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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, June 20, 1907, Image 8

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I 6fce Farm Fireside. I
8 G/ean/ng nv Our Country I
Correspondents 8
SPENCER BROOK
Remarkable Rescue.
GREENBUSH
Mr. Greenwood is busy with a crew
of men getting the roads in good con
dition.
Will Deshaw and P. Brochman
made a trip through the northern part
of the county on Friday
School in district No. 5 closed on
June 7, after a successful term held by
Miss Dagmar Christianson. A nice
program was presented in the after
noon of the closing day, after which
ice cream and cake were served. Nels
Robideau added to the enjoyment by
giving selections on his gramophone.
The farmers of Greenbush were
awakened by an enthusiastic speech
given at school house No. 5 last
Thursday evening by Geo. Carr of
the American Society of Equity, and
a local union of this society was
organized by a number of Green
bush's most prosperous farmers. The
following officers were elected
Tilley. president Fred McFarland,
vice president John Grow, secretary
Peter Brochman, treasurer.
He Fired the Stick.
I have fired the walking stick I've
carried over 40 years, on account of
a sore that resisted every kind of
treatment, until 1 tried Bucklen's
Arnica Salve that has healed the
sore and made me a happy man,"
writes John Garrett, of North Mills,
N. C. Guaranteed for piles, burns,
etc., by C. A. Jack, drugigst. 25c.
FORESTON.
Fish are very plentiful in Rum river
at the present time, pickerel weighing
ten or twelve pounds being frequently
landed.
George Smith and wife of Cam
bridge were visiting here over Sun
day and caught a twelve pound pick
erel to take home
A number of young people from
Spencer Brook and Bradford spent first bottle relieved and three bottles
Sunday at Sandy lake and partook of completed the cure." Guaranteed
the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Grant
The elements got in their work on
Eugene Clough's wind mill last week.
Mother earth rotted the anchors and
the wind took mean advantage of the
situation.
Mrs. Ethel West of Minneapolis is
visiting with the Severance family
for a time. Mrs. West was formerly
Miss Hope, her parents having lived
at the Brook for a number of years.
It was thought by some of the farm
ers that the potato bugs had been
killed by the winter, but this is not
so. Within the last few days they
have put in an appearance and will
likely be as numerous as ever.
Rev. Bennett Erickson of Cam
bridge delivered a sermon in the
grove near the school house last Sat
urday evening, but on accdunt of the
hard shower in the afternoon there
was rather a small audience present.
Rev. Erickson is an eloquent, forceful
and convincing speaker. Those who
did not attend missed a rare oppor
tunity
All those interested in the Ameri
can Society of Equity are invited to
attend a meeting next Saturday even
ing, June 22, at the Woodman hall,
Spencer Brook. An able advocate of
the cause will be present to instruct
the farmers in the theory advanced by
the society, that the tillers of the soil
may have a decent chance with the
balance of humanity
That truth is stranger than fiction,
has once more been demonstrated in
the little town of Fedora. Tenn., the
residence of C. V. Petter. He writes:
I was in bed, entirely disabled with
hemorrhages of the lungs and throat.
Doctors failed to help me, and allsick
hope had fled when I began taking
Dr. King's New Discoverj. Then in
stant relief came. The coughing soon
ceased the bleeding diimnished
rapidly, and three weeks I was
able to go to work." Guaranteed
cure for coughs and colds. 50c and
$1.00, at C. A. Jack's drug store.
Trial bottle free.
Mrs. Judkins is having her house
repainted.
Tom Robinson is home on a visit to
his mother.
Mr. Chase's daughter of Duluth is
home on a visit.
Miss Allen of Minneapolis is visit
ing Miss Eunice Deans.
W. F. Waldhoff spent part of last
week at Linstrom looking after his
business there.
Harry Lockwood is making a num
ber of improvements on the property
he recently bought.
Mrs. P. F. Golden, who has been
on the sick list for the past two weeks,
is able to be about again.
The Foreston Mercantile company's
store and F. T. P. Neumann are go
ing to have special sales on Satur
day.
Hurrah for the glorious Fourth.
Foreston will celebrate in grand old
style. If you want a good time come
to Foreston. Street parade, speaking,
singing, races, ball game, fireworks
and dancing. Everybody should come
to Foreston for the Fourth
Mrs. Minnie Skeate and daughter of
The riagic No. 3.
Number three is a wonderful mascot
for Geo. H. Parris of Cedar Grove,
Me., according to a letter which reads:
"After suffering much with liver and
kidney trouble, and becoming greatly
discouraged by the failure to find re
lief, I tried Electric Bitters, and as a
result I am a well man today. The
best on earth for stomach, liver and
kidney troubles, by C. A. Jack, drug
gist. 50c.
