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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 27, 1906, Image 2

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Plate applesMrs. Aug. Thoma
first, Mrs. Rose Patterson second.
Concord grapesMrs. Elita Smith
ers first.
Delaware grapesAdessa Smithers
first.
PeanutsAug. Henschel, special.
Collection fruitMrs. Rose Patter
son first.
FLOWERS.
Sword fernMrs. Abe Steeves first,
Mrs. Robt. Clark second.
FuchsiaMrs. Robt. Clark first,
Mrs. Robt. Clark second.
Foliage plantMrs. Robt. Clark
first.
GeraniumsMrs. Robt. Clark first,
Mrs. H. Heitman second.
BegoniaMrs. Robt. Clark first,
Mrs. Robt. Clark second.
Flowering abutilonMrs. F. C.
Foltz first, Mrs. A. Bryson second.
Collection plantsMrs. Robt. Clark
first, Mrs. A. Steeves second.
Collection AstersMrs. Robt. Clark
first, Mrs A Bryson second.
Collection PansiesMrs. Robt.
Clark first, Mrs. Mount second.
Bouquet cut flowersMrs. Robt.
Clark first.
White MyrtleHenry Heitman first.
Valotia PurpureaMrs. A. Bryson
first
AGRICULTURE.
Hubbard squashE. C. Stark first,
Groff second.
MuskmelonAug. Henschel first,
Aug. Hiller second.
WatermelonAug. Henschel, spec
ial, Kaliher first.
TomatoesMrs. Mudgett first, Aug.
Henschel second.
SunflowersWm. Steadman first, R.
Murray second.
Prize onionsR. Murray, first Robt.
Clark second.
Red Weatherfield onionsC. H.
Berry first, R. Murray second.
CitronF. C. Foltz first, David
Berry second.
Evergreen cornF. C. Foltz first,
Robt. Clark second.
Squaw cornF. C. Foltz first.
Drumhead cabbageA. Howard
first, Chas. Hiller second.
ParsnipsC. H. Berry first, Aug.
Hiller second.
Red globe onionsC. H. Berry sec
ond.
Early Minnesota cornC. H. Berry
first, A Berry second.
CarrotsRobt. Clark first, Robt.
Clark second.
Silver skin onions- Robt. Clark
first.
Danver bellow Globe onionsRobt.
Clark first.
CeleryRobt. Clark first.
CauliflowerRobt. Clark first.
Egg plantRobt. Clark first, Robt.
Clark second.
Table beetsRobt. Clark first, A.
Berry second.
Pie pumpkinsDavid Berry first.
Navy beansDavid Berry first.
Late Rose potatoesDavid Berry
first, Wm Steadman second.
Field pumpkinsF. A. Lowell first,
E Thompson second
BurbanksWm. Steadman first,
Isaiah Mudgett second
ManglesG. Hoeft second
PeasG. Hoeft second
Triumph potatoesMrs A. Payette
first, Heruth second.
Jap pie pumpkinWm Arnett first,
A Lowell second.
Early Ohio potatoesIsaiah Mud
gett fust, Rev. Koenig second.
Pickling cucumbersMrs Byron
Dilly first, Chas. Hiller second.
Pie squashWm. Hors'man first.
Sal/er's potatoRev. Koenig first.
Blue Victor potatoRev. Koenig
fiist
Winter radishesAug. Hiller sec
ond
CucumbersAug. Hiller first, Chas.
Hiller second
Summer squashAug Hiller first.
TurnipsAug. Hiller first.
TobaccoAug. Hiller first.
Boston squashChas. Hiller first.
Peerless melonElmer Stevens first.
Early Rose potatoesIsaiah Mud
gett first
White Ohio potatoesCarl Beto
in st.
Peerless potaoesIsaiah Mudgett
first
Largest pumpkinA. Schonberg
first.
Russet potatoesA. E. Lynch first.
Collection onionsA. Berry first.
Collection watermelonsC. H.
Berry first.
Collection potatoesIsaiah Mudgett
first. David Berry second.
Collection cabbageRobt Clark
first.
