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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, November 01, 1906, Image 7

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a judicial one. He knew-one
sfdeTdi
the case. It was his duty to hear the
other, and Tandy was the spokesman
of that other
Duncan's reception was most gra
cious, and Napper Tandy came at
once to the subject hand.
"I'm more than glad, Duncan," he
lyingly said, "that these financial peo
ple have asked you to examine and re
port upon this scheme of extension.
You are so heartily in sympathy with
every enterprise that looks to the de
vfilQntnpnJ- of our western country, and
your intelligence is so superbly" well
informed, that of course a project like
this appeals to you."
"It does not appeal to me at all, Mr.
Tandy," said Duncan frankly. "I do
not think well of the extension. It"
"Pardon me for interrupting," inter
posed Tandy in fear that Duncan
might commit himself beyond recall
against the scheme. "Pardon me for
interrupting, but you must see that the
Redwood mines, in which, I under
stand, you own 15 per cent"
"I own 25 per cent, for I have put
my savings into that enterprise," an
swered Duncan
"Well, so much the better. You must
see that the Redwood mines, in which
you own 25 per cent, will benefit as
much as the Quentm mines do by this
extension of the railroad. It will give
us two markets for our coal instead of
one We can play one market against
the other, you see, and"
"That isn't the question that I am
employed and paid to answer," inter
rupted Duncan "You have other and
vastly greater interests than those of
the mines that -would be served by the
extension of the railroad. But the
financiers who are asked to put their
money into this project will be in no
wise benefited either by the increased
earnings of your coal mine and ours
or by the development of your other
and far greater Interests that are de
pendent upon this extension. So when
they employ me to report upon the
project I am not free to consider any
of these things. I must consider only
their interests. I must ask myself
whether or not it will 'pay' them to
undertake this extension. I know that
it, will not. I know that the extended
line cannot within a generation to
come pay even operating expenses, to
say nothing of interest on the cost of
construction. I am bound to set forth
those facts in my report. They pay
me to tell them what the facts are. Of
course, I shall tell them truly. Other
wise I should not be an honest man. I
should be a swindler, taking their mon
ey as pay for deceiving them and in
ducing them to undertake a losing en
terprise
"Oh, that's all right. But you might
be mistaken, you know. You've form
ed a judgment after a brief trip
through the country. That country
seems poverty stricken just now, but
that's because it hasn't enjoyed the
stimulating influence of a railroad. It
is a better country than you think, as
I can convince you if you'll let me take
you through it in a carriage. We can
start at oncetomorrow morningrun
out to the mines by rail and there take
a carriage and drive through the coun
try I've ordered the carriage, with
abundant supplies, from Chicago I
want to show you the resources of the
country. I'll convince you before we
get back that the country will build up
as soon as the railroad penetrates it
and that, there will be an abundant
traffic for the road
"Pardon me," answered Duncan.
"I've already been through that region.
I've questioned eveiy farmer as to his
crops I've questioned every merchant
in every village as to his possible ship
ments by the railroad and as to the
amount of goods he hopes to sell if the
railroad is built Their replies are
hopelessly discouraging. Taking their
outside estimates as certain, there can
not be enough traffic over such a line
for twenty years to come to pay operat
ing expenses. In the meantime the
men whom you are asking to build the
road must lose not only the interest on
their investment, but the investment
itself. I know al! the facts that bear
upon the case
"All but one," answered Tandy.
"What is that one?"
"That a favorable' report from you
means a check, right now and here,
tonight, payable to 'bearer,' for $10,-
000. My check is supposed to be good
for all it calls for. You can have it
now, and it will be cashed tomorrow
morning. Here it is. Payable to bear
er as it is, you needn't indorse it, and
you need not be known in the matter
in any way. I'm talking 'business'
now"
Duncan scanned the face of his in
terlocutor for an instant. Then he rose
from his seat, and with utterance
choked by emotion managed to say:
"I quite understand. You would
bribe me with that check. You would
hire me to betray the confidence of the
men who are paying me a very much
smaller sum than $10,000. You pro
pose to buy my integrity, my honor,
my soul. Very well. My integrity,
my honor and my soul are not for sale
at any price. I shall make an honest
report in this matter. Good night, sir!
