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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, August 25, 1910, Image 7

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THC COMFORTABLE WAV.
GOING SOUTH GOIKGHOBTH.
6:00 a.m Duluth 18:15 p.m.
8:55 a.m Brook Park 7:20 p.m.
9:04 a.m Mora 6:56 p.m.
9:31 a.m Ogllvie 6:39p.m.
9:42 a.m Bock 6:26.p.m.
10:10 a.m Milaca 6:05 p.m.
10:22 a.m Pease (f) 5:49 p.m.
10:35 a.m...Long Siding (f)... 6:37 p.m.
10:41 a.m Briokton (1).... 5:33p.m.
10:56 a.m Princeton 5:27 p.m.
11:15 a.m Zimmerman 5:06 p.m.
11:40 a.m ElkRiver 4:46p.m.
12 05 a.m Anoka 4:25 p.m.
12:45 p.m Minneapolis.... 3:45p.m.
1:15 St. Paul 3:15p.m.
(f) Stop on signal.
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WB8T. GOING BAST.
10:18 a. Milaca 5:40p.m.
10:23 a. Foreston 5:34 p.m.
11:20 a. St. Cloud 4:30 p. m.
WAY FREIGHT.
.GOING SOUTH I GOING NORTH
Daily, except Sun. Daily, except Sun.
8:30 a.m Milaca 2:10p.m.
9:30 p. Princeton 1:00p.m.
10:30 p.m Elk River 10:30a.m.
r-3:00p.m Anoka 8:00a.m.
Any information regarding sleeping
cars or connections will be furnished at
any time by
Gt. H. PENN1SOK, Agent.
Princeton, Minn.
MILLE LACS COUNTY.
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookA. J. Franzen. ..Route 2, Milaca
BorgholmGeo. Hulbert R. 1, Milaca
East SideAndrew Kalberg Opstead
GreenbushJ. H. Grow R. 1, Princeton
HaylandAlfred F. Johnson Milaca
Isle HarborC. M. Halgren Wahkon
MilacaJ. A. Overby Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
OnamiaLars Eriksson Onamla
PageAugust Anderson Star R., Milaca
PrinoetonJos. Johnson....Route5, Princeton
KathioE. E. Dinwiddie Garrison
bouth HarborChas. Freer Cove
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
A. N. Lenertz Prinoeton
C. H. Dahlstrom Milaca
P. T. P. Neumann Foreston
E. R. Bailey Onamia
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinH. B. Fisk Route 3, Princeton
Blue HillM. B. Mattson Princeton
Spencer Brook-O. W. Blomquist.R. 3, Princeton
WyanettP. A. Chilstrom R. 2. Prinoeton
LivoniaW. R. Hurtt Zimmerman
SantiagoGeo. Roos Santiago
DalboJohn D. Sarner Dalbo
BradfordWm. Conklin R. 3, Cambridge
"StanfordLee Hass St. Francis
Spring ValeHenry A. Olson. .R. 5, Cambridge
W
PRINCETON-:- LODGE,
NO. 93, of
Regular meetings every TueB? eve-
ning at 8 o'clock.
FRANK GOTJLDING, C.
A. J. ANDERSON, K. R. & S.
T. F. SCHEKN, Master of Finance.
PRINCETON LODGE
NO. 208,1.0.0.
Regular meetings every Monday evening at
8.00 o'clock. F. C. CATER, N. G.
HARRY MOTT, Rec. Sec.
Princeton Homestead No. 1867
Regular meeting nights sec
ond and fourth Wednesday
in each month.
RAL PH CLAGGETT,
Cor. and M. of A.
[iJKiP DAHRAGH, Foreman
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
^EORQE PRENTICE ROSS,
Undertaker and
State Licensed Embalmer.
Disinfecting Specialty. Rural Phone No.
Princeton, Minnesota.
R. D. A. McRAE
DENTIST
Office In Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON, MINN
JLVERO L. MCMILLAN,
LAWYER.
