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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 05, 1905, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1905-10-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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War and Literature.
Whatever tends to stir the imagina
tion and enthusiasm of a people very
deeply awakens all their powers to
fresher vigor. As literature is the record
of the thought wherein man surveys his
vwn actions and the things related to
them, the result of war is quite sure to
stimulate what may be called this ef
florescence of national life. The influ
ence may not be perceptible in war
times themselves. The intense interest
in the actual at such a period rather
finds its outlet nowadays in the news
paper and the magazine than in book
making and book reading. But after
the war is over and thought subsides
from its effervescent to the reminis
cent mood then the effect is apt to
show its strength. The lover who
writes a sonnet to his mistress' eye
brow is not at that moment the victim
of a grand passion in all its fury, but
he must have felt something like it
previously. Tetrarch could not have
written his exquisite poems if he had
,be jictually sighing at the feet o
Laura.
There was a magnificent outburst of
literature in England during the Napo
leonic wars, it is true, but there were
influences at work besides the current
war spirit to produce the result. It
was rather the fruit of the French rev
olution which preceded Napoleon's rise.
So in the magnificent Elizabethan pe
riod, when England was fighting a life
and death struggle with Spain, then at
the apex of its power, the chief ferti
lizing force was the vision of a newly
discovered world, with all its boundless
possibilities, which intoxicated the
imagination as men speculated on its
marvels. During our civil war, which
shook the country to the roots, there
was but little done in literature. But
the fertilizing effect was very evident
after the war ended, and the period
since has been one of brilliant literary
activity.
It would be easy to multiply proofs
that the stimulus to literature from
war takes its active form after the in
tense excitement has subsided alike for
the people who make books and those
who read books. Then human energy
finds in its reminiscent and reflective
attitude a greatly enriched field in
which to work. It is natural to expect
an outburst of literary vigor in the far
east. The race which produced Turge
neff and is represented today by Tol
stoi and Gorky will express in books its
new resentments and new aspirations.
And the Japanese will not feel that
they have conquered a place in the
western world until they produce a na
tional literature to be read of all man
kind.
The Czar's Dislike of Witte.
The personal powers of M. Witte
will be subjected to" another severe
test now that he returns to St. Peters
burg wearing new laurels. The world
has taken the great Russian statesman
mainly on his reputation as a liberal
progressivist. At last he has been
seen right in the crucible and comes
out bigger than before. This will not
please the czar and the reactionary
party around the throne. has been
hated at home for the very qualities
and deeds which give him fame abroad.
He has revolutionized Russia while in
the confidence and pay of the czar.
But Witte has not been an under
hand reformer. has worked foi
greater Russia just as Japan's great
statesman Ito worked for greater Ja
pan. Like Ito, Witte developed the
industries of the nation, put business
ahead of pleasure and "noble" idleness
and dissipation. He built factories, and
the factories built up towns, and the
towns gathered in workingmen who de
manded the rights the peasants dare
not ask for. This was the price of na
tional progress, and the autocrats don't
like Witte on that account. This mere
subject has always been stubbornly
independent in the very teeth of the
czar and will hardly prove less so now
that the western world, which Is his
model, has approved of him at a close
view.
Even south of Mason and Dixon's
line Ben Butler is given credit foi
heading off the fever by cleaning up
New Orleans. And it is also more
than whispered there that fever skipped
the usual visit during Butler's sway
because Providence "refused to afflict
the people of the city with two such
curses at one time."
The appeal which is making for con
tributions from this country in aid of
the League For the Preservation oi
the Beauty of Switzerland, recently
founded in London, is well worth at
tention, if only to emphasize the fact
that we have some noble beauty spots
in this country in need of preservation
N When Mark Twain was a poor boat
man on the Mississippi river how little
did he dream that one day he would
live luxuriously enough to have the
gout and have all the world talking
about it.
A few years ago everybody stood in
awe of the word diplomacy. In thest
enlightened days the fact is generally
realized that a skillful diplomat is only
a horse trader in disguise.
Russell Sage and Hetty Green will
no doubt sympathize with the czar Ir
bis refusal to part with the money.
