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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, June 18, 1908, Image 6

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IIHMHI.|II|,I|III
.|<p>Hays Joh|n HammondH
I
World Famous Mining Engineer Wh Retired From a Quarter
1 Million Dollar Position and Made an Active Campaign 1
For the Republican Vice Presidential Nomination. I
Can Smell a Gold Mine a Thousand Miles
OffSentenced to Be Shot by Boers. $
ROBERTUS LOVE.
ONEBgetsston
middling tired of poli
tician I politics. That fact
helps account for the gen
eral interest In the announce
ment of John Hays Hammond's can
didacy for the Republican nomination
for the vice presidency at the Chicago
convention. Mr. Hammond is a busi
ness man* or, rather, a business profes
sional man. He has lived to be fifty
three years of age without having
mixed Into American politics In the
slightest degree. Now, In Tola maturity,
he suddenly makes a high dive for
the second best plum on the political
tree, and his friends are hinting that
Mr. Hammond has bis eye oa the pres
idential plum four yearsThencet'
All of which makes interesting read
ing.
?vXhe Hammond announcement caught
us unprepared. We, had supposed
that all the entries were in. We had
just finished reading some saffron
journal tales to the effect that John
Hays Hammond, consulting mining
engineer for the Guggenheim Explora
tion company, had enjoyed a salary
raise from a quarter to half a million
dollars a year whenpresto, change!
came the enlightening and enlivening
information that this same Mr. Ham
mond had quit his quarter million job
and was an active aspirant for an
$8,000 post at Washington.
Perhaps the most interesting thing
about It an is that Mr. Hammond pr#
ceeded to make a campaign for theScotch
nomination. As a rule, the vice- presi-
dential aaminatlon Is thrust upon
ome7iK)dc^^tl2a^whCfpretend9.that
he doesn,t$Brant
it Mr. Hammond I
otherwise* He "wonted*it-and^nraa-oot
ashamed tdeavt o.
Though not in American pontics
heretofore, as stated, Mr, Tynmmnitfi
JOHN HAYS HAMMOND.
has hail a political career It was
short, but not very sweet After all,
it ended happily, for Mr. Hammond
escaped with his Ufa Should he be
come vice president or president he
would occupy a unique position as the
only man ever elevated to that high
position who had been tried and con
victed and sentenced to death on a
charge of high treason against a for
eign country. That was exactly the
predicament lu which Mr. Hammond
found himself thirteen years ago.
Militant Mining Engineer.
John Hays Hammond was born in
San Francisco when the glamour of
gold was in the air. He grew up in
the midst of gold mines, panning gold
from the gravel for pastime as a boy
and learning at first hand about quartz
formations and other auriferous depos
its Major Hammond,ids father,a West
Pointer and Mexican warfighter,had
married the daughter of Colonel Hays,
a noted Texas ranger. Thus two fight
ing families united to produce a mili
tant mining engineer, for young John
Hays early determined to make gold
hunting in a scientific way his life
work. The boy entered the Sheffield
Scientific school at Yale and was grad
uated in 1876. Then he took a course
in the Royal School of Mines at Frei
berg, Saxony. Returning to San Fran
cisco, he enjoyed an excellent post
graduate course in mining as a mem
ber of a United States geological sur
vey party which tinkered with every
gold mine in California. What Ham
mond did not know about gold depos
its by, that time would make only a
small leaflet
Over In Sooth Africa the Barnato
brothers were bulging with bags of
sold ana boxes of diamonds dog out of
the earth, bat they wanted still more
old. Banrey"Barnato remarked:
ip*
I 11 1 11111
Cecil Rhodes' Close Friend.
Within a year Rhodes increased bis
salary to $100,000 a year, Hammond
becoming consulting engineer' to the
Consolidated Gold Fields of South
Africa. He lived in Johannesburg and
naturally was a person of some conse
quence. Hammond and Cecil Rhodes
were close friends. Rhodes was inpointed
tensely ambitious for British suprem
acy in the South African Republic, of
which old Paul Kruger was president
Very naturally the Boers, who had
been driven by the British from post
to pillar and finally had conquered a
republic out of a wilderness in the
Transvaal, wanted to run their own
country. Living in Cape Colony was a
freebooter, a physician by pro
fession, Mr. Leander Starr Jameson,
who was one of Rhodes' handy men.