Townsend Building.
Princeton, Minn
R. F. L. SMALL, DENTIST.
Offlc hours 9 a. m. to 12m. 2 p.m. to6 p.m.
Over E. B. Anderson's store
Princeton, Minn.
ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Qffloe and Residence over Jack's Drugstore
Tel.Rural, 36.
Princeton, Minn.
J.
A. ROSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office in Carew Blook,
Main Street, Prinoeton.
BUSINESS CARDS.
ILLIAM KALIHER,
BARBER SHOP & BATH ROOMS.
A fine line of Tobacco and Cigars.
Main Street, Prinoeton.
A. ROSS,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR.
Will take full ohargeof dead bodies when
desired. Coffins and caskets of the latest styles
always -n stock. Also Springfield metalics.
Dealer In Monuments of all kinds.
E. A Ross, Princeton, Minn. Telephone No. 30.
JOHN BARRY
Expert Accountant,
Over 30 Tears Experience.
1011 First Ave. North, 3
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN,
T. J. KALIHER, Proprietor,
Princeton, Minn.
Single and Double Rigs
at a rioments' Notice.
Commercial Travelers' Trade a Specialty.
II^.IMilljl.l lilll
^''k A4&&&. i%^^^zJkl^k^kf&^iM
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
His Grandma
Wife
How a r*lan to Save a Fortune
Was Obliged to Wed His
Grandmother.
BRADFORD C. ALMY
Copyright, 1910, by American Press
Association.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
I was in Switzerland and about to
climb the Jungfrau when a bundle of
letters and newspapers were banded
me. While waiting for my guides I
tore open the wrapper of the papers
and, scanning one of the journals, no
ticed a marked item stating that my
grandfather, Sherman Wellesley, aged
eighty-five, had married and died the
same day.
In a twinkling I was deposed from a
position of heir expectant to a great
fortune toI did not know what. My
grandfather had bitterly opposed my
propensity to travel and especially to
climb mountains. I was his only de
scendant, and he had long endeavored
to induce me to settle down to the care
of the millions which he had willed
me. He1
lived in constant terror lest 1
should make a slip on one of my
climbs, go several thousand feet down
over a precipice and the fortune that
had been accumulating during his life
time would go a-begging. In other
words, it must be left to charity.
His intention in marrying was plain
to me. He could not have an heir
(other than myself), but he could have
a wife. He had doubtless lost all pa
tience with me and at the last moment
married some woman who would sup
ply my place as an heir.
I hesitated what to do, but, looking
up at the glittering top of the white
mountain, forgot for the time all about
the fortune I had lost, and, my guides
being ready, I started on what proved
my last ascent. On returning to my
starting point, Interlaken, I left for
home. As soon as I landed I wrote my
new grandmother asking for informa
tion as to her husband's disposition of
the property. By return mail I receiv
ed this reply:
Your grandfather, being taken suddenly
ill, concluded to destroy the will leaving
you his sole heir, not having confidence
that you would settle down and attend to
the property. Having but an hour or two
to live, there was no time to make a de
tailed will. His brain, always quick to
work, solved the problem in this wise:
Having great confidence in me, he mar
ried me on his deathbed and signed a
will comprised in a few words leaving me
all his property. He, however, exacted a
promise from me that if you desired to
marry me I would take you for a hus
band.
Phew! Marry my grandmother!
Well, all depended upon what kind
of a woman she was. A hope sprang
up in my breast that she might be of a
suitable age for me and passably good
looking. I wrote her that I would run
up for a conference and politely as
sured her that if she was not favora
bly impressed with me I would release
her from the verbal condition by de
clining to marry her. This, I flattered
myself, was a very foxy way of put
ting it, my real object being to decline
to take a wife with a fortune if I
didn't like her.
I was doomed to a terrible disap
pointment. I found my grandmother
a veritable grandmother. She was six
ty-five years old, fat, bald and not a
tooth in her head that was her own.
