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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, August 23, 1906, Image 6

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"I see. This Mauburn isn't good
enough for your family, but you reck
on he's good enough, for me? Is that
it, now?"
"Come, Mrs. Wybert, let's be broad.
That's the game you like, and I don't
criticise you fur it. It's a good game
if that's the kind of a game you're
huntin' fur. And you can play it bet
ter'n my granddaughter. She wa'n't
meant fur itand I'd rather have her
marry an American, anyhow. Now
you like it, and you got beautyonly
you need more money. I'll put you in
the way of it, and you can cut out my
granddaughter."
"I must think about it. Suppose I
plunge in copper, and your tip isn't
straight. I've seen hard times, Mr.
Bines, in my life. I haven't always
wore sealskin and diamonds."
"Mrs. Wybert, you was in Montana
long enough to know how I stand
there?"
"I know you're A 1, and your word's
as good as another man's money. I
don't question your good intentions."
'It's my judgment, hey? Now, look
here, I won't tell you what I know and
how I know it, but you can take my
word that I know I do know. You
plunge in copper right off, without
saying a word to anybody or makin"
any splurge, and here"
From the little table at his elbow
he picked up the card that had an
nounced him and drew out his pencil.
"You said my word was as good as
another man's money. Now I'm going
to write on this card just what you
have to do, and you're to follow direc
tions, no matter what you hear about
other people doing. There'll be all
sorts of reports about that stock, but
you follow my directions."
He wrote on the back of the card
with his pencil.
"Consolidated Copper, remember
and now I'm a-goin' to write some
thing else under them directions.
'Do this up to the limit of your
capital and I will make good anything
"YOU THINK IT OVER
you lose.' There, Mrs. Wybert, I've
signed that 'Peter Bines.' That card
wouldn't be worth a red apple in a
court ot law. but you know me, and
you know it's good fur every penny
you lose."
"Really. Mr. Bines, you half-way
persuade me. I'll certainly try the
copper playand about the other
wellwe'll' see I don't promise, mmd
you!"
"You think over it. I'm sure you'll
like the ideathink of bein' in' that
great nobility, and bein' around them
palaces with their dukes and counts.
Think how these same New York
women will meach to you then!"
The old man rose.
"And mind, follow them directions
and no othermakes no difference
what you hear, or I won't be respon
sible. And I'll rely on you, ma'am,
never to let anyone know about my
visit, and to send me back that little
document after you've cashed in."
He left her studying the card with a
curious little flash of surprise.
CHAPTER XXIII.
TH E SPENDER S
A TALE OF THE THIRD GENERATION
By HARRY LEON WILSON
i_l_
Copyright, by Lothrop Publishing Company.
THE AMATEJL'R NAPOLEON OF WALL,
STREET
At the beginning of April, the sit
uation in the three stocks Percival had
bought so heavily grew undeniably
tense. Consolidated Copper went from
L09 to 103 in a week. But Percivars
enthusiasm suffered little abatement
from the drop.
"You see." he reminded Uncle Peter,
"it isn't exactly what I expected, but
it's right in line with it, so it doesn't
alarm me. I knew those fellows inside
were bound to hammer it down if they
could. It wouldn't phase me a bit if
it sagged to 95."
"My! My!" Uncle Peter exclaimed,
with warm approval, "the way you
master this business certainly does
win me. I tell you, it's a mighty good
thing we got your brains to depend
on. I'm all right the other side of
Council Bluffs, but I'm a tenderfoot
here, sure, where everybody's tr'yin' to
get the best of you. You see, out there!
everybody tries to make the best of It.
I told that to one of them smarties
last night. But you'll pull them in
their place all right. You know both
ends of the game and the middle. We
certainly got a right to be proud of
you, son. Dan'l J. liked big proposi
tions himselfbut, well, I'd just like
to have him see the nerve you've
showed, that's all."
Uncle Peter's professions of confi
dence were unfailing, and Percival
took new hope and faith in his judg
ment from them daily.
