OCR Interpretation


The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, April 29, 1909, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1909-04-29/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

&flfflMM3iimjHp WMH "1U1 '111 Iliayniinr i
TIDINGS FROM
SCAKOINAVIA
News of General Interest
from Three Countries.
NEW PACT WITH GERMANY
Present Commercial Treaty Between
That Country and Sweden Will Not
Be in Force After July 1, 1910,of
Judging from Authentic Reports,
Says the National ZeitungBelieves
That the Custom Tax Will Be Ma
terially Increased by the New
Treaty.
SWEDEN.
Says the National Zeitung: "Judg
ing from authentic reports, the pres
ent commercial treaty between Swe
den and Germany will not be in force
after July 1, 1910. Already this
year, and surely not later than next
fall, negotiations will be under way
for drawing up a new treaty. While
at present a committee is engaged in
Sweden in revising the customs tax,
the details of which are kept secret,
it is firmly believed in Germany that
the customs taxes will be materially
increased. Germany believes that
Sweden is in this respect discrim
inating against her and a protest from
the German government is likely to
be forthcoming in the near future."
Says an exchange: "Riksdagsman
Bogren of Falkoping has stirred up a
hornet's nest by a recent speech in
the house in reference to a motion in
regard to shooting and sportmanship.
Mr. Bogren took occasion to deplore
the fact that pleasure and luxury
seemed more important in many of
the gun clubs nowadays, and this the
Falkoping club understood to reflect
upon them. A circular of protest has
been sent, stating that they have
never had dances, or used liquor at
their shooting tournaments. Further
more, they claim that Mr. Bogren does
not know the conditions in his own
district, not having shown any inter
est in the affairs of the club, or even
joined as passive member. And in
the meantime Mr. Bogren is busy try
ing to square himself with his enraged
district."
About thirty volumes, representing
the most valuable books at the Royal
library, have recently been stolen and
in spite of the most urgent search on
the part of the police and detectives
no clew has been obtained. Those
who committed the theft are evidently
men who are accustomed +o reading
books, as no other people except those
who are fond of books frequent the
library. The theft was a daring one
to say the least, for there were at
the time so many people around.
The tax valuation of Stockholm's
suburbs is at present estimated at
"very nearly 68,000,000 crowns. Prices
on real estate in Stockholm suburbs
are simply enormous and there is
bound to be a reaction in the near fu
ture and when it comes it will go hard
on real estate owners in these sec
tions. The taxes are enormous and it
will be impossible for the real estate
world to stand the strain for any
length of time.
King Peter's and Crownprince Alex
ander's abdication from the throne of
Servia and their relinquishing all
claims thereto has caused much com
ment in Sweden, owing to the fact
that Prince Wilhelm of Sweden has
been pertinently mentioned as a can
didal 1'or the vacant throne. Prince
Waldftnar of Copenhagen has also
been mentioned as a successor to King
Peter.
The bill abolishing capital punish
ment in Sweden was defeated by both
chambers of the riksdag, and no
further attempt along this line will be
made for some time to come. The
feeling in Sweden is still that wrong
doers and murderers should receive
their just deserts and an effort to
counteract this feeling will not be as
easy as some people suppose.
Sweden's minister to Germany,
Count Taube, arrived a few days' ago
in Stockholm. It is rumored that
Taube has been offered the foreign
minister portfolio, and is reported
willing to accept it. Something
definite in regard to this matter will
most likely be announced within the
next few days.
Stockholm expects distinguished
company in the course of a few weeks.
Among those who are scheduled to
visit the "Malar Queen" during the
month are the Emperor of Russia, who
will be accompanied by the foreign
minister of affairs in that country. Ex
tra preparations are beng made for
their entertainment.
Among men who are noteworthy for
their philanthropic deeds in these
days in Sweden are Erik Wiik, who
recently donated the Gothenburg high
school the handsome sum of 100,000
crowns. Mr. Wiik has made himself
famous in his home city by his dona
tions to charitable and philanthropic
institutions.
Twenty-four members of the Royal
Opera company have cancelled their
contracts with Director Ranft and
since March 25 there has been all
kinds of trouble brewing at the Royal
Opera. The theater-going public is
greatly disappointed and there have
been all manner of protests registered.
Albert Anderson, the well known
newspaper man of Stockholm, cele
brated his seventy-fifth birthday an
niversary the other day. He has been
In the newspaper business during the
past forty years and is respected and
looked up to by all who nave learned
to know his worth.
According to' dispatches a slight
earthquake shock of about two min
utes' duration was felt in Sundsvall
and vicinity a week ago last Satur
day and is reported to have caused
considerable damage. NORWAY.
