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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, June 10, 1909, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1909-06-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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Stock Proof Gates
Hog Tight, Chicken
ca
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kunSheep close tTight, the ground but wilTightr.
handleconvenient in summer and winterwill swing up hill or down hill as you wish ~*9
m~- When you have time drop aronnd and look over a sample gate all hung up
I PRINCETON LUMBER CO.
DEALERS IN
sE-Coal, Lumber, Sash, Doors, Building Material. -S
solutely harmless to vegetation Absolutely pure and full
net eight. Guaranteed to conform in all respects to State
Government reguirements and will stand the strictest in-
spection For sale by
Princeton Drug
jS"!"^**^***^**^*"**"****^
WM. DRESCHER EDWARD DRESCHER
Are you going to build9
DRESCHER BROS.
Contractors and Builders
neve drag because the
v*.u^ outer end is adjustable Hog tight mesh and stretchers on ZSm
y*" every wire Gate fastened at both the top and bottom, plain strong hinges, nc wear-
g ing parts The Rolled Steel Tubing used in the frame instead of gas pipe makes S
them proof against any stock "A chain is only as strong as its weakest link Why
fc not use Iowa gates to match your good fences' You will find them strong but easy to
GEO. A. COATES, ilanager 3
^iiiituiiaiaiuiiiiiiiiaiuiiiiuiaiaiiaaiitauiuiuaiiuiiiiii^
SAVE THE CROPS
Nothing but the strongest and purest Paris Green will
fully protect your crops from the ravages of bugs and other
plant parasites. You can't afford to take chances with the
ordinary brands What you need is the best that can be
had The standard for more than fifty yearsused and
preferred by three generations of those who know what
the words "HIGHEST QUALITY" meanis
ANSBACHER'S PURE
PARIS GREEN
Strongest and most deadly to insects and fungi, yet ab-
If so let Drescher Bros, do your carpenter
work We are capable of handling anything the building line.
Will build for you on contract or day work Small jobs and work
out of town given attention. We guarantee our work and attend
promptly to all orders Call up
Wm. Drescher, Rural Phone No. io, Princeton
$M$.fr.fr4Mfr4'*S"JMfr.frfrfr.}
G. H. GOTTWERTH,
Dealer la
Prime Meats of Every Variety,
Poultry, Fish, Ete.
Highest market prices paid for Cattle and Hogs.
Main Street, Princeton.
S'WVWWWVW'VWWt VVWVWWtW WWV%
Foreston Mercantile& LiveStock Go.
Are fitters of men, women and children
in shoes, dry goods groceries, hardware,
and all kinds of farm machinery and
fencing.
Foreston Mercantile & Live Stock Co.
FORESTON, MINN
_2S ,4i_,nr ii ...ruinftl llf nliliilili
ww%%www^v %w-*^vw*%%wvw.^%-wvwwv%%%vvvSportance
HOWELL PLANER AND MATCHER
You no doubt find it a hard
matter to sell your rough lumber _^___=.^_
to advantage because most of ffi3jjPfeSlJBM8MBjjag(F^. '^fBm^
your customers want it finished. JjJ^SSmMa^Em^SSgS^tm Established
Furthermore you can get twice IIHIIIHIHILJIBM ma -\M~,_^
as much for your lumber by plan
ing it, making it up into flooring,
drop siding, window casing and
mouldings, for which there is an
unlimited demand at big prices
The Howell Planer and Matcher
does all this work to perfection..
You can also make big money'
by working up all your slabs and
waste material into Lath and
Shingles All you need for this purpose is our Lath Mill and Shingle Machine. We build the I
best and most up-to-date machines of this kind on the market which we can furnish you at I
manufacturers prices Keep your plant running all the time. Remember we build complete I
Saw Mill Plants from top to bottom all of our own manufacture. Our new Catalog is justI
now out If you have not received it, witre to-day. Manufactured by
R. R. HOWELL & CO., MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
I I
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Machinery
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"TV$ ^p^Tvr^ THB PBIKCBTON UNION: THUBSDAY, JU KE 10, 1909.
TWO CALLED BEYOlfD
Mrs. Rose Fradette Died at Oreenbush
on Friday, June 4, at the Ad-
vanced Age of 86 Years.
Mrs. Clifford I. Parks Passed Away on
Sunday, June 6, at Her Home
in Baldwin Township.
Mrs. Rose Fradette died at the home
of her son in Greenbush on Friday
morning, June 4, at 1 o'clock, from a
general breaking down of the consti
tution as a result of old age. She was
i years old.
Rev. Father Levings conducted the
funeral services in the Greenbush
Catholic church on Saturday morning
at 10 o'clock and the interment was in
the Catholic cemetery of that town.
Mrs. Fradette was born near
Canada, in 1823 and went to
Greenbush to reside about two years
ago. She is survived by one son,
Napoleon, who lives on a farm in
Greenbush.