I am not such a scoundrel as you
hoped I might be."
And with that Guilford Duncan
stalked out of the house, helping him
self to his hat as he passed the rack
in the entry way.
[TO BE CONTINUED.]
I was taken with appendicitis on
May 4th. The doctors who treated me
said I must be operated to be saved,
but I refused. I was so bad that they
gave me morphine injections and for
six weeks my body was in a horrible
conditon. I received a bottle of Dr.
Adler's Treatment on June 29 and in
two hours I went to work again. I
know your medicne will do all you
claim for it did so for me. John
Blair, Kahlotus, Wash." Large dol
lar bottles at the Home Drug Store.
ssauMtt
PROPOSED
Amendments
TO THE
Constitution
OF MINNESOTA
Hon Peter E Hanson,
Secretary of State
Sir
As required ly Section 25 of the
Revised Laws. I hate the honor to
advise jou as to the purpose and
effect of these amendments which
are to he voted on by the people at
the coming election.
FIRST PROPOSED AMEDME
The first proposed amendment is
contained in Chapter 1GS of the
Laws of 1905. this amendment it
is sought to repeal Sections one (1),
two (2 three (3), four (4) and sev
enteen (IT) of \rticle nine (9) of
the Constitution (t he latter section
being the amendment to said Article
nine (9) adopted in 1S9G) which
sections now read as follows:
Section 1 All taxes to be raised in
this state shall be as nearly equal as
may be, and all property on which taxes
are to be levied shall have a cash valua
tion and be equalized and uniform
throughout the 3tate Provided, that the
legislature may, by general law or spe
cial act, authorize municipal corpora
tions to levy assessments for local im
provements upon the property fronting
upon such improvements, or upon the
property to be benefited by such im
provements, or both, without regard to
cash valuation, and in such manner as
the legislature may prescribe, and pro
vided further, that for the purpose of
defraying the expenses of laying water
pipes and supplying any city or munic
ipality with water, the legislature may,
by general or special law, authorize any
such city or municipahtj, having a pop
ulation of five thousand or more, to levy
an annual tax or assessment upon the
lineal foot of all lands fronting on any
water main or water pipe laid by such
city or municipality within corporate
limits of said city for supplying water
to the citizens thereof without regard
to the cash \alue of such property, and
to empower such city to collect any
such tax, assessments or fines or penal
ties for failure to pay the same, or any
fine or penalty toi any violation of the
rules of such city oi municipality in re
gard to the use of water, or for any wa
ter rate due for the same and provided
further that there may be by la*r levied
and collected a tax upor all inheritances,
devises, bequests, legacies and gifts of
every kind and description above a
fixed and specified sum, of any and all
natural persons and corporations Such
tax above such exempted sum may be
uniform, or it m~y be graded or progres
sive, but shall not exceed a maximum
tax of five per cent
"Section 2 The legislature shall pro
vide for an annual tax sufficient to de
fray the estimated ordinary expenses of
the state for each year, and whenever it
shall happen that such ordinary ex
penses of the state for any
year shall exceed the income of the
state for such year, the legislature shall
provide for levying a tax for the ensu
ing year sufficient with other sources of
income, to pay the deficiency the pre
ceding year, together with the estimated
expenses of such ensuing year But no
law levying a ta making other pro
visions for the payment of interest or
principal of bonds denominated 'Minne
sota State Railroad Bonds' shall take
effect or be in force until such law shall
have been sabmitted to a vote of the
people of the state and adopted by a
majority of tho electors of the state vot
ing upon the same
Section 3 Lavs shall be passed tax
ing all moneys credits, investments in
bonds, stocks, joint stock companies, or
otherwise, also all real and personal
property, according to its true value in
money, but public buymg grounds, pub
lic school houses public hospitals acad
emies, colleges, universities, and all sem
inaries of learning all churches church
property used for religious purposes, and
houses of worship institutions of purely
public charity, public property used ex
clusively for any public purpose and
personal property to an amount not ex
ceeding in value two hundred dollars for
each individual, sha'l by general laws,
be exempt from taxation
"Section 4 Laws shall be passed for
taxing the notes and bills discounted or
purchased, moneys loaned, and all other
property, effects, or dues of every de
scription, of all banks and of all bank
ers so tht all property employed in
banking sh 11 always be subject to a
taxation equal to that imposed on the
property of individuals
"Section 17 The legislature may im
