OCR Interpretation


The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, July 05, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1906-07-05/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

THE COMFORTABLE WAY.
GOING SOUTH. GOING NORTH.
6:20 a.m Duluth 9:40p.m.
9:15 a.m Brook Park 6:40 p.m.
9:35 a.m Mora 6:17 p.m.
9:48 a.m Ogllvie 6:oOp.m.
10:20 a.m Milaca 5:35 p.m.
10:30 a.m Pease (f) 5:24p.m.
10:40 a.m. .Long Siding (f). 5:13 p.m.
10.45 a.m Brickton (f).... 5:07p.m.
10 55 a.m Princeton 5:02 p.m.
11:10 a.m Zimmerman 4:45 p.m.
11:35 a.m Elk River 4:26 p.m.
12 00am Anoka 4:05p.m.
12.45 Minneapolis 3:25p.m.
1 10 St. Panl 2:55 p.m.
(f) Stop on signal.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST. GOING EAST.
1018 a. Milaca 5:25 p.m.
10:23 a. Foreston 5:19 p.m.
11.15 a. St. Cloud 5:25 p.m.
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING SOUTH I GOING NORTH
Tue. Thu.andSat Mon. Wed. and Fri.
10:45 a.m Milaca 2:50p.m.
12:30 p. Princeton 1:40 p.m.
2:45 p. Elk River... .11:35a.m.
5'QOp Anoka .10:00 a.m.
Any information regarding sleeping
cars or connections will be furnished at
any time by
GEO E RICE, Agent,
Princeton, Minn.
ELK RIVER TRAINS.
(Great Northern For St. Paul and Minne
apolis, trains leave at 6:00 A. M. and 11:35 A. M.
For stations west to Williston, N. D. via
CrookstOD 9.53 P. M.
(Northern Pacific.) West bound. North
Coast Limited, 11.50 A. M. (at tank). Minne
sota Local, 10.OS A. M. Manitoba Express, 11:47
p. (at tank.) East bound, Manitoba Ex
press, 5 40 A Twin City Express, 6.02 A. M.
(at tank) Minnesota Local, 4.14 P.M. North
Coast Limited, 12.48 P.M. (attank,) and at
depot, Sundays.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookAndrew Jorgenson ..Princeton
BorgholmEmil Sjoberg Bock
GreenbushR A. Ross Princeton
HaylandAlfred F. Johnson Milaca
Isle HarborO. S Swennes Isle
MilacaOle E. Larson Milaca
MiloR. N.Atkinson Foreston
PrincetonOtto Henschel Princeton
RobbinsE. E. Dinwidde Vineland
South HarborChas. Freer Cove
East SideAndrew Kalberg Opstead
OnamiaG. H. Carr Onamia
PageAugust Anderson Page
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
J. C. Borden Princeton
H.Ward Milaca
F. T. P. Neumann Foreston
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinH. B.Fisk Princeton
Blue HillChas. D. Kahher Princeton
Spencer BrookO W.Blomquist Spencer Brook
WyanettP. A. Chilstrom Wyanett
LivoniaCarl Parker Zimmerman
SantiagoW. W. Groundrey Santiago
DalboM. P. Mattson Dalbo
Grain and Produce Market.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern $.75
Wheat, No. 2 Northern 73
Corn 46
Oats 32
Beans (hand picked) [email protected] 40
Wild hay [email protected]
Flax [email protected] 06
Rye [email protected]
Princeton Roller Mills and Elevator.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern $ .75
Wheat, No. 2 Northern 7^
Corn [email protected]
Oats 3032
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack $2.45
Flour, (100 per cent) per sack 2 35
Banner, per sack 195
Rye flour 2.10
Whole wheat (10 lb. sack) 25
Ground feed, per cwt 1.10
Coarse meal, per cwt 1.05
Middlings, per cwt 95
Shorts, per cwt 90
Bran.percwt 8a
All goods delivered free anywhere in Princeton
FRATERNAL. LODGE
NO. 92, A. F. &A.M.
Regular communications,2d and 4th
We^.nesdav of each month.
J. F. ZIMMERMAN, W.
C. A. CALEY, Sec'y.
PRINCETON LODGE,
NO. 93, K. of P.
