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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 20, 1906, Image 4

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THE PRINCETON UNION
BY Ft. C. DUNN.
Published Every Thursday.
TIRM8-$1.0 0 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.
Si.25 I NOT PAID IN ADVANCE.
OFFICE: FIRST ST.. EAST OP COURTHOUSE.
0 1. STAPLES,
Business Manager.
TH05. H. PROWSE,
Editor.
The "survival oi the fittest" does
not at all times apply to primary
elections.
From many a candidate's head has
suddenly disappeared the bump of
aspiration
The editonal page of the Chinook
Opinion is liable to give the impres
sion that it has none.
You can't judge a candidate's qual
ifications by the number ot cards he
has posted in the saloons.
Theodore Roosevelt is the only man
who can prevent his election to the
presidency for the third time.
The smoke of the candidate seems to
be cast into insignificance by the
smoke ot his campaign cigar.
The gassy candidate is always lis
tened to with more attention when he
has pieviously backed up his gas with
dough
Should alcohol eventually come into
use as fuel for locomotives it will
probably become necessary to lay the
rails in the shape of italic zs.
Strenuous is the life ot a congress
manwhether he be working in Wash
ington for $5,000(?) a year or at the
chautauqua for $500 a speech'
Mr Bryan condemns all editors who
"sell then brains for dollars." Yet
by following this very same course
does Mr. Bryan derive most of his
income.
The republicans who have refused to
contribute one dollar to the state
campaign fund are of course John
son-iepubhcans and their ducats have
gone into the O'Connor barrel
The difference: It is said that Wil
liam R. Hearst will pay his own ex
penses in his governorship campaign
in New York and that the corpora
tions will pay Governoi John's in
Minnesota.
President Roosevelt has sent a
special commissioner to Ellis Island
to probe the immigration bureau. If
that should prove insufficient the pres
ident will likely go down himself and
pry it open with a jimmy or a big
stick
An office building is being eiected
in Ne\v Yoik city the height of which
will be, when completed, 612 feet. The
Washington monument, which is now
the highest structure in the world, is
57 feet lower than will be this huge
pile of masonry
The new state of Oklahoma has
started out consistently by issuing a
paper printed in the new language,
Esperanto At first glance one might
eironeously suppose it to be a repro
duction of the new "style" sheet of
the go\evnment printing office.
The Willmar Republican says that
the opening gun for the campaign in
Kandiyohi county will be fired at At
watei on Sept. 29 by S. R. Vansant.
It would show wisdom on the part of
Candidate Cole were he to send forth
a detachment to spike that gun before
it is touched off.
The Valley Herald of Chaska, Car
ver county, has entered upon its for
ty-fifth year of existence. It was
started by its present owner, Senator
A DuToit "Uncle" Fred has al
ways been a democrat, but has at the
same time treated the opposition with
absolute fairness.
A few of the country newspapers
have now and then denounced the ex
orbitant charges of express com
panies, and, as a result of this, the
state railroad and warehouse commis
sion has ordered all such companies
doing business in Minnesota to
apIn
pear before that body on Sept. 26 for
the purpose of being interrogated
upon their current rate schedules.
To the country weekly is al
most solely due the bringing about of
this investigation. The subsidized
dailies dared not broach the proposi
tion.
Tl jf^
A trust, world-wide in its scope,
which will place in the hands of Amer
ican capitalists control of crude
caoutchouc and practically make them
masters of the rubber manufacturing
industry of the world, is said to have
been recently organized. If this be
true prices of gum shoes might be
expected to stretch upward.
Wrapping and other grades of wood
fiber paper have been advanced $5 per
ton by all mills simultaneously. It
will be remembered that last May the
paper trust, as the result of an action
brought against it in St. Paul, was
ordered to dissolve From the pro
ceeding above narrated it would ap
pear to a man up a tree that this dis
solution has not yet taken place.