^g^ZjsHi^^^^3^^^L
State News, ff
The electric light plant at LeroyVas
entirely consumed by fire on Friday
morning. Loss $6,000 insurance,
$3,500.
The First National bank building
of Foley is under construction, the
contract being awarded to Mr. Wall
of St. Cloud.
William Grant, president of the vil
lage of Chisholm, who was indicted
for subordination of perjury, was ac
quitted by the jury atfer 15 minutes
deliberation.
John Minto, 11 years, son of James
Minto of Echo, was instantly killed
by the accidental discharge of a shot
gun which was in a buggy when the
boy climbed in.
Fred Foote of Beaudette, the con
fessed murderer of Matt Gannon,
mayor of Spooner, last spring, has
been sentenced to fifteen years' im
prisonment at hard labor and taken
to Stillwater penitentiary.
Gotfried Bjorkquist, agent for the
Wilcox Lumber company at Hawley,
was arrested at Moorhead by Sheriff,
John M. Bayer on five warrants pre
ferred by the company charging em
bezzlement in the sum of $3,963.10.
M. O. Hall, founder of the State
bank of Duluth, which failed in 1896,
has returned to that city to pay his
personal debts. Since leaving Duluth
Mr. Hall has accumulated a fortune
in North Dakota, where he founded
the town of Mohall.
The general store of A. Hartman
of Pierz was broken into and the rob
qers secured $12 in cash and about
$4,000 in notes. The latter, while not
of any account to the thieves, are
worth much to Mr. Hartman, who has
no exact record of them.
A project is on foot to divide Nor
man county, forming a new county of
the sixteen townships included in the
White Earth reservation. Popular
sentiment there seems to be in favor
of the division and a petition asking
for separation will be circulated soon.
Mahnomen, the new town on the Soo,
would be the county seat.
It is reported that the Great North
ern road will build shops and round
houses in Minneapolis to cost $1,000,-
000. The shops will be on the thirty
acre Chadbourn tract, near Cedar
lake and the roundhouse adjoining.
Much difficulty is' being found in
filling part of the land acquired to
extend the yards west of Lyndale
avenue.
William Grant, president of the
village of Chisholm, has come out
triumphant in the third case against
him. has been acquitted of the
charge of having exhibited an inde
cent show at Chisholm in August at
the street carnival. It is rumored
that the other indictments will be
dropped. Mr. Grant has been acquit
ted on three counts.
Two freight trains on the Great
Northern road collided head on near
Darwin station, five miles east of
Litchfield. Two men, whose names
are not known, were hurt, one having
his leg broken and receiving other
injuries. The other was only slightly
hurt. Both engines were nearly
ruined and severval boxcars were
smashed into kindling wood.
John Nelson, a farm hand, eloped
with the sixteen-year-old daughter of
a prominent farmer living seven miles
northeast of Ortonville. Nelson came
to Ortonville and secured a livery
team in the night and took the girl
from a second-story window of her
home and drove north about twenty
miles and tied the team in the yard
of a farmer named Sol. Peters.
The commissioners^ of Rice county
have filed their complaint against the
bondsmen of the First Natioonal bank
in the office of the clerk of court. The
complaint says that upon Sept. 17,
1903, the county funds were deposited
in the bank, in consideration of which
the bank bonded itself to repay on
demand. The bondsmen for $50,000
were T. Celment, A. Theopold,
A. W.McKinistry, H. C. Theopold and
G. W. Batchelder. On May 24 a divi
dend of 20 per cent, amounting to
$381, was paid the county and the
commissioners now demand judgment
for $1,527 with interest.
Sprinkling red pepper and cloves
behind them in their flight, two re
formatory inmates baffled the pursuit
of bloodhounds and made their escape.
They had secured a piece of steel from
which they fashioned a saw and cut
one of the bars to the window. Then
breaking another bar they made an
aperture large enough to admit of the
passage of their bodies through the
window. Their escape was discovered
within twenty minutes and the blood
hounds of the institution were put on
their track. Scarcely had the hounds
struck the trail when they began to
sneeze violently from the inhalation
of the pepper and the trail was lost in
the outskirts of Sauk Rapids.