Regular meetings every Tuesday eve
nly at 8 o'clock.
_, c, S. A. CRAVENS, C. C.
T. F. SCHEEN, K. R. & S.
K. O. T. M.,
Tent No. 17.
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall.
I. G. STANLEY, Com.
W. G. FREDERICK S. R. K.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O.O.F.
Regular meetings every Monday evening at
8 00 o'clock. OSWALD KIN G, N. G.
OSCAR STARK, R. Sec.
The Rural
Telephone Co.
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE.
Lines to Dalbo, Cambridge, Santi
ago. Freer and Glendorado.
J3P~ Good Service in Princeton and to all
adjoining points. We connect with the
Northwestern Long Distance Telephone.
Patronize a Home Concern.
Service Day and Night.
AND FEED BARN.
KALIHER & GALVIN, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a rtoments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty.
i ii'iVnii iiiiiiiiiin iiiii mm
bearin' down hard on 'Family''and
you've got money,' he says, 'and Money
and Family need each other badly in
this town,' he says. 'Yes,' I says, 'I
met up with a number of people here,'
I says, 'but I ain't met none yet that
you'd have to blindfold and back into
a lot of money,' I says, 'family or no
family,' I says. 'And that young man,'
he says, 'is a pleasant, charming fel
low why,' he says, 'he's the best
coated man in New York.' "Well, I
looked at him and I says: 'Well,' says
I, 'he may be the best-coated man in
New York, but he'll be the best-booted
man in New York, too,' I says, 'if he
comes around trying to spark Caroline
any moreor would be it ted say
way. His chin's pushed too far bacR.
under his face,' I says, 'and besides,'
I says, 'Caroline is being waited on by
a young hardware drummer, a good
steady young fellow traveling out of
little old K. C.,' I says, 'and while he
ain't much for fam'ly,' I says, 'he'll
have one of his own before he gets
through,' I says 'we start fam'lies
where I come from,' I says."
"Good boy! Good for you," cheered
the self-made Barbarians, and drank
success to the absent disseminator of
hardware.
With much loud talk of this modi
fying character the dinner progressed
to an end through selle d'agneau,
floated in '84 champagne, terrapin con-
A CAKE WALK.
voyed by a special Madeira of 1850,
and canvasback duck with Romanee
Conti, 1865, to a triumphant finale of
Turkish coffee and 1811 brandy.
After dinner the ladies gossiped of
New York society, while the barbaric
males smoked their big oily cigars and
bandied reminiscences. Higbee showed
them through every one of the apart
ment's 22 rooms, from reception hall
to laundry, manipulating the electric
lights with the skill of a stage man
ager.
The evening ended with a cake walk,
for the musical artists had by rare
wines been mellowed from their classic
reserve into a mood of rag-time aban
don. And if Monsieur the Baron with
his ceremonious grace was less ex
uberant than the crown prince of Crip
ple Creek, who sang as he stepped the
sensuous measure, his pleasure was
not less. He enjoyed to observe that
these men of incredible millions had
DO hauteur.
"I do not," wrote the baron to his
noble father, the marquis, that night,
'yet understand their joke why should
it be droll to wish that the marj whose
coat is of the best should also wear
boots of the best? but as for what
they call une promenade de gateau, I
find it very enjoyable. I have meta
Mile. Bines, to whom I shall at once
pay my addresses. Unlike Mile. Hig
bee, she has not the father from Chi
cago nor elsewhere. Quel diable
d'homme!"
CHAPT*]xl X.
THE PATRICIANS ENTERTAIN.
To reward the enduring who read
politely through the garish revel of
the preceding chapter, covers for 14
are now laid with correct and tasteful
ciuietness at the sophisticated board of
that fine old New York family, the
Milbreys. Shaded candles leave all but
the glowing table in a gloom discreetly
pleasant. One need not look so high
as the old-fashioned stuccoed ceiling.
The family portraits tone agreeably
into the half-light of the walls the
huge old-fashioned walnut sideboard,
soberly ornate with its mirrors, its
white marble top and its wood-carved
fruit, toi/ers majestically aloft in
proud scorn of the frivolous Chippen
dale fad.