Rhodes and others authorized Jameson
to proceed to the Transvaal border
with a body of 600 troopers with a
view to making a "demonstration" in
favor of the uitlanders, or foreigners,
resident in the Boer republic, when
conditions were favorable. Jameson,
it appears, acted upon his own initia
tive and made a raid into Kruger*s
country before the plans were com
plete His force ingloriously surren
dered, and the Scotch doctor himself
was turned over to the British govern
ment for discipline.
Opposed Jameson's Raid.
This brings us to the point of ex
plaining how Mr. Hammond nearly
lost his head. He became a member
of the reform committee which sought
to secure, representation in the Boer
government for the non-Dutch resi
dents who owned property which was
taxed by the republic. Hammond, be
ing an American, did not believe in
taxation without representation. That
was strictly an American viewpoint
Other members of the reform commit
tee saw in the situation an opportu
nity to acquire territory and rich gold
fields and diamond dirt for Great Brit
ain. When it was announced at a com
mittee meeting that instructions had
been sent to Jameson under certain
circumstances to make a raid into the
Transvaal, Mr. Hammond is said to
have arisen and exppessed his views
in this wise:
"I do not know what others may
think of those instructions. I speak for
myself, and I tell you that not for all
the wealth this land contains, not if
you were to make me the absolute
ruler of this country, would I have a
hand in carrying out those instruc
tions. 1 can pull a trigger to shoot
down an oppressor, but I cannot and
will not be_a party to a revolutionary
totfrigne. If I am going to take up
arms trader any flag It will be the stars
and stripes flying today over the ocean
yonder, the banner of free people
who believe in revolution as a remedy
^^w-t'
ma nt
*fr
"There's a man in America who can
smell a gold mine a thousand miles
off. Lef send for him."
So they sent for Hammond to smell
out new gold mines at $50,000 a year.
Hammond was such a successful
smeller that Cecil Rhodes, the British
Colossus in general control of affairs
in Cape Colony, coveted him. Mr.
Rhodes invited Mr. Hammond to din
ner and intimated that he would like
to have the American's services In de
veloping gold deposits.
"Make me a proposition as to your
terms for entering the service of the
British South Africa company," said
Rhodes between bites.
"Five thousand dollars a month,"
replied Hammond.
1J| WHBCiffOJM g&WBFt THlHUBUft jwaa ity m&
fe* oppwtelni, but who bate with a ,_
Kaffir's bote the rape of a fiee people's ..o W7
territory. Gentlemen, yon can count
howl of protest from Cairo to the
Sant
ZSttTJS.
Ar
aiier me crazy raid
Hammond was arrested, witoseveral SS
quence of this fact there went up a
an
252?.L*of
&
ae
cutio
eV?J^placu
ex
day, having been released on *M"J
honor.. Mrs Hammond, who was Miss Nata
lie Harris of Mississippi, very early
took a hand in the game of her hus
band's deliverance. She cabled his
brother in California, who put theJopp
matter up to the California delegation
in congress. The state department got
busy. Here was an American in trou
ble, and his interests must be pro
tected. The Prince of Wales, now
King Edward, also used his influence
in behalf of the plucky American. In
fact, so many protests, prayers and
other expressions poured in upon
President Kruger that the venerable
patriot was almost whiskers deep in
documents designed for the deliver
ance of John Hays Hammond
Freed For $125,000.
The upshot was that away out was
found. Mr. Hammond's sentence was
commuted to fifteen years in prison.
That with good behavior would just
let him out in time for the present
campaign. But he did not serve any
of the term. Oom Paul found a still
easier way. What was the good of
cooping up a healthy American with a
hearty appetite and feeding him
atNo
public expense for fifteen years when
the government already needed mon
ey? It was arranged that by the pay
ment of a fine of $125,000 Mr Ham
mond might go free. The American
considered his life worth that much at
the least so he paid up and was re
leased.
Instead of having his salary doubled
a few weeks ago, as most of the big
newspapers stated, Mr. Hammond re
tired from the service of the Guggen
heim people, his five year contract hav
ing expired. He retired and surprised
everybody by diving into politics. He
is said to possess a very considerable
fortune also it is declared by those
who know about mining matters that
he might have been one of the richest
men in the world had he cared for
immense wealth. One can believe this
readily in view of the fact that this
man possesses an instinct for locating
precious metals, aided and abetted by
a thorough scientific training for that
very purpose.
