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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, April 25, 1907, Image 8

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Sfce Farm Fireside. I
1
Gleanings by Our Country
Correspondents 5
a
ZIMMERMAN.
Will Iliff was in town Tuesday buy
ing live stock.
E. J. Johnson was\a visitor in Min
neapolis last week.
Harry Pratt went to Princeton on
Monday to consult a doctor.
H. B. Pratt of Elk Lake was a
passenger to Elk River Monday.
Helen Swanson was at home over
Sunday. She returned to her work
Monday.
Art Casper and C. F. Wood came
up from Minneapolis on Monday
evenings
Mrs. Whiteoak of Elk River spent a
few days this week*with her son, Wm.
Whiteoak.
Seth Cohoes was called home Satur
day by the death of his sister, Mrs.
Harrison.
Gus Johnson and wife of Rockford,
Minn., came up Saturday evening and
spent Sunday here.
Mrs. Arthur Hurtt of Los Angeles,
Cal., was the guest of Mrs. Wm. Hurtt
a few days last week.
Mrs. Kate Hagan's daughter and
granddaughter came up from Minne
apolis Saturday evening.
Rev. Galbraith returned on Satur
day from Brainerd, where he had
been to attend conference.
H. E. Thomas has sold his farm to
a party in Minneapolis who will take
possession in a short time.
Clarence Stillman carried the mail
on route No. 2 Monday and Tuesday
as substitute for Joe Cohoes.
Miss Amy Johnson on Monday re
turned from Minneapolis, where she
has been for some weeks visiting.
Miss Ethel Carter, who has been
very sick the past week with measles,
is reported to be much better now.
Last week Mrs. Parker enjoyed a
few days' visit from her sister, Mrs.
Morgan of North Dakota. She re
turned to her home Friday.
Wm. Hagan, who was taken to
Fergus Falls about 10 days ago, died
there last Friday. His remains will
be brought here for burial. Mr.
Hagan was one of the early settlers of
this place and had been an invalid for
a number of years. He leaves a wife,
daughter and three grandchildren to
mourn his loss.
Mrt James Harrison died at her
home on Friday morning of blood
poisoning. Her death was a great
blow to her relatives and friends, for
she had been sick only a few days.
In her own family she leaves a hus
band and one child eight months old
to mourn for her. She also leaves a
father, mother, one sister, Mrs. Geo.
James, and four brothers, George,
Joseph, Charles and Seth Cohoes of
this place and Will Cohoes of Wash
ington. The funeral was held Mon
day morning at 9 o'clock from the
residence. The remains, accompanied
by the relatives, were taken to Hast
ings, Minn., for burial.
Thousands have pronounced Hollis
ter's Rocky Mountain Tea the great
est healing power on earth. When
medical science fails, it succeeds.
Makes you well and keeps you well.
35 cents, tea or tablets. C. A. Jack.
BALDWIN.
Ed Laporte has returned from the
west
Ed Judkins left for Duluth this
week.
Miss Jennie Rossing is at home
again.
Mrs. Wm. Trunk has been having
an attack of la grippe.
G. Richardson has returned to
Baldwin for a short time.
Services will be held in the Judkins
school house on Sunday, April 28, at
11 a. m.
Mrs. E. M. Fiero and children spent
a few days with the former's parents
in Wyanett last week.
Miss Troy entertained the Guild last
Saturday. The ladies are preparing
for their sale in the near future.
Mrs. G. A. Johnson has a severe
attack of sciatic rheumatism. We
trust she will not be laid up long.
George Judkins has returned from
Dakota, where he went intending to
spend the summer. He likes Minne
sota better.
Bitten by a Spider.
Through blood poisoning caused by
a spider bite, John Washington of
Bosqueville, Tex., would have lost
his leg, which became a mass of run
ning sores, had he not been persuaded
to try Bucklen's Arnica Salve. He
writes: "The first application re
lieved, and four boxes healed all the
sores." Heals every sore. 25 cents
at C. A. Jack, druggist.
BOGUS BROOK.
Herman Kuhrke is working the
sawmill at Brickton
George Peterson was home from St.
Cloud on a visit Sunday
Henry Dalchow will begin work on
his house the coming week.
The young people report an enjoj-
able time at the Remus home Satur
day evening.
The meeting of the A. S. of E. at
the Gerth school house on Friday
night was well attended.
Fred Kuhrke, R. Bartz and Henry
Dalchow arrived home from the lake
Sunday afternoon, where they have
been working on the new railroad.
Henry met with an accident while in
the woods. He fell on his ax and sus
tained a severe cut which required
eight stitches' to close.
Wonderful South American Cataract.