Jarvis, the accomplished and incom
parable butler, would be subdued and
scholarly looking but for the flagrant
scandal of his port-wine nose. He
gives finishing little fillips to the white
chrysanthemums massed in the central
epergne on the long silver plateau,
and bestows a last cautious survey
upon the cut-glass and silver radiating
over the dull white damask. Finding
the table and its appointments fault
less, he assures himself once more
that the sherry will come on irre
proachably at a temperature of 60 de
grees that the Burgundy will not fall
below 65 nor mount above 70 for Jar
vis wots of a palace so acutely sensi
tive that it never fails to record a
variation of so much as one degree
from the approved standard of tem
perature.
How restful this quiet and reserve
after the color and line tumult of the
Higbee apartment. There the flush
and bloom of newness were oppressive
to the right-minded. All smelt of the
shop. Here the dull tones and decor
ous lines caress and soothe instead of
overwhelming the imagination with
effects too grossly literal. Here is the
writable spirit of good form.
THE PBINCBTOK TJKioN: THXTBSDAY, JULY 5, 1906.
Throughout th house this contrast
might be noted. It is the brown-stone,
high-stoop house, guarded by a cast
iron fence, built in vast numbers when
the world of fashion moved north to
Murray Hill and Fifth avenue a gen
eration ago. One of these houses was
like all the others inside and out, built
of unimaginative "builder's architec-
ture." The hall, the long parlor, the
back parlor or library, the high stuc
coed ceilingsnot only were these alike
in all the houses, but the furnishings,
too, were apt to be of a sameness in
them all, rather heavy and tasteless,
but serving the ends that such things
should be meant to serve, and never
flamboyant. Of these relics of a sim
pler day not many survive to us, save
in the shameful degeneracy of board
ing houses. But in such as are left,
we may confidently expect to find the
traditions of that more dignified time
kept unsullied to find, indeed, as we
find in the house of Milbrey, a settled
air of gloom that suggests insolvent
but stubbornly determined exclusive
ness.
Something of this air, too, may be
noticed in the surviving tenants of
these austere relics. Yet it would
hardly be observed in this house on
this night, for not only do arriving
guests bring the aroma of a later
prosperity, but the hearts of our host
and hostess beat high with, a new
hope. For the fair and sometimes un
certain daughter of the house of Mil
brey, after many ominous mutterings,
delays, and frank rebellions, has de
clared at last her readiness to be a
credit to her training by conferring her
family prestige, distinction of manner
and charms of person upon one
equipped for their suitable mainten
ance.
Already her imaginative father is
ravishing in fancy the mouldiest wine
cellars c. continental Europe. Already
the fond mother has idealized a house
in "Millionaire's Row" east of the
Park, where there shall be twenty ser
vants instead of three, and there shall
cease that gnawing worry lest the
treacherous north setting current
sweep them west of the Park into one
of those hideously new apartment
houses, where the halls are done in
marble that seem3 to have been sliced
from a huge Roquefort cheese, and
where one must vie, perhaps, with a
shop-keeper for the favors of an ir
reverent and materialistic janitor.
The young woman herself entertains
privately a state of mind which she
has no intention of making public. It
is enough, she reasons, that her action
should outwardly accord with the best
traditions of her class and, indeed, her
family would never dream of demand
ing more.
Her gown to-night is of orchard
green, trimmed with apple blossoms,
a single pink spray of them caught in
her hair. The rounding, satin grace of
her slender arms, sloping to the opal
tipped fingers, the exquisite line from
ear to shoulder strap, the melting ripe
ness of her chin and throat, the tender
pink and white of her fine skin, the
capricious, inciting tilt of her small
head, the dainty lift of her short nose,
these allurements she has inventor
ied with a calculating and satisfied
eye. She is glad to believe that there
is every reason why it will soon be
over.
And, since the whole loaf is notor
iously better than a half, here is the
engaging son of the house, also firmly
bent upon the high emprise of matri
mony handsome, with the chin, it may
be, slightly receding but an unexcelled
leader of cotillions, a surpassing polo
player, clever, winning, and dressed
with an effect that has long made him
remarked in polite circles, which no
mere money can achieve. Money, in
deed, if certain ill-natured gossip of
tradesmen be true, has been an incon
siderable factor in the encompassment
of this sartorial distinction. He waits
now, eager for a first glimpse of the
young woman whose charms, even by
report, have already won the best de
votion he has to give. A grievous er
ror it is to suppose that Cupid's ar
tillery is limited to bow and arrows.