A Scientific American correspondent
says that the old-fashioned Mason
fruit jars so extensively used in house
hold canning are most unsanitary re
ceptacles. It might now be expected
that Governor John's "pure food"
commission will make careful investi
gation of this charge with a view of
prohibiting the sale of these unsan
itary glass jars in the state of Minne
sota'
In view of the fact that denatured
alcohol will soon be a reality and
that this (denatured) condition of the
liquid will be brought about by the
addition of methyl, or wood, alcohol,
it is opportune to caution the public
against the inhalation of the vapor
from this product, as the continual
breathing of it will tend to weaken
the eyesight and to eventually bring
about blindness.
W. F. Ewert of Foley has resigned
as a member of the democratic state
central committee because Mr. O'Day
has been retained as chairman of that
heterogeneous organization. It is
said that the kitchen cabinet, realiz
ing that Mr. Ewert is a "power" in
Benton county, has put forth every
effort, even unto a promise of permit
ting him to "look into the barrel," if
he would but reconsider his decision,
but Mr. Ewert stands pat.
To prevent a panic the exercises at
the unveiling of the monument to Wil
liam McKinley at Columbus were
brought to an abrupt close. The
surging, cheering mob of people that
packed the capitol grounds and ad
joining streets became so unruly in
its efforts to see Mrs. Alice Roose
velt-Longworth that she was commobiles,
pelled to drop the star spangled drap
ery which enshrined the statue and
withdraw while the ovations and ad
dresses on the program were post
poned until night.News Item.
"What fools these mortals be"
The Deer River News pertinently
puts it this way: Bank examiners ap
pear to make examinations after some
rascally president or cashier has
looted a bank, and then excuses and
gauzy explanations are given inno
cent and suffering depositors in lieu
of cash. What is needed is a few ap
plications of the Chinese law in re
gard to such bank officials: off with
their heads and throw them into the
waste basket with the other assets. It
would not require many doses.
That retribution has overtaken the
beef trust for its former imposition
upon the public is made manifest by
the government bulletin of the depart
ment ot commerce for the month of
August It says- "There were ex
ported during the month 659,127
pounds of canned meat, valued at
$67,445. In the same month of 1905cane.
the canned meat exports were 5,048,-
533 pounds, valjued at $498,041. The
loss of business in the month of
August alone on canned meat there
fore is shown to have been $430,590."
An old friend writes us from Texas
to inquire whether or not the dissolu
tion of the railroad merger has proven
beneficial to the state of Minnesota.
In the first place it has not been
proven to the satisfaction of the peo
ple of Minnesota that a merger ever
existed lor that ifc has been dissolved.
the second place the enigma has
proven beneficial only to*a chfonic
officeseeker named Vanra&t and the
lawyers called in to assist the attor
ney general. In the third place the
state squandered thousands o&dpllars
of the taxpayers' money to dissolve
this alleged merger. That's all we
know about the fiasco.
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26V 1906.
Because he has reached the age of
sixty years and no longer possesses
the vital force and activity that he did
in his youth, Rev. E. B. Chase of the
Austin Congregational church, Chi
cago, has been requested to resign. It
seems to us that the action of the
church is badly taken, for a minister
of the gospel who has attained the
age of sixty, or even seventy or
eighty, is surely better qualified from
experience to expound the truths of
the scriptures than a young man of
twenty-five or thirty. Placing an age
limit upon ministers of the gospel
may be a modern church idea, but it
is nevertheless extremely ridiculous.
ALCOHOL. AS FUEL..
Alcohol Engines Will Not Displace Those
Operated by Gasoline.