Collection tomatoesRobt. Clark
first.
Collection peppersRobt. Clark
first.
Collection bressicaRobt. Clark
first.
Collection vegetablesRobt. Clark
first.
Collection sweet cornDavid Berry
first.
GRAIN AND SEEDS.
White rice pop cornGordon Robi
deau first, C. H. Berry second.
Sorghum caneC. H. Berry first,
Aug. Henschel second.
Sheaf oatsAug. Hiller first, A.
Berry second.
White fife wheatW. Scott first.
BarleyG. Hoeft first, W. Scott sec
ond.
OatsWm. Arnett first.
Blue Stem wheatGeo. Tomlinson
first, Wm. Arnett second.
Yellow dent cornJos. Olson first,
F. A. Lowell second.
White cap dentGeo. Tomlinson
first, Olof Anderson second.
Other variety wheatChas. Beto
first, A. Berry second.
RyeAug. Hiller first, Geo. Tom
linson second.
Wheat in sheafAug. Hiller first.
Timothy in strawAug. Hiller first.
White flint cornAug. Hiller first.
Yellow flint cornAug. Hiller first.
Clover seedM. Mahoney first.
Red clover in bundlesM. Ma
honey first.
HONEY AND SUGAR.
Extracted honeyMrs. R. S. Shaw
first.
Preserves in honeyMrs. R. S.
Shaw first.
Pickles in honeyMrs. R. S. Shaw
first.
FINE ARTS.
Landscape in pastelMrs. Ferrell
first, Mrs. Berg second.
Flowers in oilMrs. Ferrell first,
Mrs. E. B. Anderson second.
Animals in water colorMrs. Jes
mer first, Mrs. Caley second.
Marine in water colorMrs. Caley
first, Mrs. Caley second.
Portrait in water colorMrs. Caley
first.
Landscape in water colorMrs.
Caley first,Mrs. Ferrell second.
Flowers in water colorMrs. Caley
first.
Best exhibit of paintingsMrs^
Caley first.
Flowers in pastelMrs. Jones first,
Mrs. Jesmer second.
Fruit in pastelMrs. Small first.
Portrait in oilsMrs. Small first.
Marine in oilsMrs. Jesmer first,
Mrs. Small second.
Landscape in oilsMrs. Jesmer
first, Mrs. Berg second.
Animal in pastelMrs. Barnes
first.
Figure in patselMrs. Berg first.
Marine in pastelMrs. Berg
first.
Portrait in pastelMrs. Berg first.
Fruit in oilMrs. Horan first.
Animal in oilMrs. Horan first,
Mrs. Horan second.
Figure in oilMrs. Horan second.
Pencil drawingMamie Briggs first,
Elsie Mount second.
DOMESTIC MANUFACTURE.
Silk quiltMrs. M. E. Jones first,
Mrs. O. C. Kalstad second.
Worsted patch quiltMrs. W. Page
first, Mrs. Chas. Hiller second.
Cotton patch quiltMrs. M. E.
Jones first, Mrs. Lassard second.
Silk outline quiltMrs. Chas. Jud
kins first.
Log Cabin quiltMrs. Robt. Clark
first, Mrs. Aug. Hiller second.
Knitted spreadMrs. Gertie Negard
first.
Best display woolen goodsMrs.
M. J. Ayers first, Mrs August Hiller
second.
Plain woolen socksMrs. M. J.
Ayers first, Mrs. Chester Pierson sec
ond.
Plain woolen mittensMrs. Gertie
Negard first, Mrs. M. J. Ayers sec
ond.
Double woolen mittensMrs. Shan
non first, Mrs. Dilly Byron second.
Knitted skirtMrs. Bertha Ander
son first, Mrs. Bertha Anderson sec
ond.
Braided rugMrs. Nellie Steadman
first.
Silk embroidered sofa pillowGer
tie Brands first, Nellie Libby second.
Silk patched sofa pillowMrs.
August Hiller first, Mrs. L. Roche
ford second.
Canvas sofa pillowMrs. Frank
Morneau first, Mrs. Frank Morneau
second.
Mountmellick sofa pillowMrs. F.