There is every indication that thero
will be a large delegation of Nor
wegian-Americans who will visit their
old home in Norway this summer.
Ocean travel nowadays is a pleasure
and the average Scandinavian in the
northwest is becoming independent
and wealthy, especially among the
farming classes, and thus we find that
a whole lot of them take advantage
low steamship rates and take a trip
to good old Norway. There is a charm
about this summer trip to Sweden and
Norway which does not fail to attract
the attention of the home loving
Swede or Norwegian, and there is
every year a decided increase in the
number of travelers. "Home Sweet
Home" is the drawing card and that
explains much.
Ah item which appeared in a Nor
wegian paper recently and caused not
a little amusement among the news
paper reading public in Norway and
elsewhere is the following: "King
Haakon received in audience the oth
er day a gentleman who had presented
him with an exceedingly valuable
meerschaum pipe." The notice has
received a rather large amount oi
good-natured comment at the hands
the Christiania press.
The French officers who came to
participate in the Holmenkollen ski
events in March have not yet left the
country. They have been making an
extensive tour in the northern section
of the country and have traversed as
far north as Norwegian Lappmarken
They have been enjoying their trip im
mensely and one of their number has
been writing a series of interesting
articles for a Paris sportng paper.
The number of post money orders
received from American were during
the last quarter 400,000 crowns less
than last year during the same period.
There has been not a little speculation
in Norway as to the cause of the
falling off of this source of revenue,
but it may be that the Norwegian
press has been going a little too
strong against American interests
lately.
Great preparations are under way
for the sangaerfest which is to be
held in Stavanger this summer. There
will be male choruses coming from
all parts of the country and many of
the west coast cities will charter ex
cursion steamers for the event. Chris
tiania and Bergen will send the larg
est choruses and even Aalesund will
send quite an aggregation.
Newpaper reports state that a monu
ment to the memory of Asbjorn Klos
ter will be erected at Stavanger this
season. Gustav Laerum, the sculptor,
has promised that he will finish a
statue of the honored departed one
prior to Aug. 1, and the unveiling will
in all probability take place during the
convention of the total abstinence so
ciety Aug. 12, to 13 next.
One of the unique features at the
Bergen exposition in 1910 will be the
arrangement of a great ski tournament,
which will take place right on Mid
summer's Day up in the adjoining
"fjoll," where the snow lies several
feet thick the year around. The com
petitors in this race will be experi
enced ski runners from Christiania
and Bergen.
In Bergen there is an unusual build
ing activity this season. There are
at present being erected not less than
thirty new villas, which will be occu
pied by tourists during the coming
season. Bergen is getting right to the
front as a tourist center and the local
tourist there is receiving new applica
tions every day.
All the Norwegian hotel and inn
keepers are now busying preparing to
receive the summer visitors. There is
every indication, judging from the re
ports from the tourist bureaus, that
there will be a large contingent of
tourists from all over Europe this
summer.
DENMARK.
The following item gives an Inter
esting account of what influence the
women of Denmark are bearing on the
elections since they received the right
to vote: "The March elections this
year were of unusual importance be
cause of the active participation of the
women of Denmark, who, for the first
time, were accorded the right to vote
and to seek election to officethat is
to say, in local or communal affairs.
They are still disfranchised so far as
national or state affairs are concerned,
and consequently cannot vote for
members of the rigsdag. Owing to
the slowness of Danish statisticians,
we do not yet know how many women
availed themselves of the right of suf
frage last month. As to the number
elected to office a dispatch says that
in Copenhagen 14 per cent of the new
ly elected officials are women, and
that throughout the country 7 per cent
are women. A rather unexpected re
sult of the elections is the falling off
in the socialists in many cities where
the new propaganda has been firmly
established. In the rural districts,
however, the socialists made a better
showing, but on the whole they have
no particular reason for exultation
over the outcome."
The Danish government has given
orders to the governor general in the
Danish West Indies to under no con
sideration allow former President
Cipriano Castro to land on one of the
West Indian islands. The United
States gave the same order a day or so
before.
MARION S. NORELIUS.
5 THE PRINCETON UNION: THTJBSDAY, APRIL 29, 1900.
Here are the answers to the fourth
series of puzzles:
FORTS.
No. 17. St. Pierre, a post built by
the French on the southwest shore of
Rainy Lake in 1728, in an attempt to
push through to the Pacific.
No. 18. William, a Canadian post
mentioned in the account of Major
Stephen Long's explorations.
No. 19. Snelling, the fort es
tablished-in 1820 at the conjunction of
the Minnesota with the Mississippi
rivers. Given this name four years
later at the instance of Gen. Winfield
State News.