I cursed myself for a fool to have de
clined to comply with my grandfa
ther's wishes during his life, for now
that the blow had fallen I realized my
folly. It was evident that to save the
fortune I must marry an old woman,
and even then she would own the
property till her death, and I should
have to ask her for every penny I
spent.
Having taken sufficient time to make
up my mind what course to pursue, I
sounded her as to whether I could
marry her, take an allowance and
spend my time anywhere but with her.
She said she would think it over, and
I had hope. But the next day I was
informed that such a course would not
be carrying out her late husband's
wishes. He had desired that I should
take care of the property.
The medium through whom I receiv
ed this answer was Agnes Dorchester,
my grandmother's secretary, a young
woman not quite my age. Indeed, 1
was obliged to transact everything
through this girl, and it was not long
before I saw plainly that Mrs. Welles
ley was completely under her thumb.
This added to my chagrin. Another
had stepped in between me and the
fortune I had been brought up to ex
pect would be mine, and I was not
even at liberty to deal directly with
that person.
Having discovered where the power
lay, there was nothing for me to do
but endeavor to gain such points as I
wished to make through its possessor.
I invited Miss Dorchester to a confer
ence, in which I played my best card
in an attempt to induce her to per
suade her mistress to fulfill her prom
ise, allow me a stated income and per
mit me to live abroad.
"Mrs. Wellesley," she said in reply
to this proposition, "would not have
been intrusted with this matter were
it not that she was to be implicitly
trusted with carrying it out. Your
grandfather's object was to make a
man of one who was wasting his tal
ents in globe" trotting."
While I was disappointed, I was im
pressed. Even this girl, whom I had
begun by disliking, saw that I was not
worthy to be trusted with a fortunea
fortune of which she herself held the
real management.
I" spent some time at my grandmoth
er's endeavoring to bring her to some
The evening before the wedding,
when I was a hundred miles from my
Intended bride. I was thrown into a
wild state by the receipt of the follow
ing telegram:
You must marry your grandmother, aft
er all, or lose your fortune. AGNES.
What new complication could have
arisen? Why could not those lawyers
be certain of anything? I had become
violently in love with Miss Dorchester
and would not in any event give her
up. I replied:
Grandmother be hanged! I will marry
you tomorrow.
I could not get a train till early the
next day, but after a sleepless night
at 5 a. m. was steaming toward my
bride that was to be. On my arrival I
hesitated whether to go at once to see
her and discover the meaning of her
telegram, but there was little time,
and my mind was made up as to the
marriage, so I dressed for the wedding
before setting out. I dashed up to the
house in a carriage, alighted and hur
ried up the steps. Agnes was standing
in a front window in bridal array, her
face radiant with happiness. Rushing
into the room where she was, I caught
her in my arms.
"What's the matter?" I asked, breath
less.
'.'You're going to marry your grand
mother."
"No, I'm not. I'm going to marry
you."
"I'm your grandmother." Her eyes
were dancing a hornpipe.
Then I saw it all. My grandfather
had married her instead of the old
"woman. She had been playing a gam*
with me. My grandfather in the pres- WALU
{'jjl'-^jfr
ai
PBlNCBSTOy XTKIQN: THUBSDAT, AUGUST 25^910.
terms. She declined all my proposals,
adhering to her late husband's inten
tions. She would fulfill her promise
and would not consent to any subter
fuge to get around it. A month passed,
and 1 was about to give it all up and
go away when Mrs. Wellesley herself
came to me with a proposition.
"1 sympathize with you heartily,"
she said. "in being obliged to give up
a fortune or take with it an old wo
man like myself. I will tell you what
I will do. I am as attached to Miss
Dorchester as if she were my daugh
ter. She is of suitable age for you
and a woman of rare good sense. 1
can safely trust her to carry out your
grandfather's intentions toward you.
If she will have you and you will
have her 1 will make a will leaving
my property to you both jointly, giv
ing her meanwhile control of the in-
come."