A Hero Worshiper.
Mr. Hammond is a citizen of Massa
chusetts, his summer home being at
Gloucester He spends the winters in
New York city and Lakewood, N.
When not working hard he takes a
cruise in his private yacht He is said
to be something of a hero worshiper
His favorites In contemporary Ameri
can life are ex-President Cleveland,
Secretary Taft President Diaz of
Mexico and Richard Olney. Pictures
of these and of the late John Hay
adorn the walls of his study at home.
He admires Rudyard Kipling intense
ly and is an intimate friend of the
Anglo-Indian author. Mr. Hammond,
in short, has a liking for the men who
have achieved. He has achieved a
few things himself. For one thing, he
has helped to eliminate from Ameri
can politics the free silver coinage is
sue by discovering so much gold that
silver simply had to go away back
and sit down.
One of Mr. Hammond's political ad
visers, himself a noted mining en
gineer, says: "Mr. Hammond is not
only a famous mining engineer, but
he has done more than any man in
the west to develop the country. He
has long been known to the people of
the west as a producer. He has never
been a destroyer, but always a build-
er."
The candidate himself thus explains
how be happened to permit himself to
be drawn into the political maelstrom
"Gloucester, Mass., has been my home
for the past seven years. A good
many New England people are among
my friends. The Republican situation
it is said, calls for a man on the na
tional ticket who is known in New
England, who is known in New York
and who knows the west For along
time it has been suggested to me that
I should enter the political field. This
idea did not make a serious impres
sion until my western friends began
to echo the thought Then some of
the working people who know me
came at me, and I yielded."
.H* Kidney* Are
RHEUMATIC POLKS..
8u*m
aNcks
he, i
unf,
are due to
&Well?
blo Bub the duty of
ma
0
i
others, and thrownJnt SLITS. %*$? ft"^^SMS
prisoners were tried on charges of shows the kidneys are inacdve!
high treason, convicted and sentenced Don't dally with "uric acid
to be shot. It doesn't matter who the solvents." You might go on till
others were. One of them was John doomsday with themr but until1you
Hays Hammond, American, in conse-
cur
kidneys you will get
tn
fchneve kidneys
acid
S
cu
Doa-n's
wel1
Kidney Pills not only
aci
bu
remo
Cape and from Sandringham palace to ended
Francisco. Hammond was themonial
mos noted mining engineer on the
face of the earth. He had worked in Princeton, Minn., says: "Mv hus
various countries before going to the
Transvaal. He had more friends at
forty than the average famous man
ever enjoys. Hammond himself sud
denly discovered that he was by no
means alone in the world, and Oom
uri
a
?se Her i a Princeton testi
to prove it.
Mrs. Leonard Pratt, Third" street,
band has been troubled with rheuma
tism for years and has also ex
perienced a great deal of difficulty
from a disordered condition of the
kidneys. He had rheumatic pains
through his shoulders and often would
be so lame and that I would have
J-2 SpjHiPstiff r^rffi
that he had in his clutches one the
most popular persons on the globe.
The doughty old Boer president was
perplexed. He was quite eager, it is
understood, to have Hammond escape.
Under the circumstances he could not
turn the prisoner loose. Hammond, in
fact, was given excellent opportunity
to escape, but he declined to take ad
vantage of it He was out on bail
after his arrest left the country, was Pills at the Home Drug Store and they
urged to stay away, but went back gave just as satisfactory results as in
fnr trial thrmch ha times Tn.ii thfe first instanna."
for trial, though he morall ce
tain that he would be condemnedPr t-o
death. As a general thing, thn only
sort of Americans with nerve like that
are the only original Americans, the
Indians, some specimens of whom
have been
know?
three years ago he used Doan's Kid
ney Pills and they removed all the
trouble. He remained cured for
sometime but the trouble again re
turned. His back was very weak and
his kidneys were so frequent in action
as to greatly interfere with his rest
at night. He also complained of
headaches and dizzy speljs were of
frequent occurrence. He at once pro
cured a supply qf Doan's Kidney first instance.
