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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 16, 1913, Image 4

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THE PRINCETON UNION
BY R. O. DUNN.
Plli*Hd E.yrmrjr, Thursday.
TERMSS1.00 PE YEAR IN ADVANCE.
S1.25 I NOT PAID I N ADVANCE.
OFFICE) FIRST ST., EAST OF COURT HOUSE.
0. I. STAPLES,
Business Manager.
THOS. H. PROWSE,
Editor.
Mayor Nye should now write a
book on "How I Revolutionizad
Minneapolis.'
And now the price of lemons has
advanced. Woodrow has probably
created a scarcity by purchasing,
enormous quantities of the fruit for
presentation to the hordes ot demo
cratic officeseekers who are not enapparent,
titled to plums.
A witness before the congressional
tariff committee endeavored to con
vince that august body that perfum
ery is not a luxury. We should cate
gorize several of the varieties with
which our olfactory oigans have
come into contact as effluvia.
When that suit brought by Theo
dore Eoosevelt against George A.
Newett of the Ishpeming Iron Ore is
tried at Marquette, Mich., next
month those mean persons who dealtogether
clared that it is impossible to libel
the ex-leader of the bull moose herd
may change their conclusion.
In his Commoner Mr. Bryan says:
"The men selected by Mr. Wilson
for the cabinet should be selected
not because of personal service ren
dered to him nor even because of past
service rendered to the party." If
Mi. Wilson follows this advice Will
iam will be handed a portfolio.
In a special message President
Taft last week asked congress to
appropriate $250,000 for continuing
the investigation of the commission
on economy and efficiency into the
executive departments of the govern
ment. There is no doubt that these
departments need a thorough over
hauling.
The complexities of the new parcel
post law has not only driven some of
the rural carriers to drink, but it
drove one of them, a young man
atfurnished
Yale, Iowa, to commit suicide by
hanging himself to a sour apple tree.
His brain was unequal to the task of
solving the knotty problems required
in the pursuit of his duties.
The colony of Russians up at Cass
Lake has engaged an instructor and
will proceed to learn the English
language. This is the sort of
bet-conclusively
tiers the country needs. They are
starting out with the intention of
becoming Amencan citizens, and in
this differ materially from thousands
ot immigrants wno come to this
country from southern Europe.
only
Mc-
rnil-
Merely because little Vinny,
child of Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Lean, known as "the hundred
lion dollar baby,'' contracted the
semblance of a cold he was immedi
ately lushed off to Palm Beach,
Florida, in a special train, accom
panied bv Ihiee doctors and five
nurses. Did you ever hear of any
thing more nauseating than this?
We would like to have some one
who knows explain why it is that
special stamps must be used on par
cels post packages'?Winnebago City
Enterprise.
Probably for the reason that each
postoffice be better able to keep a
separate account ot stamps sold for
parcel post purposes, so that at the
end of the vear the receipts from
this particular department may beWar
accurately ascertained. We do not,restoration
however, profess to be an authority
on the question.
South Dakota is awakening to the
necessity and value of better high
ways, and one of the principal meas
ures to come before the legislature
of that state will deal with the fur
therance of the progress of the Good
Roads league. This measure will,
among other things, provide for the
utilization of convict labor on the
highways, the transference of the
$40,000 now in the state game fund
to the good roads fund, and the ap
propriation of the automobile tax to
the same purpose. As the majority
of the legislators are in favor of the
enactment of such a law the bill will
probably go throiigti\n
g* ^f^Tm^^f^^^^^
Miss Florence Burns of the St.
Paul Teachers' federation declares
that "motion pictures are making
our children clamlike.'T
A couple of the militant London
suffragettes who poured destructive
acids into street letter boxes were
tried at the Old Bailey the other day
and sentenced to eight months im
prisonment each. Considering the
nature of the crime the judge was
too lenient with them.
Throughout the center and west end
of London many money orders, con
tracts, checks and bank notes have
been destroyed in the letter boxes.
Three switchmen were killed in
the Minneapolis yards last Friday,,
and one of them, Edward Cheatham,
both of whose legs had been severed,
fought heroically to save his life.