Automobile owners of every place
in the state must take out licenses in
the secretary of state's office after
May 15 as the result of the passage of
a bill in the legislature just ad
journed.
The annual reunion of the veterans
of the old First Minnesota regiment
will be held at Bemidji in June of this
year if satisfactory arrangements can
be made for rates. James J. Hill is
an honorary member of that regiment.
Fire that is supposed to have started
from a defective chimney at 8:30
o'clock on Friday night destroyed the
Red Lake county court house at Red
Lake Falls. The loss on building
and contents is fully covered by in
surance.
Building permits have been issued
by the village council of Milaca to
Denison & Carter for a brick structure
on the lots on the north side of the
Milaca State bank and to Albin Allen
for a brick structure on the south.
They are already under construction.
E. C. Blanchard, for the past eleven
years division superintendent of the
Northern Pacific, with headquarters
in Duluth eight of these years, has
been appointed general superinten
dent of the Northern Pacific, with
headquarters in St. Paul, to succeed
F. W. Gilbert, who died about two
weeks ago.
MINNESOTA HISTORY PUZZLE PICTURES
5. EARLY EXPLORERS.
Gov. Johnson announced on Friday,
says a news item, that he absolutely
refuses to consider any applications
for the position of state bank examiner
at present. Hundreds of applications
have been coming into his office from
all parts of the state. The examiner
is not needed until next September,
and the governor said that he would
not named anyone until August at the
earliest.
The United States Indian school at
Morris has been tendered the state of
Minnesota by the government as a
gift to be used as an agricultural
school and the state has accepted it.
The property adjoins the city limits
of Morris and includes a 293-acre
farm, the buildings being located on a
nice rise of ground and all being of
first-class construction and in per
fect condition.
Wood placed in a kitchen oven to
dry was left so long that it became
ignited and when Mrs. Gunchild
Rudningen, 75 years old, and residing
on a farm near Nerstrand, opened the
oven door and admitted the air the
flames darted forth, setting fire to her
clothing and enveloping her whole
body, causing burns from which she
died. Mrs. Rudningen was alone in
the house at the time, but her cries
brought the neighbors. When help
reached her, however, she was found
dead from the burns and shock. This
should prove a warning to those who
are in the habit of drying wood In this
manner.
Notice to Electric Light Users.
You are hereby notified that all
electric light bills fall due on the first
day of each month, and if such bills
are not paid by the 15th day of the
month upon which they fall due the
village electrician is authorized to cut
off all lights which are not paid for,
and the sum of one dollar will in each
instance be required to have them re
placed. By order of the village coun
cil. A. N. Lenertz, Recorder.
Grace: Pimples, blotches, rough,
shiny skin are from the blood and
stomach. A simple and never failing
remedyone that makes clear, healthy
complexions, pure blood, perfect di
gestion, is Hollister's Rocky Mountain
Tea. Surprise yourself. Tea or
tablets, 35 cents. C. A. Jack.
Scott in honor of Col. J. Snelling, the
commandant. Has remained an im
portant U. S. military establishment
to this day.
No. 20. Beauharnois, a post estab
lished by the French in 1727 on the
Minnesota side of Lake Pepin.
No. 21. St. Anthony, the first name
given Fort Snelling by the colonel
himself.
No. 22. Ridgely, an important mili
tary post on the Minnesota river, lo
cated fourteen miles below the Lower
Sioux agency.
The names of winners of prizes will
appear on first page.
SOOTHING THE WAVES.
Oiling the Waters When the Seas Are
Running High.
When the captain of a wave beaten
ship pours oil upon the waters he does
not empty a barrel of kerosene over
the side. He has somebody stitch up
three or four cotton bags, which he
fills first with oakum and then with
oil, usually equal parts of fish oil and
kerosene. The bags are then tied
tightly at the tops and pricked all over
with a sail needle to permit the oil to
exude and are hung from the boat
davits and weather chains to drip their
contents on the raging billows. The
bags must not be allowed to get emp
ty, but must be refilled every two
hours. For six bags ten gallons of
oil are used in thirty hours. Some
times if it is very cold the oil congeals
and will not run out through the holes
fast enough, and the mouth of the
bag is then loosened to let it escape
in that way. Its effect is magical on
a rough sea. A huge comber will
arise, threatening to bury the laboring
vessel under tons of water, but will
strike a patch of oil no larger than a
common dining table "and subside in
an instant into a smooth, round swell,
which the ship rides like a cork.