Small first.
Velvet piano scarfMiss Le Mieux
first.
DoiliesMrs. Andy Bavier first,
Mrs. Robt. Clark, second.
Point lace cuffs and collarMrs.
Carlton first.
Battenburg table coverMyrtle
James first.
Battenburg center pieceMiss
Le Mieux first, Mrs. Robt. Clark sec
ond.
Battenburg curtainsMrs. Leon
Annis first.
Eyelet embroidery center piece
Mrs. F. Campbell first, Mrs. Carlton
second.
Eyelet embroidery yoke and cuffs
Mrs. Bryson first.
Fruit center pieceMrs. Nora Mar
vin first, Mrs. Andy Bavier second.
Pansy center pieceMrs. Nora
Marvin second.
Canvas center pieceMrs. Carlton
first.
Fruit lunch clothGertrude Brands
second.
Flower center pieceMrs. F. Camp
bell first, Mrs. Frank Morneau sec
ond.
Nasturtium center pieceMrs. Robt.
Clark first.
Flower tray clothMrs. Robt. Clark
first.
Flower bureau scarfMrs. Robt.
Clark first.
Flower lunch clothGertrude"
Brands second.
Collection oriental platesSophia
and Rosetta Sugarman first.
^re
Knitted shawlMrs. Shannon first,
Mrs. Robt. Clark second.
Knitted booteesMrs. Shannon
first.
Crocheted tidyMrs. Bryson first,
Mrs. Robt. Clark second.
Work basketMrs. Carlton first,
Mrs. Aug. Hiller second.
Hardanger Indian bead beltMrs.
Frank Morneau first.
Hardanger Indian bead purseMrs.
Lucinda Wallace first.
Mexican drawn work bureau scarf
Mrs. Fred Newton first, Mrs. Fred
Newton second.
Mexican drawn work lunch cloth
Mrs. Leon Annis first, Blanche
Holm second.
Mexican drawn work handkerchief
Mrs. Robt. Clark first, Mrs. Fred
Newton second.
BREAD, PASTRY, ETC.
Angel cakeMrs. Ferrell first,
Grace Herdliska second.
Cocoanut cakeMrs. Aug. Hiller
first, Myra Libby second.
Cinnamon rollsMrs. Berg first,
Mrs. Frank Libby second.
Molasses cookiesMrs. Byron
Dilly first, Mrs. Berg second.
Pan of biscuitsMrs. Daisy Mud
gett first, Mrs. Berg second.
Chocolate cakeMrs. Berg first,
Mrs. Aug. Hiller second.
CrullersMrs. T. W. Thompson
first, Mrs. B. Anderson, second.
White cookiesMrs. Frank Libby
first, Mrs. Aug. Henschel second.
Layer jelly cakeMrs. Rocheford
first.
Boston brown breadMrs. F. A.
Lowell first, Mrs. A. Bryson second.
White breadMrs. Millard Howard
first, Mrs. Aug. Hiller second.
Graham breadMrs. Aug. Hiller
first, Mrs. Louise Rogers second.
Rye breadMrs. Aug. Hiller first,
Mrs. Aug. Hiller second.
School cakeMrs. Byron Dilly
first.
Apple pieMrs. Berg first, Mrs.
Daisy Mudgett second.
Fruit cakeMrs. Frank Libby first,.
TartsMrs. Frank Libby first.
Home cookingMrs. Daisy Mud
gett, first, Mrs. A. Bryson second.
Chocolate layer cakeMrs. Frank
Libby first.
DOMESTIC CANNED FRUITS, ETC.
Collection canned goodsMrs.
Barnes first. Mrs. Berg second.
Crab applesMrs. A. Payette first,
Mrs. Byron Dilly second.
Pie plantMrs. A. Mott first, Mrs.
L. Wallace second.
PlumsMrs. F. Morneau first, Mrs.
A. Payette second.
StrawberriesMrs. Barnes first,
Mrs. Berg second.
PeachesMrs. Barnes first, Mrs.
Berg second.
RaspberriesMrs. Berg first, Mrs.