"But I don't know that I like Miss
Dorchester," I exclaimed, taken aback
at this offer. Then after a pause,
"Will she consent to the plan?"
"That is for you to find out."
I had no hope that Miss Dorchester
would marry me simply to gain a for
tune, and in any event I should have
to live with her and carry out my
grandfather's wishes. But anything
rather than beggary. I went to the
young lady, told her of Mrs. Welles
ley's proposition and asked her to be
my wife.
What did she do but toss her nose in
the air and decline to have anything
to do with such a proposition.
I left her furious. She would rather
give up a fortune than be my wife.
I spent the next twenty-four hours
in inventing imaginary ways of tortur
ing her. The upstart!
We all know that a woman scorned
becomes a fury. There is no such
adage about a man, but there should
be, "A man scorned is soon conquer-
ed." I resolved that I would make
Miss Dorchester love me, then toss her conducted a Norwegian school this
aside as a wax doll. e* o^uuui ims
In a few weeks I had softened her
so far as to receive a proposition from
her.
"I cannot bear," she said, "to stand
between you and a fortune. I feel that
it will be impossible for Mrs. Welles
ley to carry out your grandfather's in
tentions toward you. I will agree to
her proposition to marry you provided
you will promise to go away and not
trouble me."
I had secured terms that in the be
ginning I would have considered very
acceptable. But what did I consider
them now? An insult.
"Are you aware," I said, the color
rising to my cheek and a spark glitter
ing in my eye, "that you are by no
means flattering?"
"But I supposed what you wish is
to go abroad and break your neck
climbing mountains."
"Oh!" I exclaimed ironically. "In
that case you would not be troubled
with me further."
"And death would release you from
living with a wife you had married
for convenience."
In this retort I fancied I could de
tect something womanlysomething of
pain. I was surprised. I went to her
and laid my hand on her arm. I was
not repulsed.
"I think." I said, "that you could
carry out my grandfather's wishes.
At any rate, try. I will do all I can to
help you."
"To retain your fortune," she said,
pouting.
"And become a loving husband."
G/Q
me
pres-- ence of death had hiteupon the expc
dient of marrying the girl who had
been supplying my place
\thia
sense of my real grandmother that the Princeton on Monday.
moment I was piqued I was hopelesslv
in love.
1 *E &."*"*
Farm Fireside.
Gleanings by Our Country I
Correspondents.
GLENDORADO.
O. G. Wold was a Princeton visitor
on Friday.
C. Jenson was a visitor at Prince
ton on Friday.
Mrs. T. Knufcson called on Mrs. H.
Stowe on Thursday.
G. Moey transacted business at the
county seat on Friday.
Misses Lillie Olson and Christine
Nelson were Foley visitors last week.
Miss Clara Stowe of Rose Creek is
the guest of her sister, Mrs. S. Kittil
son.
Mrs. H. Uran returned last Friday
from a fortnight's visit in Minne
apolis.
Mrs. Isaac Anderson and daughter,
Julia, have returned from a two
months' visit to relatives at Hanna
ford and other points in North Dako
ta.
Mrs. L. Larson visited her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Strand of Santiago,
on Thursday.
Mrs. Lewis Solberg of Princeton
visited with Glendorado relatives a
few days last week.
Miss Bertha Viste returned from
the twin cities last Saturday after a
prolonged stay there.
Mrs. Snortum and Miss Dora Ness
of Canby are the guests of their par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. G. Ness.
Miss Ida Lee recently returned from
Valley City, N. D., where she has
summer
Carl Ness and Fred Sponser of
Princeton were the guests of the
former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G.
Ness, on Sunday.
Mrs. Hilmer Lind departed for her
home at Sandstone on Friday after an
extended visit at the home of her
parents, Mr. and Mr. J. Moey.
Miss Alma Johnson has been en
gaged to teach the Glendorado
school, district 13, and Miss Rebecca
McGuire of Foley will teach in dis
trict 47.