With the beginning of the new year
the way will be paved for the use ot
alcohol as a fuel for small engines,
and while experts do not predict a
startling revolution which will sweep
the gasoline and kerosene engines into
mechanical limbo, they do assert that
the alcohol engine will find a large
field all its own for usefulness. The
only "if" lurking in the proposition
is what restriction the internal revenue
officials will place on its manufacture
Congress has removed the tax on the
manufacture of denatured alcohol,
which is grain alcohol, such as is
used for whiskey, but poisoned chem
ically to destroy the possibilities for
use in beverages or medicinally. The
restrictions as to its manufacture
have been left to the discretion of the
revenue officials and they have men
abroad now investigating its manufac
ture there. As both France and Ger
many have fostered the use of alcohol
engines and the United States govern
ment is inclined to do the same, it is
not thought likely that oppressive re
strictions will be made here. If they
are, would-be users of the fuel will
be as badly off as they are now while
there is a tax on it, which is to be re
moved on January 1.
"Alcohol engines will not displace
gasoline engines," said Dr. Charles
E. Lucke, of Columbus university,
who is experimenting with the fuel on
behalf of the United States govern
ment. "They will occupy a field of
their own, and their chief value will
be in isolated localities, where the
high price of gasoline, due to the ex
pense of transportation, has made its
cost prohibitive.
"In the irrigated districts, for in
stance, the rancher can pump his
water by an alcohol engine, making
the fuel from grain on his own place,
thus making corn grow more corn.
"It would have value in isolated
regions as a motive power for auto
power boats and similar
uses. We are experimenting, first, to
find the amount of alcohol required
for a given engine, compared with the
amount of gasoline. This comparison
of consumption and the comparison of
price will give the man interested a
basis for determining whether or not
he should buy an alcohol engine.
The price of gasoline is different in
different parts of the country owing to
the cost of transportation. Secondly,
we are to determine whether there is
any more trouble in handling alcohol
as a fuel than in handling gasoline.
I have obtained as high as 10 per cent
more power with alcohol than with
gasoline, but with much larger con
sumption. In engines built properly
for the alcohol the consumption
the same, but in gasoline engines I
have had to use three times as much
alcohol as I would gasoline. We
arefell
also making abstracts ot work al
ready done in regard to alcohol en
gines. At the Paris exposition of
1900, for instance, prize competitions
for these engines were held. The mak
ing of engines designed especially for
alcohol as fuel will probably go slow
ly, only the more enthusiastic manu
facturers building them at first.
"In addition to grain, alcohol can
be made cheaply from other sub
stances, such as corn cobs and sugar
In Cuba they make a large
amount of alcohol from sugar cane and
molasses and use it for engines.
Sugar beets obtain such a good prica
on themarket for sugar purposes that
I hardly think they will be used, while
potatoes contain such a high percent
age of water that they do not com
mend themselves for the purpose.
Officials of the bureau of forestry are
investigating the value of wood al
cohol for fuel purposes."
The denatured alcohol act will re
move an internal revenue tax of $2.05
a gallon on alcohol of this nature,
which will bring it in price within
range of competition with gasoline.
Just what it will cost to make it has
not been determined. Some eleven
chemicals are being tested to de
termine the best for the process of
poisoning. The investigations being
carried on regarding its manufacture
as well as its use for engines will be
compiled late in the fall for free dis
tribution, and by the time the lawthings
goes into effect it is expected that this
treatise on the subject will be in thecounty.
hands of the public.
Al^(MM^r^w^M*M%w%^i
CANDIDATES
REPUBLICAN
Judge 7th Judicial District
Myron Taylor
Member of Congress, 8th District
Adam Bede
E Millai
State Senator, 45th District
John Goss
Swanson
Representatives 45th District
Charles A Dickey
Andrew Davis
Thomas Hoi ton
Emmet Mark
Eric Tornberg
Frank White
County Auditor
E E Whitney
County Treasurer
Burrell
Register of Deeds-
John A Erstad
FiankGoulding
Sheriff-
Harry Shockley
Judge of Probate
VanAlstein
County Attorney-
Joseph A Ross
County Purveyor
Richard S Chapman
Superintendent of Schools
Guy Ewing
Countv Commissioner 2nd District
Ole Uglem
County Commissioner 4th District
Erick Enckson
PUBLIC OWNERSHIP
Member of Congress 8th District
Geo Peterson
BATTLE MBALLOTS
Congressmen Tawney, McCleary, Da=
vis, Stevens, Volstead, Bede and
Steenerson Renominated.
