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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, August 26, 1909, Image 6

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I A CAFE,
A Incident That Proves All Me
Have Patriotism.
By O. HENRY.
ICopyright, 190G, by McClure, Phillips &
Co.]
At midnight the cafe was crowded.
By some chance the little table at
which I sat had escaped the eye of in
comers, and two vacant chairs at it
extended their arms with venal hos
pitality to the influx of patrons.
And then a cosmopolite sat in one of
them, and I was glad, for I held a
theory that since Adam no true citizen
of the world has existed. We hear oi
them, and we see foreign labels on
much luggage, but we find travelers
instead of cosmopolites.
I invoke your consideration of the
scenethe marble topped tables, the
range of leather upholstered wall
seats, the gay company, the ladles
dressed in demi-state toilets, speaking
In an exquisite visible chorus of taste,
economy, opulence or art the sedulous
and largess loving garcons, the music
wisely catering to all with its raids
upon the composers the melange of
talk and laughterand, if you will,
the Wurzburger in the tall glass
cones that bend to your lips as a ripe
cherry sways on its branch to the
beak of a robber jay. I was told by a
sculptor from Mauch Chunk that the
scene was truly Parisian.
My cosmopolite was named E. Rush
more Coglan, and he will be heard
from next summer at Coney Island.
He is to establish a new "attraction"
there, he informed me, offering kingly
diversion. And then his conversation
rang along parallels of latitude and
longitude. He took the great round
world in his hand, so to speak, famil
iarly, contemptuously, and it seemed
no larger than the seed of a maraschi
no cherry in a table d'hote grapefruit.
He spoke disrespectfully of the equa
tor, he skipped from continent to con
tinent, he derided the zones, he mop
ped up the high seas with his napkin.
With a wave of his hand he would
speak of a certain bazaar in Haidara
bad. Whiff! He would have you on
skees in Lapland. Zip! Now you rode
the breakers with the Kanakas at Kea
laikahiki. Presto! He dragged you
through an Arkansas post oak swamp,
let you dry for a moment on the alkali
plains of his Idaho ranch, then whirl
ed you into the society of Viennese
arehdukes. Anon he would be telling
you of a cold he acquired in a Chicago
lake breeze a.nd how old Escamila
cured it in Buenos Aires with a hot
Jnfusioh of the chuchula weed. You
"would^ have addressed a letter to' "E.
Rushmore Coglan, Esq., the Earth,
Solar System, the Universe," and have
mailed it, feeling confident that it
would be delivered to him.
I -was sure that I had found at last
the one true cosmopolite since Adam,
and I listened to his worldwide dis
course fearful lest I should discover In
it the local note of the mere globe
trotter. But his opinions never flut
tered or drooped. He was as impartial
to cities, countries and continents as
the winds or gravitation.
And as E. Rushmore Coglan prattled
of this little planet I thought with
glee of a great almost cosmopolite who
wrote for the whole world and'1
dedi
cated himself to Bombay. In a poem
he has to say that there are pride and
rivalry between the cities of the
earth and that "the men that breed
from them, they traffic up and down,
but cling to their cities' hem as a child
to the mother's gown." And when
ever they walk "by roaring streets un
known" they remember their native
city, "most faithful, foolish, fond, mak
ing her mere breathed name their
bond upon their bond." And my glee
"EXCUSE ME," SAID HE.
was roused because I had caught Mr.
Kipling napping. Here I had found a
man not made from dust, one who had
no narrow boasts of birthplace or
country, one who, if he bragged at all,
would brag of his whole round globe
against the Martians and the Inhab
itants of the moon.
Expression on these subjects was
precipitated from E. Rushmore Cog
lan- by the third corner to our table.
While Coglan was describing to me
the topography along the Siberian rail
way the orchestra glided Into a med
ley. The concluding air was "Dixie,"
and as the exhilarating notes tumbled
forth they were almost overpowered
by a great clapping of hands from al
most every table.
It Is worth a paragraph to say that
this remarkable scene can be witness
ed every evening in numerous cafes in
the city of New York. Tons of brew
have been consumed over theories to
account for it. Some have conjectured
hastily that all southerners in town
hie themselves to cafes at nightfall.
