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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 24, 1907, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1907-01-24/ed-1/seq-7/

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ChilcoteChilcote with his position, his
constituencyhis wife. He half extri
cated his arm, but Fraide held it.
"No," he said. "Don't draw away
from me. You have always been too
ready to do that. It is not often I have
a pleasant truth to tell. I won't be de
prived of the enjoyment."
"Can the truth ever be pleasant, sir?"
Involuntarily Loder echoed Chilcote.
Fraide looked up. He was half a
head shorter than his companion,
though his dignity concealed the fact.
"Chilcote," he said seriously, "give up
cynicism! It is the trademark of fail
ure, and I do not like it in my
friends."'
Loder said nothing. The quiet in
sight of the reproof, its mitigating
kindness, touched him sharply. In
that moment he saw the rails down
which he had sent his little car of ex
istence spinning, and the sight daunted
him. The track was steeper, the gauge
narrower, than he had guessed there
were curves and sidings upon which
he had not reckoned. He turned his
head and met Fraide's glance.
"Don't count too much on me, sir,"
he said slowly. "I might disappoint
you again" His voice broke off on
the last word, for the sound of other
voices and of laughter came to them
across the terrace as a group of two
women and three men passed through
the open door. At a glance he realized
that the slighter of the two women
was Eve.
Seeing them, she disengaged herself
from her party and came quickly for
ward. He saw her cheeks flush and
her eyes brighten pleasantly as they
rested on his companion, but he noticed
also that after her first cursory glance
she avoided his own direction.
As she came toward them Fraide
drew away his hand in readiness to
greet her.
"Here comes my godchild!" he said.
"I often wish, Chilcote, that I could
do away with the prefix." He added
the last words in an undertone as he
reached them, then he responded
warmly to her smile.
"What!" he said. "Turning the ter
race into the garden of Eden in Jan
uary! We cannot allow this."
Eve laughed. "Blame Lady Sarah!"
she said. "We met at lunch, and she
carried me off. Needless to say I
hadn't to ask where."
They both laughed, and Loder joined,
a little uncertainly. He had yet to
learn that the devotion of Fraide and
his wife was a long standing jest in
their particular set
At the sound of his tardy laugh Eve
turned to him. "I hope I didn't rob you
of all sleep last night," she said. "I
caught him his den," she explained,
turning to Fraide, "and invaded it most
courageously. I believe we talked
till 2
Again Loder noticed how quickly she
looked from him to Fraide. The knowl
edge roused his self assertion.
"I had an excellent night," he said
"Do I look as if I hadn't slept?"
Somewhat slowly and reluctantly
:E^ looked hack. "No," she said truth
fully and TMth a famt surprise that to
Loder seemed the first genuine emotion
she had shown regarding him. "No, I
don't think I ever saw you look so
well" She was quite unconscious and
very charming as she made the admis
sion. It struck Loder that her coloring
of hair and eyes gained by daylight
were brightened and vivified by their
setting of somber river and somber
stone
Fraide smiled at her affectionately,
then looked at Loder. "Chilcote has
got a new lease of nerves, Eve," he
said quietly. "And IbelieveI have
got a new henchman. But I see my
wife beckoning to me. I must have a
word with her before she flits away.
May I be excused?" He made a cour
teous gesture of apology, then smiled
at Eve.
She looked after him as he moved
away. I sometimes wonder what I
should do if anything were to happen
to the Fraides," she said, a little wist
fully. Then almost at once she laugh
ed, as if regretting her impulsiveness.
"You heard what he said," she went on
in a different voice "Am I really to
congratulate you*5"
The change of tone stung Loder un
accountably "Will you always disbe
lieve moV" he asked.
Without answering, she walked slow
ly across the deserted terrace and,
pausing by the parapet, laid her hand
on the stonework. Still in silence, she
looked out across the river.
Loder had followed closely. Again
her aloofness seemed a challenge.
"Will you always disbelieve me?" he
repeated.
At last she looked up at him slowly.
"Have you ever given me cause to
believe?" she asked in a quiet tone.
To this truth he found no answer,
though the subdued incredulity nettled
him afresh
Frompted to a further effort, he spoke
again. "Patience is necessary with
every person and every circumstance,"
he said. "We've all got to wait and
see."
