her first days are put in
about the hive learning housekeeping.
When bees leave their old home,
each one fills her honey sack, so as
to be provided for the journey.
There are few localities where fruit
and crops are not benefited by colo
nies of bees.
A bright woman can, on a capital
of $300, after the first year, earn from
$500 to $600 annually by keeping bees.
The drone is a large, stingless bee,
with a tongue too short to gather
honey. As each queen mates but
once, consequently only one drone is
really essential to every swarm. The
workers, therefore, drive the others
out and sting them to death.
When colonies are put on the sum
mer stands they should have enough
honey on hand to last at least two
weeks.
The old-fashioned hive is no longer
profitable. The shallow brood frame
and the tall, plain sections are indis
pensable.
The supply of beeswax is never
equal to the demand.
Bees will travel a long distance for
stores, but the wise man will sow
clover, alfalfa and buckwheat at hand.
Wheat Crop Estimate.
The wheat crop estimate of Statis
tician Jones of the firm of Watson &.
Co., is as follows:
Total for the United States 624,000,-
000 bushels, viz., winter wheat 370,-
000,000 bushels, spring wheat 242,000,
000 bushels, macaroni wheat 12,000,-
000 bushels. He estimates the three
northwestern states: Minnesota, 67,-
000,000 bushels North Dakota, 66,-
000,000 bushels South Dakota, 33,-
000,000 bushelsa total for these
three states of 166,000,000 bushels.
Fiendish Suffering
Is often caused by sores, ulcers and
cancers, that eat away your skin.
Wm. Bedell of Flat Rock, Mich.,
says: I have used Bucklen's Arnica
Salve for ulcers, sores and cancers.
It is the best healing dressing I ever
found." Soothes and heals cuts,
burns and scalds. 25 cents at C. A.
pack's drug store guaranteed.
THE PRINCETON IJiadN: THURSDAY,* AUGUST 24, 1905.
State News. $$9 r--
Church Topics 3*
4 Sunday and Weekday
Announcements. METHODIST.
Morning, "The Christian Rule of
Conduct." Evening, "Service on
The Band Stand."
CONGREGATIONAL.
Morning, "Taming the Tongue."
Evening, Union out "of doors service
with the M. E. church at which Rev.
Swinnerton will preach.
Fail Meetings, Merchants' Excursions to
Duluth.
On account of the Fall Meetings of
the Merchant's association to be held
at Duluth, August 17th to 24th,
August 31st to September 7th and
October 26th to November 2nd, the
Great Northern Railway is making
reduced rates. This will enable you
to see the city at the head of the
great lakes, view the immense grain
elevators, the aerial bridge, the coal
docks and other places of interest at
the head of the famous inland sea.
For rates and detailed information,
call on your local agent. 36-5t
A friend of the home^
A foe of the Trust
Calumet
Baking
Powder
Complies with the Pure Food Laws
of all States.
JOHN BARRY
Expert Accountant,
Over 30 Tears Experience.
1011 First Ave. North.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Nature's Great Invention
On de banks ob de Amazon, far away, far away,
Whar Dr. Green gits August Flowers to dis day
Ah picked doseflowersin August in ole Brazil,
An' aldo' I'se a Yankee, ah longs to be dar still.
JAugus Flower is the only medicine
(free from alcoholic stimulants) that has
been successful in keeping the entire
thirty-two feet of digestive apparatus in a
normal condition, and assisting nature's
processesof digestion, separation and ab
sorptionfor building and re-buildjlng
by preventing AU, irregular or unnatural
causes which interrupt healthy arid per
fect natural processes and result in intes
tinal indigestion, catarrhal affections
(causing appendicitisstoppage of the
gall duct), fermentation of unhealthy
foods, nervous dyspepsia, headache, con
stipation and other complaints, such as
colic, biliousness, jaundice, etc. i
]TAugus Flower is nature's intended reg
ulator. Two sizes, 25c, 75c. All druggists.
For Sale by C. A. Jack.