He called for a piece of engine beli
cord and two small sticks, and with
these he improvised tourniquets, but
notwithstanding this the poor fellow
bled to death before he reached the
hospital in an ambulance. Three
switchmen in a day is a heavy death
toll in one railroad yard, and it is
a pity that means are not devised for
making the work of switchmen more
safe.
The Colorado senate has a lady
senator and* she is proving a blessing
in that fire-eating body where men
were wont to pull their jack knives
by the stateand rush at
one another upon the least provoca
tion. Old nicotine fiends who for
merly bespattered the marble floors
with expectorative abomination now
use the cuspidors, and unparliamen
tary language is no longer resorted
to. A general metamorphosis has
taken place and the 'senatoress'' is
responsible. She has already shown
how it is possible for
one woman to reform a bod^ of can
tankerous old sinners.
A story comes from Washington to
the effect that the democratic pat
ronage committee has formulated a
plan which contemplates the enact
ment by congress of a law that will
terminate next July the terms of
office of all presidential postmasters,
district attorneys, marshals, revenue
collectois and other officeholders
whose terms originally were contem
poraneous with that of the president
and of his cabinet. I is proposed
that in the event of the republicans
supporting such measure the 1.300the
Taft nominations now being held up
shall be confirmed. The enactment
of such a law would mean the throw
ing open to the democrats in a block
on July 1 all the vast field of federal
patronage.
In a healing before the military
affairs committee of the natina
house of representatives Secretary of
Stimson strongly advocated the
of the canteen at army
posts. I is claimed that since the
canteen was abolished there has been
a great increase in drunkenness and
insubordination among the soldiers.
This is brought about, it is declared,
by the fact that the men, when off
duty, visit the rum shops which
abound within a few miles of the
army posts and drink the poisonous
liqours sold at such places whereas,
when canteens are maintained by
the government at headquarters the
liquor is not only pure but a man is
refused a sufficient quantity to bring
about intoxication. Army officers
have found it almost impossible to
enforce discipline since the abolition
of the canteen, and many of them
are in favor of restoring it. Of two
evils it is well to choose the lesser.
L^&tf^Mil a!ii^#i
THE PBIKCETON UNION:
We always
entertained the impression that
they had a directly opposite effect
that they impelled the children to
open up. We drew our conclusions
from the laughter which the pictures
incite among the little ones.
Sixty school children were recently
arrested in St. Petersburg and
thrown into prison charged with
organizing a revolutionary movement
against the government. The
absurdity of the charge is clearly
but the despotic govern
ment of Russia will trump up any"chronic"
charge that suits its purpose. The
people could not be blamed were
they to arise en masse and drive the
rascally czar from the throne.
With the discovery of the A rendez
vous of William Rockefeller, "who
was basking in the sun at Nassau in
the West Indies, it was also discov
ered that he is suffering from a
"chronic" ailment of the vocal
nerves which precludes the possibil
ity of his testifying before the so-was
called "money trust investigators.
At least his physician says so,
andmore
adds that Mr. Rockefeller's death
would doubtless be hastened were he
to attempt it. Even were he to
answer the interrogatories of the
committee in writing the strain
would be too much for his weakened
constitution, declares the medical
man. Is it not peculiar that this
vocal ailment from which
Mr. Rockefeller is said to be suffer
ing was not discovered until fifty or
more process servers had gone forth
to bring him before the investigators
to give testimony? Until a week or
two ago William was one of the most
loquacious old boys in the country.
LEGISLATIVE NOTES.