pose, or provide for the imposition of,
upon the pioperty within this state of
any and all owners or opeiators, whether
corporate oi individual, or otherwise, of
any and all sleeping, parlor and draw
ing room cars or any or either of the
same, which run in into or through this
state, also upon the pioperty within this
state of any and all telegraph and tele
phone companies or owners, whose lines
are in, or extend in. into or through
this state, also upon the property within
this state of al' express companies, or
owners or any or either of the same,
doing business this state, also upon
the property within this state of all do
mestic insurance companies of this state
of an\ kmd also upon the property with
in this state of any and all foreign in
surance companies doing business in
this state of any kind, also upon the
property within this state of all owners
or operators of any and all mines or of
mineral ores situated this state, also
upon the property within this state of all
boom companies or owners, and of all
ship builders or owners doing business
in this state, or having a port therein
(provided, that this act shall not apply to
property owned by railroad companies,
their lands and other property), and
upon the property of either or any of
such companies or owners,a tax as uni
form as reasonably may be with the
taxes imposed upon similar property in
said state, or upon the earnings thereof
within this state, but nay be graded or
progressive, or both, and providing
for such tax, or in providing for ascer
taining the just and true value of such
property it shall be competent for the
legislature, in eithei or all of such cases,
to impose such tax upon any or all
property thereof within this state, and
in either case by taking as the basis of
such imposition tl proportionate busi
ness earnings, mileage or quantity of
production or property now or hereafter
existing of any such companies, persona
or owners, transacted or existing in this
state, in relation to the entire business,
mileage or quantity of production or
property of such companies, persons or
owners as aforesaid, or in such other
manner, or by such other method, as the
legislature may determine, but the pro
ceeds of such taxes upon mining prop
erty shall be distributed between the
state and the various political subdivi
sions thereof wherein the same is sit
uated, in the same proportion as the
proceeds of taxes upon real property are
distributed Provided further, that noth
ing this act contained shall operate
to a\ithonze the assessment or taxation
of any farm land or ordinary business
blocks or property owned by any such
corporation, person, firm or company ex
cept in the manner provided by the or
dinary methods of taxation."
And to substitute therefor the iol
lowings
TOW
"Section 1 The power of taxation shall
never be surrendered, suspended or con
tacted away Taxes shall be uniform
upon the same class of subjects, and
shall be levied and collected for public
purposes bjt publ'c burying gro aids,
public school houses public hospitals,
academies college^, universities and all
seminaries ot lecUi ing, all chuiches,
church propertj, and houses of -worship
institutions of purely pubuc charity, and
public propertv used exclusively for any
public puipose, shaU be exempt from tax
ation, and there may be exempted from
taxation peisonal property not exceeding
in value "O00 for each household, indi
vidual or ead of a family, as the legis
lature may determine Pro/ided that
the legislature mav authorize municipal
corporations to levy and collect assess
ments for local impiovcments upon prop
erty benefited thereby without regard to
a cash valuation, and provided further,
that nothing herein contained shall be
construed to affect modity or repeal
any existing law piovidmg for the taxa
tion of the gross earnings of railroads
The purpose and effect of this
amendment would he to greatlj en
laige the power of the legislature
with reference to the subject of
taxation. Section one (1) as it now
stands provides that all taxes im
posed shall be eqnal-ng near as mav
beon all forms of property, and all
propei upon which a tax is im
posed is required to have a CASH
VLX VriOI* equalized throughout
the stat e.
Section tno as it now stands re
quires the legislature to lev* the
necessary taxes nnnuallv to defray
the expenses of the stat e. That la
the dutj o* the legislature without
anconstitutiona direction.
Section three as it now stands pro
vides that all real and personal
property, including MONEYS, CRED
ITS and r\VESTME]*TS IN BOADS
AftD STOCKS, shall be assessed ac
cording to their true value in
monev.
Section four as it now stands pro
vides that property employed in
banking shall be subject to a tax
equal to that imposed on other
property. This is only a repetition
Of the requirements ot Sectio ns one
and three, as no rational person
would claim that banking capital
should be exempt froin taxation.