"YOUR MONEY IS
NO GOOD"
and will be refunded to you if after us
ing half a bottle of
THE FAMOUS
MATT.J.JOHHSOHS 60 88
RHEUMATISM and
BLOOD CURE
you are not satisfied with results.
This is our guarantee which goes witl
every bottle.
For Sale and Guaranteed Only by
C. A. JACK, Princeton, Minn.
Buy, Sell
And Exchange
Your
Cattle
WITH
E. BIGELOW
And get a
Square Deal.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
Stf-J&Sn
R. D. A. McRAE DENTIST
Office In Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON, MINN
Q.
ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore.
Tel.Rural. 36.
Princeton, Minn.
pLVERo L. MCMILLAN,
LAWYER.
Office In Odd Fellows'Building.
Princeton, Minn.
J.
A. ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Block,
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
HAPMAN & KAL1HER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line or Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A. ROSS,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR.
Will take full charge of dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer In Monuments of all kinds.
E A. Ross, Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
JULIUS SUGARMAN,
CIGAR MANUFACTURER,
of Princeton.
Finest 5c and 10c Cigars on the Market.
Main Street, Princeton.
R.
E. LYNCH,
RELIABLE WELL DRILLER.
Twenty years in the well business. Can give
perfect satisfaction. If you want a good well
call on or address R. E. LYHCH,
Zimmerman, Minn.
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
PRINCETON, MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
life. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment, Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Only non-contagious diseases admitted,
Charges reasonable.
Trained Nurses furnished for sickness
in private families.
Staff of Physicians and Surgeons,
H. C. COONEY, M. D.
Chief of Staff.
N. K. WHITTEMORE, M. D., H. P. BACON, M. D.,
R. B. HIXSON, M. D., G. ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
D. K. CALDWELL. M. D., A. G. ALDRICH. M. D.
MISS EMMA NORDSTROM. Supt.
Spring I
i Announcement I
If you are looking for
beautiful ribbons, fancy
wash silks, newest voiles,
latest figured lawns, good
staple ginghams.
LOOK HERE!
We can also fill your wants in
the grocery line.
R. D. BYERS,
Bottom Price Cash Store.
1 White Front
!BAKERYj
Manske & Son, Props.
We Bake Daily.
Full weight, best materials, free
7 from all impure ingredients.
I Fine Pastry
Baking for parties, weddings,
etc., given prompt attention,
Give Us a Call. $
I Both 'Phones.
Main St. Princeton, Minn. I
Peterson & Nelson
Can set your buggy tires cold while
you are waiting without taking the
wheels off from the buggy or the
bolts out of the wheels.
Great Northern Railway.
ST. PAUL,, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND DUX,TJTH.
GOING SOUTH. GOING NORTH.
Leave.
Duluth 6:20
Brook PaTk.. 9:15
Mora 9:35
Ogilvie 9:48
Mllaca 10:20
Pease (f) 10:30
L. Siding(f).10:40
Brickton (f).10:45
Princeton.... 10:55
Zimmerman. 11:10
Elk River....11:35
Anoka.'. 12
Minneapolis.12: Ar. St. Paul. 1:05
a.m. a.m. a.m.
a.m. a.m.
a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m.
Leave.
St. Paul 2
Minneapolis. 3
Anoka 3
Elk River.... 4
Zimmerman. 4
Princeton 4
Brickton (f). 4
L. Siding (f). 4
Pease (f).... 5
Milaca 5
Ogilvie 5
Mora 6
Brook Park. 6
Ar. Duluth.. 9
:35p.m :05 p.m.
:45 p.m.
:07 p.m.
:25 p.m.
:42 p.m.
:47 p.m.
:51 p.m.
:01 p.m
:20 p.m
:45 p.m
:02p.m
:25 p.m
:25 p.m.
00 a.m.
40 p.m. p.m.
(f) Stop on signal.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
Le, Milaca... Foreston.
Ar. St. Cloud.
GOING WEST.
Le. St. Cloud.
Foreston Ar, Milaca.
?S.INMilacQ Le a
Princeton."
Elk River
Ar. Anoka
Grain and Produce Market.