And now, instead of the rude com
mercial horde that laughed loudly and
ate uncouthly at the board of the bar
barian, we shall sit at table with peo
ple born to the only manner said to
be worth possessing if we except, in
deed, the visiting tribe of Bines, who
may be relied upon, however, to be
have at least unobtrusively.
As a contrast to the oppressively
Western matron from Kansas City,
here is Mistress Fidelia Oldaker on
the arm of her attentive son. She
would be very old but for the circum
stance that sue began early in life to
be a belle, and age cannot stale such
women. Brought up with board at her
back, books on her head, to guard her
complexion as if it were her fair name,
to be diligent at harp practice and
conscientious wiflh the dancing master
she is almost the last of a school that
nursed but the single aim of subjugat
ing man. To-night, at seventy some
thing, she is a bit of pink bisque fra
gility, bubbling tirelessly with remin
iscence, her vivacity unimpaired, her
energy amazing, and her coquetry
faultless. From which we should learn,
and be grateful therefor, that when
a girl is brought up in the way she
ought to go she will never be able to
deparV from it.
Here also is Cornelia "Van Geist, sis
ter of our admirable hostessrelict of
a gentleman who had been first or
second cousin to half the people in
society it were really desirable to
know, and whose taste in wines, din
ners, and sports had been widely
ipraised at his death by those who had
|had the fortune to be numbered among
Ihis friends. Mrs. Van Geist has a
kind, shrewd face, and her hair, which
turned prematurely grey while she was
yet a wife, gives her a look of age
that her actual years belie.
Here, too, is Bulon Shepler, the
money-god, his large, round head turn
ing upon his immense shoulders with
out the aid of a necksharp-eyed,
grizzled, fifty, short of stature, and
with as few illusions concerning life
as the New York financier is apt to
retain at his age.
If we be forced to wait for another
guest of note, it is hardly more than
her due for Mrs. Gwilt-Athlestan is
truly a personage, and the best people
on more than one continent do not be
come unduly provoked at being made
to wait for her. Those less than the
very best frankly esteem it a privilege.
Yet the great lady is not careless of
engagements, and the wait is never
prolonged. Mrs. Milbrey has time to
say to her sister, "Yes, we think it's
going and really, it will do very well,
you know. The girl has had some
nonsense in her mind for a year past
none of us can tell whatbut now
she seems actually sensible, and she's
promised to accept when the chap pro
poses." But there is time for no more
gossip.
The belated guest arrives, enveloped
in a vast cloak, and accompanied by
her two nephews, whom Percival Bines
recognizes for the solemn and taciturn
young men he had met in Shepler's
party at_ the mine.
[TO BE CONTINUED.
Lincoln's Mule "Train."
Things are changed of course since
1SG2, aud it is not to be expected that
the presidents of the United States
shall now get around the country as
did Lincoln on one of the most im
portant of his official journeys. The
preliminary proclamation of emanci
pation was issued Sept. 22, 1S62, just
three days after the close of the battle
of Anlietam and one day after Lin
coln's memorable visit to the battle
field to see how the work had been
done. The president had vowed some
weeks previously that as soon as the
army gained some substantial advan
tage he would issue the proclamation.
The battle of Antietam ended with the
retreat of Lee's army from Maryland
back to Virginia on the 19th of Sep
tember. On the 21st Lincoln appeared
on the field, having traveled from the
railway station, some miles distant, in
an old farm carriage drawn by a pair
of inules.
This little journey of the president
was one of his own appointing and not
done to please the people of the region
visited, but nevertheless lots of the
farmer folk of all ages and conditions
dug themselves out of their cellars and
caves when the news went round that
"Old Abe" was in McClellan's camp.
The men and women shook the presi
dent's hands and brought their chil
dren and babes to get a look at him.