DISTRICT NO. 50.
A new house is going up on the
Campbell ranch.
The prospects now are for a good
crop of small grain at least.
B. I. Tripp of Anoka was visiting
relatives in Baldwin on Saturday.
Considerable new land is being
opened up in this vicinity this spring.
Jerry Haley is wrestling with a
stump-pulling machine these fine warm
days.
How is the new road system work
ing? We have not seen any effects of
it yet.
Several of the Baldwinites attended
the farmers' picnic at Sandy lake on
Sunday.
Miss Engebrigtson will close a suc
cessful term of school in district 50
on Thursday.
We suppose F. B. Mitchell will go
some with his new horse. The horse
will go, anyway.
Mrs. J. H. Fullwiler and daughter
of Greenbush were calling on rela
tives here Sunday.
A. Fullwiler lost a valuable horse a
short time ago. Hard luck at the price
charged for horses now.
A great improvement is noticeable
in the appearance of Baldwin's town
hall since it was repainted.
Mr. Vetsch has just completed an
addition to his house which greatly
improves the appearance of his farm.
BLUE HILL.
H. Thompson is onthe
Mrs. W.
list.
Mrs. Spence has returned from Min
neapolis.
Mrs. Elmer Thompson is improving
in health.
Charlie Groff has moved onto his
farm for the summer
A dance will be given in the town
hall on Saturday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Esler of Becker were
visiting friends here last week.
The Ladies' Aid society will meet
with Mrs. Horace Johnson the 26th of
this month.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Stevenson were
visiting in the northern part of the
town last Sunday.
Remember church services next
Saturday evening at 8 o'clock and
Sunday school at 11 o'clock Sunday
morning.
There will be an ice cream social in
the church Friday evening, June 28,
to raise money to pay the insurance
on the church. Everybody is invited
to attend. There will be plenty of
good ice cream.
BUSINESS LOCALS.
For Bent.
A ten-room house in
Princeton good location.
L. Slaback.
S. E.
village of
Inquire of
24
For Sale.
About 25,000 feet of oak, elm and
other kinds of lumber, two-by-fours,
etc., from $8 per 1,000 up. Apply at
Glendorado store. 24-4t
For Sale.
A house and three lots, fenced, in
Ed. Meinhardt's addition, north
Princeton. For particulars apply to
Ed. Meinhardt, Brickton. 25tf
Land for Sale.
600 and 31-100 acres at $15 and up
according to location 200 acres in the
village limits. Easy terms, long time.
7-tf Mrs. A. M.v
Cater.
For Sale, Cheap.
Fourteen desirable residence lots
situated a short distance west of
depot, also a dwelling house and four
lots. Apply to F. C. Cater, Princeton.
Farmers, Attention!
are
You are invited to come to thekettles
Mark barns. Good hay, clean stalls
all danger of contagious diseases re
moved. Come and see how clean we
Mark's Barns.
For Sale.
Twenty-seven acres of standing
clover. Must be taken off land
this month. One mile from Santiago
store. Apply to Mrs. M. A. Bursley,
Santiago. 2 6-2t
For Sale or Bent.
Mrs. B. M. Van Alstein offers
sale her spacious ten-room house
posite the high school building. It is
in a convenienyocation and the house
is surrounded with a beautiful gar
den. 'A choice lot of books is also
offered for sale. Apply to Mrs. B.
M. Van Alstein.
for
op-
TH^BINCBTON^mOir^lrmTBSDiTr^iTNElsO^idOT.
LOCAL.
n_
gBps^
Wednesday
I J1
Loqis Rust visited friends in St.
Pftu
St. Cloud are vitising Mrs. Skeate's
sister-in-law, Mrs. Greenough. at theterday
Foreston hotel.
*h+f 1
Mrs. E. M. Chapman returned
from a visit in St. Paul.
yes-
Mrs. Abbie Pratt is on a visit to her
son, Harry, and family at Zimmer
man. the construction of a nice dwelling
house for Henry Dalchow.
Miss Adele Grow arrived here last
evening from Colorado Springs on a
visit to relatives and friends.
A letter from Nebraska addressed
"Bob Dunn, Mille Lacs, Minn.,"
reached the publisher of the Union
this week.
Clerk of Court King issued a mar
riage license yesterday to John Wil
helm of Princeton and Miss Martha
Gebert of Bogus Brook.
Misses Mabel Gregory, Myrtle
Hatch and Marjorie Applegate ar
rived home on Monday evening's
train for a week's visit with relatives
and friends.
Father Levings was summoned to
the bedside of Patrick Farley, who
resides about three miles from Mil
aca, yesterday afternoon. Mr. Farley
is seriously ill.