Section seventeen as it now stands
is not easy to understand, but it was
intended that section to relieve
from the operation of sections one
and three, aboie quoted, property
of the classes therein enumerated,
so that a gross earnings tax could
be applied theieto instead of direct
taxation.
Owing to the provisions of sec
tions one and three of the present
Constitution many amendments
were from time to time added so as
to permit taxes to be Imposed on
pecifle hinds of property other
wise than upon a cash valuation
equalized throughout the stat e. W
have among these exceptions rail
road gross earnings taxes: munici
pal frontage taxesinheritanc
taxesan the gross earnings taxes
authorized said section seven
teen.
Several exemptions from taxation
are also provided for, but as these
exemptions are not changed by the
proposed amendment, I will mafce
no further reference to them.
The amendment which, if adopted,
would take the place of all of the
sections and amendments aboie re
ferred to, is simple and plain.
provision of the Constitution is
necessary to authorize the im
position of the taxes necessary for
the support of the state and its
various politicnl subdivisions. The
power of taxation is inherent In
government. This proposed amend
ment declares that this Inherent
power of taxation shall never be
surrendered, suspended or con
tracted aw that taxes shall be
imposed for public purposes and
shall be uniform On the same class
of subjects Should this amend
ment be adopted all property of
every kind in the state would be
subject to ta-tntion, according to
the method the legislature saw fit
to adopt, prov ided only that the
tai. was levied for a public purpose
and wag uniform on the same cla ts
of subjects. Under this amendment
eyerj tax law -we no-w have on the
statute books would continue to be
valid, because under this amend
ment all limitations on the power
of the legislature would be taken
awa.
The adoption of this amendment
would, indicated, repeal the so
called inheritance tax amendment,
and the gross-earnings tax amend
ment adopted in 1896 as contained
in said section seventeen, but in
their place this amendment would
give the legislature greater author
it y, tniler this amendment the
power to impose inheritance tnx*s
would be unlimited, and any form
of gross earnings tax would be
valid. The gross earnings tax. on
railroads would not be affected by
this amendment, as the Constitution
provides that it can not be changed
without a vote of the people. ut
with this amendment various new
forms of taxation could be imposed,
notably an income tax and a regis
try tax on mortgages. Under the
present Constitution we can impose
no tax on mortgages owned by non
residents. A registry tax, which
would be valid under this amend
ment, would reach all mortgages
alike. "While all subjects of taxa
tion are required to have a cash
valuation with the tax equalized
throughout the state, no proper in
come tax could be imposed. Such a
tax, if imposed, should be pro
gressive, which would be valid
under this amendment.
SECOND PROPOSED \ME\DMET.
The second proposed amendment is
contained in Chapter 212 of the
Laws of 1005. It is sought this
amendment to repeal Section 10 ol
Article 9 of the Constitution, which
Is as follows:
"Section 16 For the purpose of lending
aid in the construction and improvement
of public highwavs and bridges there is
hereby created a fund to be known as
the 'State Eoad and Bridge Fund Said
fund shall include all moneys accruing
from the income derived from invest
ments in the internal inorovement land
fund, or that may hereafter accrue to
said fund and shall also include all
funds accruing to any state road and
bridge fund however provided The
legislature is authorized to add to such
fund for the purpose of constructing or
Improving roads and bridges of this
state, by providing, in its discretion, for
an annual tax levy upon the property of
this state of not to exceed in any year
one-twentieth of one mill on all the tax
able property within the state The leg
islature is also authorized to provide for
the appointment by the governor of the
state a board to be known aa the State
Highway Commission, consisting ot
three members, who shall perform such
duties as shall be prescribed by law
without salary or compensation other
than personal expenses Such commis
sion shall have general superintendence
of the construction of state roads and
bridges and shall use such fund in the
construction thereof and distribute the
same in the several counties in the state
upon an equitable basis Pro\ ided
further, that no county shall receive in
any year more than three per cent or
less than one-half of one per cent of
the total fv^nd thus provided and
pended during such year, and provided,
further, that no more than one-third of
such fund accruing any year shall
be expended for bridges, and in no casa
shall more than one-third of the cost of
constructing or Improving any road oi
bridge be paid by the state from SJ el
fund
WilkK
B" *?W
THE PKINCETOK UNION: THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1906.