A Dozen Times a Might.
'I have had kidney- and bladder
trouble for years, and it became so
bad that I was obliged to get up at
least a dozen times a night," says
Mr. Owen Dunn, of Benton Ferry, W.
Va. I never received any permanent
benefit from any medicine until I took
Foley's Kidney Cure. After using two
bottles, I am cured." Sold by C. A.
Jack.
*A%_
rather than a business man. He is
apparently about thirty-one two
years of age. He first came into pub-
hi
lionotic
of food and clothing among those in
indigent circumstances since his ar
rival in Minneapolis.
The first that was known of Cooper's
power over disease was when Mr. E.
Pomereau, living at No. 554 Eight
Ave. N., a trusted employee of the
Commutator Co. of No. 121 First St.
N., brought to Voegeli's Drug Store
the largest parasite or tape-worm
ever seen in this city, which he
claimed had been removed from his
system by the philanthropist. The
parasite measured 90 feet in length,
and when exhibited to the astonished
druggist was still alive and squirm
ing in the glass dish which contained
it.
Mr. Pomereau was greatly excited
and told the following remarkable
story: I have been ill for a long
time. Sometimes I had a voracious
appetite, and then there would be days
when I could eat scarcely anything,
and the smell of food nauseated me.
I felt tired all the time, and when com
ing down town to my work felt as
though I hardly had the strength to
get back home again, althouglrl was
a strong, robust man before I was
taken ill. I was irritable and had
become so nervous and crabbed that I
could not be agreeable or pleasant to
any one around me, and I felt so
tired and worn out all the time that i
could not perform my daily labor
without the greatest effort. I was
weak and emaciated and my skin was
sallow. I became .moody and de
pressed in spirits and was grealy wor
ried about myself.
My employer, Mr. Ben Boneau,
had seen Mr. Cooper in the east and
said he had effected many marvelous
cures there, and advised me to consult
him. I followed his advice and have
been taking Cooper's treatment less
than one week. Two hours ago this
tapeworm passed from my system
now know what has been troubling
me all this time.
Some people would not tell about a
matter of this kind, but I believe in
giving credit wherever credit is due,
and I want everyone to know what
Cooper has done for me. I would do
anything in my power for him, for I
actually believe he has saved my life.
A few days after this Mr. W. H. Mc
Clurg, living at No. 2601 Newton Ave.
N., reporoted that Cooper had cured
him of a severe case of rheumatism
and stomach trouble. said: I
have had stomach trouble and rheu
matism for a long time. I heard of a
man who had been cured of rheuma
tism in one week by Cooper. I did
not believe there was a medicine on
earth that could cure me, but I de
cided to try him.
1 have been under his treatment for
less than two .weeks and it has done
for me just what it did for the other
man. Every trace of rheumatism and
stomach trouble has disappeared, not
a sign of it remains, and I feel as well
today as I ever did in my life. I seem
to have been made over. I am gain
ing rapidly in flesh, my appetite is
good and I can eat and digest any
kind of food. Cooper is a remarka
ble man.
This was followed by the still more
remarkable cure of Mrs Catherine
The millions of readers who have
been delighted for the last thirty years
with the stories of St. Nicholas will
feel a sense of loss in the d^ath of
Maiy Mapes Dodged its editor. To an
unusual extent Mrs. Dodge kept in
sympathy with a childhood which she
never apparently outgrew. He fresh
interest in life and her intimate knowl
edge of the child mind were evident in
every issue of the magazine which she
edited.
Whenever the temperature reaches a
certain point in Switzerland the schools
are dismissed:. This is on the theory
that after a certain degree of suffering
has been reached by both teachers and
ouniLi tha oaa cannot isepart nor. the
W^i^iM^^^d
PBENCBTOlf UNIONS THXTUSDAl^OGTOBER 5^905?
WEALTHY PHILANTROPIST
1STARTLES MINNEAPOLIS
City is Excited Over the Remarkable Cures of a Mys-
terious Han Whose Eccentricities
7 r~ Are Startling.