Nevertheless, as the weeks passed,
and the mysterious insiders succeeded
in their design of keeping the stock
from rising, he came to feel a touch
of anxiety. More, indeed, than he was
able to communicate to Uncle Peter,
without confessing outright that he
had lost faith in himself. That he
was unable to do, even if it were true,
which he doubted. The Bines fortune
was now hanging, as to all but some
of the western properties, on the turn
ing of the three stocks. Yet the old
man's confidence in the young man's
acumen was invulnerable. No shaft
that Percival was able to fashion had
point enough to pierce it. And he
was loth to batter it down, for he still
had the gambler's faith in his luck.
"You got your father's head in busi
ness matters," was Uncle Peter's in
variable response to any suggestion of
failure. "I know that muchspite of
what all these gossips sayand that's
all I want to know. And of course
you can't ever be no Shepler 'less you
take your share of chances. Only don't
ask my advice. You're master' of the
game, and we're all layin' right smack
down on your genius fur it."
Whereupon the young man, with
confidence in himself newly inflated,
would hurry off to the stock tickers.
He had ceased to buy the stocks out
right, and for several weeks had
bought only on margins.
"There was one rule in poker your
pa had." said Uncle Peter. "If a hand
is worth calling on, it's worth raising
on. He jest never would call. If he
didn't think a hand was worth raising,
he'd bunch it in with the discards, and
wait fur another deal. I don't know
much about the game, but he said it
was a sounS rule, and if it is sound
in poker, why it's got to be sound in
this game. That's all I can tell you.
You know what you hold, and if 'tain't
a hand to lay down, it must be a hand
to raise on. Of course, if you'd been
brash and ignorant in your first cal
culationsif you'd made a fool of
yourself at the startbut shucks!
you're the son of Daniel J. Bines, ain't
you?"
The rule and the clever provocation
had tneir effect.
"I'll raise as long as I have a chip
left, Uncle Peter. Why, only to-day
I had a tip that came straight from
Snepler. though he never dreamed it
would reach me. That Pacific Cable
bill is going to be rushed through at
this session OL congress, sure, and that
means enough increased demand to
send Consolidated back where it was.
And then, when it comes out that
they've got those Rio Tinto mines by
the throat, well, this anvil chorus will
have to stop, and those Federal Oil
sharks and Shepler will be wondering
how I had the face to stay in."
The published rumors regarding Con
solidated began to conflict very sharp
ly. Percival heard them all hungrily,
disregarding those that did not con
firm his own opinions. He called them
irresponsible newspaper gossip, or be
lieved them to be inspired by the
clique for its own ends.
He studied the history of copper
until he knew all its ups and downs
since the great electrical development
began in 1887. When Fouts, th3 bro
ker he traded most heavily with, sug
gested that the Consolidated company
was skating on thin ice. that it m'ght,
indeed, be going through the same ex
perience that Mattered the famous
Secretan cornei a dozen years before,
Percival pointed out unerringly the
vital differences in the circumstances.
The Consolidated had reduced the pro
duction of its controlled mines, and
the price was bound to be maintained.
When his adviser suggested that the
companies not in the combine might
cut the price, he brought up the very
lively rumors of a "gentlemen's agree
ment" with the "non-combine" pro
ducers.
"Of course, there's Calumet and
Hecla. I know that couldn't be gunned
into the combination. They could pay
dividends with copper at ten cents a
pound. But the other independents
know which side of their stock is
spread with dividends, all right."
When it was further suggested that
the Rio Tinto mines had sold ahead
for a year, with the result that Euro
pean imports from tne United States
had fallen off, and that the Consoli
dated could not go on forever holding
up the price, Percival said nothing.
The answer to that was the secret
negotiations for control of the Euro
pean output, which would make the
Consolidated master of the copper
world. Instead of disclosing this, he
pretended craftily to be encouraged by
mere generally hopeful outlook in
all lines. Western Trolley, to, might
be overcapitalized, and Union Cordage
might also be in the hands of a pirat
ical clique but the demand for trolley
lines was growing every day, and
cordage products were not going out
of fashion by any means.
"You see," he said to his adviser,
"nere's what the most conservative
man in the street says in this after
noon's paper. 'That copper must nec
essarily break badly, and the whole
boom collapse I do not believe. There
is enough prosperity to maintain a
strong demand for the metal through
another year at least. As to Western
Trolley and Union Cordage, the two
other stocks about which doubt is now
being so widely expressed in the
street, I am persuaded that they are
both due to rise, not sensationally, but
at a healthy upward rate that makes
them sound investments!'