The basket social at J. K. Nelson's
last Saturday night was a success
both socially and financially. Th
sum of $33 was netted for the May
wood Lutheran church.
tor Qalck Relief From Hay Fever.
Asthma and summer bronchitis,
take Foley's Honey and Tar. It
quickly relieves the discomfort and
suffering and the annoying symptoms
disappear. It soothes and heals the
inflamed air passages of the head,
throat and bronchial tubes. It con
tains no opiates and no harmful
drugs. Refuse substitutes. For sale
by all druggists.
OXBOW
were
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Annis
visiting at Emery's Sunday.
The farmers of this locality have
been busy threshing the past week.
The Misses Stella and Cora Bock
oven spent Sunday afternoon with
Myrtle Carr.
Val Mott went to St. Paul last
Saturday and visited over Sunday,
returning Monday night.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Carr were pleas
ant visitors at Henry Steeves' Sun
day afternoon and evening.
Miss Helga Chalstrom stayed with
her sister, Mrs. Ed Larson, from
Tuesday to Thursday of last week.
Miss Ruth Briggs, sister to L. S
Briggs of Princeton, drove through
this country last Friday calling on a
few of her old acquaintances.
Visitors at Ernest Radeke's, Sun
day, were Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Ransom,
Mr. and Mrs. Emil Lundgren and chil
dren, and Mrs. August Henschel.
Mrs. Lee Jones and her mother,
"Grandma" Radeke, came out to
Peter Anderson's Saturday and
visited with them until Sunday
nightdefeateedbeingthen
rf
Ellen Peterson and Jennie Abbott
came out from town to attend the sur
prise party at Peterson's Saturday
night and visited at Andrew Road
strom's Sunday.
Amoneg those who attended the
oeuue
were the Misses Freda and Eleanor
Anderson, Harold Anderson, Rena
Roy and Virgil Wmsor.
were the Misse Fred a and Elaann
Last Saturday night the young folks
Stanchfield
fro
gathered ant the Peterson home i
a
lak
S&
an
bymake
Selma a pleasant surprise.
devoting The evenin was spent dancing.
Thi would her Refreshmentg were served ain midnight
herself to him
inheritance stronger in law, though he
left a will in her favor telling her that
it was his wish that she should marry
me and make a man. of me.
But she had no mind to make a
business transaction of the matter
She had therefore put an old woman The next meeting will be with Mrs
forward to personate her as the widow Joe Rudolph on September 1.
while she stood in the background
The old woman had nothing else to do
with the matter except to receive a
handsome salary. I had been com
pletely duped, but had become so im
pressed with the ability and good
The club met with Mrs. Ernest
Radeke last Thursday afternoon.
Not many members were present on
account of the busy season. A fine
lunch was served by the hostess.
BLUE HILL.
Miss Emma Taylor is
friends in Baldwin.
Prank Morrill delivered stock
i $
3OOO0 RACING PROGRAM
LIBERAL ARTS EXHIBIT IN THE NEW
GRANDSTAND AND EXPOSITION BUILDING
l\.TURAL,Fi0D,f/llVO
evening at the old ^Maggart farm
house.
Obas. Groff is helping Chas.
Reichert stack his grain.
Mrs. Lavelle and daughter,
Alice, spent Sunday visiting with
Mrs. John Boehm and Miss Tracy
Boehm.
Harold Hull has been very sick
with an attack of summer complaint.
We are glad to learn that the little
fellow is better.
We are all glad to learn that Louis
Kohlman is getting well again, and
hope he may soon be able to perform
his daily labor.
A bonfire party will be given at
Gaulier's next Saturday night. Ad
mission fee, two roasting ears, a new
potato and some salt.
It is reported that Miss Emma Lenz,
a former Blue Hill resident, is to be
married Tuesday of this week to Ed
Klink'of Easton, Minn. Well, here's
best wishes, etc.