Martin Brands has decided to erect
a building of two stories instead of
one as originally determined by him.
We would now like to see Mr. Town
send follow suit.
Mrs. Emma Stanley of St. Cloud,
mother of Ira G. Stanley, and Mrs.
Julia Birch of Willmar? his aunt, were
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
from Monday until today.
Fred Townsend returned to hisice
ranch in North Dakota last week, and
on Monday Mr. and Mrs. John Town
send, accompanied by their bright
little daughter Molly, left for Willis
ton.
Fred D. Mason, attorney, Burr
Block, Lincoln, Neb., wants to locate
Chas. A. Andrews or some of his
heirs. Andrews, it is thought, re
sided on section 34, town of Spencer
Brook, in 1867.
No spring and not much summer yet
this year, but the crops are looking
fine at present. The indications are
good for a bountiful harvest, al
though corn will have to hustle to get
out of the way of an early frost
Misses Martha and Katherine Caley,
instructors in St. Mary's Hall semi
nary, Faribault, are home for their
summer vacation. Today, with Miss
Georgia Campbell and others, they
will go into camp at Spectacle lake.
The Union this morning received
a message from Minneapolis saying
that Miss Alice Ecklund, daughter of
Mrs. C. H. Ecklund, died there on
Wednesday and that the remains
would be brought to Princeton this
afternoon for interment. The funeral
will take place tomorrow afternoon.
Mr. Lawrence A. Dare and Miss
Anna Fournier were married on Tues
day at the home of the bride's parents
at Elk River. Mr. Dare is the son of
Hon. A. N. Dare, publisher of thewhich
Star-News, and is employed on thethe
editorial staff of the Duluth Herald.
The Union extends hearty congratu
lations to the young couple.
A. D. Brunovr of Minneapolis, an
experienced upholsterer, is now lo
cated in the Gillespie, Stoneburg &
Co. 's store. He makes a specialty of
repairs on automobiles and carriage
upholstery. Mr. Brunovr has a
cottage at Elk Lake where his family
is sojourning and where he will make
his sleeping headquarters during the'
summer.
Frank Morneau came down from
Wahkon on Saturday and expects to
return today. Frank says that as
there is a town by a similar name in
Minnesota, although not spelled ex
actly the same, considerable trouble
has been caused and that an effort will
be made to change the name of thein
town to something more euphonious.
Mr. Morneau is well pleased with the
outlook in the town where his bank
has been established.
Singing Kettles.
The Japanese, who know so well
how to add little unexpected attrac
tions to everyday life, manufacture,
in a great variety of forms, iron tea
which break into song when
the kettle boils. The song may not
be a perfect melody, but it is perhaps
as agreeable as the notes produced
by some of the insects which the Jap
anese also treasure for their music.
A trial will convince you that golden
grain belt beer is not only the purest
of all beverages but also the most
beneficial to body and mind. Order
of your nearest dealer or be supplied
by Sjoblom Bros., wholesale dealers,
Princeton.
BUl's Chest Was Weak.
"So poor Bill's gone, has he? How
did he die?"
"Three tons of cement fell on hisSehmidt
chest."
"Poor feller! He always was weak
there. "Harper's Weekly.
Ift *8'feuu!il$-
Church Topics a*
Sunday and Weekday
Announcements.
METHODISTJ.
Morning, 10:30, "Keeping the Sab
bath evening, 8, the Epworth
League will observe the eighteenth an
niversary of the League in a special
John Wetter on Wednesday finished service and program entitled "Quest
of the Highest,
cially invited.'
Archbishop Ireland oft Charity.
Check-drawing is not the whole of
Christian charity, according to Arch
bishop John Ireland, who preached
the conference sermon to the delegates
to the national conference of Chari
ties and Correction at the Auditorium,
Minneapolis, on Sunday afternoon.
Though the day was oppressively
hot, the attendance was fair and those
who came were doubly repaid by an
excellent sermon and a cooler at
mosphere than could have been found
elsewhere. Amos W. Butler, presi
dent of the conference, presided, and
the stage seats were filled by the local
clergy and charity workers.
Taking as his text the broad defini
tion of charity contained in Christ's
saying, "inasmuch as ye do it unto
one of the least of these," the*arch
bishop argued that the essence of
charity is the giving of personal serv
and sympathy. Charity, to be
real charity, must be, he said, in
spired by this divine sympathy. It
must not consist merely of giving
alms where thy are needed it is also
the extending of sympathy and en
couragement to the down-trodden the
giving of understanding and pity to
the weak and wayward.
"Give us justice and we will not
need charity,'] said the archbishop,
is a plea often heard, but it is ncft a
true plaint. Too often those who are
dependent are so through their own
folly or their own sin, yet justice,
when tempered by charity, does not
insist that they bear unaided the
burden they have assumed.