"There," said Percival, "there's the
judgment of a man that knows the
game, but doesn't happen to have a
dollar in either stock, and he doesn't
know one or two things that I know,
either. Just hypothecate 10,000 of
those Union Cordage shares and 5,000
Western Trolley, and buy Consolidated
on a 20 per cent, margin. I want to
get bigger action. There's a good rule
in poker: if your hand is worth call
ing, it's worth raising."
"I like your nerve," said the broker.
"Well, I know some one who has a
sleeve with something up it, that's all."
By the third week in April, it was
believed that his holdings of Consoli
dated were the largest in the street,
excepting those of the Federal Oil
people. Uncle Peter "was delighted by
the magnitude of his operations, and
by his newly formed habits of indus
try.
"It'll be the makings of the boy,"
he said to Mrs. Bines in her son's pres
ence. "Not that I care so much my
self about all the millions he'll pile up,
but it gives him a business training,
and takes him out of the pinhead
class. I bet Shepler himself will be
takin' off his silk hat to your son,
jest as soon as he's made this turn in
copperif he has enough of Dan'l J.'s
grit to hang onand I think he has."
"They needn't wait another day for
me," Percival told him later. "The
family treasure is about all in now,
except ma's amethyst earrings and the
hair watch chain Grandpa Cummings
had. Of course I'm holding what I
promised for Burman. But that rise
can't hold off much longer, and the
only thing I'll do, from now on, is to
hock a few blocks of the stock I
bought outright, and buy on margins,
so's to get bigger action."
"My! My! you jest do fairly dazzle
me," exclaimed the old man, delight
edly. "Oh, I guess your pa wouldn't
be at all proud of you if he could see
it. I tell you, this family's all right
while you keep hearty."
"Well, I'm not pushing my chest out
any," said the young man, with be
coming modesty, "but I don't mmd
telling you it will be the biggest thing
ever pulled off down there by any one
man."
"That's the true western spirit," de
clared Uncle Peter, beside himself with
enthusiasm. "We do things big when
we bother 'em at all. We ain't afraid
of any pikers like Shepler, with his
little two and five thousand lots. Oh!
I can jest hear 'em callin' you hard
names down in that Wall streetNa
poleon of Finance and Copper King
and all like thatin about 30 days!"
He accepted Percival's invitation
that afternoon to go down into the
street with him. They stopped for a
moment in the visitors' gallery of the
stock exchange and looked down into
the mob of writhing, disheveled, shout
ing brokers. In and out, the throng
swirled upon itself, while above its
muddy depths surged a froth of hands
in frenzied gesticulation. The frantic
movement and din of shrieks disturbed
Uncle Peter.
"Faro is such a lot quieter game."
was his comment "so much more calm
and restful. What a pity, now, 'tain't
as Christian!"
CHAPTER XXIV.
HOW THE CHINOOK CAME T WALL
S1REET
The loss of much money is com
monly a subject to be managed with
brevity and aversion by one who sits
down with the light reverence for
sheets of clean paper To bewail is
painful. To affect lightness, on the
other hand, would, in this age, savor
of insincerity, if not of downright
blasphemy. More than a bare recital
of the wretched facts, therefore, is not
seemly.
The Bines fortune disappeared much
as a heavy fall of snow melts under
the Chinook wind.
That phenomenon is not uninterest
ing. We may picture a far-reaching
waste of snow, wind-furrowed until it
resembles a billowy white sea frozen
motionless. The wind blows half a
gale and the air is full of fine ice crys
tals that sting the face viciously. The
sun, lying low on the southern horizon,
seems a mere frozen globe, with lus
trous pink crescents encircling it.
One day the wind backs and shifts.
A change portends. Even the herds of
half-frozen range cattle sense it by
some subtle beast knowledge. They
are no longer afraid to lie down as
they may have been for a week. THe
danger of freezing has passed. The
temperature has been at 50 degrees
below zero. Now, suddenly it begins
to rise. The air is scarcely in mo
tion, but occasionally it descends as
out of a blast furnace from overhead.