The falls of Ignazu, near the meet
ing place of Brazil, Argentina and
Paraguay, seldom visited by foreign
ers, are among the most wonderful
cataracts in the world. They are par
ticularly interesting on account of
their greater extent and far more va
ried character than those of Niagara.
It's a well known fact that golden grain
belt beer is the ideal table beverage.
Take a glass of this delicious bever
age before each meal and you will not
have to deprive yourself of the things
you like to eat. Order of your near
est dealer or be supplied by Henry
Veidt, Princeton.
SPENCER BROOK.
Henry Whiting has been sojourning
at the Brook the past week.
George Smith and wife of Cam
bridge were visiting the former's folks
at the Brook on Sunday
Mr. Waumbeir, a German living in
the west part of Bradford, had a run
away last week. He was thrown from
his wagon and severely injured.
There is a scarcity of hay around
here this spring, the demand far ex
ceeding the supply. Unless we get
rain and sunshine soon cattle will
suffer.
The ladies of Spencer Brook and
vicinity had a bean picking bee at the
M. W. A. hall last Thursday and
looked over seventeen sacks for Lem
Turner.
Leon Wheeler and another gentle
man were at the Brook last week in
the interest of the Caley Hardware
company soliciting for the Sharpies
separator.
Irving Barnum met with a loss by
fire last Saturday. He had been burn
ing around his barn and when he sup
posed the fire was all out went to an
other part of the farm to do some
burning. Looking up he discovered
his barn on fire. He rushed back but
was unable to save any of his prop
erty. The barn, hay, set of harness
and a pair of good work horses were
destroyed.
There are many tonics in the land,
As by the papers you can see
But none of them can equal
Hollister's Rocky Mountain Tea.
C. A. Jack.
TOLIN
A. Sunberg is building a fine new
house.
Algot Olson called at A. Sunberg's
on Sunday.
Josie and Edith Anderson spent
Sunday afternoon at Hedlund's.
A. Anderson was in Princeton one
day last week.
C. V. Bergquist and Andrew Hed
berg are each erecting new barns.
E Pehrmen has sold his farm to D.
Wendt, who has moved onto the prop
erty.
Mrs. Linton and daughter, Gussie,
spent the past week visiting friends in
Mora
Tolin Bros, have nearly finished
sawing. They have done some fine
work this winter.
Mrs. T. A. Linton and daughter,
Daisy, visited at the H. Olson home
in South Fork on Sunday.
Peter Johnson and Miss Hulda Ol
son spent Sunday with the latter's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Olson.
Every woman appreciates a beau
tiful complexion, so much desired by
men. Such complexions come to all
who use Hollister's Rocky Mountain
Tea. 35 cents, tea or tablets.
C. A. Jack.
BLUE HILL.
Mr. Camp has put a new roof on his
house.
Clarence Taylor purchased a couple
of colts last week.
All the farmers are busy sowing
their small grain.
The county examinations were given
in nearly all of the schools the past
week.
Mr. Lamereaux lost his barn, sev-
eral chickens and a large number of
bees by fire.
Mr. and Mrs. Marsh and Miss Gal
braith were visiting friends in Blue
Hill last week.
Grover Taylor will give an oyster
supper at his home on May 3. Attend
and enjoy the time of your life.
Mrs. Brande and son Orin started
for South Dakota on Monday. Mr.
Brande accompanied them to Minne
apolis. He has returned.
Mr. and Mrs. Baker and family will
leave for their new home in Milaca
this week. We are very sorry to lose
any resident of this vicinity.
There will be a dance in the town
hall Saturday evening, April 27.
Strawberries, celery, lettuce
green stuff at Ludden's store.
Horse Finds Defender.
THIS ?RiyCffTOy TTNI03SJ: THURSDAY, APBIt257l907.
Everybody is invited* "We wish to see
some young folks of Princeton in at
tendance.
Mrs. Camp will close her school,
after a very successful term, on Fri
day, April 26. A program will be
given and also refreshments served.
Everybody is invited to attend.
A surprise party was given in honor
of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey on Saturday
evening. The evening was passed in
dancing and card playing. Luncheon
was served at midnight.
It frequently happens, especially in
persons who are troubled with consti
pation, that small particles and seeds
enter the appendix. These soon start
to ferment and decay and then we
have that dreaded disease, appendi
citis. How much nicer it is to have a
bottle of Dr. Adler's Treatment in the
home and to take a dose once or twice
a week. Then you are perfectly safe
and need not worry about a sudden
attack of this disease. Large dollar
bottles at the Home Drug Store.
OXBOW.