Then he turned to the army and the
business in hand, getting points for
the act which will live as long as his
tory. The trip had been taken on im
pulse when news of Lee's retreat from
Maryland reached the White House by
wire. The single railway running out
of Washington was clogged with mili
tary trains, and one of these Lincoln
boarded. When he reached the point
of debarkation the only conveyance to
be found was a rickety farmer's car
riage to which was hitched a pair of
mules taken from the army baggage
train. A truly simple outfit for a
mighty occasion.
Coming Into Uncle Sam's Family.
July 4, 1907, if all goes well, the for
ty-sixth star may be added to the flag
of our Union, for by that time, and
possibly a little earlier, the president
will have proclaimed Oklahoma a state.
It is best to go slow in organizing a
new state out of territories which have
enjoyed a certain degree of political
independence.
The first step for the formation of a
state out of the territories of Oklahoma
and the Indian Territory is the appor
tionment into election districts. When
the apportionment is done the proper
officials must order an election of dele
gates to a convention, which will adopt
the United States constitution and also
prepare a state constitution, to be sub
mitted to the people for ratification or
rejection. State officers will be elect
ed at the same time with the vote on
the state constitution. The state con
stitution must conform to the United
States constitution and in the case of
Oklahoma must also contain certain
special provisions called for by the en
abling act. When the election can
vassers have certified the results, the
president, if the law has been complied
with, will proclaim the election, "and
thereupon the proposed state of Okla
homa shall be deemed admitted to the
Union on an equal footing with the
original states."
The citizens of the new state will be
found to need little schooling in po
litical affairs. The whites, as a rule,
were originally citizens of organized
states, accustomed to political duties.
Many of the Indian tribal leaders are
men of ability and will doubtless rise
to importance in the state councils.
A college which teaches novel read
ing has existed at Backworth, a min
ing center in England, for four years
with such good results that the Lon
don Chronicle thinks the idea should
be extended. That paper's suggestion
that there be established professorships
of novel reading shows the trend of
the movement, which was started on
the basis of a union.
i,^ _,. %jBj&ji&mMto&
First Publication June 14.1906.
Summons.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Mille Lacs.
ss
Notice of Lis Pendens.
STATE OF MINNESOTA, I
County of Mille Lacs, fss'
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Mille Lacs.
In the matter of the petition of E. H.
Cone and others, for a public ditch
in the county of Mille Lacs, State
of Minnesota, designated and num
bered as County Ditch No. 3.
Notice is hereby given, that a peti
tion has been filed in the office of the
county auditor of said county, pray
ing for the construction of a public
ditch, designated and numbered by
the county auditor of such county as
County Ditch No. 3, beginning 1106
feet east and 13 feet south of the
northwest corner of section five (o).
in township thirty-seven (37) north, of
range twenty-seven (27) west of the
4th Principal Meridian, and running
thence in a general southerly direc
tion, through the following described
lands, to-wit: The west half of the
northwest quarter and the west half of
the southwest quarter of section 5
the west half of the northwest quarter,
the southeast quarter of the northwest
quarter, the north half of the south
west quarter, the southeast quarter of
the southwest quarter, and the south
half of the southeast quarter of sec
tion 8 the east half of section 17 the
northeast quarter of the northeast
quarter of section 20: and the west
half of the northwest quarter and the
northwest quarter of the southwest
quarter of section 21: all of above
described lands being in township 37,
range 27: and terminating in Estes
Brook, at a point in the northwest
quarter of the southwest quarter of
secton 21, township and range afore
said, 647 feet east and 646 feet south
of the northwest corner of the south
west quarter of said section 21.
Also branch ditch "A," beginning
400 feet west and 24 feet north of the
southeast corner of section 8. town
ship 37, range 27, and running thence
west, parallel to the south line of said
section 8, a distance of 956j^ feet, and
terminating in the main ditch at sta
tion 118 plus 27.
Also branch ditch "B," beginning
1327 feet north and 20 feet west of the
southeast corner of section 8, town
ship 37, range 27, and running thence
in a general southwesterly direction,
through the southeast quarter of the
southeast quarter of said section 8,
and terminating at station 2 of branch
ditch "A" heretofore described, as
appears by the report of the engineer
hereinafter mentioned and that the
names of the owners of the lands and
the names of the municipal and other
corporations that will be affected by
the construction of said ditch, as ap
pears in the report of the viewers
hereafter mentioed are as follows, to
wit: Magdalena Moline, August Mo
line, Andrew Moline, John Landman,
E. S. Ladblad, William Bergstrom,
John Nylen, August Lindstrom, Ju
liana Nelson, Peter Johnson, Lina
Johnson, Gust Nystrom, Wm. E.