This applause of the "rebel" air in a
northern city does puzzle a. little, but
it is not insolvable. The war with
Spain, many years' generous mint and
watermelon crops, a few long shot
winners at the New Orleans race track
and the brilliant banquets given by the
Indiana and Kansas citizens who com
pose the North Carolina society have
made the south rather a "fad" in Man
hattan. Your manicure will lisp softly
that your left forefinger reminds her
so much of a gentleman's in Rich
mond, Va. Oh, certainly! But many
a lady has to work nowthe war, you
know.
When "Dixie" was being played a
dark haired young man sprang up
from somewhere with a Mosby guer
rilla yell and waved frantically hfs
soft brimmed hat. Then he strayed
through the smoke, dropped into the
vacant chair at our table and pulled
out cigarettes.
The evening was at the period when
reserve is thawed. One of us men
tioned three Wurzburgers to the wait
er. The dark haired young man ac
knowledged his inclusion in the order
by a smile and a nod. I hastened to
ask him a question because I wanted
to try out a theory I had.
"Would you mind telling me," I be
gan, "whether you are from"
The fist of E. Rushmore Coglan
banged the table, and I was jarred into
silence.
"Excuse me," said he, "but that's a
question I never like to hear asked.
What does it matter where a man is
from? Is it fair to judge a man by his
postoffice address? Why, I've seen
Kentuekians who hated whisky, Vir
ginians who weren't descended from
Pocahontas, Indianians who hadn't
written a novel, Mexicans who didn't
wear velvet trousers with silver dol
lars sewed along the seams, funny
Englishmen, spendthrift Yankees, cold
blooded southerners, narrow minded
westerners and New Yorkers who
were too busy to stop for an hour on
the street to watch a one armed gro
cer's clerk do up cranberries in paper
bags. Let a man be a man and don't
handicap him with the label of any
section."
"Pardon me," I said, "but my curios
ity was not altogether an idle one. 1
know the south, and when the band
plays 'Dixie' I like to observe. I have
formed the belief that the man who
applauds that air with special violence
and ostensible sectional loyalty is in
variably a native of either Secaucus,
N. J., or the district between Murray
Hill lyceum and the Harlem river, New
York. I was about to put my opinion to
the test by inquiring of this gen
tleman when you interrupted with
your ownlarger theory, I must con-
fess."
And now the dark haired young man
spoke to me, and it became evident
that his mind also moved along its
own set of grooves.
"I should like to be a periwinkle,"
said he mysteriously, "on the top of'a
valley and sing too-ralloo-ralloo."
This was clearly too obscure, so I
turned again to Coglan.
"I've been around the world twelve
times," said he. "I know an Eskimo
in Upernavik who sends to Cincinnati
for his neckties, and I saw a gont
herder in Uruguay who won a prize in
a Battle Creek breakfast food puzzle
competition. I pay rent on a room in
Cairo, Egypt, and another in Yoko
hama all the year around. I've got
slippers waiting for me in a tea house
in Shanghai, and I don't have to tell
'em how to cook my eggs in Rio Janei
ro or Seattle. It's a mighty little
world. What's the use of bragging
about being from the north, or the
south, or the old manor house in the
dale, or Euclid avenue, Cleveland, or
Pike's peak, or Fairfax county, Va., or
Hooligan's flats, or any place? It'll
be a better world when we quit being
fools about some mildewed town or
ten acres of swamp land just because
we happened to be born there."
"You appear to be a genuine cosmop
olite," I said admiringly. "But it
also seems that you would decry pa
triotism."
"A relic of the stone age," declared
Coglan warmly. "We are all brothers
Chinamen, Englishmen, Zulus, Pata
gonians and the people In the bend of
the Kaw river. Some day all this
petty pride in one's city or state or
section or country will be wiped out
and we'll all be citizens of the world,
as we ought to be."
"But while you are wandering in
foreign lands," I persisted, "do not
your thoughts revert to some spot
some dear and"
"Nary a spot," interrupted E. R.
Coglap flippantly. "The terrestrial,
globular, planetary hunk of matter
slightly flattened at the poles and
known as the earth Is my abode. I've
met a good many object bound citi
zens of this country abroad. I've seen
men from Chicago sit in a gondola In
Venice on a moonlight night and brag
about their drainage canal. I've seen a
southerner on being introduced to the
king of England hand that monarch,
without batting his eyes, the informa
tion that his grand-aunt on his moth
er's side was related by marriage to
the Perkinses of Charleston. I knew a
New Yorker who was kidnaped for
ransom by some Afghanistan bandits.
