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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, August 28, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1913-08-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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UNO WORKS
Federal and Constitutionalist
Forces Both More Active
AH Over Country.
WITI1
lho announcement that
1 .itioub between the
.ml Matob and the piow
-\v. fciuennient of .Mexi
co, condih!*'! b.\ ex-Governoi John
Lind, Pit *n nt Wilson's personal rep
tresentatn o, .ind Provisional President
Huerta, had witually come to an end
news comeb ihuly of the increased ac
tivities of the Federal and Constitu
tionalist foices in northern and west
ern Mexico
In the north Governor Carranza, at
the head of the Constitutionalist army,
is said to have suffered a severe set
back at the hands of General Bravo,
the federal leader, while reports of up
risings from many points in the west
ern part of lower California indicate
that the revolt there is spreading.
Nevertheless, despite the foregoing
facts, the possibility of armed inter
vention hy the United States in Mexi
co daily grows more remote. The prob
ability that this government will raise
the embargo on arms entering Mexican
territory, a step which once seemed
imminent, is now almost negligible
even in the face of the fact that Pres
ident Huerta rejected without qualifi
cation the suggestions of President
^Wilson for ending the war in that
Scountry.
President Wilson's future policy, it
is now understood, will be that pur
sued by President Taft in the last
months of his administration and fol
lowed by President Wilson up to the
time he sent ex-Governor John Lind to
Mexico City to try to effect an end to
the hostilities and a restoration of
Photo Ameilcan Press Association
MEXICAN INFAN1RYMAN ON GUAKD AT
BOUNDARY ON BRIDGE AT EL PASO,
1E\ 1'IIiIiAR OJN RIGHT MARKS LINE
BEIW LEN THE UNITED STATES AND MEX-
ICO
pea ce thiough mediationa policy ot
nomntciteience and the maintenance
of a strict neutralit y, a tightening up
of the frontier guard to prevent the
shipment of arms and ammunition to
eith er faction Mexico.
Only Three Alternatives.
When President Wilbon sent Com
missioner Lind to Mexico with three
suggestions toi settling the disturb
ances he had in reset three alterna
tives which he could adopt in the event
of failure. They were:
FirstInter\ ention.
Second.Raising the embargo against
the revolutionists obtaining arms and
ammunition in the United States.
Thiid A return to the former policy
of noninterference, always entertain
ing the hope that one side would quick
ly win out in the struggle of arms.
Like his predecessor. President Wil
son never did seriously consider the
first alternative He held that it was
too drastic a remedy for the ailment
After going over the reports of the
state department he found that so far
as the killing of Americans was con
cerned there had not been a sufficient
disregard of the safety of foreigners on
the part of either of the factions in
Mexico to justify intervention.
He found that with two or three ex
ceptions all the Americans killed in
Mexico had lost their lives through
some overt act on their part A few,
less than half a dozen, had been acci
dentally killed. The most the reports
showed was a wholesale pillage of
property and destruction of the same.
The remedy for this, the president de
cided, was not intervention, as under
international law all claims for dam
age can be collected without resort to
arms.
After viewing and reviewing all this
the president cast aside every thought
urging for intervention
Matter of the Embargo.
He next gave consideration to the
proposal of raising the embargo against
toe revolutionists obtaining arms and
ammunition in the United States
What he found was this:
All the foreign governments having
property interests in Mexico have pro
visionally recognized Huerta. Germany
has given full recognition.
These countries were asked by the
United States to lend their moral sup
port to the effort to induce Huerta to
accept one of the three proposals for
'"Ifdiiii..
mmm
yUtgin^Ajm J.fJ-UuiU'J-"
Intervention Improbable, but
United States Prepares
For All Emergencies.
spr
pr -^n^F-y-v tj ^-^pfw $^J^J$
mediation. All were assured that the
United States would take no action in
Mexico without fully acquainting them
with it and that no step would be tak
en which was contrary to internation
al law and diplomatic procedure.
To lift the embargo and permit the
insurgents to obtain arms and ammu
nition in the United States without re
striction would mean, the president
found, that there would be a just cause
for complaint on the part of those
countries looking to the United States
as a guide and which had pledged the
American government moral support
Photo by American Press Association.
MEXICAN FEDERAL TROOPS ON ROOF OF
CATTLE CAB.
3ENERAL VENUSTIANO CARRANZA, COM-
MANDER IN CHIEF OF THE CONSTITU-
TIONALIST FORCES AND LEADER OF THE
REVOLT AGAINST PROVISIONAL PRESI
DENT HUERTA
Photo by American Press Association
GENERAL VENUSTIANO CARRANZA, GOVER
NOR OF COAHUILA, EXHORTING HIS FOL
LOWERS TO REMAIN LOYAL TO THE
REVOLUTION.
in deali ng vwth the probl em that the
United States was not fulfilling its
part.