Mrs. Fradette was a kind-hearted
old lady, a good christian, and was
much beloved by her neighbors.
Quebec,
2
Mrs Clifford I Parks.
Mrs. Clifford I. Parks died on Sun
day, June 6, at 4 o'clock in the after
noon, at her home in Baldwin, aged
25 years 7 months 25 days. The cause
of her death was cancer, from which
she had suffered for a period of two
years, but she was confined to her bed
only one week.
Funeral services were conducted at
the family residence on Tuesday
morning at 10 o'clock by Rev. C. Lar
son of Princeton and the burial was
in Oak Knoll cemetery.
Mrs. Parks had been married a
year and 10 months. She is survived
by a husband, father and two brothers.
Her father, Hans Woollery, resides
at Elmore, this state, and her brothers
in Minneapolis.
Though her sufferings were severe
Mrs. Parks was ever cheerful and
kindshe bore her pain with forti
tude. She was a true christian lady
beloved by all who were favored with
her acquaintance.
Lightning's Pranks
Tom Post, who lives on the north
side, was awakened on Sunday morn
ing at 1 o'clock by a heavy thunder
clap followed by a crackling, sizzling
sound which appeared to be tearing
the interior of his house to pieces.
Tom proceeded with all speed to a
bedroom on the ground floor where
two of his boys were sleepingaged
13 and 11 years respectivelyand
there found that a bolt of lightning
had come down the chimney and cut
up some peculiar capers in the room.
It had forced out the stop in the chim
ney, struck the pillow upon which the
boys' heads were resting and scattered
feathers all over the room.
To grab the children and carry them
out was Tom's first thought, and when
he picked them up he found they were
as stiff as frozen pickerel. Upon
examination he found there were no
burns or scars on them and they even
tually came tothey had merely been
shocked into insensibility by coming
into close proximity with the electric
fluid. Throughout Sunday, however,
they suffered from headache, and Mrs.
Post also felt the effects of the shock
but in a milder form.
Further examination of the premises
by Mr. Post disclosed the fact that a
rug in the boys' bedroom had been
damaged, a board ripped from the
floor, the window casing badly
splintered and the wire screen torn to
shreds. The room through which the
chimney passed on the second floor
was covered with sootthe lightning
had also forced out the chimney stop
thereand the telephone wire outside
the house was burned to a crisp.
Mr. Post did not return to bed again
on Saturday night, but sat up with a
pail of water on each side of him
awaiting further developments. He
could smell fire somewhere, he said,
and wanted to run no chances.
Worth Reading.
It is a matter of greatest encourage
ment to all who are interested in sani
tation and hygienic reform that our
statesmen and government officials
are at last coming to recognize the
fact that the health, energy and stami
na of the people of the United States
is the greatest asset which this nation
possesses. It is also a matter of im
to know that the daily use of
Golden Grain Belt Beer is conducive
to good health. It gives a feeling of
bodily comfort and mental exhilara
tion and makes red blood and health
tissue. Order of your nearest dealer
or be supplied by Sjoblom Bros.,
wholesale dealers, Princeton.
Bids Wanted
Sealed bids will be received at the
county auditor's office in the village
of Princeton up to June 19th, 1909, at
1 o'clock p. m., for painting the ex
terior of the court house building.
Bids to include all material and to be
submitted for both one and two coat
work. The committee reserves the
right to reject any or all bids re
ceived. Dated June 8, 1909.
O. H. Uglem,
John Dalchow,
F. C. Cater,
24-2t Improvement Committee.
Church Topics
Sunday and Weekday
Announcements. METHODIST.
Morning service, 10:30, subject,
"The Practice of Faith evening
service, 8 p. m., "How to Make the
Most of the Summer Vacation"
sermon to young people. Epworth
league at 7 p. m., Miss Aimee Wood
cock, leader. Sunday school 12 m.
Midweek service of the church, 7:45,
Thursday evening.
Friday evening Rev. and Mrs.
W. Heard will open their home to the
young people of the church for a
social time. The election of officers
for the Epworth league will occur at
that time.
SWEDISH LUTHERAN
Next Sunday, June 13, services will
be held in Livonia church, Zimmer
man, at 10:30 a. m. Sunday school
at 12 o'clock m.
The Ladies' Aid society of Emanuel
church, Princeton, meet with
Mrs. Shannon this afternoon at 2:30
p. m. Everybody requested to attend.
The Ladies' Aid society of Saron
church, Greenbush, will meet with
Mrs E. Stark on Thursday, June 17,
at 2 30 p. m. All are cordially in
vited to attend.
August Lundquist, Pastor.
FIFTY PUPILS GRADUATE
Eighth Grade Exercises Held at Assembly
Room Friday Evening
Graduation exercises of the Eighth
grade of the Princeton public schools
were presented in the assembly room
of the high school building on Friday
evening. Many of the parents of the
children were in attendance and there
was a good representation of the
general publicthe hall was fairly
crowded. The program of exercises,
prepared by Misses Margaret I. King
and Tennie Cravens, instructors in the
Eighth grade, was superbly arranged.