Trumble, John Goulett, Aulger Rines,
H. P. Stanchfield, George Johnson,
Christ Hogan, Knute Carlson, Swan
Olson, Henry Wicklund, Jacob Kling,
Julius LeMay, August Blomberg,
Sylvester Cone Heirs, Margaret Wil
son, George H. Deans, Louis Nyholm,
Town of Milo, Town of Miaca, and
Great Northern Railway Co., and
that the engineer appointed by the
board of county commissioners of
said county to make a survey of the
route of said ditch has completed his
work and made due report hereon,
and filed the same in the office of said
county auditor: and that the viewers
appointed by said board of county
commissioners to view the same have
completed their work and filed their
report thereon in the office of said
county auditor.
And that, therefore, the board of
county commissioners of Mille Lacs
county, State of Minnesota, will hold
a special meeting on Friday, the 20th
day of July, 1906, at the county audi
tor's office in the village of Princeton,
in said county, at 11 o'clock a. m., of
said day, for hearing and considera
tion of said petition and of said sur
veyor's and viewers' report thereon
and that all persons interested in the
construction of said ditch are invited
to appear and be heard by and before
said board of county commissioners
at said time for or against the con
struction of said ditch.
E. E. WHITNEY,
County Auditor of fMille Las County,
Minnesota.
[Auditor's Seal.]
^k^km^^MM^^^^M^,hk^S&i^^
SS.
PJ HI
District Court.
Robert H. King, Plaintiff,
Ellen P. Spiller, Ellen Prentiss Spille.
Jennie Prentiss Hrown. William A.
Prentiss, Josephine A. Bates, Carroll
R. King. Myra King, and Joseph W.
Prentiss also all other persons un
known claiming any right, title, estate.
interest or lien in the real estate de- I
scribed in the convolaint herein. De
fendants,
The State of Minnesota to the above named
defendants-
You are hereby summoned and required to
answer the complaint of the plaintiff in the
above entitled action, which complaint has
been filed in the office of the clerk of the dis
trict court of said county, and to serve a copy
of your answer to the said complaint on the
subscriber, at his office in the village of Prince
ton, in said Mille Lacs county, within twenty
days after the service of the summons upon
you, exclusive of the day of service, and if you
fail to answer said complaint within the time
aforesaid, the plaintiff will apply to the court
for the relief demanded in said complaint.
Dated June 11th, 1906
J. A. Eoss,
Plaintiffs Attorney, Princeton, Minn.
District Court.
Robert H. King, Plaintiff,
vs.
Ellen P. Spiller, Ellen Prentiss Spille.
Jennie Prentiss Brown. William A.
Prentiss, Josephine A. Bates, Carroll
R. King, Myra King, and Joseph W.
Prentiss also all other persons un
known claiming any right, title, estate,
interest, or lien in the real estate de
scribed in the complaint herein, De
fendants. To whom it may concern:
Take notice, that an action has been com
menced and is now pending in the district
court of the county of Mille Lacs, in the State
of Minnesota: that the names of the parties,
plaintiff and defendants, are respectively as
above written: that the object of said action
is to determine the respective adverse claims
of the parties in and to the real estate herein
after described and to obtain a judgment that
the plaintiff is the sole owner of all said real
estate that the defendants have no right, ti
tle, estate, lien or interest therein. The
real estate effected, involved and brought
in question by said action is in said Mille Lacs
county and described as follows: The north
east
quartersectio
of the southeast quarter (NE
the SE1^),
thirty-on (31) townshif
thirty-seven (37), range twenty-six (26).
J. A. Ross,
Plaintiff Attorney. Princeton. Minn.
Auditor's Notice of Hearing on Peti
tion in Ditch Proceedings.
st8f^?"!fS^ffSP
.asy yifrrrr^ ^'W^l-**
It has caused laughs and dried
more tears, wiped away diseases and
driven away more fears than any other
medicine in the world. Hollister's
Rocky Mountain Tea. 35 cents, tea
or tablets. C. A. Jack.