Under the leadership of such ad
vanced thinkers as Messrs, Nolan,
Knapp. Hohnburg, Lennon, Camp
bell and Hopkins I was led to believe
that a fairer and better way of select
ing the elective officers of the house
would be devised than the rotten
method which came into vogue with
the speakership of Sam Van Sant in
1895. Up until that year the elec
tive officers of the house were nomi
nated in open caucus and, the major
ity party of course, ratified the
choice of the caucus on the floor of
the house. In recent years, how
ever, the "steering committees" are
the whole works. The total mem
bership of the house is 120, of which
20 are democrats, 2 prohibitionists
and 1 socialist, the remainder claim
to affiliate with the repbulican
party, hence the latter organized the
house. The majority party is held
responsible and should rule, and
there could be no valid objection to
the 97 republicans selecting the elec
tive officers, but as a matter of fact
14 members do the selecting. Here
is the modus operandi: A few of
the republicans from each of the
nine conrgessional districts get to
gether and each district selects a
"steering committee" of three mem
bers these steering committees4-27
members in allmeet in joint caucus
and a majority of the 2714-^vjrtu-
ally select the elective officers. The
men nominated for the elective posi
tions by the joint steering commit
teeschief clerk, sergeant at arms,
etc.are nominated without opposi
tion in the open republican caucus
and, of course, the caucus nominees
are elected by the house.
Take the case of George H. Deans
for instance: He was undoubtedly
the choice of a majority of the re
publican members for the position
of sergeant at arms and would have
been chosen if the republican mem
bers of the house had been affoided
an opportunity of voting for him.starts
But in the caucus of the joint steer
ing committees, where the secret
ballot prevailed and men could disre
gard their pledges with impunity, he
failed to receive 14 votes, hence his
name was not presented in the gen
eral republican caucus.
From reading the city papers one
would imagine that the house organ
ization achieved a great victory in
fight over the adoption of the
rules repoited by the rules commit
tee The only rule that was seriously
objected to was that which gave the
rules committee of seven members
the right to dictate to every other
committee of the house. The
netprices
result of the somewhat heated and
proti acted debate was that the rule
was rescinded. To be sure the mo
tion to strike out the rule was
deing
feated, but the rule was amended in
such a manner that the contention
was sustained, and the rules commit
tee will not dictate to all the other
committees of the house.
A former confidential man of
of the largest public service corpora
tions in the Northwest, but who fdr
several years past has affiliated with
the alleged progressive wing ot the
republican party, said to me the day
after the house and senate were
organized: "The people have been
fooled again. I has been heralded
throughout the state that the pro
gressives have organized both
branches of the legislature, and so
they have, but the steel trust and
the railroad and publie service cor
porations have also had a hand! in
the organization, and I am half iin
clined to believe that the brewers
are not at all dissatisfied.' I pressed
the gentleman hard for further en
lightenment but he closed up like, a
clam.
1
^smr^ifvqjBWfg
^Ji-^f&i^i
SDAY, JANUARY 16, 1913. 4
rolCSATIOJU tiF WEEDS-
If
How a Seed Ripened In Asia May TaRe
Root In America.
Weeds migrate as well as men. Ac
cording to the best authorities, there
are already 600 varieties at least of
weeds in New England that were not
to be found there when the country
first settled. Within less than
twenty-five years after the landing of
the pilgrims one observer counted
than forty new weeds the Euro
peans had brought them.
Nature employs all sorts of methods
for spreading life about the planet and
does not seem to care whether the life
is that of a weed or of a plant fit for
human use. Indeed, it uses such un
romantic material as old rubber over
shoes for seed carriers, as many new
weeds have appeared in a valley in
Connecticut since a factory was estab
lished there that found use for such
castoff things.
The overshoes come from all parts of
the world. The cloth lining is torn out
before the rubber is used, and from the
seeds that have found lodgment in
such an apparently unpromising place
plants have grown on the dump heap,
and their seeds have found fertile soil,
multiplied and flourished. What a ro
mance there is in the life of such a
seedripened, perhaps, in Asia, trod
den in the mud and carried on board
ship on the feet of a passenger, thence
taken to Europe, where it was picked
up by the boot of an American, was
finally dislodged in the overshoe and
found its germinating place in Con-
necticutChicago Record-Herald.
OVERREACHED HIMSELF.
ftapoleon and the Causes That Led Up
to Waterloo.
In one way Napoleon possessed a de
fect similar to that of Frederick the
Great. He provided no adequate staff
to relieve himself of details.