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern S 79
Wheat, (new) No. 2Northern...... '77
Corn zMfrv\
Oats (new) "j&gs
Beans (hand picked) i.25g2.0
W
lldna
Flax. (new)
FRATERNAL -:-LODGE
NO. 92, A. F. & A. M.
Regular communications, 2a and 4th
Wednesday of each-month.
Tr,
.JA 1
ft
GRANT, W. M.
FR ED KEITH, Sec'y.
[email protected]&
RlNCETON-:- LODGE,
Is! NO. 93, K. of P.
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
ning at 8 o'clock.
n^ 1 x^ (PETERSON, C. C.
OSCAR PETERSONFKANK K. R. & S.
K. O. T. M.f
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall.
N. M. NELSON. Com.
W. G. FREDERICKS. R.
PRINCETON -:-LODGE
NO. 208,1. O. O.F.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 8:00
ROST. H. KING, N. G.
JOHN BOMAN, R. Sec.
The Rural
Telephone Co.
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE.
Lines to Dalbo, Cambridge, Santi
ago and Glendorado.
Good Service in Princeton and to all
adjoining points.
Patronize a Home Concern.
Service Day and Night.
CRAVENS & KALIHER, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a floments' Notice.
CommercialTravelers' Trade a Specialty
1
10:18 a. m.
10:28 a. m.
11:23 a.m.
GOING EAST.
"WAY
\?nEo'toTTuesdayFREIGHT.
4:17 p.m.
4:54 p.m.
5:00 p. m.
Thursda and Saturday.
10:45 a. m.
12:30 p.m.
2:45 p.m.
GOING WESTMonday, Wednesday'and Friday
Le. Anoka
Princeton 1 i.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookO. E. Gustafson Princeton
BorgholmEmil Sjoberg Bock
GreenbushR. A. Ross Princeton
HaylandAlfred F. Johnson Milaca
Isle Harbor-Otto A. Haggberg isle
MilacaOle E. Larson Milaca
MiloR. N.Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonOtto Henschel Princeton
RobbinsC. N. Archer Vineland
South HarborChas. Freer Cove
East SideAndrew Kalberg Opstead
Onamia-G. H. Carr f. Onamia
PageAugust Anderson Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
^T-P- Neumann Foreston
J. C. Borden Princeton
J. H.Ward Milaca
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinH. B. Fisk Princeton
Blue Hill-Chas. D. Kaliher Princeton
Spencer BrookJ. L. Turner... Spencer Brook
WyanettOle Peterson Wyanett
Livonia-M. K. Iliff Zimmerman
Santiago-W W.Groundrey Santiago
DalboM. P. Mattson Dalbo
:F^ITO:E]T02iT
,5
10:00 a.m.
glk River \Y'.'.'.'.V.'.'.: li:2&'*. m.
40t
Ar- Milaca. l^i.m.
ELK RIVER TRAINS.
(Great Northern.) For St. Paul and Minne
apolis, trains leave at 6:00 A. ai. and 11-35 A
For stations west to Williston, N. via*
Crookston 9:53 P. M.
(Northern Pacific.) West bound. North
Coast Limited, 11:50 A. M. (at tank). Minne
sota Local. 10,-0S A. M. Manitoba Express 11 47
P. u. (at tank.) East bound, Manitoba Ex
press, 40 AM. Twin City Express, 6 02 A. M.
(at tank): Minnesota Local, 4 14 P.M. North
Coast Limited, 12:48 P.M. (attank,) and at
depoii Sundays.
1
4.00(^4.5 0
[email protected]
Princeton Boiler Hills anfl Eleyalor.
Wheat, (old) No. 1 Northern... $1 00
Wheat, (old) No. 2 Northern 07
Corn.
[email protected]
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack ja n*
Flour, (100 per cent)per sack. q?
Banner, per sack 7,v?
Rye flour.
2.50
Wholewheat (101b. sack).
Ground feed, per cwt 1'?=
Coarse meal, per cwt 1*1-
Middlings, per cwt 7S
Shorts, per cwt 7%
Bran,percwt 2-
All goods delivered free anywhere in Princeton
'-if
V?5

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