His people sent over the money, and
he came back to Kabul with the
agent 'Afghanistan?' the natives said
to him through an interpreter. "Well,
not so slow, do you think?' 'Oh, 1
don't know!' says he, and he begins to
tell them about a cab driver at Sixth
avenue and Broadway. Those ideas
don't suit me. I'm not tied down to
anything that isn't 8.000 miles in di
ameter. Just put me down as E. Rush-
more Coglan, citizen of the terrestrial
sphere."
My cosmopolite made a large adieu,
and left me, for he thought he saw
some one through the chatter and
smoke whom he knew. So I was left
with the would be periwinkle, who
was reduced to Wurzburger without
further ability to voice his aspirations
to perch melodious upon the summit of
a valley.
I sat reflecting upon my evident cos
mopolite and wondering how the poet
had managed to miss him. He was
my discovery, and I believed in him.
How was it? "The men that breed
from them they traffic up and down,
but cling to their cities' hem as a
child to the mother's gown."
Not so E. Rushmore Coglan. With
the whole world for his
My meditations were interrupted by
a tremendous noise and conflict in an
other part of the cafe. .1 saw above
the heads of the seated patrons E.
Rushmore Coglan and a stranger to
me engaged in a terrific battle. They
fought between the tables like titans,
and glasses crashed, and men caught
their hats up and were knocked down,
and a brunette screamed, and a blond
began to sing "Teasing."
My cosmopolite was sustaining the
pride and reputation of the earth
when the waiters closed in on both
combatants with their famous flying
wedge formation and bore them out
side, still resisting.
I called McCarthy, one of the French
garcons, and asked him the cause of
the conflict.
"The man with the red tie," (that
was my cosmopolite), said he, "got hot
on account of things said about the
bum sidewalks and water supply of
MY MEDITATIONS WERE INTEBRTJPTED.
the place he come from by the other
guy."
"Why," said I, bewildered, "that
man is a citizen of the worlda cos
mopolite! He"
"Originally from Mattawamkeag,
Me., he said," continued McCarthy,
"and he wouldn't stand for no knockin'
the place."
What He Really Said.
A gentleman calling on an M. P.
one day while waiting in the reception
room was attracted by the manner of
the small attendant and. started a ran
dom conversation.
"And how much do you earn a week,
my boy," he inquired.
"Ten pounds," said the youngster,
with avidity.
Being shown into the member's pri
vate office just then, the visitor's sur
prise found vent in words.
"Mighty bright youth you have to
be getting 10 a week," he remarked.
"Why," said the M. P., "he only gets
22 shillings."
"But he told me just now you were
giving him 10 a week," persisted the
gentleman.
"Nonsense!" said the M. P., and he
touched the bell. "Billy," he said, "did
you tell this gentleman I was paying
you 10 a week?"
"No, sir."
"You didn't? Well, what did you
say?"
"I said I earned it," was the prompt
and stout rejoinder.London Mail.
Rousing Her Suspicions.
The young man from the country sat
looking amazedly about him at the
splendid coiffures of the women and
girls about the room.
"Marvelous!" he said softly to the
girl next to him. "I never saw any
thing like it. Your hair now. Wonder
ful! Wonderful! The girls in the
country don't grow such hair as that.
I wonder why."
She put her hand quickly up to her
hair, then rose suddenly. "Pardon me
a minute," she implored and, crossing
the room, stood by a girl friend in the
light of a single candle.
"Take a look at my pompadour," she
whispered, "and see if the padding
shows."
"No," returned her friend when she
had looked. "Why?"
"Nothing," said the girl, "only that
young man from the country was so
fawningly complimentary of my abun
dance of locks it made me suspicious."
New York Press.
Feeling His Way.
"Jenkins, do you know anything
about literature?"
"No." "Know anything about art?"
"Nothing." "Anything about music?"
"Not a note."
"Politics?" "Never heard of 'em! What are
theyskittles?"
"Good! Come over to my room, bring
a pipe and let's enjoy ourselves."Lon
don Answers..
THE l-RiyCETON tOTION:| THURSDAY, AUGtST -J6 Vm
A Transformation Scene.