Strange Stories are Told of a Quiet Stranger Who Distrib-
utes Great Quantities of Food and Clothing and
Cures Disease Without Pay.
Minneapolis, Minn., Oct. 2, 1905.f Mulvihill, a
(Special)The people of this city are No. 2101 Twenty-sixth Ave. S. Mrs.
greatly excited over a number of
remarkable cures which have been
effected by a wealthy philanthropist disease, rheumatism and stomach
who is known as the Great Cooper.
His headquarters at Voegeli's Drug sicians and various remedies had
Store is besieged with crowds of men failed to benefit her and she had de-
and women eager to be cured of their spaired of ever regaining her health.
ills
Cooper is a quiet, gentlemanly per
son, with the appearance of a student ever every trace of her trouble had
disappeared.
The report these remarkabl
cures flew through the city like wild
prominent lady living at
Mulvihill has been sick for fifteen
years with a complication of kidney
trouble, with severe headaches. Phy-
In one week after she began Cooper's
treatment she was feeling as well as
philanthropior work fire and Voegeli'ofDrug"store,where
among the poor. The large fortune Cooper is making his headquarters,
he possesses has made it possible for is besieged by people suffering from
him to distribute many wagon loads
all"manner
of ailments
The physicians of the city are
amazed at the work' he is doing and
have tried to shake the wonderful in
fluence he has over the people even
going so far as to threaten prosecu
tion, but as he does not accept any
money for his services' and does not
give out any~ medicine himself, they
have been powerless to interfere.
Cooper created considerable amuse
ment at the expense of the doctors by
asking them why they did not write
their prescriptions in English, so their
patients would know what they were
taking.
Since the interest has become so
widespread that Cooper cannot meet
the people personally, he is receiving
an enormous mail and keeps a large
force of stenographers employed in
answering it. In the meantime stories
of marvelous cures continue to pour
in.
Mr. Lawrence Tuscany, a prominent
citizen living at No 1112 Aldrich
Ave. North, was confined to his bed
with rheumatism, stomach trouble
and kidney disease he was a very
sick man and had tried doctor after
doctor and spent hundreds of dollars
without relief. had given up all
hope of being cured when he heard of
Cooper and wrote him a description
of his case. The phialnthropist told
him what remedies to use, and in three
days Mr. Tuscany was out of bed and
walking around. In a week he was
apparently as well as ever.
In telling of his remarkable cure,
Mr. Tuscany walked quickly up and
down the room and kicked with his
rheumatic limb in every direction,
saying: I guess that's pretty good
for a man who was confined to his bed
one week ago. I can use my limbs as
well as I ever could in my life. Every
trace of my rheumatism has disap
peared and my stomach and kidneys
are in perfect condition. I don't be
lieve there is another medicine on
earth like the one Mr. Cooper told
me to use, and if I could not get more
of the remedy, I would buy fifty dol
lars' worth right now. It is the great
est medicine I ever heard of."
The philanthropist claims to have
received the formulas of the medicines
he is using from an aged priest in a
sleepy Spanish town in Old Mexico.
The Mexicans believed that holy water
or some supernatural element entered
into their composition.
Cooper receives an enormous daily
mail. Letters are coming from every
part of the State asking for his ad
vice.
The philanthropist reads every let
ter carefully and replies to each one,
advising the remedy which is applica
ble to each individual case.
While his remarkable cures are the
chief topic of conversation, many
stories are heard on the streets and
in business places of his goodness to
the poor. His gifts of food, money
and clothing have relieved a great
amount of distress and have greatly
endeared him to the people.
He is beginning to show the great
strain he has been under the past few
weeks, and it is understood that he
will remain here only one more week.
These remedies are for sale at the
Home Drug Store.
other absorb instruction that would be
of any value, and so the time spent in
attempting it is wasted.
Don't Borrow Trouble.
It is a bad habit to borrow any
thing, but the worst thing you can
possibly borrow, is trouble. When
sick, sore, heavy, weary and worn
out by the pains and poisons of dys
pepsia, biliousness, Bright's disease,
and similar internal disorders, don't
sit down and brood over your symp
toms, but fly for relief to Electric Bit
ters. Here you will find sure and
permanent forgetfulness of alL your
troubles, and your body will not be
burdened by a load of debt disease.