She did not lower her gaze as he
spoke, and there seemed to him some
thing disconcerting in the clear, candid
blue of her eyes. With a sudden dread
of her next words, he moved forward
and laid his hand beside hers on the
parapet.
"Patience is needed for every one," he
repeated quickly. "Sometimes a man
is like a bit of wreckage. He drifts
till some force stronger than himself
gets in his way and stops him." He
looked again at her face. He scarcely
knew what he was saying. He only
felt that he was a man in an egregious
ly false position, trying stupidly to jus
tify himself. "Don't you believe that
flotsam can sometimes be washed
ashore?" he asked.
High above them Big Ben chimed the
hour.
Eve raised her head. It almost seem
ed to him that he could see her answer
trembling on her fips. Then the voice
of Lady Sarah Fraide came cheerfully
from behind them.
"Eve! sh called "Eve! We must
fly. It's absolutely o'clock!"
mN"theedayswit.3tforndiscretionLodes.
CHAPTER X.
tha followed Fraide'
marked adoptio of him
behaved a that
spoke well his qualities
Many a man placed in the same re
sponsible and yet strangely irresponsi
ble position might have been excused if,
for the time at least, he gave himself
a loose rein. But Loder kept free of
the temptation.
Like all other experiments, his show
ed unlooked for features when put to a
working test. Its expected difficulties
smoothed themselves away, while others,
scarcely anticipated, came into promi
nence. Most notable of all, the physical
likeness between himself and Chilcote,
the bedrock of the whole scheme, which
had been counted on to offer most dan
ger, worked without a hitch. He stood
literally amazed before the sweeping
credulity that met him on every hand.
Men who had known Chilcote from his
youth, servants who had been in his
employment for years, joined issue in
the unquestioning acceptance. At times
the ease of deception bewildered him.
There were moments when he realized
that, should circumstances force him to
a declaration of the truth, he would
not be believed. Human nature pre
fers its own eyesight to the testimony
of any man.
But in face of this astonishing suc
cess he steered a steady course. In the
first exhilaration of Fraide's favor, in
the first egotistical wish to break down
Eve's skepticism, he might possibly
have plunged into a vortex of action,
let it be in what direction it might
but, fortunately for himself, for Chil
cote and for their scheme, he was liable
to strenuous second thoughtsthose
wise and necessary curbs that go fur
ther to the steadying of the universe
than the universe guesses. Sitting in
the quiet of the house on the same day
that he had spoken with Eve on the
terrace he had weighed possibilities
slowly and cautiously. Impressed to
the full by the atmosphere of the place
that in his eyes could never lack char
acter, however dull its momentary busi
ness, however prosy the voice that fill
ed it, he had sifted impulse from ex
pedience as only a man who has lived
within himself can sift and distinguish,
and at the close of that first day his
programme had been formed. There
must be no rush, no headlong plunge,
he had decided. Things must work
around. It was his first expedition
into the new country, and it lay with
fate to say whether it would be his
last.
He had been leaning back in his seat,
his eyes on the ministers opposite, his
arms folded in imitation of Chilcote's
most natural attitude, when this final
speculation had come to him, and as it
came his lips had tightened for a mo
ment and his face become hard and
cold. It is an unpleasant thing when
a man first unconsciously reckons on
the weakness of another, and the look
that expresses the idea is not good to
see. He had stirred uneasily, then his
lips had closed again He was tena
cious by nature, and by nature intol
erant of weakness. At the first sug
gestion of reckoning upon Chilcote's
lapses his mind had drawn back in
disgust, but as the thought came again
the disgust had lessened.
In a weektwo weeks, perhapsChil
cote would reclaim his place. Then
would begin the routine of the affair.
Chilcote, fresh from indulgence and
freedom, would find his obligations a
thousand times more irksome than be
fore he would struggle for a time,
then
A shadowy smile had touched Lo
der's lips as the idea formed itself.