It is likely that his intense desire to
stand alone, in order to receive all the
credit for what was done was the se
cret of his action.
Although undoubtedly the greatest
military genius that ever lived, he
overreached himself. This is shown
In a single enterprise like the Russian
eampaign, but it is shown in the life
as a whole. He could probably have
accomplished the anomaly, with the
mercurial French, of founding a per
sonal dynasty upon the French revolu
tion which beheaded royalty and an
nounced the rights of man, but when
he attempted to remake the map of
Europe he reckoned beyond his power.
He realized that the armies of the re
public had been animated by a passion
for liberty, equality and fraternity, but
he could not understand that his ag
gressions qpon other countries depriv
ed his armies of this moral force and
implanted it in his enemies and that
no skill in strategy and tactics could
long withstand it. He would not per
mit a group of great administrators
and military leaders to share his hon
ors and form around him a cabinet
which might have protected him
against himself. And so he plunged
forward, unadvised and talking of his
star and destiny to his Waterloo.
Edward D, Jones in Engineering Mag*
azine. C. H. NELSON'S
Store News
On Friday, January 17,
oursecond annual clean
up sale, and we have gone
the limit on prices to make
this a grand success. The
few bargains we have space
to quote are only a small
part of those you can expect
to find when you come.
It is the aim of this store
to carry nothing over from
one season to another, and
that is the principal reason
for the great sacrifice' of
we are making.
The bargains we are offer
you in our dry goods de
partment are all exceptional
values.
35-cent value half-wool
Danish cloth* full yard wide,
for children's dresses,
a big bargain at 19c a yard.
onesuitable
White novelty stripe, a
very good quality, $1.00
value, slightly soiled, other
wise perfect, at only 48c a
yd.
We have only one piece of
this extra good grade all
wool batiste, and about two
dress patterns "left, color
black. The price is now 49sizes,
cents instead of 75c a yd.
1 I
s^W'& HMI?^ :4&,
ra i
jV*r
^,f k*\
Herel"is special* bargain:
Nine pieces in batiste, serges
and novelty suiting, full yard
wide goods that have sold
for 50c a yard, now on sale
at 29c a yard.
One small lot of short
length pieces" of 3 yds.
andclose
up in values up to $1.25 a yd.
Your choice 48c yd.
Duckling fleece, full width
and standard 15c quality, a
great big bargain at 9c yd.
12|c Lerma flannelette, a
good selection of patterns to
choose from, sale 8c a yd.
One lot, about 25 pieces
dress ginghams, splendid se
lection of patterns, and val
ues up to 17c a yd. They
won't last very long at 10c a
yard.
Regular 10c outing flannel
in light and dark patterns,
7c a yard.
Children's cashmere hose
19c instead of 25 cents a pair.
Ladies' cashmere hose, all
sizes, 40c and 50c values,
now 29c a pair.
Embroideries, 10c and 12gC
grade, widths up to 4 inches,
have a very good edge and
good quality Swiss, sale 7c a
yard.
You will find bargains in
every department, and you
can expect to find just what
you want on sale.
Winter coatsWe want
the money a whole lot worse
than these coats, so don't
spoil a good notion and pass
up this bunch of bargains.
They are priced so exception
ally low that it is a shame
not to come and take them
away. Below we list only a
few of them. The fur collar
on most all of them is worth
double "the price we ask for
the coat. One lot ladies'
fine broadcloth, fur collared
coat, slightly soiled from
handling, not this season's
style, values up to $27.50,
special sale $3.98. One lot
ladies' fur collared coats,
slightly soiled, values up to$1.75,
$18.00, special sale $2.98.
One big lot ladies' and
misses' coats, a good range
of styles and colors, the big
gest coat snap ever offered.
You can't,afford to be with
out one at this reduced price,
$1.98.
Children's bearskin and
possum coats, good heavy
quilted lining, all colors, red,
blue, grey and brown, large
and small sizes. They are
marked down to less than
the cost of making them,
Malone pants
men's all-Wool
pants is
it comes
dress when
style. than
more?