At C. A. Jack's drug store. Price 50c.
Guaranteed.
|M*. D. A. AfcRAE ^my^i
CJLVERO L. MCMILLAN
iSt--*~*S?
T4^ DBNTIST^i^ *?C~
Office in Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON, MINN
Q.ROSS
CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SUBGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore!
Tel.Rural. 36.
Princeton,
LAWYEB.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton,
J.A.
ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office In Carew Block,
Main Street. Princetot.
BU8INE38 CARDS.
HAPMAN & KALIHER,
BABBEB SHOP & BATH BOOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
A. ROSS,
FUNEBAL DIBECTOB.
WiU take full charge of dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer in Monuments of all kinds.
E A. Ross, Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
JULIUS SUQARMAN,
CIGAR MANUFACTURER,
of Princeton.
Finest 5c and 10c Cigars on the Market.
Main Street, Princeton.
O E. LYNCH,
RELIABLE WELL DRILLER.
Twenty years in the well business. Can-give
perfect satisfaction. If you want a good well
call on or address E LTKCH,
Zimmerman, Minn.
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
PRINCETON, MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
life. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment, Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Only non-contagious diseases admitted.
Charges reasonable.
Trained Nurses furnished for sickness
in private families.
Staff of Physicians and Surgeons,
H. C. COONEY, M. D.
Chief of Staff.
N. K. WHITTBMOBB, M. D., H. P. BACON, M. D.,
B. B. HIXSON, M. D., G. BOSS CALEY, M.
D. K. CALDWELL, M. D., A. G. ALDRICH. M. D.
MISS EMMA NORDSTROM, Supt
4
I Our
I Announcement
If you are looking for
beautiful ribbons, fancy
wash silks, newest voiles,
latest figured lawns, good
staple ginghams.
LOOK HERE!
We can also fill your wants in
the grocery line.
IR. BYERS,!
2 Bottom Price Cash Store. i
t
White Front
BAKERYj
Manske & Son, Props.
We Bake Daily.
Full weight, best materials, free
from all impure ingredients.
Fine Pastry
Baking for parties, weddings,
etc., given prompt attention,
Give Us a Call.
Both 'Phones.
Princeton, Minn.
Main St.
Peterson & Nelson
Can set your buggy tires cold while
you are waiting without taking the
wheels off from the buggy or the
bolts out of the wheels.
Oreat Northern Railway.
PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS, PRINCETON
AND DULUTH.
GOIHG SOUTH. GO
Leave.
Duluth. 6:20 a.m.
Brook Park.. 9:15 a.m.
Mora 9:35 a.m.
Ogilvie 9:48 a.m.
Milaca 10:20 a.m.
Pease 10:30 a.m.
L. Siding(f).10:40a.m.
Brickton (f). 10:45 a.m.
Princeton 10:65 a m.
Zimmerman. 11:10 a.m.
Elk River.... 11:36 a.m.
Anoka 12 00 a.m.
Minneapolis. 12:40 p.m.
Ar. St. Paul. 1:05 p.m.
Mfnn
Min
(f) Stop on signal.
IK NORTH.
St. Paul 2:35 p.m
Minneapolis. 3:05 p.m.
Anoka 3:46 p.m.
Elk River.... 4:07 p.m.
Zimmerman. 4:25 p.m.
Princeton. 4:42 p.m.
Brickton (f). 4:47 p.m.-
L. Siding (f). 4:51p.m.
Pease (i).... 5:01 p.m
Milaca 5:80 p.m
Ogilrie 5:45 p.m
Mora 6:02 p.m
Brook Park. 6:25 p.m
Ar. Duluth.. 9:25p.m.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WB8T.
lie. Milaca nniRa
Foreston a
Ar. St. Cloud ."uSSlm.
To c* GOING EA8T.