The use of oil is also a valuable aid
in wearing ship in a gale and high
seas. A few gallons of paint oil over
the lee quarter enable the vessel to
perform the maneuver in perfect safe
ty without taking a drop of water on
board. When a boat ships so much
water that it is impossible to get the
oil bags slung in position without run
ning the risk of being swept over
board an ordinary bed sheet saturated
with paint oil tied to a rope and al
lowed to float will soon calm the seas
sufficiently to permit men to move
about the decks safely. Paint oil is
agreed to be the best to use, rape seed
oil and porpoise oil rank next, but
kerosene is not satisfactory unless
mixed with some other oil.New York
Press.
His Excuse.
DiggsYou believe that whisky is
good for a cold, don't you? Swiggs
Yes, but how did you know? Diggs
Oh, I've noticed that you nearly al
ways have a cold.Chicago News.
Repetition.
Husband (entering house with bos
of chestnuts)I brought home some
more chestnuts, dear. Wife (wearily,
without glancing up)I'm listening.
Judge.
Swept Over Niagara.
This terrible calamity often happens
because a careless boatman ignores
the river's warningsgrowing ripples
and faster currentnature's warnings
are kind, that dull pain or ache in
the back warns you the kidneys need
attention if you would escape fatal
maladiesdropsy. diabetes or
Bright's disease. Take Electric Bit
ters at once and see backache fly and
all your best feelings return. "After
long suffering from weak kidneys and
lame back, one $1.00 bottle wholly
cured me." writes J. R. Blankenship
of Belk, Tenn. Only 50c at C. A.
jack"s.
Farmers.
I have two 80-acre improved farms
at Long Siding, five miles north of
Princeton, that I would like to sell this
spring on long time and easy pay
ments, or will make a big discount for
half cash. L. J. Chad bourne,
4014 Sheridan Ave. S.,
U-tf Minneapolis, Minn.
For Sale.
A solid brick dwelling house, 10
rooms, hardwood finish, with full
basement, 28 by 30 feet also a .barn
16 by 20 feet, buggy shed and two
acres of land, centrally located in vil
lage of Princeton. Just the place for
a retired farmer or a person who
wants to start a chicken farm. Terms,
cash or., five years' time. Apply to
Lewis Robideau, Route 1, Princeton.
***&..** \L^^^m^.
***'m i
I
To GetThe
Greatest Value For
YourMoiey
In Clothes
Buying
you will miss It if you
don't visit this store
and look at the ex
ceptional values we 1
offer in
Men's New Mod
el Sack Suits at
$10.00 to $25.00
They are the same
sort of suits your tail
or would charge 825
to 060 for. We stand
ready to prove this, if
you so wish, but you
will be able to see it
for yourself the mo
ment you examine
these splendid hand
fashioned suits. Not
anew style nor fabric
is missing, if you
want the best there
is in ready-for-ser-
vice garments, then
don't fail to come
here.
Suesine
S11MA
[M..1. \\,yi 11111
The Avery Clothing House
GALEY LUMBER COMPANY
Yard and office at Railroad Track, near Depot.
A LARGE STOCK OF
PINE LUMBER
AT ALL TIMES ON HAND.
THE BEST GRADES OF
Moulding, Sash, Doors, Maple Flooring "Cedar
and Pine Shingles and Cedar and Pine Siding
at lowest prices.
W. P. CHASE, Manager, Princeton, Minn.
Did You Ever
Stop to think that we are the only ones in town
to.sell an entirely new and exclusive line of Wall
Paper each year? Get our prices and you will
soon know where to buy.
Armitage's Drug' Store
One door south of Caley Hardware building on Main Street.
Dr. Armitage's Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Has Just Received a New Lot of Summer Goods
Everything New and Fresh
W Hl
BYERSl
Embroideries
What is prettier for a fine summer dress 4
for the little girl than a nice embroidery $
dress? W are showing the finest and most
complete line ever brought to Princeton.
We have also the cheaper grades, in fact a
complete line, prices from 3 up.
Laces
We are putting out hundreds of yards
of laces and insertings at the special price
of 5 per yard.
Ginghams
Sheer and dainty. Strong and service
able. Dress ginghams at 10c up. Apron
ginghams at 7 c.
White Goods
The very latest patterns for waists and
dresses. Prices from lOc up.
Table Linen
A special bargain in an all linen heavy
damask, 2 yards wide, at $1.00 per yd.
A few pieces of goods left from last year
we are offering at reduced prices. Lot 1 at
7 per yd. W are also showing a beauti
ful line of fine lawns and organdies.
i,,,! 111111 M.H, I ii frMnl. 1 lit)
nwaUi^
as-

xml | txt