Barnes second.
JamMrs. Berg first, Mrs. Daisy
Mudgett second.
Crab-apple jellyMrs. Berg first,
Mrs. L. Wallace second.
Grape jellyMiss Christie Wallace
first, Mrs. Berg second.
Currant jellyMrs. Berg first, Mrs.
Mott second.
Plum jellyMrs. Barnes first, Mrs.
Bryson second.
Green tomato picklesMrs. Barnes
first, Murray Hiller second.
ChowchowMrs. L. Wallace first,
Mrs. Barnes second.
Fancy picklesMrs. Aug. Henschel
first, Mrs. Geo. Tomlinson second.
Cucumber sweet picklesMrs. L.
Wallace first, Mrs. Barnes second.
Sour cucumber picklesMrs. A.
Payette first, Mrs. Aug. Henschel
second.
Chili sauceMrs. Aug. Hiller first,
Mrs. Barnes second,.
Crab-apple picklesMrs. Barnes
first, Mrs. L. Wallace second.
Mixed picklesMrs. Geo. Tomlin
son first, Mrs. Aug. Henschel second.
Watermelon picklesMrs. Stone
first, Mrs. Barnes second.
CherriesMrs A Payette first,
Mrs Morneau second
Crab-apple butterMrs. Barnes
first
BlueberriesMrs. Daisy Mudgett
first.
Gooseberry jellyMrs. Berg first.
Ground cherriesAdessa Smithers,
first.
Husk tomatoesAdessa Smithers
first.
Tomato catsupMrs. Aug. Henschel
first.
TomatoesMrs. Morehead first,
Mrs. F. Morneau second.
PeasMrs. Moorehead first.
Pickled beansMrs. Morehead
first
Canned beansMrs. Morehead
first.
Canned cornMrs. Morehead first.
Mincemeat and chickenMrs.
Morehead first.
Starving to Death.
Because her stomach was so weak
ened by useless drugging that she
could not eat, Mrs. Mary H. Walters
of St. Clair St., Columbus, O., was
literally starving to death. She
writes: "My stomach was so weak
from useless drugs that I could not
eat, and my nerves so wrecked that I
could not sleep and not before I was
given up to die was I induced to try
Electric Bitters with the wonderful
result that improvement began at
once, and a complete cure followed."
Best health tonic on earth. 50 cents.
Guaranteedlby C. A. Jack, druggist.
1
J141 PPJ
THE PBIKCETOK TJNIOK THTJJttSDAY, SEPTEMBER, 27,
Political Announcements.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
For County Commissioner.
Having decided to become an inde
pendent candidate for Ja second term
as county commissioner in the Second
commissioner district of Mille Lacs
county, I respectfully ask the support
of the voters at the general election
on November 6, 1906. R. S. Shaw.
For County Commissioner.
I hereby announce myself as an in
dependent candidate for county com
missioner of the Fourth commis
sioner ditsrict of Mille Lacs county,
and solicit the support of the voters
at the polls next November.
Geo. H. Deans.
Pain from a Burn Promptly Relieved by
Chamberlain's Pain Balm.
A little child of Michael Stauss of
Vernon, Conn., was recently in great
pain from a burn on the hand, and
as cold applications only increased
the inflammation, Mr. Strauss came
to Mr. James N. Nichols, a local mer
chant, for something to stop the pain.
Mr. Nichols says: I advised him to
use Chamberlain's Pain Balm, and
the first application drew out the in
flammation and gave immediate re
lief. I have used this liniment my
self and recommend it very often for
cuts, burns, strains and lame back,
and have never known it to disap
point." For sale by Princeton Drug
Co.
FiGHTING THE SEA.
Holland's Continuous Performance
In Preventing: Floods.