Miss Mazie Mott has gone to Long
Lake on a visit and will be away sev
eral months.
Jesse and Miss Gertrude Steeves
have been seriously sick with scarlet
fever the past week.
The Ladies' Social club will meet
on Thursday, May 2, at the home of
Mrs. Herman Francis.
Mrs. Frank Schilling and family
were visitors at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Dibblee on Sunday.
The Oxbow local union of the A. S.
of E. will hold a business meeting
next Tuesday, April 30, at the usual
meeting place.
and
A. Lightning Rod Revival.
The following article is published at
the request of J. A. Wetter, agent for
lightning arresters:
The lightning rod man may be
happy, for the Ohio state fire marshal
has come out plumply in favor of his
industry. In his report on losses by
lightning in his state he says- In
reply to an inquiry about a lightning
fire the secretary of a mutual company
having $5,233,000 at risk said: "In
my seven years' connection with this
asociation as an officer we have not
had one loss to a rodded building by
lightning."
An insurance company which ranks
in the first half dozen in amount of in
surance carried on farm buildings in
Ohio in a circular to agents says that
losses from lightning in the United
States have increased five per cent a
year for the last ten years that it is
unfair to insure barns at the rate? for
dwellings that higher rates on barns
and stock are a necessity that a
proper rod or conductor will reduce if
not prevent loss from electricity that
rates on country buildings not so pro
tected will be advanced and the time
is not far distant when all companies
will charge a higher rate on unrodded
property.Spokane Chronicle.
Whenever a horse runs away from
any cause whatsoever and plays hob
in the sreets, it is the invariable rule
to lay all of the blame on the dumb
beast who can never defend himself.
Even the owner of the animal, how
ever much he may be attached to it, is
almost always inclined to cover up
his own part in the matter by crying
out against "that fool horse."
The horse, however, has at last
found a friend and champion. This
man has made a personal investiga
tion of 1,000 runaways and in con
siderably over half of all of them he
has proved that the drivers or owners,
and not the animals, were primarily
to blame. -For no less than 308 of the
accidents, broken traces, reins, bits
or saddle girths or loss of driving
reins were responsible. In 155 cases
some part of the buggy or wagon
broke as a direct result of the negli
gence of the man. In 92 cases the
horse was left unhitched on a street.
In all of these 545 cases, therefore,
owner and not animal was clearly to
blame.
Automobiles and motorcycles were
the causes of 178 runaways railway
trains and trolley cars of 130 fire
works, flying paper and fire engines,
of 49 and other runaways of 70. In
none of these cases can the horse be
held much to blame, for human oeings
themselves are by no means without
fear of swiftly flying machines of all
of the kinds enumerated.
People will, of course, continue to
blame runaway accidents on their
horsesit would not be human nature
not to shift the responsibility onto
those who cannot defend themselves
but it is to be hoped that, for the sake
of the good name of the most faithful
servant of man which a puffing, toot
ing, noisily exlplosive machine is try
ing to drive to the boneyard, some
one will seek out and make public the
real causes of all runaways.Duluth
Herald.
The Difference.
The difference between pleasure and
duty is the difference between going
fishing and to church.New York
Church Topics a* a*
Sunday and Weekday
Announcements. METHODIST.
Morning service, 10:30, subject,
"The Dictation of Unbelief evening,
7:30, subject, "Living by Bread
Alone." Sunday school at 12, Ep
worth League at 6:30.
EPISCOPAL,.
Baldwin school house, Sunday,
April 28Sunday school, 10 a. m.
morning service and sermon, 11 a. m.
Princeton Congregational church
Afternoon service and sermon, 3 p. m.
Special offering for missionsmite
boxes All are welcome. Rev. Esaac
Houlgate, pastor.
The Only Remedy.
This is not likelythat the Standard
Oil company will be fined $30,000,000
under the conviction at Chicago on
1,463 counts of an indictment for vio
lation of the Elkins anti-rebate law.
But suppose the court does inflict the
maximum penalty, will any reasoning
being believe that the oil monopoly
will be destroyed, or even seriously
injured, by the sentence? John D.
Rockfeller, who says he is only a
small holder of Standard stock, can
give away far more than $30,000,000 a
year.
The Standard Oil company will con
tinue to monopolize the oil business,
and to extend its insidious influence
into every form of American activity
until the members of the conspiracy in
restraint of trade are branded with
the mark of the criminal and put
under lock and key.New York Press.
Where?
As people always give ten times as
much in wedding presents as they get,
where does the difference go?New
York Press.
For Sale, Cheap.
The new dwelling house situated
south of the village power house.
This house, which'is worth $1,800,
will be sold for $1,200. Also the
house now occupied by Thos. H.