Then would come the inevitable re
call then in earnest he might venture
to put his hand to the plow. He never
indulged in day dreams, but something
in the nature of a vision had flashed
over his mind in that instant. He had
seen himself standing in that same
building, seen the rows of faces first
bored, then hesitatingly transformed
under his personal domination, under
the one great power he knew himself
to possessthe power of eloquence
The strength of the suggestion had
been almost painful. Men who have
attained self repression are occasion
ally open to a perilous onrush of feel
ing. Believing that they know them
selves, they walk boldly forward to
ward the highroad and pitfall alike.
These had been Loder's disconnected
ideas and speculations on the first day
of his new life. At 4 o'clock on the
ninth day he was pacing with quiet
confidence up and down Chilcote's
study, his mind pleasantly busy and
his cigar comfortably alight, when he
paused in his walk and frowned, inter
rupted ty the entrance of a servant.
The man came softly into the room,
drew a small table toward the fire and
proceeded to lay an extremely fine and
unserviceable looking cloth.
Loder watched him in silence. He
had grown to find silence a very useful
commodity. To wait and let things
develop was the attitude he oftenest
assumed, but on this occasion he was
perplexed. He had not rung for tea,
and in any case a cup on a salver sat
isfied his wants. He looked critically
at the fragile cloth.
Presently the servant departed and
solemnly re-entered carrying a silver
tray, with cups, a teapot and cakes.
Having adjusted them to his satisfac
tion, he turned to Loder.
"Mrs. Chilcote will be with you in
five minutes, sir," he said.
He waited for some response, but
Loder gave none. Again he had found
the advantages of silence, but this time
it was silence of a compulsory kind.
He had nothing to say.
The man. findinc him irresponsive,
retired, and, left to himself, Loder
stared at the array of feminine trifles
then, turning abruptly, he moved to
the center of the room.
Since the day they had talked on the
terrace he had seen Eve only thrice
and always in the presence of others.
Since the night of his first coming she
had not invaded his domain, and he
wondered what this new departure
might mean.
His thought of her had been less
vivid in the last few days, for, though
still using steady discretion, he had
been drawn gradually nearer the fas
cinating whirlpool of new interests
and new work. Shut his eyes as he
might, there was no denying that this
moment, so personally vital to him,
was politically vital to the whole coun
try and that by a curious coincidence
Chilcote's position well nigh forced
him to take an active interest in the
situation. Again and again the sug
gestion had arisen that should the
smoldering fire in Persia break into a
flame Chilcote's commercial interests
would facilitate would practically
compelhis standing in in the cam
paign against the government.
The little incident of the tea table,
recalling the social side of his obliga
tions, had aroused the realization of
greater things. As he stood meditative
ly in the middle of the room he saw
suddenly how absorbed he had become
in these greater thingshow, in the
swing of congenial interests, he had
been borne insensibly forward, his ca
pacities expanding, his intelligence as
serting itself. He had so undeniably
found his sphere that the idea of usur
pation had receded gently as by natu
ral laws until his own personality had
begun to color the day's work.
As this knowledge came he wondered
quickly if it held a solution of the
present little comedy if Eve had seen
what others, he knew, had observed
that Chilcote was showing a grasp of
things that he had not exhibited for
years. Then, as a sound of skirts came
softly down the corridor, he squared
his shoulders with his habitual abrupt
gesture and threw his cigar into the
fire.
Eve entered the room much as she
had done on her former visit, but with
one differencein passing Loder she
quietly held out her hand.
He took it as quietly. "Why am I so
honored?" he asked.
She laughed a little and looked across
at the fire. "How like a man! You
"Why am 1 so honored?" he asked
always want to begin with reasons.
Let's have tea first and explanations
after." She moved forward toward the
table, and he followed. As he did so
it struck him that her dress seemed in
peculiar harmony with the day and the
room, though beyond that he could not
follow its details. As she paused be
side the table he drew forward a chair
with a faint touch of awkwardness.
She thanked him and sat down.
He watched her in silence as she
poured out the tea, and the thought
crossed his mind that it was incred
ibly long since he had seen a woman
preside over a meal. The deftness of
her fingers filled him with an unfamil
iar, half inquisitive wonder. So inter
esting was the sensation that when
she held his cup toward him he didn't
immediately see it.
"Don't you want any?" She smiled
a little.
He started, embarrassed by his own
tardiness. "I'm afraid I'm dull," he
said. "I've been so"
"So keen a worker in the last week?"