Holland is a country of -wooden piles
and dikes, for the people are perpetu
ally fighting against the encroach
ments of water. One building in Am
sterdam rests on no fewer than 13,659
piles, though the dikes around the
town, which have been erected at enor
mous expense, effectually prevent any
chance of a flood. The streets of the
flourishing port of Rotterdam even are
frequently under water in the winter,
and in some parts of south Holland
the people are compelled to do their
shopping in boats
When the Zuyder Zee breaks on to
the land, those who wade Up to their
knees along the streets of a flooded
Village meet all manner of fish. This
is explained by the fact that the Zuy
der Zee, with its mud bottom, is liter
ally crammed with finny tribes and
one authority states that if it were
well scraped of all its fish one year,
it would be full again the next.
The land of Holland is really of four,
distinct levels, and from ten to twelve
feet between the highest and the low
est. To make the land dry, the water
is pumped from the lowest level to the
one immediately above it, and so on,
until the water has been returned
again to the sea. A large number of
engineers are specially engaged to look
after the dikes, and no less a sum than
$2,500,000 is expended every year in
keeping these fortifications against the
sea in proper repair.
SOFT CRABS.
After Shedding the New Shells Hard,
With Great Rapidity.
The supply of soft crabs for market
Is obtained by catching hard crabs and
keeping them until they shed their
shells. For this purpose large rec
tangular floats, made of laths and
planking, are employed, and three or
four times every day the stock on hand
is carefully inspected, all the soft
crabs being picked out and packed
without delay. They are put into shal
low boxes of moist seaweed, from ten
to thirty-five dozen in a box, according
to the size of the animals. When the
packing is done carefully the occu
pants may be kept alive from sixty to
seventy hours after leaving the water.
Crabs have been shipped all the way
from the Chesapeake to Canada, arriv
ing at their destination In good condi
tion. In summer, of course, ice is used.
But where soft crabs are concerned
it Is necessary that they shall reach
the market quickly, because their new
shells harden with great rapidity.
At the end of twelve hours the shells
are like parchment, and in three or
four days the crab is as hard as ever
hence unfit for use in the form most
highly approved by epicures.New
York Herald.
A Fine Art
ZabzinHow's this for a neat little
work of art? It's worth over $10, but
I managed to get it for $1. Jabzin
iWhere's the art in it? ZabzinIn get
ting it for $1, of course.
What men prize most is a privilege,
even if it be that of chief mourner at a
funeral.Lowell.
1906..
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Vtt&UJLY, SEPTEMBER 27 1906 ^gp?
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Princeton Lumber Company, i
Dealers In Hirii Grade
Dealer in Hig Qrad
Sash, Doors, Millwork,
Maple, Beech and Fir Flooring,
Red Cedar and Pine Shingles.
A Full Line of Building Materials.
GEO. A. COATES, Manager. PRINCETON. 1
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Does Gtmwx
M. S. RUTHERFORD
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W. P. CHASE,
ilanager.
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First National Bank
of Princeton, Minnesota.
Paid up Capital, $30,000
A General Banking Busi
ness Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved
Security.
Interest Paid on Time De
posits.
Foreign and Domestic Ex
change
S. S. PETTERSON, President.
T. H. CALEY, Vice Pres.
J. F. PETTERSON, Cashier.
BANE O PRINCETON.
J. J. SKAHEN, Cashier and Manager.
^-Banking Business
Collecting and Farm and
Insurance. Village Loans.
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JMy4MiM{..I.,t,.j..I..1.,I,.I,,I,,t,
We Make
A Specialty
I Farm Loans/0
I M. S. RUTHERFO
Odd Fellows Buildng,
Princeton, Minn.
Caley Lumber Company,
(Successors to Foley Bean Lumber Co.)
Dealers in
White Pine Lumber,
Lath and Shingles.
Also Sash, Doors, Mouldings and a Com.
plete Stock of Building Material.
COMMERCIAL HOTEL
J. P. SELANDER, Proprietor.
New management, newly furnished throughout, elec-
trie lighted, bath rooms, everything up-to-date. Sam-
pie room in connection. Both phones.
Princeton, Minn.
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I Foreston Mercantile& LiveStockCo,
Are fitters of men, women and children
in shoes, dry goods groceries, hardware,
and all kinds of farm machinery and
fencing.
Foreston Mercantile & Live Stock Co.
FORESTON, MINN
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E. L. MCMILLAN
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CO.
PRINCETON.
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