-This line of
work and
unsurpassed to wear and
tj
One lot of mens all-wool
dress or W
special $3.9&.
pants in all
valueu
corduroy
mm
wtM $?
One lot men's
and whipcord pants, in dark ftet can salmon,valuetoe sale a caam
rs
A?^f"-
and light colors, values^ufTlb
$3.00 pair, now $1.79^
Ladies' patent JrMt, ^ic^
kid and gun jnetal lace an&
button shoes, sizes 3 to 4},
values up to $3.50j pair, to
out $1.98.
Buy your boy a pair 6i
these strictly all solid-leathc
shoes, a good asTortm^hr^
choose from, sizes 3 to, JS,
values up to $2.50, to close
out $1.68 pair.
J"****'-
Men's velvet lined and dark eat cc
tared coats, mackinaws and clo\
overcoats. Regular prices have
forgotten on these coats. In order
make a quick clean up we have a
the price very near in half and sonj
we are almost giving away.
They COSt no more flannel shirts, all sizes, worth $1,751
others, so why pay
tocioseoutat$i.39chl^^vUa
Come in andlook in an a
over this line and be con
vinced. Dark grey stripes
and mixtures at
and $4.00 pair.
$3.25, $3.75
3
1
1ST I
$V-
E&.
5ii is
i f[jt,0 I
Women's box calf and gun
metal ideal everyday. winteV
and spring shoes, a gboja
range of sizes, value's up ifp
$1.90, now $1.39.
.eo-itwaiiw^i
Boys' and girls^ all-solid
school and dress^ sty^ssiig-j
gle and double
soles,'"sizes
to 2, values j& VW8&*
close $1.39. *fjaiia-'o
i
Men's all-wool red ^^mcl
grey sweater coats, all size
high and low collars, value
up to $3.25, to close
$1.98.
Warm shoes Women'
fleece lined and felt shoe
plain and patent, tips, hig
and low heels, leather or iel
soles, values up to $1.7i
now $1.39.
Misses' fleece lined an
felt foxed shoes, single an
double soles, values up
$1.75 pair, now $1.29.
Children's all-leather ftee
and felt lined shoes, a goc
range of sizes and styi
values up to $1.15, now 7S
i
Men's medium -weight DIV
denim overalls and jacket
made up in good full size
while they last each 50ci?J"r
Men's dark grey strii
jumpers, with brass deta
able buttons, a regular 81
Value, now 65c.,.
,_rj
^x
Men's heavy wool knit socks, doi
b!e heel and toe, the best value iy
ever saw at the price, while they las
per pair 25c.
*x
Hen's wool mixed dark and lig
grey sweater coats, worth up
to close, only $1.29. JK in
This
your chance to get a real good wan
winter coat at your own price. Lo
them over, the price will appeal
you sure.
,f
Wool underwear---rien's all-wo
cream colored shirts and drawers
regular run of sizes, worth up^o $1.7
per garment, now 98c. _,
f.
Hen's heavy all-wool ribbed* anc\
flat undershirts, worth $1.25 each,
close out at 49c each.
rien's extra fine medium weight]
French flannel work,shirty, high and!
low collars, worth uptQ^2.5Q^ach,
to close out at $1.48 each. a \s
Men'a heavy dark blue anld grey
Groceries, at prices ,th^t will please
you. Large package oatmeal, 15c
extra5lbhox
,oc
fancy sun-dried peaches, per lb.
fancy prunes, p^r,box,I
59c yeast foam, 2 pkgs. ,pr 5c ,gafloa \j
I pall best corn syrup, 33C^ tooth picks,
r\ IA^X ^'-,-.11. _~~i pkgs. for 5c electric 4park wftlte
ISO soap, 7 bars for 25c fancy tea fan-
nlngjlf wort
to $5.00 pair,
g0ode
1 perfectionh
|b
emn KOOd
t\l
LUV^
bulkccoffee,oil,oyste^a^ioc*8caicWar-T5IJ*a?pyurirpepou-erpea5kerosen larggrdestandard can grade A
pluma^^sc^^
15c

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