For a moment he felt relieved. Then,
as a fresh silence fell, his sense of
awkwardness returned. He sipped his
tea and ate a biscuit. He found him
self wishing, for almost the first time,
for some of the small society talk that
came so pleasantly to other men. He
felt that the position was ridiculous.
He glanced at Eve's averted head and
laid his empty cup upon the table.
Almost at once she turned, and their
eyes met.
"John," she said, "do you guess at
all why I wanted to have tea with
you?"
He looked down at her. "No," he
said honestly and without embellish
ment.
The curtness of the answer might
have displeased another woman. Eve
seemed to take no offense.
"I had a talk with the Fraides to-
day," she said, "a long talk. Mr.
Fraide said great things of you, things
I wouldn't have believed from anybody
but Mr. Fraide." She altered her posi
tion and looked from Loder's face back
into the fire.
He took a step forward. "What
THE PTUNCKTOV Wlf*N TlimwDAY, JAKUAEY 24, 1907.
things?" he said. He was almost
ashamed of the sudden, inordinate
satisfaction that welled up at her
words.
"Oh, I mustn't tell you!" She laughed
a little. "But you have surprised him."
She paused, sipped her tea, then looked
up again with a change of expression.
"John," she said more seriously,
"there is one point that sticks a little.
Will this great change last?" Her
voice was direct and even, wonder
fully direct for a woman, Loder
thought. It came to him with a cer
tain force that beneath her remarkable
charm might possibly lie a remarkable
character. It was not a possibility
that had occurred to him before, and
it caused him to look at her a second
time. In the new light he saw her
beauty differently, and it interested
him differently. Heretofore he had
been inclined to class women under
three headsidols, amusements and
Incumbrances. Now it crossed his
mind that a woman might possibly fill
another placethe place of a com
panion.
"You are very skeptical," he said,
still looking down at her.
She did not return his glance. "I
think I have been made skeptical," she
said.
As she spoke the image of Chilcote
Bhot through his mind Chilcote, ir
ritable, vicious, unstableand a quick
compassion for this woman so inev
itably shackled to him followed it.
Eve, unconscious of what was pass
ing in his mind, went on with her sub
ject.
"When we were married," she said
gently, "I had such a great interest in
things, such a great belief in life. I
had lived in polities, and I was marry
ing one of the coming meneverybody
said you were one of the coming men.
I scarcely felt there was anything left
to ask for. You didn't make very ar
dent love." she smiled, "but I think
I had forgotten about love. I wanted
nothing so much as to be like Lady
Sarahmarried to a great man." She
paused, then went on more hurriedly:
"For awhile things went right then
Slowly things went wrong. You got
youryour nerves."
Loder changed his position with
something of abruptness.
She misconstrued the action.
"Please don't think I want to be
disagreeable," she said hastily. "I
don't. I'm only trying to make you
understai. whywhy I lost heart."
"I think I know," Loder's voice broke
in involuntarily. "Things got worse,
then still worse. You found interfer
ence useless. At last you ceased to
have a husband."
"Until a week ago." She glanced up
quickly. Absorbed in her own feel
ings, she had seen nothing extraor
dinary in his words.
[TO BE CONTINUED.]
Cured of Lung: Trouble.
"It is now eleven years since I had
a narrow escape from consumption,"
writes C. O. Floyd, a leading business
man of Kershaw, S. C. I had run
down in weight to 135 pounds, and
coughing was constant, both by day
and by night. Finally I began taking
Dr. King's New Discovery, and con
tinued this for about six months, when
my cough and lung trouble were en
tirely gone and I was restored to my
normal weight, 170 pounds. Thous
ands of persons are healed every year.
Guaranteed at C. A. Jack's drug store.
50 cents and $1.00. Trial bottle free.
Two Views of the Canal.
JkUny men in a position to know
what they are talking about, among
them the late Collis P. Huntington,
have expressed the opinion that a
canal across the South American isth
mus would in the end disappoint the
hopes of all who anticipate immense
benefits to the nation from a waterway
between the oceans. Perhaps these
oracles have spoken their real minds,
and then again interest or other mo
tive may have colored their opinions.