Caley as a dwelling.-
Also an 83-acre farm, with dwelling
house and barn, situated in Green
bush. Price $2,500.
Terms in each instance will be made
to suit purchaser. Apply to the Caley
Hardware Co., Princeton.
Bargain.
Lot 1, ex. railway sec. 28, NE^ of
SEM and NE34 ex.' Ry. sec. 32, all in
township 35, range 26. Situated 6
miles south of Princeton, 70 acres
under cultivation, 30 acres meadow,
balance wild. Good five room house,
barn 36x60, 18 foot posts, corn crib,
chicken house and well. This prop
erty is owned by an old lady under
guardianship. Our client says if you
can not get what this property is
worth sell it for what it will bring.
Make us an offer. Terms will be
given for part of the purchase price.
Chippewa County Land Company,
16"3t Montevideo, Minn.
IF IT ISN'T
A Victor
ISN'T THE BEST.
Pricesof ($10, $17, $22, $30,
Hachines $40, $50,$60,$100.
Records 35c, 60c and $1.00.
All Supplies and Latest Records.
J. C. BORDEN,
Only Authorized Agent for Princeton.
A HARD PAIR TO BEAT
The Old Reliable
Wheeler & Wilson
and Singer
Sewing Machines.
These machines obtained awards
at the World's Fair for light run
ning, noiselessmess, durability and
simplicity. Sold on easy terms.
Can furnish repairs for all kinds
of machines. Repairing a specialty.
AH work warranted.
fF~ Musical Instruments and Furnishings
handled
W. E. PRESC0TT,
In building with Prescott, the Jeweler
Princeton, Minn.
NotlCfi 1
PIANOS
Vose, Sohmer,
Rodenbush
& Sons,
Shoniger, Colby,
and Wesley
"Monarch" Shirts $
Cluett-Peabody Co'sv Custom Made Shirts now in
stock in all sizes and sleeve lengths. Newest de-
signs in Madras, Percales and Cheviots, coat and
regular negligee styles. These are an extraordi
nary values at
$1.00 each, others to $1.50
Collars "ARROW" BRAND Cuffs
15c, 2 for 25c
Wear the Best. It's Cheapest.
Groceries
Were you ever in doubt where to find something
a little bit better than usual in canned
-v
Corn, Peas, Tomatoes,
Salmon, Lobsters, Etc.?
If so try our "Fort Snelling" Brand. These
Gr
the finest goods that are grown, and are in
conformity to all state and national pure food laws.
"Moccasin Brand"
Include some in your next order.
een Vegetables, Onions, Radishes, Celery, Lettuce,
Tomatoes, etc., are kept in stock. Also Strawberries.
I P. L. ROADSTRO
*'w"i*ni
HOW YOUR SEPARATOR
MAY PAY FOR ITSELF.
With the unprecedentedly high prices for
butter there never was so important a time
to make the most profitable of all invest
ments for everyone having cream to separate
as the cream saparator.
But some who should have a machine do
not have the ready cash and all may not un
derstand that this isn't necessary in the pur
chase of the best separators.
Others who have a small amount of cash are
tempted to put it into some trashy cash-in
advance machine because they cannot im
mediately command the full amount neces
sary to buy a DE LAVAL.
But there is no such necessity. More than
200,000 of the 600,000 users of DE LAVAL,
machines have practically let their machines
earn their own cost, which they have done
the first year and have kept on doing every
year since.
If you have the ready cash of course there
is a liberal discount for it. But if not, any
reputable buyer may secure a DE LAVAL
machine on such liberal terms that it actu
ally means the machine paying for itself.
EVENS HARDWARE GO.
Sewing Machines
The White Rotary Machine, Lock Stitch or Chain Stitch
The New Home Sewing Machine
Two of the very best makes.
PIANOS AND 0RGAHS
Here area few of the makes we sell:
ORGANS
Estey,
Hamilton,
Wesley
and
Monarch.
Celebrated
Edison Phonographs
and records.
Swings' Music Store,
Security Bank Building, Princeton, Minn.
"^^^^^^^a^^l 11^ in^ i i^
AVATERTITE I 1^R^^^^^___. ANY MAN CAN MAKI
i
*^j
MAK E A
RABLEWATERTIfirlT ROOF
PWATERTITE
RUBBER ROOFING
^DEAL
DISCRIPTI
BOOKLET
FOR SALE
GUARANTEE^ BY
EVENS HARDWARE CO., PRINCETON.
Ks*'-
Or
I
aret55s
od s-F
ir
gpacked
standar
a
Extr
ft
packs in California Fruits \b
and Vegetables.
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