To the southeast is a mass of dull
black clouds. Their face is unbroken.
But the upper edges are ragged, torn
by a wind not yet felt below. Two
hours later its warmth comes. In ten
minutes the mercury goes up 35 de
grees. The wind comes at a 30-mile
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 1906.
velocity. It increases in strength ana
warmth, blowing with a mighty roar.
Twelve hours afterward the snow,
three feet deep on a level, has melted.
There are bald, brown hills every
where to the horizon, and the plains
are flooded with water. The Chinook
has come and gone. In this manner
suddenly went the Bines fortune.
April 30, Consolidated Copper closed
at 91. Two days later, May 2, the
drop of 40 points. Roughly the decline
meant the loss of $100,000,000 to the
15,000 shareholders. From every city
same ill-fated stock closed at 51a
of importance in the country came
tales more or less tragic of holdings
wiped out, of ruined families, of defal
cations and suicides. The losses in
New York city alone were said to be
$50,000,000. A few large holders, re
puted to enjoy inside information,
were said to have put their stock aside
and "sold short" in the knowledge of
what was coming. Such tales are al
ways popular in the street.
Others not less popular had to do
wim the reasons for the slump. Many
were plausible. A deal with the Roths
childs for control of the Spanish mines
had fallen through. Or, again, the
slaughter was due to the Shepler group
of Federal Oil operators, who were
bent on forcing some one to unload a
great quantity of the stock so that
they might absorb it. The immediate
causes were less recondite. The Con
solidated company, so far from con
trolling the output, was suddenly
shown to control actually less than 50
per cent, of it. Its efforts to amend
or repeal the hardy old law of Supply
and Demand had simply met with the
indifferent success that has marked all
such efforts since the first attempted
corner in stone hatchets, or mastodon
tusks, or whatever it may have been.
In the language of one of its news
paper critics, the "trust" had been
"founded on misconception and
prompted along lines of self-destruc
tion. Its fundamental principles were
the restriction of product, the in
crease of price and the throttling of
competition, a trinity that would
wreck any combination, business, po
litical or social."
With this generalization we have no
concern As to the copper situation,
the comment was pat. It had been
suddenly disclosed, not only that no
combination could be made to include
the European mines, but that the Con
solidated company had an unsold sur
plus of 150.0u0.000 pounds of copper
that it was producing 20,000,000 pounds
a month more than could be sold, and
that it had made large secret sales
abroad at from two to three cents be
low the market price.
As if fearing that these adverse con
ditions did not sufficiently insure the
stock's downfall, the Shepler group of
Federal Oil operators beat it down
further with what was veritably a
golden sledge. That is, they exported
gold at a loss. At a time when obliga
tions could have been met more cheap
ly with bought bills they sent out
many golden cargoes at an actual loss
of $300 on the half million. As money
was already dear, and thus became
dearer, the temptation and the means
to hold copper stock, in spite of all dis
couragements, were removed from the
paths of hundreds of the harried hold
ers.
Incidentally, Western Trolley had
gone into the hands of a receiver, a
failure involving another $100,000,000,
and Union Cordage had fallen 35
points through sensational disclosures
as to its overcapitalization.
Into this maelstrom of a panic'mar
ket the Bines fortune had been sucked
with a swiftness so terrible that the
family's chief advising member was
left dazed and incredulous.
For two days he clung to the ticker
tape as to a life line. He had com
mitted the millions of the family as
ligfctly as ever he had staked $100 on
the turn of a card or left ten ,on the
change-tray for his waiter.
Then he had seen his cunningly built
toundations, rested upon with hopes so
high for three months, melt away like
snow when the blistering Chinook
comes.
It has been thought wise to adopt
two somewhat differing similes in tne
foregoing, in order that the direness of
the tragedy may be sufficiently appre
hended.
The morning of the first of the two
last awful days, he was called to the
office of Fouts & ttendricks by tele
phone.
"Something going to happen in Con
solidated to-day."