and substitute therefor the fol
low ing(
Section 16 Foi the purpose of lending
aid in the construction and improvement
of puohc higlmavs and bridges., there is
hereby created a tund, to be known as
the Mate Road ard Bridge Fund,' said
fund shall include all moneys accruing
from the income derived from invest
ments in the internal improvement land
fund, or that may nereafter accrue to
said fund, and shall also include all
funds accruing to any state road and
bridge fund, howevei provided
"I he legislature is authorized to add
to such fund for the purpose of con
stiucting and improving roads and
bridges of this state, by providing,
its discretion, tor an annual tax levy
upon the propei ty of this state of not
to exceed in anj jear one-fourth (&) of
one mill on all taxable property within
the state
Provided, that no county shall receive
in any jear more than thiee per cent
or less than one-half of one (1) per
cent of the total fund thus provided and
expended during such ear and provided,
furthei that in no case shall more than
one tlmd (1-3) ot tne cost ot co-istiuct
mg or improving any road or budge be
paid bv the state from such fund
The purpose and object of the
amendment is (1st) to eliminate
from the Constitution the lequjre
ment that nn unsalaried higlma)
commission shall he appointed to
have charge of the expenditure of
the road and brodge fund. This
would leave it optional with the
legislature to have a state highway
commission or not (2nd) to in
crease the tax which can be levied
for state road purposes from one
twentieth of a mill to one-fourth of
a mill. The legislature may levy a
less tax, but can not exceed one
fourth of mill. The proviso shows
how it will be divided among the
counties.
THIRD PROPOSED AMENDMENT.
The third proposed amendment to
the Constitution is contained in
Chapter 2S3 of the Laws of 1905,
and is as follows:
"Section 18 Anv person may sell or
peddle the products ot the farm or gar
den occupied ard cultivated by him
without obtaining a license therefor
This proposed amendment is In
tended to be added to Article one
(1) of the Constitution, which is
known ns the bill of rights, and
will, if adopted, be Section 18 of
said Article. leaving all of the Ar
ticle otherwise as it is at present.
The only change tr-at would be
effected thereby would be to enable
any farmer or gardener to sell the
products of the farm or garden,
which he occupies and cultivates,
within anj eitv or village In the
state by peddling the same from
house to house without taking out
a peddler's license.
Respectfully,
Edward T. Young,
Attorney General.
Dated St. Paul, Julv 1, 1900.
In Time of Peace.
Tn the first months of the Russia
Japan war we had a striking example
of the necessity for preparation and
the early advantage of those who, so
to speak, "have shingled their roofs
in dry weather." The virtue of prep
aration has made history and given
to us our greatest men. The individ
ual as well as the nation should be
prepared for any emergency. Are you
prepared to successfully combat the
first cold you take? A cold can be
cured much more quickly when treated
as soon as it has been contracted and
before it has become settled in the
system. Chamberlain's Cough Rem
edy is famous for its cures of colds
and it should be kept at hand ready
for instant use. For sale by Prince
ton Drug Co.
Ireland May Take Half a Loaf.
It looks as though the Irish Nation
alists would accept what has been in
terpreted as only a halfway measure
to give the Irish political rights. Sup
port of the Irish National party in par
liament is necessary to the Campbell
Bannerman government. But the Lib
eral ministry risks a stampede in the
home ranks if too much is conceded to
the Irish at this time.
Two things the Nationalists of Ire
land will insist upon in the new meas
ure to be offered at the next session
of parliament by the government. It
must be consistent throughout with the
fundamental principle of complete
home rule, and it must obviously lead
up to complete home rule at no dis
tant day. The Unionists have opposed
an Irish parliament and won elections
on that issue. The Liberals propose to
grant Ireland power over its local af
fairsfor instance, the management of
finances, schools and roads. This is a
great advance, and even if it fails to
satisfy the aspirations of the National
ists the concession has in it the germ
and the promise of thorough home rule,
as was once enjoyed in Ireland.