For by allfdealers. Price 5
cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo,
New York, sole agents for the United
States.
Remember the nameDoan'sand
take no other.
AmericasalSociety Equity Directory0
to proceed unguard- ^___
No 4243, Green Lake, will meet the second and
fourth Monday of each month at A hall
Wyanett at 8
AUGUST JOHNSON, Pres E. NYSTROM Sec
(First Pub June 11)
Citation for Hearing on Petition for
Administration.
ESTATE OF LEWIS KNIFFIN
State of Minnesota, County of vine Lacs,
In Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Lewis
Kniffln, decedent
The state of Minnesota to all persons inter
ested in the granting of administration of the
estate of said decedent
The petition of Laura South having been
filed in this court representing that Lewis
Kniffln then a resident of the county of
Mille Lacs, state of Minnesota, died intestate in
in the year 1886 and praying that
letters of administration of his estate be
granted to Ira Stanley, and the court hav
ing fixed the time and plaoe for hearing said
petition
Therefore you and each of you, are hereby
cited and required to show cause, if any vou
have before this court at the probate court
rooms in the court house, in the village of
Princeton in the county of Mille Lacs state
of Minnesota, on the 6th day of July, 1908
at 10 o'clock a why said petition should
not be granted
Witness, the judge of said court and seal of
said court, this 9th day of June 1908
S BRIGGS,
(Court Seal) Probate Judge
E MCMILLAN,
Attorney for Petitioner
(First Pub June 4)
Order Limiting Time to File Claims
and for Hearing Thereon.
ESTATE OF SARAH GATES
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court
In the matter of the estate of Sarah Gates
decedent
Letters testamentary this day havine been
granted to Charles N Orr, of St Paul, Minn
It is Ordered, that the time within which all
creditors of the above named decedent may
present claims against her estate in this court
be, and the same hereby is, limited to six
months from and after the date hereof and that
Monday, the 7th day of December, 1908, at 9
o'clock a in the probate "court rooms at
the court house, at the village of Princeton, in
said county, be. and the same hereby is. fixed
and appointed as the time and place for hearing
upon and the examination, adjustment and
allowance of such claims as shall be presented
within the time aforesaid
Let notice hereof be given by the publication
of this order in the Princeton Union, a weekly
newspaper printed and published in said coun
ty as provided by law
Dated June 1, 1908
S. BRIGGS,
(Probate Seal) Judge of Probate
ORR & STARK
Attorneys for Excutor.
Mo William E Flanders
Default having been made in the payment by
you of the sum of $157 85 now due and owing
Irom vou under and by virtue of that certain
written contract between The Mille Lacs Lum
ber Company and you, the said "William E
Flanders, dated the twenty-ninth day of March
1905 for the purchase by you of the following
described property situated in Mille Lacs
county Minnesota, to-wif Lot numbered seven
(7), of out lots to Milaca, according to the re
corded plat thereof
Notice is hereby given of said default, and
that unless the said amount so in default is
paid on or before the expiration of thirty days
from the service of this notice upon you. said
contract will be canceled and terminated,
which said cancellation and termination shall
take effect upon the expiration of said thirty
days after said service of this notice aforesaid
THE MILLE LACS LUMBER COMPANY,
rr. By JNO J' TOOMEY,
[Corporate Seal] President.
St Paul, Minnesota, May 19th, 1968.
JOHN BARRY I
Expert Accountant,
I Over 30 Tears Experience.
1011 First Ave. North,
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN.