Lindberg Defeats Buckman in thewhile
SixthNye Wins Out in Hen-
nepin County.
Swanson for Senator, and Davis, Mor-
ton and White for Representa-
tives in 45th District.
"Reformer" Jones Hay Not be Re-
nominated Mayor of ilin-
neapolis.
While the returns from Tuesday's
primaries are by no means complete
it is certain that Congressmen Mc
Cleary, Stevens and Bede are easily
winners in the Second, Fourth and
Eighth districts, Frank M. Nye has
distanced his competitors in the Fifth
(Hennepin county), and the indica
tions are that Charles H. Lindbergh
defeats Congressman Buckman in theexception,
Sixth. Tawney in the First, Davis in
the Third, Volstead in the Seventh,
and Steenerson in the Ninth had no
opposition.
McCleary, Stevens and Bede all
have large majorities. Frank Nye
is only a few hundred votes ahead of
Hall and Eustis in the Hennepin dis
trict, but it is thought his lead cannot
be overcome. Little Billy Washburn,
whose only claim to distinction is
that he is the son of his father, imag
ined that he, too, was running, but
his votes will be reckoned in the
"scattering" column. David P. Jones,
the alleged "reform" mayor of Min
neapolis, is having a hard time of it.
He may pull through despite the dam
aging support of the Journal and one
Vansant. Sammy T. Johnson, another
of the Journal's proteges who aspired
to the city treasurership of Minneap
olis, was completely snowed under.
W. P. Roberts, Willie Washburn, Ell
Torrence and all of the Journal's pets
by the wayside Genial George
R. Smith will be the next judge of
probate of Hennepin county. On the
whole the Hennepin county bolters
and traitors of two years ago fared
badly last Tuesday.
In Ramsey county Congressman
Stevens carried every ward in the
city. Some splendid men were nom
inated for the legislature old Ram
sey: W. W. Dunn, E. S. Durment
and Joseph M. Hackney for the sen
ate, and Ambrose Tighe for the house,
are fine specimens of high-grade leg
islative timber. Such men, if elected,
will reflect credit not only on the city
of St. Paul but on the state of Min
nesota as well.
Locally, in Mille Lacs county, little
interest was taken in the primary elec
tion and an exceedingly light vote
was polledless than 40 per cen of
the average vote of the county. The
only contest for a county office was
between Frank Goulding and John A.
Erstad for register of deeds, and the"(renominated)
former was an easy winner. There
was no electioneering either for or
against J. Adam Bede or E. L. Millar
for congress. Mr. Bede was best
known to the voters and polled the
most votes. A determined effort was
made in behalf of Mr. C. J. Swanson
for state senator. His friends seemed
to be well supplied with the "sinews
of war" and worked unceasingly for
him. Especially was this the case in
Princeton town and village. But, allthctifrost
considered, Mr. John Goss re
ceived a handsome majority in thecentage
As forecasted in the Union the
l. I I 'I..
PRIMARY ELECTION RETURNS^***"*^
Of Mille Lacs County. Sept. 18, 1906.
a
.a
3
a
60
a
59
Si
S3
43
GO
(A
S
tc a
CO
a
53 72 11 8 61
33 18
61 22
9 9 3
63 15
28 &1
3 9
12
1
40 47
5 3
3? 21 ?4 12 22 53
7 9
30 27
3'
W
50 43 78
81
3b 30
1
5
11 12
33
14
4 6 9
10
50 73 12 9
54 bO 11 9
Al
O
7 13 43 33 99 7
6 1
25 29
343
23
66 25 18 16
23 77
0 4
8
53
4
4
16
81 12 9 81 8
42 17
16
45 46
74 83
80 71
80
52
65
2
^^^^^^^^0^^^^t^^t^i^m^^\ m f^***^^*****!***^^^**)*^*^
3
bitter fight between the friends of
Charles A. Dickey and Emmet Mark
has resulted in Mille Lacs county be
ing left out in the cold as far as rep
resentation in the legislature is con
cerned. Anoka gets the senator, Mr.