Sunday was one of the most dis
agreable, muggy days we have had
this year, and Monday was noted for
the peculiar color of the sky at
periods during the day. Some of the
superstitious thought the world was
coming to an end, but she's still
moving at the present writing.
They Have a Definite Purpose.
Foley Kidney Pills give quick relief
in cases of kidney and bladder ail
ments. Mrs. Rose Glaser, Terre
Haute, Ind., tells the result in her
case. "After suffering for many
years from a serious case of kidney
trouble and spending much money for
so-called cures, I found Foley Kidney
Pills the only medicine that gave me
a permanenet cure. I am again able
to be up and attend to my work. I
shall never hesitate to recommend
them." For sale by all druggists.
BOCK
Fredolf Sword was home for a va
cation last week.
Frank Tellander has gone to St.
Paul to work at the carpenter trade.
Mrs. Nels Hoglund underwent an
operation at Grasston, Minn., last
week.
Mrs. Frank Tellander is spending
two weeks at Grasston taking medical
treatment.
The O'Neil baseball team crossed
bats with the Bock Tigers on Sunday
on the latter's grounds. Bock was
8COr
in eleventh inning, the
te to nine
The Best Hoar of Life
Is when you do some great deed or
discover some wonderful fact. This
hour came tsoJ"from R. Pitt of Rocky Mt.,
sa
tu
A1y B. A. picnic at Greeunr laku Sunda#
li
AGRlCUtfW
I o.iMfviiCTDlfeL V?* ^UlfJDUSTR^
BEAUTIFUL
the worst cold
N.C when h^e was suffering
a
nad
eve
proved to mintense-greay
satisfaction, what a wonderful cold
and cough cure Dr. King's New Dis
ver'y is For after taknig one
c^l?Ps nt
a
anvtninf
1Dffg,
cnac
I ways cured. You
"eyy1i
7entirely
K"
can'nt sa anything too good of a
Its the surest
and best remedy for diseased lungs,
5
meaicn
hfimnrrViaaoo n-inno
in
Henry Maggart gave
party to his friends on Saturday used.
a dancing
oc i
feverany or trouble.
50c and $1.00. Trial bottle free.
Guaranteed by C. A. Jack.
nemorrnagesthroax
%m
la
grippelung
A Silk Producing Caterpillar.
In Assam, where the natives call it
"eri," a silk producing caterpillar has
been used for silk spinning for cen
turies, but, strange to say, its employ
ment for the purpose has been restrict-
coons are not sealed like those of the
common silkworm. One enu of thc
loops of silk Thi renders. iT unneces-
Bar
|LIGHT|T
S!?H
^^.Efcop
LANE
WITH 1OO0 PARTICIPANTS
FIRST NORTHWESTERN CORN SHOW
EXCURS/O/V PATES
ON ALL RA/I ROADS
S
SPECTACLE
5L
PAGEANT^NATIONS
MADE IN LOS ANGELES. CAL.
Consumption can be Cured
Even in its last stages progress of the malady
can be checkedthe tubercle bacilli destroyed.
We have incontrovertible evidence ef our snccess.
Many people nave been resceed from an apparently
Hopeless stage of the dread disease.
Your Loved Ones May Saved From
Their Impending Doom.
Tuberclecide completely eliminates the Tub
erculosis Germ from the Human Body.
No Hypodermics. No Nostrums.
Investigate Our Claims and Begin Treatment
Before It Is Too Late.
Treatment at Home, surrounded by home
comforts. We invite correspondence and will
give full particulars by mail or to all who call.
IllDtKtLtllUt 10., BisneaKlMlinnesaU*'
To keep your health sound to avoid
the ills of advancing years to con
serve your physical forces for a ripe
and healthful old age, guard your
kidneys by taking Foley's Kidney
Remedy, For sale by all druggists.
(First Pub. Aug. 18.)
Citation for Hearing on Final Account
and for Distribution.