Senator Smoot has announced his in
tention of backing the restoration of
the army canteen. He does not con
ceal the fact that his course is prompt
ed by hostility to an organization
which has opposed his remaining in
the United States senate, but that
ought not to cause interested people
to lose sight of the practical phases of
the canteen question, which should not
be mixed up with sentiment or be
loaded down with outside fights. The
thing for congress to consider is sim
ply this: Has the abolition of the can
teen accomplished the object sought to
be achieved?
The production of coal In the United
States Is increasing at a very rapid
rate. In each decade the output of the
United States has been practically dou
bled. The great increase in the iron
industry naturally called for an In
crease in the production of coal. There
are 626,174 men and boys employed in
coal mines in the United States.
Lncle Sam's soldiers were vaccinated
before they started to Cuba. Now if a
yellow fever mosquito does not bite
them they will be reasonably safe.
Famous Strike Breakers.
^The most famous strike breakers in
the land are Dr. King's New Life
Pills. When liver and bowels go on
strike, they quickly settle the trouble,
and the purifying work goes right on.
Best cure for constipation, headache
and dizziness. 25 cents at C. A. Jack's
drug store.
First publication Nov 1 1906
Order for Hearing on Petition for Pro
bate of Will.
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs In
Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Catherine Mc
Dougall, decedent
A cei tain instrument purporting to be the
last will and testament of Catherine McDougall
having been presented to this court and
the petition of William Huntington being
duly tiled therein, representing, among other
things that said decedent, then being a resi
dent of the county of Mille Lacs State of Min
nesota died testate in the county of Mille
Lacs State of Minnesota, on the 18th day of
October, llOfi, and that said petitioner is a
nephew, and that William Huntington is
named in said will as the executor thereof and
praying that said instrument be allowed and
admitted to probate as the last will and testa
ment or said decedent and that letters testa
mentary be issued to the said William Hunt
ington thereon
It is ordered that said petition be heard be
fore this court, at the probate court rooms in
the court house in Princeton county of Mille
Lacs, State of Minnesota, on the 22rd day of
November, 1906, at 2 clock p, M and that the
citation of this court issue to all persons in
terested in said hearing and said matter and
that such citation be served by the publication
thereof in the Princeton Union a weekly
newspaper printed and published at Prince
ton, according to law
Dated October 89th, 1906
By the court,
,_ VANALSTEIN,
[Probate Seal Probate Judge
First publication Nov, l, 1906
Order of Hearing on Petition for De
termination of Descent of Land.
ESTATE OF MARIAN GAGE
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs In
Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Marian Gage,
decdent
On reading and filing the petition of
Rollins, praying that this court determine the
descent of certain lands described therein as
belonging to the above named decedent in her
life time, who died more than five years prior
to the date hereof
It is ordered, that said petition be heard, and
that all persons interest in the estate of the
above named decedent be aad appear before
this court on the 22nd day of November, 1906
at 10 o'clock A at the probate court rooms
in the court house at Princeton in said county,
and then and there, or as soon thereafter as
said matter can be heard, show cause, if any
there be, why said petition should not be
granted
Let notice of said hearing be given by the
publication of this order in the Princeton
Union, a weekly newspaper printed and pub
lished at Princeton in said county, according
to law
Dated October 31,1906
[Probate Seal Judge of Probate
(First publication Nov 1 1906
Order of Hearing on Petition for De
termination of Descent of Land.
ESTATE OF JANE MARKS
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs In
Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Jane Marks,
decedent
On reading and filing the petition of
Rollins, praying that this court determine the
descent of certain lands described therein as
belonging to the above named decedent in her
lifetime who died more than five years prior
to the date hereof
It is ordered that said detition be heard, and
that all persons interested in the estate of the
above named decedent be and appear before
this court on the 32nd day of November, 1906,
at 2 clock at the Probate court rooms
in the court house at Princeton, in said county,
and then and there, or as soon thereafter as
said matter can be heard, show cause, if any
there be, why said petition should not be
granted
Let notice of said hearing be given by the
publication of this order in the Princeton
Union, a weekly newspaper printed and pub
lishea at Princeton in said county, according
to law
Dated October 31,1906
VANALSTEIN,
[Probate Seal I Judge of Probate
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that a peti
tion, of which the following is a copy,
has been filed in the office of the
county auditor of Mille Lacs county,
State of Minnesota, and that a hear
ing will be had upon said petition be
fore the county board at the office of
the county auditor of said county,
in the village of Princeton, on the 15th
day of November, A. D. 1906, at 3
o'clock p. m.