As a success the canal must seriously
interfere with the colossal investments
in transcontinental railroads. As a
failure it will swallow up millions of
the people's treasure and blast the ex
pectations of those who look forward
to the opening as a revolution in the
marine transportation of two hemi
spheres.
In direct opposition to the pessi
mistic view cited above stands that
of the people of this nation, a view
wherein sentiment largely mingles
with practical considerations. It is a
national enterprise, one which by its
boldness and magnitude is worthy of
the American spirit. After weighing
all the arguments for and against the
canal the consensus of opinion is that
the project is worth while and must
be put through at every hazard and at
any cost. But the typical American Is
as thrifty as he is daring. He wants
his money's worth whether the invest
ment be made for a return in kind or
for a dividend of glory. The canal will
never lack for popular indorsement
and support so long as the appointed
agents of the people are digging dirt
and doing it with as little money as
possible. In the end the people will
not cavil over the sources of supply of
labor and material, provided these
vital factors in the undertaking are
put to good use and the canal is dug.
Possesses wonderful medicinal
power over the human body, remov
ing all disorders from your system,
is what Hollister's Rocky Mountain
Tea will do. Makes you well, keeps
you well. 35 cents, tea or tablets.
C. A. Jack.
"KiJf 't, "Si.
Sfcif
BUSINESS LOCALS.
Monumental agents wanted in this
locality. Apply to Twin City Granite
Works, 501-509 Rice St., St. Paul,
Minn. 4-3t
Fire! Fire!
Don't run the risk of fire by having
your chimney burn out. Have it
cleaned in time. I guarantee a good
3b. Dan C. Mirick.
Eor sale Cheap.
King Coral heater, used only a few
months. Owner lives in Minneapolis
and has no use for it. Can be seen
at residence of Walter E. Brown,
Princeton.
For Sale or Rent.
An 83-acre farm, three miles north
east of Princeton, good house, stable
and well, 15 acres under cultivation.
On easy terms, 10 years time if sold.
Inquire of Henry Noth, 422 Newton
ave. N., Minneapolis, Minn. 5-7
He Should Be Thankful Therefor.
Even when a woman buys her hus
band a Christmas present with his
money she finds on that morning some
one else has been forgotten and takes
it away from him to use on the other.
New York Press.
A Jamaican Lady Speaks Highly of Chamber
lain's Cough Remedy.
Mrs. Michael Hart, wife of the su
perintendent of Cart Service at King
ston, Jamaica, West Indies Islands,
says that she has for some years used
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy for
coughs, croup and whooping cough
and has found it very beneficial. She
has implicit confidence in it and would
not be without a bottle of it in her
home. Sold by Princeton Drug Co.
Notice of Cancellation of Contract.
To Clarence T. Thompson:
Default has been made in the pay
ments due November 1st, 1904, 1905
and 1906 respectively on that certain
contract between Oliver H. Havill and
Clarence T. Thompson dated Novem
ber 1st, 1902, for the purchase of south
west quarter of northwest quarter of
section twenty-eight (28), and south
east quarter of northeast quarter of
section twenty-nine (29) all in town
ship thirty-eight (38), range twenty
seven (27) Mille Lacs county, Minne
sota and whereas by an instrument in
writing dated August 24th, 1904, the
above described contract was assigned
by Oliver H. Havill to the Citizens
State Bank of Princeton of which
bank the First National Bank of
Princeton is the successor, now notice
is hereby given that said contract will
terminate and be cancelled thirty
days after the service of this notice
unless prior thereto the said pur
chaser, Clarence T. Thompson, shall
pay to the First National Bank of
Princeton $1,262.80 together with the
costs of the service of this notice.
Such payment may be made at the
First National Bank of Princeton,
Minnesota.
Dated January 2nd, 1907.
First National Bank of Princeton,
Minnesota.
By Jno. F. Petterson, Cashier.
First publication Jan 24, 1907
Summons.
STATE OF MINNESOTA
Countv of Mille Lacs fs
District Court Seventh Judicial District
Empire Real Estate & Mortgage Co "l
a corporation. Plaintiff
vs
Carl Peterson, Defendant.