That great statesman William Pitt,
upon whose word so many tremendous
issues hung, was in the habit of retir-1 ^JEgrt MS?g
ing to his country house for seasons of
relaxation. There he dropped his char
acter of august prime minister and be
came for the time a romping school
boy. One day he had been skylarking
with his young friends. He rushed
into every fray with the ardor of the
youngest present. When the fun was
most furious a servant entered the
room and informed the prime minister,
who was coatless and embellished wfth
burnt cork, that Lords Hawkesbury
and Castlereagh had arrived from
London on important business. "Ask
them to wait," remarked Pitt and pro
ceeded with the game. When that
was finished Pitt said that he must
attend to two noble lords and retired
to his dressing room to repair dam
ages. Presently he returned, and a
remarkable transformation took place.,
Standing in the middle of the room,
the prime minister drew himself up to
full height of unapproachable dignity.
To the astonishment of the young peo
ple present the two lords came into
the room almost on their hands and
knees and with abject obsequiousness
explained the object of their visit. Mr.
Pitt listened with an air of distant
hauteur and with a sentence or two
dismissed his noble guests.West
minster Review.
A Train Load of Monkeys.
A plague of monkeys some years ago
sorely troubled the officials at a small
station on the Saran railway, in north
west India, says the Bombay Gazette.
Trucks full of grain for export were
often stored up in the station, and the
monkeys came down in large numbers
from a neighboring grove to help them
selves to the grain, picking holes in the
tarpaulin roof of the wagons. The of
ficials were wearied out with keeping
watch and scaring away the thieves,
who daily grew bolder, till an ingen
ious guard hit upon a stratagem. For
several days sweets and fruits were
put on the roofs of the wagons, with
the result that the whole of the mon
key colony were attracted to the spot
and soon became perfectly indifferent
to man.- One morning when they were
all busily feeding an engine was
stealthily attached to the wagons, and
suddenly the train moved off. The
monkeys were quite scared and made
no attempt to escape, sitting crouched
together till the train had gone several
miles and stopped at the jungle. Then
they wanted no hint to leave. Every
monkey leaped down howling and fled
into the jungle, whence none ever re
turned to trouble the railway.
(First Pub. Aug 26)
Citation for Hearing on Petition for
Probate of Will.
ESTATE OF CHARLOTTE PRATT.
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Charlotte Pratt,
decedent.
The State of Minnesota to the next of kin
and all persons interested in the allowance and
probate of the will of said decedent:
The petition of Susie L. Canright being duly
filed in this court, representing that Charlotte
Pratt, then a resident of the county
of Mille Lacs, state of Minnesota, died on the
10th day of August, 1909, leaving a last will
and testament which is presented to this court
with said petition, and praying that said in
strument be allowed as the last will and testa
ment of said decedent, and that letters
testamentary be issued thereon to Susie L.
Canright
Now therefore, you, .and each of you, are
hereby cited and required to show cause, if
any you have, before this court, at the probate
court rooms in the court house, in Princeton,
county of Mille Lacs. State of Minnesota, on
the 20th day of Septemoer, 1909, at 10 o'clock a.
m., why the prayer of said petition should not
be granted.
Witness the Honorable Wm. V. Sanford,
judge of said court, and the seal of said court,
this 26th dav of August. 1909.
WM. V. SANFORD.
(Court Seal) Judge of Probate.
J. A. Ross,
Attorney for Petitioner.
Farmers.
I have two 80-acre improved farms
at Long Siding, five miles north of
Princeton, that I would like to sell this
spring on long time and easy pay
ments, or will make a big discount for
half cash. L. J. Chad bourne,
4014 Sheridan Ave. S.,
11-tf Minneapolis, Minn.
For Sale.
Hardwood lumber for sale. Prices
lower than the lowest.
Farnham Brick Co.,
Brickton, Minn.
THE GREAT MINNESOTA STATE FAIR BY NIGHT-
(First Pub. July 15)
Summons.
TA
District Court, Seventh Judicial District.
Lucy Swaim, Plaintiff, 1
AS.
George W. Prentiss. George Loveland
Prentiss, George L. Prentiss, Benja
min Soule. Benj. Soule, John T. D.
Sadley, John H. Allen and Leonard
Pratt also all other persons unknown
claiming any right, title, estate, inter- I
est or lien in the real estate described
in the complaint herein, defendants.