Dated at Princeton, Minn., this 12th
day of October, 1906.
E. E. WHITNEY,
County Auditor.
(Auditor's Seal).
Petition for Public Ditch.
To the County Board of the County of
Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota:
The undersigned land owners, whose
lands will be liable to be affected by,
or assessed for, the expense of the
construction of the public ditch here
inafter described, would respectfully
represent that the public health, con
venience and welfare, and the recla
mation of wet and overflowed lands,
require the establishment and con
struction of a public ditch along the
following described route in the town
of Milaca, in said county of Mille
Lacs, and that the construction of the
same would be of public beneiit and
utility.
A general description of the pro
posed starting point, route and termi
nus of said ditch is as follows: Com
mencing at a point near the center
post of the southeast quarter of sec
tion twenty-one (21), in said township
of Milaca, Mille Lacs county and
State of Minnesota thence running
east to near the center of southwest
quarter of section twenty-two (22), in
said township thence running in a
southeasterly direction, into and
through the northeast corner of the
northeast quarter of the northwest
quarter of section twenty-seven (27),
and through the southerly part of the
northwest quarter of the northeast
quarter of said section twenty-seven
(27), to its termini and entering a
small creek called "Little Chase
Creek," near the center of said quar
ter section last named, which said
creek runs into the Bum river as
shown by the sketch hereto attached.
And your petitioners pray that you
will proceed to establish such public
ditch and cause the same to be con
structed as provided by Chapter Two
Hundred Thirty (230), of the General
Laws of Minnesota for 1905.
Dated September 27, 1906.
C. ErickErickson, Emma Olson,
Olof Lasell, B. Lindstrqm,
Nils Lindfors, Andrew Marklund,
P. P. Kjaglien, Hans P. Kjaglien.
Petitioners.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that a peti
of which the following is a copy,
been filed in the office of the
county auditor of Mille Lacs county,
Mat of Minnesota, and that a hear
will be had upon said petition be
the county board at the office of
county auditor of said county, in
of Princeton, on the 15th
of November, A. D. 1906, at 2
'clock p. m.
Dated at Princeton, Minn., this 12th
day of October, 1906.
E. E. WHITNEY,
IK A-. r, County Auditor.
(Auditor's Seal).
tion\,
has ing fore the
the dayvillage Petition for Public Ditch.
^County Board of the County of
Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota
The undersigned land owners, whose
lands will be liable to be affected by,
or assessed for, the expense of the
construction of the proposed county
ditch hereinafter described, would re
spectfully represent that the public
neaith, convenience and welfare, and
the reclamation of wet and overflowed
lands, require the establishment and
constructiongofS
theah
Chapter
5SJ
SSSSSf
Lac
andd,ml,er
mortgage"
i" E
a county ditch along
Brook being town
the followin described route in the
o
S
ship 37, range 26, in said county ocf
Mille Lacs, and that the constructioncilb
and utlmy8.
nating in Bogus
southwest quarter of
qurte
eleve a
^nI
S
O
6
VANALSTEIN
ditch described as
6 Sa
ia
follows: Beginning at a point four
teen rods west of the southeast corner
of the northeast quarter of the south
west quarter of section ten (10) in
same township and range thence
northerly and northeasterly, over and
across the northeast quarter of the
southwest quarter, the east half of the
northwest quarter and the west half of
the northeast quarter of section ten,
to the north quarter post of said sec^
tion ten thence northeasterly across
the south half of the southeast quarter
and the northeast quarter of the south
east quarter of section three thence
northeasterly and southeasterly across
the west half of the southwest quarter,
the south half of the northwest quarl
ter and the northeast quarter of the
southwest quarter of section two, and
terminating the main ditch herein
before described at a point in the
northeast quarter of the southwest
quarter of section two all the lands
herein described being in township 37
and range 26.
And your petitioners pray that vou
will proceed to establisprovided such pro
posede county ditcth
anfdMinnesote
as by
cause th 9J?
nstruce
J.
Twol
recorded in the office of the
2
3
3903
i
ee
Spte
fta
0
or yNW#)
^V
28L
J4
i3!