(First publication May 24,1906.)
Summons.
STATE OF MINNESOTA
County of Mille Lacs.
District Court, Seventh Judicial District.
Charles Keith, Plaintiff,
vs.
David C. Anderson, Mary J. Ander
son, Junius B. Anderson. Philip W. An
derson, Samuel F. Hersey, Jacob Bean,
Minnie T. Grimes. J. P. Bowman
Frank Harper, Robert Blackwood,
Northwestern Improvement Company,
M. W Dexter. Eastern Minnesota Land
Company. William H. Ennis. James E.
Merrick, William A. Zumpfe. also all
other persons or parties unknown
claiming any right, title, estate, lien or
interest in the real estate described in
the complaint herein. Defendants.
The State of Minnesota, to the above named
defendants:
You are hereby summoned and required to
answer the complaint of the plaintiff in the
above entitled action, which complaint has
been filed in the office of the clerk of said dis
trict court, at the village of Princeton, county
of Mille Lacs and state of Minnesota, and to
serve a copy of your answer to said complaint
on the subscriber, at his office in the village of
Princeton in the county of Mille Lacs, within
twenty (30) days after service of this sum
mons upon you, exclusive of the day of such
service and if you fail to answer the said com
plaint within the time aforesaid the plaintiff
in this action will apply to the court for the
relief demanded in said complaint, together
with plaintiff's costs and disbursements herein.
CHARLES KEITH,
Plaintiff and Attorney per se,
Princeton, Minn.
Notice of Lis Pendens.
STATE OF MINNESOTA. I
County of Mille Lacs.
ss
District Court. Seventh Judicial District.
Charles Keith, Plaintiff,
vs.
David C. Anderson, Mary J. Ander
son, Junius B. Anderson, Philip W. An
derson, Samuel F. Hersey, Jacob Bean,
Minnie T. Grimes, J. Bowman,
Frank Harper, Robert Blackwood,
Northwestern Improvement Company,
M. W. Dexter. Eastern Minnesota Land
Company, William H. Ennis. James E.
Merrick. William A. Zumpfe, also all
other persons or parties unknown
claiming any right, title, estate. Jien or
interest in the real estate described in
the complaint herein, Defendants.
Notice is hereby given, that an action has
been commenced in this court by the above
named plaintiff against the above named de
fendants: that the object of said action is to
determine the adverse claim of the defendants,
and each and all of them, and the rights of the
parties respectively herein, in and to the real
estate hereinafter described and asking that
said adverse claim of the defendants, and each
of them, may be adjudged by the court null
and void, and that the title of said real estate
may be adjudged and decreed to be in the
plaintiff, and that the premises affected by said
action, situated in the counties of Mille Lacs
and Kanabec, in the State of Minnesota, are
described as follows:
The northwest quarter of the northeast
quarter, and the northeast quarter of the
northwest quarter of section nineteen (19),
township thirty-seven (37), range twenty-six
(26) the northwest quarter of section twenty
two (22), township thirty-eight O"), range
twenty-seven (27): the north half of the north
west quarter of section three (3). township
thirty-eight (3S), range twenty-six (26): the
northwest quarter of the northwest quarter of
section five (5), township thirty-nine (39),
range twenty-seven (27): the souths est quar
ter of the southwest quarter of section twenty
eight (28), township forty (40), range twenty
six (26) the southeast quarter of the south
east quarter of section twenty-six (26). town
ship forty-two (42), range twenty-five (25)
and the south half of the southeast quarter
and the southeast quarter of the southwest
quarter of section thirty-one (31). township
thirty-eight (3S), range twenty-five (25).
CHARLES KEITH,
Plaintiff and Attorney per se,
Princeton. Minn.
First publication June T. 190C.
Mortgage Foreclosure Sale.