Lifting the embargo on the insur
gents would mean that the latter could
fortify themselves and could carry on
indefinitely a warfare such as they
have maintained for the last six
months and all hope of ending the dis
turbances would be remote. Of course
this line of thought was based on the
premises that Huerta is so strongly in
trenched in the capital and the states
which he controls as to defy dislodge
ment by all the revolutionists in the
country The reports received in the
last few weeks indicate that the revo
lutionists will not be able to make any
advance on the Mexican capital that
with plenty of arms and ammunition
they are numerically too weak to ac
complish the overthrow of Huerta un
less it is done with assistance of a
force in the capital, just as Madero's
overthrow was accomplished.
Third Proposal Possible.
In taking up the other proposition
the president had in mind much of the
argument he had before him for aban
doning the proposal to lift the embar
go against the i evolutioniststhe in
terests of the European governments
and the question of the future of the
two factions in Mexico. His conclu
sion was that both sides would have
.-*f
as much consideration for American
lives and property as they have had
heretofore. They would have the same
respect as heretofore for the lives and
property of other foreigners, so that
question was decided in tavor of re
turning to the noninterference policy.
He then gave thought to the question
of the finances of both factions and
their ability to carry on a warfare for
an indefinite period. The reports be
fore the president indicated that both
factions are hard pressed for funds and
that the reason they are not obtaining
more arms is not because they cannot
transport them into Mexico, but be
cause they have no money with which
to purchase them. Another phase in
this feature was that without any
source of supply one side or perhaps
both would exhaust themselves fight
ing.
Again, that with resources down low
one side might make sufficient head
way to force the other to agree to quit
It was believed that by following a
policy of noninterference beyond mak
ing the customary demands that for
eigners be protected we would retain
the moral support of foreign govern
ments.
Neutrality Strictly Enforced.
In the meantime there will be no let
up in the maintenance of vigilance by
the American government. The four
battleships at Vera Cruz will be re
tained there, and the border patrol will
continue its duty. It is probable that
it will be strengthened, as will the
naval force on the Pacific coast of
Mexico, for the purpose of preventing
the shipment of arms or other muni
tions of war to either the rebels or fed
erals.
It is believed that with these precau
tions strictly enforced the troubles in
Mexico will speedily settle themselves.
On the other hand, while the possibil
ity of intervention is now regarded as
slight the United States shall not be
found unprepared for the worst in the
event that it becomes necessary.
Ever since the first revolution in
Mexico army and navy officers have
been preparing for just such a contin
gency. They have been working out
Photo by American Press Association
OFFICERS OF THE MEXICAN FEDERAL
FORCES DIRECTING OPERATIONS IN
NORTHERN MEXICO.
the smallest details, so that upon di
rections from the president, the com
mander in chief of the army and navy,
all of the available troops of the army
and navy will be ready to move.
Should it become necessary to em
ploy the armed force of the United
States it is expected that the navy
would have less work of an urgent and
immediate character than either the
marine corps or the army. The ma
rine corps is in readiness as an expe
ditionary force to be taken to auy
point on the Mexican coast where it
might be considered advisable to land
a large body equipped for field opera
tions and furnished with the means of
shelter and support for an indefinite
period.
Mobile Army of 30,000.
The troops forming the Second divi
sion, at Galveston and Texas City, un
der the command of General William
H. Carter, have been for several
months impatiently awaiting orders ei
ther to cross the Rio Grande or to be
relieved from monotonous and uncom
fortable service. It is realized by the
military experts that this command
will not of itself suffice for any form
idable movement in Mexico, but ar
rangements have been made to in
crease the force by infantry, cavalry
and field artillerycomprising the mo
bile armyto an aggregate extent of
35,000 troops. Most of these are dis
tributed over the United States, but all
the details for their concentration at
ports on the Atlantic and west coasts,
whence they would sail on specially
chartered transports to the Mexican
Doint of debarkation, have been com
pleted.
The four transports which have been
at Galveston for some months are In
possession of full complements of men
and in readiness to sail with troops
and supplies at a moment's notice.
These four transports are regarded as
sufficient to transfer from Galveston
to the Mexican ports all the troops as
rapidly as they can be brought to Gal
veston, with their supplies for de
parture.
Thus every feature of our military
arrangements have been worked out in
detail in anticipation of a possible in
vasion of Mexican territory If it does
not comeand its probability grows
daily less and less- it will be due in no
small measure to the preparedness of
Uncle Sam's naval and military forces
THE PRINCETON TJKIOK: THURSDAY, AUGUST 28, 1913.
ui" ^tiiiiLV,' -f-s
NORTHWESTERN HOSPITAL
AND SANITARIUM.
(ESTABLISHED 1900)
A private institution which oombines all the
advantages of a perfectly equipped hospital
with the quiet and comfort of a refined and
elegant home Modern in every respect No
insane, contagious or other objectionable cases
received. Rates are as low as the most effi
cient treatment and the best trained nursing
will permit.
H. C. COONEY, M. D.,
nedical Director,
FRANCES S COONEY. Supt.
NELLIE JOHNSON Head Nurse.
Cormany Adjudged Insane.