^'Miiaca ...v:::..::::: 5ico?:S:
WAY FREIGHTy.a
Le
ra Mifa^r
TueSday
Tbursdan
Princeton.'..'..: Elk River..
Ar. Anoka
Le
Saturday.
MOnday We'd"nes'dayandFrida*""-*mn^rlmE'SHMOns
AnX
Elk RiVer.::::::::: IM*
Princeton wnn'
AT. Miiaca 2-50p.m.
ELK
RIVERr
-iSf
6
TRAINS.
Northern.) Fo St.
Paulad.d
an
A
Minneh
apolis, trains leave at 6.0W0 As. M. and 11 35 A
For stations wesftl to Wilhston, N. D. via
Crooksto 9 5P3a P. M.
niF?rVh-en
bou Nort
Coast Limited, 11.50 A M. (at tank). Minne
sota Local, 10 0 A Manitoba Express, 11 47.
P. M. (at tank.) East bound, Manitoba Ex-
Foffl'^x4
Twi City Express, 6 0 2 A
0 tf,
M-8
(at tank) Minnesota Local, 4,14 p. 1L North
toast Limited, 12:48 M. (at tank,) and at
depov Sundays.
MlLLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookO. E. Gustafson. .Princeton
Bcrgholm-Emil Sjoberg Bock
GreenbushR. A. Ross.... Prlnppfcon
Hayland-Alfred F. Johnson.. Mil
Isle HarborOtto A. Eaggbenr T1P
Milaca-OleE. Larson.. mict
Mllo-R. N. Atkinson........ .'.VFCSSSS
KODDinsC. N. Archer Vinpianrt
SoutnHarbor-Chas. Freer ...V covi
East Side-Andrew Kalberg Op'stead
Onamia-G. H. Carr f. Onamia
PageAugust Anderson page
Tn T, V^LA GE RECORDERS.
n'nJl?.
Uman
T" W wl^
J. H.Ward
Chas
W^!f*B?Sok^rJ-P
W
G0UEd rey. Santogo
DalboM? Dalbo
Grain and Produce Market.
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern
Wheat, (new) No 2 Northern.
Corn Oats (new)
Beans (hand picked)
Wild hay...
Flax... Rye (new)
FKATlSKNAIi -:-JLODGE
NO. 92, A & A
Reguler communications, 2d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
B. D. GRANT, W. M.
FRED KEITH, Sec'y.
PKINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, K. of P.
Regular meetings every Tuesday ev
ning at 8 o'clock.
rwT FKAHK iPETERSON. C. C.
OSCAR PETERSON, R. & s.
O M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall.
N. M. NELSON, Com.
W G. FREDERICKS. R.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O. O. P.
Regular meetings every Friday evening at 8 00
ROBT. KING, N. G.
JOHN BOMAN, R. Sec.
The Rural
Telephone Co,
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE.
Lines to Dalbo, Cambridge, Santi
ago. Freer and Olendorado.
Good Service in Princeton and to all
adjoining points. We connect with the
Northwestern Long Distance Telephone.
Patronize a Home Concern.
Service Day and Night.
CRAVENS & KALIHER, Props.
3% Jt,^ Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
"at a noments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialt]
'*0-
Foreston
Princeton
Mllac a
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
SaUtortnH. B. Fisk Princeton
ISSSt
Kauh.::::.::::prK oS Turneerr Spence Broo
WyanettOle Peterson Wyanett
Livonia-M. K. Ihffr Zimmerman
iHr-
-Mattson
8 .73 70
[email protected]
17s!0
[email protected] 50
[email protected]
.84
52
Princeton Roller nils anfl Eleyator.
Wheat, (new) No. 1 Northern.... 74
Wheat, (new) No. 2 Northern 4*
Uat
[email protected]
RBTAJX.
Vestal, per sack i
Flour, (100 per cent)per sack 2452=e
Banner, per sack tni
Rye flour i 7?
Wholewheat (101b. sack)..."
Ground feed, per cwt i"?X
Coarse meal, per cwt jtn
Middlings, per cwt on
Shorts, per cwt "sn
Bran, per cwt
All goods delivered free anvwhere' in Princeton

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