The state of Minnesota to the above named
defendants:
You are hereby summoned and required to
answer the complaint of the plaintiff in the
above entitled action, which complaint has
been filed in the office of the clerk of the dis
trict court of said county, and to serve a copy
of your answer to the said complaint on the
subscriber at his office in the village of Prince
ton, in said Mille Lacs county, within twenty
days after the service of the summons upon
you. exclusive of the day of such service: and.
if you fail to answer said complaint within the
time aforesaid, the plaintiff will apply to the
court for the relief demanded in said com
plaint.
Dated July 7th, 1909.
J. A. Ross,
Plaintiff's Attorney.
Princeton, Minn.
Notice of Lis Pendens.
STATE OP MINNESOTA, I
Countv of Mille Lacs.
District Court, Seventh Judicial District.
Lucy Swaim, Plaintiff, 1
vs. i
George W. Prentiss, George Loveland
Prentiss. George L. Prentiss, Benja
min Soule. Benj. Soule. John T. D. i
Sadley, John H. Allen and Leonard I
Pratt: also all other persons unknown
claiming any right, title, estate, inter- I
est or lien in the real estate described
in the complaint herein, defendants.
To the above named defendants and to all
whom it may concern:
Take notice that an action has been com
menced, and is now pending in the district
court of said county, wherein the names of the
parties, plaintiff, and defendants are respect
ively as above written that the object of said
action is to determine the respective adverse
claims of the plaintiff and defendants, and the
rights of the parties respectively in and to all
that tract or parcel of land in said county
described as the southeast quarter (seM) of
southeast quarter (seM) of section thirty-two
(32) in township tbirty-seven (37) north, of
range twenty-six (26) west of the fourth prin
cipal meridian, which is the real property in
volved, affected, and brought in question in
said action, and to procure a judgment that the
plaintiff is the sole owner of said real estate
and the defendants, all and singular, have no
right, title, estate, lien or interest therein.
Dated July 7th. 1909,
J. A. ROSS,
Plaintiff's Attorney,
Princeton. Minn.
(First Pub. Aug. 12)
Order Limiting Time to File Claims
and for Hearing Thereon.
ESTATE OF ERNEST AXT.
State of Minnesota. County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Ernest Axt,
decedent.
Letters testamentary this day having been
granted to Fredericka Axt,
It is ordered that the time within which all
creditors of the above named decedent may
present claims against his estate in this court,
be. and the same hereby is, limited to six
months from and after the date hereof and
that Monday the 14th day of February. 1910,
at 10 o'clock a. m., in the probate court rooms
at the court house at the village of Princeton
in said county, be, and the same hereby is,
fixed and appointed as the time and place for
hearing upon and the examination, adjustment
and allowance of such claims as shall be pre
sented within the time aforesaid.
Let notice hereof be given by the publica
tion of this order in the Princeton Union as
provided by law.
Dated August 9th 1909.
WM. V. SANFORD.
(Court Seal) Judge of Probate.
DOING THEIK DUTY.
Scores of Princeton Readers Are Learning
the Duty of the Kidneys.
To filter the blood is the kidneys'
duty. When they fail to do this the
kidneys are sick. Backache and
many kidney ills follow urinary
trouble, diabetes. Doan's Kidney
Pills cure them all. Princeton people
endorse our claim.
Mrs: Sarah Veal, Princteon, Minn.,
says: "For over twenty-five years I
suffered from rheumatism and at
times was so bad that I was unable
to raise my arm above my head.
My hips and joints would become stiff
and painful and it would be all I
could do to hobble about. My back
grew weak and lame, my eyesight be
came affected, my head ached a great
deal and the kidney secretions were so
irregular as to cause me much an
noyance. I finally procured Doan's
Kidney Pills at the Home Drug Store,
and received such benecfiial results
that I can highly recommend them."
For sale by all dealers.
Price 50 cents. Foster-Milburn Co.,
Buffalo, N. Y., sole agents for the
United States.
Remember the nameDoan'sand
ake no other.
I MIRICK BROS. I
Can do you an up-to-date job of
paperhanging. We make a spe
cialty of paint work and hard
wood finish, also wall decorations
in water colors, stencil work, etc.