C. J. Swanson. Isanti gets one rep
resentative, Mr. Thomas H. Horton,
Sherburne, the smallest county
of the district, gets two,Andrew Davis
and Frank White. The voters of
Mille Lacs county have themselves to
blame for this state of affairs. Had
they pulled together as they ought,
and stood by Messrs. Davis and Hor
ton, Mille Lacs would not have been
deprived of a candidate. But there are
more than one thousand voters in
Mille Lacs county who were not heard
from at the primaries last Tuesday.
They may be heard from next Novem
ber. The fight in the 45th legislative
district will end when the polls close
on the 6th day of next November.
The result of the primary election
in Sherburne county was a complete
knockout for Mr. Frank White and
his followers. For representative
White himself received only 564 votes
as against 843 for his rival, Andrew
Davis. All of Mr. White's candidates
for county offices, with possibly one
were defeated.
The result of the legislative fight in
the 45th district is shown in the fol
lowing table:
J2
Mille Lacs
Sherburne
Anoka Isanti
401 627 950
463 456
341 278
332 843
837 702
4
2
8
8
354 525 608 845
Totals. 2322
12
6
16 15
79
*^^W*l^*ta^taW
a a
a
a
O a
IB
a a 2
1
O
a
9
a
-to
=3
04
3 3 O
"a
a*
.a
EH
11 100
37 20
157
31 13
125
25
10
10
3 4
691
12
4
76 43
139
89
5 1
7 6
623 27b
75 59
35 14
in
5
r-
150
91
13
6
4b 09
82
2 21 17 10
17 17
6 0 0
2
577 401
5
6
9 8
5
b3 24
28
134
91
4
6
8 6 1 5
463 332
354 419 235 343
3 5 6 1
i
0
23 24
13
33 74
4 1
12(1
22 11
34
46
47
10
bl
39 124 17 113 207
3S
6
124
3
9
57
31
8 0
11 &21
17 112
9 7
38 24
200
A3 13
6 12 82-3
43
95
53
54
12
32
42
40
1
5 213
134 7
112
9 72
6
8
54
lb
79
49
12
39
10
107
7o
7
8
413 562
9
15
15
119
47
2J1
40
6
107
8
6
860
14 108 210 6 11 786
13 113 21i 6 11 823
14
17
110
52
213
40
0
124
9
8
802
16 116
28
235 274 420
918
1104 39
3082 1538 2714 23322239
216
31 124
1847 2449
Probable Congressional Nominations.
It looks at this time as if the follow
ing candidates were nominated for
congress: First districtJ. A.
Tawney (rep.) Andrew French (dem.)
Second districtJames T. McCleary
(rep.), W. S. Hammond (dem.):
Third districtC. R. Davis (rep
Fourth districtF. C. Stevens (rep.),
Gustave Schalle (dem.) Fifth dis-
trictFrank M. Nye (rep.), Frank D.
Larrabee (dem.) Sixth districtC.
A. Lindbergh (rep.), M. C. Tifft
(dem.) Seventh districtA. J. Vol
stead (rep.) Eighth districtJ. Adam
Bede (rep.) Ninth districtHalvor
Steenerson (rep.).
Sherburne County Primaries.
The successful candidates for county
offices in Sherburne were: C. E.
Swanson (renominated) auditor God
frey Wicktor, treasurer Frank Well
ington, register of deeds Albert Bai
ley, judge of probate Chas. D.