The fetate of Minnesota to the above named
defendant
You arc hereby summoned and required to
answer the complaint of the plaintiff in the
above entitled action, which complaint has
been filed in the office of the clerk of this
Court at the Court House at Princeton. Countv
of Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota, and to serve
a copy of your answer to the said oomplaint on
the subscriber at his office, No 705 Guaranty
Building in the City of Minneapolis, Hennepin
County, State of Minnesota.within twenty days
after service of this summons upon you ex
clusn of the day of such service, and if you
fail to answer said complaint within the time
aforesaid, plaintiff will apply to the Court for
the relief demanded in said Complaint together
with its costs and disbursements herein
Dated September 29th 1906
C. J, CAHALEY,
Attorney for Plaintiff,
705 Guaranty Building,
Minneapolis, Minn
First Publication Jan 24,1907
Citation for Hearing on Final Account
and for Distribution.
ESTATE OF LOUIS PAYETTE
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs -In
Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Louis Payette,
The State of Minnesota to Mary Payette and
all persons interested in the final account and
distribution of the estate of said decedent
The representative of the above named dece
dent, having hied in this court his final account
of the administration of the estate of saia de
cedent, together with his petition praying for
the adjustment and allowance of said nnal ac
count and of th residue of
ia estate tforthattributiothereunte persons entitled
Therefore, you. and each of you, are hereby
cited and required to show cause if any you
have, before this court at the probate court
rooms in the court house, in the viUage of
Princeton, in the county of Mille Lacs, state
of Minnesota, on the 16th day of February 1907
at 2 o'clock p. M., why said petition should not
be granted.
Witness, the judge of said court, and the seal
of said court, this 22nd day of January, 1907.
B. M. VANALSTBIN
[Court Seal Probate Judge.
sa
First Publication Jan. 17.1907.
Citation for Hearing on Petition for
ProbateOof Foreign Will.
LYDIA EICHER.
E
ES 2
AT
Mate of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.In
Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Lydia Eicher,
decedent.
The State of Minnesota to all persons inter
ested in the allowance and probate of the will
of said decedent: The petition of Henry M.
Eicher. representing that Lydia Eicher, then a
resident of the county ot Henry, state of Iowa,
died on the 17th day of November, 1905. tes
tate, and that her wul has been aUowedand
admitted to probate in district court in and for
the county of Henry, state of Iowa, being filed
in this court, together with authenticated
copies of said will and of the probate thereof
in the court above named, and praying that
said win be admitted to probate in this state,
and that letters of administration with the
will annexed be thereon granted to E
Eicher
Now therefore, you. and each of you. are
hereby cited and required to show cause if any
you have, before this court, at the probate
court rooms in the court house, in Princeton,
county of Mille Lacs, state of Minnesota, on
the 9th day of February, 1907. at 2 o'clock p. M..
why the prayer of said petition should not be
granted.
Witness the signature of the judge of said
court, and the seal of said court, this 16th day
of January, 1907.
B. VANALSTEIN.
[Probate Seal-1 Judge of Probate Court.
Builds up waste tissue, promotes
appetite, improves digestion, induces
refreshing sleep, gives renewed
strength and health. That's what
Hollister's Rocky Mountain Tea does.
53 cents, tea or tablets. C. A. Jack.
Notice of Application for Liquor Li
cense.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Mille Lacs, ss.
Village of Princeton,
Notice is herbey given that appli
cation has been made in writing to the
village council of said village of
Princeton and filed in my office,, pray
ing for license to sell intoxicating
liquors for the term commencing on
the twenty-eighth day of February,
1907, and terminating on the twenty
seventh day of February, 1908, by the
following persons, and at the follow
ing place, as stated in said applica
tion respectively, to-wit: John Sjo
blom and Andrew Sjoblom, as Sjo
blom Bros., on the lower floor of the
two-story brick building located on
the south half of lot five (5) block six
(6) of original townsite of Princeton.
Minn.
Said application will be heard and
determined by said village council of
the village of Princeton at the special
meeting the recorder's office in said
village of Princeton in Mille Lacs
county, and state of Minnesota, on
the 25th day of January, A. D. 1907,
at 7:30 o'clock p. m., of that day.
Witness my hand and seal of village
of Princeton this 14th day of January
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Mille Lacs. ss.
Village of Princeton.