We guarantee satisfactory work
and fair prices. Work out of
town promptly attended to. Call
up Dan C. Mirick, Rural 'phone.
MIRICK BROS.
(First Pub. Aug. 12)
Order Limiting Time to File Claims
and for Hearing Thereon.
ESTATE OF COIT N. ARCHER.
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Coit N.
Archer, decedent.
Letters of administration this day having
been granted to K. J. Archer,
It is ordered that the time within which alt
creditors of the above named decedent may
present claims against his estate in this court
be, and the same hereby is. limited to six
months from and after the date hereof: and
that Monday, the 14th day of February, 1910 at
10 o'clock a. m.. in the probate court rooms'at
the court house in the village of Princeton, in
said county, be. and the same hereby is, fixed
and appointed as the time and place for hear
ing upon and the examination, adjustment and
allowance of such claims as shall be presented
within the time aforesaid.
Let notice hereof be given by the publication
of this order in the Princeton Union, a weekly
newspaper printed and published at Princeton
in said county as provided by law.
Dated August 2nd, 1909.
WM. V. SANFORD,
(Court Seal) Judge of Probate.
(First Pub. Aug. 13)
Citation for Hearing on Final Account
and for Distribution.
ESTATE OF FOREST B. ROGERS.
State of Minnesota. County of Mille Lacs
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Forest B.
Rogers, decedent.
The state of Minnesota to the next of kic and
all persons interested in the final account and1
distribution of the estate of said decedent:
The representative of the above named de
cedent, having filed in this court her final
account of the administration of the estate of
said decedent, together with her petition pray
ing for the adjustment and allowance of said
final account and for distribution of the residue
of said estate to the persons thereunto en
titled:
Therefore, you, and each of you, are hereby
cited and required to show cause, if any you
have, before this court at the probate court
rooms in the court house, in the village of
Princeton, in the county of Mille Lacs, state of
Minnesota, on the 6th day of September. 1909,
at 10 o'clock a. m., why said petition should not
be granted.
Witness the Judge of said court, and the seal
of said court, this 9th day of August, 1909.
WM. V. SANFORD.
(Court Seal) Probate Judge.
J. A. Ross.
Attorney for Petitioner.
(First Pub. Aug. 26)
Citation for Hearing on Petition for
Administration.
ESTATE OF NAY-GWON-AY-BEE.
State of Minnesota. County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Nay-gwon- ay-
bee, decedent.
The state of Minnesota to all persons inter
ested in the granting of administration of the
estate of said decedent.
The petition of Quod-aince having been filed
in this court, representing that Nay-gwon-ay
bee, then a resident of the county of Mille
Lacs state of Minnesota, died intestate in
April, 1908 and praying that letters of ad
ministration of his estate be granted to R. G.
Bealieu and the court, having fixed the time
and place for hearing said petition.
Therefore, you, and each of you, are hereby
cited and required to show cause, if any you
have, before this court at the probate court
rooms in the court house, in the village of
Princeton, in the county of Mille Lacs, state
of Minnesota, on the 22nd day of September.
1909, at 10 o'clock a. m., why said petition
should not be granted.
Witness, the judge of said court, and seal of
said court, this 23rd day of August, 1909.
WM V. SANFORD.
(Court Seal) Probate Judge.
CHARLES KEITH
Attorney for Petitioner.
(First Pub. Aug. 19)
Citation for Hearing on Final Account
and for Distribution.
ESTATE OF SUG-WON-DUG.
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Sug-won-dug.
decedent.
The state of Minnesota to the next of kin
and all persons interested in the final account
ana distribution of the estate of said dece
dent:
The representative of the above named de
cedent, having filed in this court his final ac
count of the administration of the estate of
said decedent, together with his petition pray
ing tor the adjustment and allowance of said
final account and for distribution of the residue
of said estate to the persons thereunto en
titled:
Therefore you, and each of you, are hereby
cited and required to show cause, if any you
have, before this court at the probate court
rooms in the court house, in the village of
Princeton, in the county of Mille Lacs, state
of Minnesota, on the 13th day of September
1909. at 10 o'clock a. m., why said petition
should not be granted.
Witness the Judge of said court, and the
seal of said court, this 18th day of August 1909
tfe 'i-" 3&
WM. SAHFORD.
(Court Seal) Probate Judge.
is it

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