Christ brought the first true char
ity into the world. His whole life ex
emplified it and the manner of his
death gave it supreme expression.
When he asked, "What can a man do
more than give up his life lor an
other?" he laid down the supreme
rule for charity. The mere giving of
money does not fulfil} this rule, said
the archbishop. It requires some
thing of self-sacrifice, something of
personal service.
Let every mar give something of
himself with his gift to the pdor.
Then he is rendering to them the true
charity of Christ. Let him go to his
unfortunate neighbor, not as a cold,
calculating dispenser of the bare
necessaries of life, but as a friend
come to relieve the sorrow and want
of a friend. Such is the charity
uplifts at once the giver and
recipient.
Through this address, which was
admirably gauged to the heat of the
day, the audience listened with close
attention. The services closed with
the singing of "America" by the au
dience. Other music was furnished by
a large mixed chorus and a quartet.
Good Citizens to the Bescue
A city should always be ruled by its
best elements, not by its worst and in
its best elements are to be included all
residents of good purpqse and law
^abiding character. In the matter of
good citizenship there is no distinc
tion of wealth or social position or
even business success. The only test
is civic patriotism, the desire and the
effort for an orderly, ]ust and law
abiding regime which shall secure the
highest good to the greatest number
of people. That cities are not always
fact are infrequently so ruled is
due to divisions and indifference of
those who might and should bring
good things to the city and the prac
tical surrender of the municipal busi
ness to spoilsmen, boodlers and
grafters. When the limit of endurance
has been reached, the indifferent citi
zens come to the relief, as they have
done in San Francisco. In that city
the cost of that indifference has been
appalling it ought to suggesj the need
of a continuing activity which shall
make and keep the city what it ought
to be. Worthy, right minded and law
abiding men are always in the ma
jority and, if they will may secure for
any city a government that will be all
that could be desired. But there must
first be an abandonment of the idea
that the offices of a city are the
propeivspoils of any party.Colum
bus Dispatch.
American Society of Equity Directory
No 4526, Schmidt District, will meet the first
and third Tuesday of every month at the
district school house No 4, at 8
GBOHGE SCHMIDT, Pres H. Hoi/rHusTSec,
No 4378, Bogus Brook, will meet regular every
second and fourth Friday of each month at
Emil Jopp's house A. SCHMATZ, Sec
7c
Young people espe-
EPISCOPAL.
Services will be held in Grace
church, Baldwin school house, on
Sunday as follows: Sunday school, 10
a. m. morning prayer and service, 11
a. m. Hope church, Princeton, in
Congregational church, evening
prayer and sermon at 3:30 p. m. All
are welcome. Rev. Isaac Houlgate,
pastor.
HOSIER
1
Ladies' fast black seamless hose, double toe,
high spliced heel, welt top, special per pair
"No Mend" "No Mend"
A hose gotten up especially for boy and girl on the go
---mostly on their knees2 and 1 ribbed, knit from the
finest Maco yarn and with an extra long, reinforced
LINEN knee. Will outwear two ordinary
pairs at the same price, per pair
Ladies' Gauze Vests Union Suits.
All Styles. AH Known Makes. All Prices.
Vests priced from' 5c each for a tape top, up to the finest
Swiss lisle, with cluny lace insertion at 50c.
UNION suns.
Clear white bleached lisle union suits, knee length, tight-
fitting or umbrella, and ankle length, with high
or low neck, full, half, quarter or no sleeve, each 50C
Cooper's "Spring Needle" Union Suits for Men.
Finest yarn, silk finish, elegantly made, two colors
blue and fleshper suit
QUT us to the test. Your $3.00
Others at $1.00 and $1.50.
P. L. ROADSTROM
Mark'sGreat Bargain
Store.
money's worth or your
money refunded. Any
goods you buy in our store,
if taken home and found
unsatisfactory, may be
brought back and your
money will be refunded.
i'
can save you money
on every article we carry,
and if we give our guaran-
tee, even six months or a
year after you may bring
back the goods and receive
your money or other goods.
"We make good every state-
ment that comes from us.
TRY US.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA.
,^,_
We would like to show you our
Runabout Buggy for $44.65
It is one of the best buggies we have to offer
at the price.
If you are in need of a Single Harness ask to see our
No. 14 Harness for $13.00
Made of the very best grade of leather, good work-
manship, full nickel plate trimmings. This is a har-
ness you can depend on to give satisfaction.
EVENS HARDWARE CO.
Ads in The Unioft Bring Results.
7c
25cuctiuiui
^^^^^^^^^^^^'N.^^.^^N^^*.^^^
Don't Forget That
We Sell
Buggies- Harness
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