Kaliher, clerk of court: M. K. Iliff,
sheriff A. Bailey, superintendent of
schools I. L. Johnson, commissioner
Second district John Dingman, com
missioner Third district C. W. Tay
lor, commissioner Fourth district.
Isanti County Primaries
In Isanti county the successful can
didates at the primaries for county
offices were: Oscar Blomquist,
auditor A. Exstrand (renominated)
treasurer John Engberg (renomin
ated) register of deeds C. M.
Johnson, sheriff A. H. Sutherland
judge of probate H. F.
Barker, attorney C. G. Benton,
superintendent of schools Erick
Becklin, commissioner Second dis
trict Isaac Larson, commissioner
Fourth district.
Corn Stalks for Cows.
It is worth while remembering that
while the*cow relishes the green corn
from the garden early in the summer
she is just as eager for the stalks
after the leaves have been withered by
in October, at which time
they contain almost as large a per
of sugar as ordinary sugar
cane. If fed to her at this time she
won't leave a scar.
5 83s
C5
13
1
199
4 10
Pioneer Flash Signals.
Another remarkable detail of the
antelope's anatomy is the white area
on each buttock. Although it seems
at first like the rest of his spots, a
mere patch of white coat, it is found
to be specialized for an important
service. It is composed of hair
graded from short in the center to
long at the front edges. Under the
skin of the part is a circular muscle,
by means of which the hair can in a
moment be raised and spread radially
into two great blooming twin chrys
anthemums, more or less flattened at
the center. When this is done in
bright sunlight they shine like tin
pans, giving flashes of light that can
be seen further than the animal itself,
affording a conspicuous identification
mark that must be of great service to
the species.
As soon, therefore, as an antelope
sees some strange or thrilling object
this muscle acts and the rump patch is
instantly changed into a great double
disk of white that shines afar like a
patch of snow, and by its flashing
spreads the alarm. This, it will be
seen, is simply a heliograph. Man
flatters himself that he was the in
ventor of flash communication, but he
is wrong the antelope had it first.
They used it thousands of generations
before man ever dreamed of it.Chi
cago Chrinoicle.
Is of Good Parentage.
Edward Wilkie, alias John Kelly,
was arrested at Fergus Falls a week
ago on the charge of holding up John
Romstad beneath a Great Northern
bridge. It has since developed that
Wilkie comes from one of the leading
families of Paterson, N. J., and his
brother has arrived from that city
with letters from the mayor, the judges
of the municipal court, the district
congressman and other prominent
officials urging that he be treated
leniently. Wilkie is a young fellow
and started out to be tough. He
followed an amusement company west
ward and was finally arrested at Per
ham,'this county, for stealing beer.
On his release he immediately held up
Mr. Romstad and demanded his
money, and was captured and is now
awaiting sentence. His family is very
much chagrined over his escapades
and will make every effort to secure
his release.
Weeds and Their Eradication
"Some Common Weeds and Their
Eradication," a most practical and
helpful little bulletin lately issued by
the Minnesota experiment station, in
making suggestions for the eradica
tion of small patches of quack grass,
recommends the tar paper method as
one of the most effective. In the in
stance cited in the bulletin tar paper
was spread over a patch of quack
grass about a rod square on July 7.
It was lapped enough to make a com
plete covering, and a few shovels of
dirt were thrown on the edges to keep
them in place. Two days later the
plants were all dead above ground,
and a month later the roots were ap
parently completely dead. While this
is commended as excellent for patches
of small size, the cost of the tar paper
would make it impractical for larger
areas.
A Ba Break.
Chancellor James R. Day of Syra
cuse university, in a discussion of the
craze for athletics that sometimes be
comes too rampant in the universities
of America, said with a smile:
Why, I know a young clergyman
he had been an excellent first-baseman
at college in his timewho, after read
ing a portion of the scriptures, said
solemnly, as he closed the bible on
Sunday morning in the baseball sea
son:
'Here endeth the second inning.'i

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