ESTATE OF GAH-GAH-KE-WASH.
Suite of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
la the matter of the estate of Gah-gah
ke-wash, decedent.
The State of Minnesota to all persons in
terested in the final account and distribution
of the estate of said decedent:
The representative of the above named
decedent, having filed in this court his
final account of the administration of
the estate of said decedent, together with
his petition praying for the adjustment and
allowance of said final account and for dis
tribution of the residue of said estate to the
persons thereunto entitled Therefore you,
and each of you, are hereby cited and required
to show cause, if any you have, before this
court, at the Probate Court Booms in the
Court House, in the village of Princeton in
the County of Mille Lacs. State of Minnesota,
on the 12th day of September. 1910. at 10
o'clock a. m., why said petition should not be
granted.
Witness, the Judge of said Court, and the
Seal of said Court, this 15th day of August,
WM. V. SANFORD,
(Court Seal) Probate Judge.
CHARLES KEITH,
Attorney for Petitioner.
(First Pub. Aug. 18)
Order Limiting Time to File Claims
Within Three Months, and
for Hearing Thereon.
ESTATE OF JOHN W. CATER.
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of John W.
Cater, decedent.
Letters of administration this day having
been granted to Charles Keith, and it appear
ing by the affidavit of said representative
that there are no debts of said decedent
It is ordered that the time within which all
creditors of the above named decedent may
present claims against his estate in this court,
be, and the same hereby is, limited to three
months from and after the date hereof and
that Monday, the 21st day of November, 1910,
at 10 o'clock a. m., in the probate court rooms at
the court house at Princeton In said county, be,
and the same hereby is, fixed and appointed as
the time and place for hearing upon and the
examination, adjustment and allowance of such
claims as shall be presented within the time
aforesaid.
Let notice hereof be given by the publication
of this order in the Princeton Union, as pro
vided by law.
Dated August 15th, 1910.
(Court Seal.) WM. V. SANFORD,
Judge of Probate.
First Pub. July 28.
Referee's Sale.i an(*
a
wii
State of Mincesoaa, County of Sherburne.
District Court, Eighteenth Judicial District.
w?8??1
Wim^VmISe
6 ii
JI. Wessel, Plaintiffs,
vs
u"l' June 23,1910, there will be sold by the under
asthma, hay signed referee at
publicMille
t,",^',,ftT,-
auction cash,
the office of the sheriff of Lacsfor county iat
the village of Princeton, in said Mille Lacs
county. Minnesota,tho te thh highestSeptembeatrrbiddefoday ten o'clock a. m. on 14te
A. D. 1910. all the foUowing described pieces of
real estate situate in the village of Princeton,
county of Mille Lacs, state of Minnesota, de
scribed as follows: Lots five (5) and six (6).
of block nine (9), of Princeton, according to
the plat of Princeton on file and of record in
the office of the register of deeds of MiUe Lacs
county and also those tracts or parcels of
real estate situated in the county of Sherburne
andstateof Minnesota, described as follows,
to-wit: The southwest quarter (S.W.JK) of
the southeast quarter (S.E.30 of section one
(1). in township (35) north of*range--
-1-"-thirty-five
coon Is closed only with converging q^arteif5 (N.E.JO or section twelve (12), lying
loona n* 111r. rph.,s, VJJTZ It -I?
to kin the insect when its silk Is
no
be
a
-3
$
53
J
1
SI
-.Hi
Referee's Sale
Fred J. Brown and Anna E,
Cross, Defendants.
Notice is hereby given that in pursuance of
the order and judgment of the above entitled
court, made in the above entitled action on
*"l
river
tn
meridian: also all thaBt of the north half
(Ntf) of the northeast {quarter (N.E.*) and
upart VIJ. iu wo tne southeasrtt quarter (S.E.K) of the northeast
ot
th
ship and range last aforesaid.
Dated July 22, A. D. 1910.
HARRY SHOCKIMT
Seferee. .W'3

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