4
benefif
pu
A general description of the pro
posed starting point, route and termi
nus of said ditch is as follows: Com
mencing at a point as near as prac
ticable to the southeast corner of the
northeast quarter of the southeast
quarter of section ten (10), in said
township and range thence north
westerly, northeasterly and north
erly, over and across the northeast
quarter of the southeast quarter and
the east half of the northeast quarter
of section ten and the west half of the
northwest quarter of section eleven, to
the northwest corner of said section
eleven thence northeasterly across
the southwest quarter of section two
thence easterly and southerlv across
the west half of the southeast" quarter
oi said section two thence southerly
across the west half of the northeast
quarter of section
eleven,s
and termin
sectio
Broook
at a point in
asa its outlet,
i
samre a fo
Hundred Thirty (230)
Law
1905
Genera
Dated September 27th, 1906
John A. Nyquist, C. B. Love,
John Folwick, Israeolr
PeterFRydberg, Albert Anderson,
Sk
Jorgenson,.Westberg
son.
Teod
0h
a,4?
Petitioners.
First Publication Sept 27.1906
Notice of Foreclosure Sale by Adver
tisement.
Whereas default has been made in the con
rrtLL
(widower) mortgagor county Sto Evan
Sst
?nT.
mor tM ai /l
ee,
toted septeafc S
1 clock
in book N of mortgages on TUUHII
which there is claimed to be due at tht"aJ&
of this notice thoe sumeof threepart hundred
and -iooS dollars,t and no action or proceeding
has beeyn instituted to recover the debt se?
CU In^
ag or ai thereoefehtf
ai
And whereof said mortgage was difiv
arvl0th,i9of
ass, S
nmei dated Febru-
Now wherefore notice is hereby given that
under a power of sale contained in said mort
gage and pursuant to statuteWblisuch in case*n
provided said mortgagpremisee
aucuo
will 1A
al
"^mortgaged bforeclosed theTiherif
a
S
C0U
ty
to the h^w
a
to the highest bidder for cash at the front
door of the court house, in the city of Prince
ton Minnesota on the 17th day of November
1906, at ten o'clock in thS forenoon tomisy
said mortgage and cost& and expenses of sale
including the su5mt twenty-five
"ipullte in "f
ndn oSw
eof
The premises described said morteaee
and to be sold are situatednorthweste
county
Minnesotawr
and? describerangeTtwentys-followsaddnlLalMUlnieant
Raf
eee
43
ter ?s
M,qh
te (SEJV i oft oofr seven
5
tsections
27)
acre more o(7) less
contalmn
according to government survey
Dated August 16th 1906
JCS
S
CATHERINE A GALLAGHER
CLIFTON A ALLBRS?f
fMOrtgage
Attorney for Assignee
(First publication Oct, 18 19U5
Order of Hearing on Petition for Pro
bate of Will.
S
TA ,T,?
MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF
O
Mille Lacs. In Probate Court
L
ma "er or the estate of Deborah A.
Chadbourne, decedent
iA,
instrument purporting to be the
^m*
i
last will and testamendecedent, of Deborah A Chad-Ig
bourne havinlg beend presented to court
J^^Petfi oU ofs Charles Chadbourne be
i5IL
flle nereto representingthis among
ity
tl i
ln 5&
then bein
ai
du ia
resident of the county of MiUe Lacs, statl of
Minnesota, died testate In the county of Mille
Lacs, state of Minnesota on the 5th day of
October, 1906. and that said petitioner is the
surviving husband and that he was named in
said last will and testament as sole executor
and praying that said instrument be altowed
and admitted to probate as the last will and
testament of said decedent, and that letters
testamentary be issued to Charles Chad
bourne thereon
It is ordered, that said petition be heard be
fore tms
ll0U
at the probate
f'L
([Probate
3?
courtyrooms 5JP Princeto count of Millni
Lacs, state or Minnesota on the 8th day of
November 1906, at 10 clock a and that the
citation of this court issue to all persons in
terested in said hearing and said matter, and
that such citation be served by the publica
tion thereof in the Princeton Union accord
ing to law
Dated October 17, 1906
By the court
VANALSTEIN,
^eal 1 Probate Judge.
"k
A

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