Default having been made in the payment of
the sum of twelve hundred one and 11-100 dol
lars, which is claimed to be due and is due at
the date of this notice upon a certain mortgage
duly executed and delivered by Fred Beto sin
gle man. mortgagor, to J.I. Case Threshing
Machine Company, a corporation, mortgagee
bearing date the second day of June. 1903, and
with a power of sale therein contained, duly
recorded in the office of the register of deeds in
and for the county of Mille Lacs and State of
Minnesota, on the second day of June, 1903, at
one o'clock m.. in book of mortgages, on
pages 549 and 550, and no action or proceeding
having been instituted, at law or otherwise to
recover the debt secured by said mortgage or
any part thereof.
Now. therefore, notice is hereby given, that
by virtue of the power of sale contained in said
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such
case made and provided, the said mortgage
will be foreclosed by a sale of the premises de
scribed in and conveyed by said mortgage, viz:
The south half of the northeast quarter of
section twenty-one (21). in township thirty-six
(S6). north, of range twenty-seven (27), west,
in Mille Lacs county and State of Minnesota,
with the hereditaments and appurtenances
which sale will be made by the sheriff of said
Mille Lacs county.at the front door of the court
house in the village of Princeton, in said coun
ty and state, on the 21st day of July. 1906, at 10
o'clock A. M.. of that day, at public vendue, to
the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt of
twelve hundred one and 11-100 dollars, and in
terest, and the taxes, if any. on said premises,
and fifty dollars, attorney's fees, as stipulated
in and by said mortgage in case of foreclosure,
and the disbursements allowed by law sub
ject to redemption at any time within one year
from the day of sale as provided by law
Dated June 1st. A. D. 1905.
J. I. CASE THRESHING MACHINE COMPANY.
CHARLES KEITH. Attorney. Mortgagee.
First publication June 14, 19CC.
Mortgage Foreclosure Sale.
Whereas, default has been made in the con
ditions of that certain mortgage bearing date
the ISth day of December, A. D. 1902. made ex
ecuted and delivered by W. A. Pitmon and
Emma Pitmon, his wife, mortgagors, unto The
Grinds Company, a corporation, mortgagee,
which mortgage was duly recorded in the office
of the register of deeds of the county of Mille
Lacs, Minnesota, on the 31st day of December
1902, at the hour of ten o'clock A. M.. in book
'N of mortgages on page 364. and
Whereas, there is now due and claimed to be
due upon said mortgage the sum of se\ en hun
dred forty-five and 69-100 dollars (5745 69). and
no action or proceeding at law, or otherwise,
have been instituted to recover the debt se
cured by said mortgage, nor any part thereof,
Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that
under and by virtue of the power of sale in said
mortgage contained and therewith recorded
and pursuant to the statute in such case made
and provided, the said mortgage will be fore
closed by a sale of the premises described
therein which are situate in the county of MiUe
Lacs and State of Minnesota, and described as
follows, to-wit:
The southwest quarter of the southeast quar
ter (SW# SEJi) of section twenty-three (23)
township thirty-seven (37) range twenty-seven
(27) west of the fourth principal meridian, less
one acre, described as follows, to-wit: Begin
ning at the point situated in the center of high
way in the southwest corner of the southwest
quarter of the southeast quarter (SWj SE\)
of section twenty-three (23) township thirty
seven (37) range twenty-seven (27) west of the
fourth principal meridian: thence running east
along the southerly boundary line of said sec
tion twenty (20) rods thence running north
and parallel to the easterly boundary line of
said section eight (8) rods: thence west and
parallel to the southern boundary line of said
scetion twenty (20) rods: thence running south
and parallel to the eastern boundary line of
said section to the point of beginning said
described tract containing thirty-nine acres.
Which sale will be made by the sheriff of said
Mille Lacs county at the front door of the court
house in the village of Princeton in said MiUe
Lacs county, on the 28th day of July. A. D.
1906. at ten o'clock in the forenoon of said day,
at public vendue, to the highest bidder, for
jcash, to pay and satisfy said mortgage debt
and interest and the taxes upon said real es
tate, if any. and fifty dollars attorney's fees
stipulated in said mortgage to be paid in case
of foreclosure and the disbursements allowed
by law.
Dated St. Cloud, Minn.. June 11th. 1906.
HE GBINOLS COMPANY,
STEWA RT & BBOWER, Mortgagee.
Attorneys for Mortgagee.
St. Cloud, Minn.
f-
i
%4
wSA&^j

xml | txt