He had hurried downtown, flushed
with confidence. He knew there was
but one thing could happen. He had
reached the office at ten and heard the
first vicious little click of the ticker
that beating heart of the stock ex
changeas it began the unemotional
story of what men bought and sold
over on the floor. Its inventor died in
the poorhouse, but capital would fare
badly without his machine. Consoli
dated was down three points. The
crowd about the ticker grew absorbed
at once. Reports came in over the
telephone. The bears had made a set
for the stock. It began to slump rap
idly. As the stock was goaded down,
point by point, the crowd of traders
waxed more excited.
As the stock fell, the banks request
ed the brokers to margin up their
loans, and the brokers, in turn, re
quested Percival to margin up his
trades. The shares he had bought out
right went to cover thft shortage in
those he had bought on a 20 per cent,
margin. Loans were called later, and
marginal accounts wiped out with ap
palling informality.
Yet when Consolidated suddenly ral
lied three points just at the close of
the day's trading, he took much com
fort in it as an omen of the morrow.
That night, however, he took but little
satisfaction in Uncle Peter's renewed
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
R. D. A. McRAE DENTIST
_. Office in Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON, MINN
R. F. L. SMALL, DENTIST.
Office hours 9 a. m. to 12 in- 2 p. m. to 5 p. m.
Over E. B. Anderson's store.
Princeton, Minn.
Q.
ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office and Residence over Jack's Drugstore
TelRural,36.
Princeton, mnn.
JLVERO L. MCMILLAN,
LAWYER.
Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Princeton, Minn.
J.
A. ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew BJock,
Main Street. Princeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
n. KALIHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Princeton.
I OUIE HORSTMAN,
TONSORIAL PARLORS.
The latest styles in hair cutting. Everything
First class. (Brown's old stand.)
First Street, Princeton.
A. ROSS,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR.
Will take full charge of dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always in stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer in Monuments of all kinds.
E A. Ross Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
JULIUS SUQARMAN,
CIGAR MANUFACTURER,
of Princeton.
Finest 5c and 10c Cigars on the Market.
Rural Phone 415 Princeton, Minn
R.
E. LYNCH,
RELIABLE WELL DRILLER.
Twenty years in the well business. Can give
perfect satisfaction. If you want a good well
call on or address R. E. LYNCH,
Zimmerman, Minn.
JOHN BARRY
Expert Accountant,
Over 30 Years Experience.
1011 First Ave. North.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
PRINCETON. MINN.
Long Distance 'Phone 313.
Centrally located. All the comforts of home
life. Unexcelled service. Equipped with every
modern convenience for the treatment and the
cure of the sick and the Invalid. All forms of
Electrical Treatment, Medical Baths, Massage.
X-ray Laboratory, Trained Nurses in attend
ance. Only non-contagious diseases admitted,
Charges reasonable.
Trained Nurses furnished for sickness
in private families.
Staff of Physicians and Surgeons,
H. C. COONEY, M. D.
Chief of Staff.
N. K. WHITTEMOBE, M. D., H. P. BACON, M. D.,
K. B. HIXSON, M. D., G. ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
D. K. CALDWELL, M. D., A. G. ALDBICH. M.
MISS HONORA BRENNAN. Supt.
AdvertisingFays
When you advertise in the
columns of the PRINCETON
UNION. The UNION has the
largest bona fide list of sub
scribers of any newspaper
published in the Eighth Con.
gressional district outside of
Duluth. The UNION has twice
the circulation of all the other
newspapers of Mille Lacs coun
ty combined. The UNION has
hundreds of subscribers in the
counties of Isanti, Benton and
Sherburne and is a weekly
visitor in almost every home
in Mille Lacs county. Yes,
it pays to advertise in the
PRINCETON UNION
R. D, BYERS
Calls attention
to his Bargains
in all lines of
Goods.
Investigate!
D. BYERS,
Bottom Price Cash Store.
H. W. BARKER'S
S
THE COMFORTABLE WAY.
R?GSODTH-
OIKG
Duluth
:?9a
10?i8
I a
NORTH.
9:40 p.m.
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6:17 p.m.
6:oO p.m.
5:35 p.m.