^^Ifef^'^F^
Training Office
i-
6
boST5 SS
S
"CWVIJfirst No 4526, Sf hmidt District, -will meet, the
Friday of every month at the Schmidt
district school house No 3 at 8
E BENSEMAN, Pres HOLTHUS Sec
No 4273. Bogus Brook, will meet the second
and lourth Friday of each month at Emil
house A SCHMATZ, Sec
T\o 374, Berry District, will meet the first
Friday of every month at the Berry school
house district 24, at 7,30
O ORNE, Pres A HATCH, Sec
No 4734 Woodard Brook will meet the first
and third Saturday of each month at the
Woodard Brook school house at 8
ALBERT RIEBE, Pres FRANK MA&NUSON, Sec
No 4804, Blue Hill, will meet the first and third
Saturday of every month at the Wheeler school
house at 8
JAMES DUGAN Pres FR ED STEHL. Sec
No 4703 Greenbush, will meet the second and
fourth Saturday of each month at the Aug
Rines house in school district 5, at 8
S E TILLEY, Pres E STARK, Sec
No 4991, Baldwin District, will meet the second
and fourth Saturday of every month at the
Baldwin town hall, at 8
CHAS JUDKINS. Pres FISK, Sec
No 4211, Oxbow, will meet the first and third
Tuesday of each month at the Gates school
house in Dist No 32, at 8
GEO CARR, Pres E RADEKE, Sec
No 5057, West Branch, will meet the first and
third Saturday of each month at the school
houst. Dist No 4, at 8
ARCHIE TAYLOR, Pres. WETSEL Sec
4117, Zimmerman, will meet the first and
third Saturday of each month in Woodman
hall at 1 30
PRATT, Pres GEORGE JAMES, Sec
YOU Can "Rp a
Farm Mortgages,
Insurance, Collections.
$
M. S. RUTHERFORD
W'ffjWW'w* J/JP uujl^pj
Bankers and Merchants
Bookkeeping Institut
126428-130 So. 3rd St., Minneapolis,*
Bookkeeping, Correspondence, Business Methods)
Practical Penmanship. i
p.rPe
i
Actual Bookkeeping
teaching.) This is
turns areCh0Pd
Met
Bankers and JVLprrfmntQ
Our Certificate of Competencyr\la gSuaS?antee
1VW
w***wv not Business School or Colleee whieh imi
phes study. Bookkeeping is work, not study, hence
SmerC1alffficf.DeSkS'
St1S'
TeleP
Northwestern States that the holde to* Swlfi?
painstaking and reliable accountant. One that can and will Mae Good!
competentthree bookkeepersby
Pamphlet free, explaining the
Actual Bookkeeping System of Training
L. C. HUMMEL
Dealer in
Fresh and Salt Meats, Lard,
Poultry, Fish and Game in Season.
Both Telephones.
Main Street, (Opposite Starch Factory.) Princetoa, Minn.
First National Bank
of Princeton, Minnesota.
Paid up Capital, $30,000
A General Banking Busi
ness Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved
Security.
inceton State Bank
Capital $20,000
^DO G.r.i Banking Business
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv^vvvvvvvvvvvVV%,%v%vt^^1
g.M..lt..ItMt.
Mr^.i.4Mfr*.^^
Security State Bank
of Princeton, Minnesota.
Capital and Surplus, $34,000.
JOHN W. GOULDING, President. G. A. EATON, Cashier.
'V '!!!fr!* .fr 4. .fr .j,,{, .j. 4.
We Make
A Specialty
Farm Loansof
M. S. RUTHERFORD & CO.
Towmend Building,
Princeton, Minn.
'I'!- 1 '1' 'I '11 I 11111 1 1 1 ,|i i|, ,1,1 ,1 ,|,fl,!- i| 11, ,|,,|.0 1 ,v%
Cemen Buildin Blocks
I have purchased the plant and business of J. D. Tann
and am now prepared to fill all orders for
Cement Building Blocks, and
Construct Sewers
of Tiling.
Contracts also Taken for All Kinds of Ditching Work.
Call or write
LOUIS WICEN,
institute,I
c?nc?ptio
ones same6
^av
W
asTnTo^ank o?
adopted th"rain^lTBook-eWActuae
device ^S"c
the
represented by tangible orders, checks and invoices instead
Senseeln
fc dim-22
foun
k**^Uk*%lg!%^^ears*
fo
a^fSffl0XLc1uurwrL
ha,v
ssssat
to
working (no
-D6 ingr two or month in our Trainingt Offic
No classes or terms. INDIVIDUAL work and instruction
study-e
S
Interest Paid on Time De
posits.
Foreign and Domestic Ex
change.
S. S. PETTERSON, President.
T. H. CALEY, Vice Pres.
J. F. PETTERSON, Cashier.
J. J. SKAHEN.
Cashier.
"fr-M-M'-M-!'!- 'V
E. L. MCMILLAN
Princeton
't, |_|-|_ II IL

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