Essays, recitations and vocal and
instrumental numbers comprised the
program and all participants present
ed their parts in a very creditable
manner. Mrs. C. A. Caley sang a
solo and Mrs. H. H. Farnham and
son, Paul, played a piano duet. Rev.
J. W. Heard invoked the divine
blessing and at the close of the pro
gram J. J. Skahen, in a well-worded
address, presented the diplomas to the
fifty graduates. This is the largest
number of Eighth grade pupils that
ever graduated from the Princeton
public schools at one time
Misses King and Cravens have
brought their pupils to the front with
remarkable rapiditythey are profici
ent, painstaking instructors. To
bring fifty pupils up to the graduation
point requires an enormous amount of
work and untiring energy, but Misses
King and Cravens have succeeded in
accomplishing this task.
Hereunder is printed the names of
the pupils who graduated:
Gertrude Heath Carl Krull
Arthur Kaliher Daile Francis
Gerald Petterson Mazie Mott
Carl Wicktor Gertrude Lamb
Oscar Wikeen Daisy Mott
Mary Braton Emma Rosin
Lee 'Whittemore Hildur Lofgren
Hazel Robideau Myron Walker
Alfred Lofgren John Brennan
Robert Brown Bessie Foltz
Forrest McVicar Mina Groff
Richard Steinbach Lena Stoddard
Effle Chute Mary Buck
Clarence Stay Cora Beth Fox
Myrtle Henschel Helen Giltner
Sarah Schurrer Mae Leach
Stella Parks Arnold Lenertz
Karen Uglem Flla Roos
Julia Kittleson Mary Shockley
Holger Wicen Katie Umbehocker
Fred Kriesel Floyd Loucks
Paul Farnham Vernon Kahher
Gertrude Smith Wanda Zimmerman
Laura McVicar Lorna Marshall
Loren Orth Earl Henschel
Village Council
On Thursday evening the village
council met in regular session and
disposed of business as follows:
Marshal Cravens was authorized to
hire a man to take charge of the vil
lage team during the sickness of Al
bert King.
A. M. Davis and Victor Osell,
representing the village fire depart
ment, appeared before the council and
asked for an appropriation toward
defraying the expenses of a delega
tion to the state firemen's convention
at Cloquet on June 8 and 9. The
council appropriated the sum of $35
for this purpose.
The recorder was instructed to noti
fy the Tri-State and Rural Telephone
companies to install electric light
meters without delay.
The Princeton Union was chosen
as the paper in which to publish all
official notices, etc., for the village.
It was also awarded all other print
ing.
It was decided by the council that it
meet in a body on the following day
for the purpose of making a tour of
the village and determining where new
sidewalks and repairs to walks
were necessary.
For Sale.
For sale, a small dwelling house
with a lot and a half of ground, de
sirably situated in village of Prince
ton. For particulars inquire of Clin
ton Slater, Princeton, or write O.
Mitchell, 403 Fifth street, St. Cloud.
23-tf
M4
{"^'AW ^^^^W^O^WIIWI^. I
Men's and Young
Men's Nobby Suits,
worth to $15.00,
"We have the biggest)
stock of clothing and
furnishing goods in
town. When in the
city give us a look
whether you want to
buy or not. You are
always welcome.
Dress Goods.
yff 1 'fjffil|''t"|
A Special Suit Sale
on
Sale at only
PINE LUMBER
AT ALL TIMES ON HAND.
THE BEST GRADES OF
Moulding, Sash, Doors, Maple Flooring, Cedar
and Pine Shingles and Cedar and Pine Siding
i at lowest prices.
W. P. CHASE Manager, Princeton, Minn.
For The Summer
Come in and see our fine line of talcum powders in
the following odors: Violet, honeysuckle, carnation and
white rose. The best talcum powders to be had, 25c
a box or bottle.
Armitage's Drug Store
One door south of Caley Hardware building on Main Street.
Dr. Armitage's Office in Odd Fellows' Building.
Jv "y !"F '4' "i1
**^*^*^'*^^^*i^^"
Friend & Marks
MILWAVREE
The Avery Clothing House
1 CALEY LUMBER COMPANY
Yard and office at Railroad Track, near Depot.
A LARGE STOCK OF
f' "l" 'l *$* *i*
WE DEA IN
Hats and Caps, Shoes, Clothing, Under-
wear, Rugs and Carpets, Gloves and Mit-
tens, Prints and Ginghams, Hosiery and
Staple Groceries
Town Talk Pineapple, per can
Standard Tomatoes, per can
University Tomatoes, per can
University Corn, per can
University Peas, per can
University Lima Beans, per can
Try our University brandsthey are fine.
Butter and Eggs taken at market value.
Come and see us.
D* BYERS
111* iiiunimmn i
S5
'W
16c 10c
15c 10c
I2c
15c

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