Notice is hereby given, that appli
cation has been made in writing to the
village council of said village of
Princeton and filed in my office, pray
ing for license to sell intoxicating
liquors for the term commencing on
third day of February, 1907, and
terminating on the second day of Feb
ruary 1908, by the following persons,
and at the following place, as stated
in said application, respectively, to
wit: Magnus Sjoblom and Swan Ol
son as Sjoblom & Olson, the lower
floor of that two-story frame build
ing situate on the southwest corner of
lot twelve (12) block six (6) of Prince
ton, Minn.
Said application will be heard and
determined by said village council of
the village of Princeton at the special
meeting in the recorder's office in said
village of Princeton in Mille Lacs
county, and State of Minnesota, on
the 25th day of January, A. D. 1907,
at 7:30 o'clock p. m., of that day.
Witness my hand and seal of village
of Princeton this 14th day of January
A. D. 1907.
H. C. COONEY, President.
Attest:
J. C. BORDEN,
[Seal.] Village Recorder.
First publication Jan. 3.1907.
Summons
STATE OF MINNESOTA. I
County of Mille Lacs
District Court. Seventh Judicial District
Remhold Swedberg, Plaintiff, i
^,1 SUMMONS
Christine Swedberg, Defendant
The State of Minnesota, to the above named
defendant
You are hereby summoned and required to
answer the complaint of the plaintiff in the
above entitled action, which complaint has
been filed in the office of the clerk of the said
court at Princeton. Minnesota, and to serve a
copy of your answer to the said complaint upon
the subscriber at his office in the city of Brain
erd. in Crow Wing county. Minnesota, within
thirty days after the service of this summons
upon you, exclusive of the day of such service
and if you fail so to do the plaintiff will apply
to the court for the relief prayed for in said
complaint
A T. LABSON.
Attorney for Plaintiff, Brainerd, Minn.
First Publication Jan. 10.1907.
Citation for Hearing on Petition for
Administration.
ESTATE OF MARY CAMPBELL.
State of Minnesota, Countv ef Mille Lacs In
Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Mary Camp
bell, decedent.
The State of Minnesota to all persons inter
ested in the granting of administration of the
estate of said decedent:
The petition ofa Charles L. CampbeU having
been fl ed in this court, representing that Mary
amp 5
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H. C. COONEY, President.
Attest:
J. C. BORDEN,
[Seal.] Village Recorder.
Notice of Application for Liquor Li
cense.
STATE OF MINNESOTA,
County of Mille Lacs, ss.
Village of Princeton.
Notice is hereby given, that appli
cation has been made in writing to
the village council of said village of
Princeton and filed in my office, pray
ing for license to sell intoxicating
liquors for the term commencing on
the twenty-sceond day of February,
1907, and terminating on the twenty
first day of February, 1908, by the
following person, and at the following
place, as stated in said application,
respectively, to-wit: Frank Behnke,
on the lower floor of that certain two
story frame building, located on the
south half of lot eight (8), block two
(2), of Damon's addition to the town
site of Princeton, Minn.
Said application will be heard and
determined by said village council of
the village of Princeton at the special
meeting in the recorder's office in said
village of Princeton in Mille Lacs
county, and state of Minnesota, on
the 25th day of January, A. D. 1907,
at 7:30 o'clock p. m., of that day.
Witness my hand and seal of village
of Princeton this 14th day of January.
A. D. 1907.
H. C. COONEY, President,
Attest:
J. C. BORDEN,
[Seal.] Village Recorder.
Notice of Application for Liquor Li
cense.
resident of the county of
Mule Lacs, State of Minnesota, died intestate
on the 25th day of December, ls05 and praying
that letters of administration of her estate be
granted to Charles L. CampbeU and the court
haying fixed the time and place for hearing
said petition
Therefore, you, and each of you, are hereby
cited and required to show cause, if any you
have, before this court, at the probate court
rooms in the court house, in the village of
Princeton in the county of Mille Lacs, State of
Minnesota, on the 1st day of February, 1907
at 10 o'clock A. M., why said petition should not
be granted.
Witness the judge of said court, and the seal
of said court, this 8th day of January. 1907.
[Probate Seal.] Probate Judge.
CHAS. A. DICKBT,
Attorney for Petitioner.
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