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Brook Park
Hg
a
i:|8a.m OgiMe
}0|0a.m Mi lac a
10:30 a.m (f)
'?2a-m-
-^onPease Sidin (fj*.*
J=45a.m Bricktoa
10:55a.m. ..Princeton
n:I0-a.m...
.Zimmerman".'.". Elk River....".'
a
Anoka
a
Minneapolis..
?2
p,
i-JOp-m--.-E
St. Paul
(f) Stop
ST CLOU TRAINSG
onTsignal.
S
in-'ol I'
GOIN EAST.
-Milaca 5:25 p. m.
{:^a-m Foreston. 5:19 p.m
St Cloud 5:25 p.
a
11:1
5
WAY FREIGHT.
nw'SS
SOUT,H
?r?Jk
I GOING NORTH
andSa Mon. Wed.andFri.
J2:$ -MUaca 2:50p. m.
12.30 p. Princeton
& P-J?
E1Ak
River... .11:35a.m..m.pAOI
**f
-"P-
urnishe
Anokia" 10:00a. m
Any information regarding sleeping
any3ttoeby
S
W
eCtl
GEO. E RICE, Agent,
Princeton, Minn.
ELK RIVER TRAINS.
(Great Northern.) For St Paul anri ATT,,O
apolis trains leave at%?mZ^S&n-S A
CoSrSteriS A Platte?
Local, 10 08 A"M MJSlSba^reJ^S?
P. M. (at tank.) East bound, Manitoba F'Tth
press, 5:40 A. si. Twin City Express^ fio*
(at tank) Minnesota8Local, *MP M?'- North
2SSLlg&
^tank'a^
12:4
MILLE LACS
fSKSa^&S^:(Bo BaldwIa^B^SB
Cor Oats. Wi
a dh^
andplCked
Flax
Wheat, No. Northern
'""xmnwail
rA
a
COUNTY.-aM* TOWN CLERKS.x
Greenbush-R. A. Boss.... ..V::.'.".' Princeton
ft.aS:.r::
:rf8S
Princeton-Otto Henschel. .".'.'.'."pnncetoS
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South HarborChas. Freer r
East Side-Andrew kalbergV.."'.V"'' (Weld
Onamia-G. H. Carr oWila
Page-August Anderson...... YYYYYY Y. l^l
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
F.T. P. Neumann. -,"-.VF oSg
WN8 princeton
0
Livonia-carl Parker Zimmerman
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Grain and Produce Market.
Wheat, No. 1 Northern -n
Wheat, No. 2 Northern 5 0
1.256130
0
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RTCe 96&[email protected]
Princeton Roller Miiis~anfl Elevator.
Tft
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Rats ".'.'i'[email protected]
at
RETAIL.
Vestal, per sack fSo.
Flour, (100 per cent) per sack.
Banner, per sack fss
Rye flour i-x
Wholewheat (101b. sack) *'S
Ground feed, per cwt 1"7s
Coarse meal, per cwt i'iZ
Middlings, per cwt
Shorts, per cwt Xr
Bran, per cwt
All goods delivered free anywhere' in Princeton
FRATERNAL -:-LODGE
NO. 92, A^J*. & A. M.
Regular communications. 2d and 4th
Wednesday of each month.
J. ZIMMERMAN, W. M.
A. CALEY, Sec'y.
gS^ PRINCETON-:-LODGE
w*fc NO. 93, K. of P.
Regular meetings every Tuesday v
ning at 8 o'clock.
T. F. SCHEEN, K. R. & I
A
CHAVEN S. C. C.
K. O. T. M.,
Tent No. 17
Regular meetings every Thurs
day evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Maccabee hall.T^
TO I. G. STANLEY. Com.
W. G. FREDERICKS. R. E.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1. O. O. P.
Regular meetings every Monday evening at
i:00 oclock. GEO. TOMLINSON, N. G.
FRANK GOULDING. Rec. Sec.
The Rural
Telephone Co.
THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE.
Lines to Dalbo, Cambridge, Santi
ago. Freer and Qlendorado.
8^* Good Service in Princeton and to all
adjoining points. We connect with the
Northwestern Long Distance Telephone
Patronize a Home Concern.
Service Day and Night.
KALIHER & CALVIN, Props.
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a Jloments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade Specialty.

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