M. L. Coramny. who during his
residence in Princeton has dabbled
in photography, law, and newspaper
publishing, in none of which he made
a success, was taken before Judge
of Probate Sanford on Saturday, up
on complaint of John Anderson, his
deputized keeper, and committed to
the detention hospital for the insane
at Fergus Falls.
At the examination in probate
courtwhich was conducted by Drs.
Coonev and CaleyCormany talked
freely and demonstrated bejond a
possible doubt that his "garret is
inhabited by bugs." His insanity
is of a hallucinatory nature. He
declares, among other things, that
he is about to die that certain per
sons, who possess the power of read
ing his mind, are keeping him under
surveillance for evil purposes and
that he is a victim of unrequited
love.
Cormany was at the Northwestern
hospital for several days, entering
that institution upon the pretense
or imaginationthat he was suffer
ing from some serious bodily ail
ment, but Dr. Cooney found that he
was physically intact although
mental'y unbalanced. John Ander
son was then deputized to keep watch
over him and on Thursday he was
discharged from the hospital and
went to Sheiiff Shockley's house in
charge of his keeper, where he was
caied foi until comejed to Fergus
Falls by the sheiift on Friday after
noon.
Stanley Wins First Honors.
The boys of the Princeton Gun
club congregated at the fair grounds
last Thursday and shot for three
prizesa gun case, watch fob and
silver cupin a final handicap con
test. After figuring the percentages
it was found that Ira Stanley had
won the gun case with 95 per cent.
The second and third prizes were
not awarded in consequence of ties
in percentage, Ole Randall, Joe
Craig, jr., W. H. Ferrell and
"Daddv" Hill each figuring in the
94 column. These "cracks" will
probably determine who is entitled
to the watch fob and silver cup this
e-vening bj shooting off the ties.
Dr. McRae came in for a percentage
of 92 and Joe Mossman 90. Joe sajs
that this handicap monkey work is
a "dead-sure queer" to the man who
knows how to shoot.
Birthday Party.
Durward. son of Mr. and Mis. Carl
Bojn, gave a party to 20 of his play
mates on Saturday in honor of his
eighth birthday anniversary. They
had a mest enjoyable time, Kenneth
Boyn winning the prize in the apple
diving contest and Ruby Nygren in
the peanut hunt. Delicious refresh
ments were served. Those present
were Marion and Walter Smith,}
Linna Claggett, Ruth and Milton
Nygren, Grace Moeger, Adela and
Beth Bullis, Kenneth Howard, By
ron, Arnold, Clinton and Virgil
Whitcomb, Fred and John Godbout,
Yvonne Shaw, Roy A pplegate, Vivian
Coons and William Fryhling. Dur
ward received many pretty gifts.
Needless Alarm.
An old German farmer entered the
office of a wholesale druggist one
morning and addressed the propri
etor: I haf der schmall pox"
"Merciful heavens, Mr. Jacobs,"
exclaimed Becker, as the office force
scrambled over each other in their
hurry to get out, "don't come any
nearer."
"Vot*s der matter rnit you fellers,
anyhow?" quietly replied Jacobs.
I say I haf der schmall pox of
butter out in mine vagon vot der
Mrs. Becker ordered las' veek
already."National Food Magazine.
FARMS WANTED.
I would like to list several good
farms for sale at reasonable prices in
the vicinity of Princeton. If you
are thinking of selling call and see
me. 6-tfc Root. H. King.
Farm Lands
Exclusive Shoe Store
First National Bank
of Princeton, Minnesota.
Paid up Capital, $39,000
A General Banking Busi
ness Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved
Security.
Princeton State Bank
Capital $20,000
Do a Gn*ral
Farm Mortgages,
Insurance, Collections.
Banking Business
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
JOHN W. GOULDING, President G. A. EATON, Cashier
Successors to
fi. S. RUTHERFORD & CO.
Princeton, Minnesota
We Handle the Great Northern Railway Co. Lands
Farm Loans a
I PRINCETON LUMBER CO.
w^vmxwF^WWl
fflfc
tnteres Paid on Time De
posits.
Foreign and Domestic Ex
change.
S S. PETTERSON, Presided
T. H. CALEY, Vice Pres.
J. F. PETTERSON, Cashier.
M. M. Stroeter will conduct farm auctions either on commission
or by the day.
J. J. SKAHEN,
Cashier.
rTTTT^
Security State Bank
Princeton, Minnesota
Capital $32,000 Surplus $4,000
H*4"j*iMfr'j.M.-i.j.f it
HcMillan & Stanley
FarmM
If You Are in Need of a Board or a 2
S Load of Lumber see the 3
Princeton Lumber Co. 3
W can sell you at a lower price 3
than anv other yard. All that 3
we ask is that you will call and 3
S give us an opportunity to con- 3
vince you. ^ff
1 QEO. A. COATES, Hanager 3
Footwear of All Kinds
You Will Find a Splendid
Assortment of
Shoes and Oxfords
in the very best makes and at the low
est prices at our store. There are no
better shoes to be found anywhere than
those we carry in stock.
Solomon Long
.1.4.
Farm Loans
Lands
a
Princeton, flinnesota
A
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