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The Princeton union. [volume] (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, March 31, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1921-03-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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FARMERS RESPOND
Sixteen County Associations Respond
to Call of Minnesota Farm
Bureau Federation.
One Thousand of Europe's Starving
People to Be Saved With 30 Car-
loads of Minnesota Corn.
St. Paul, March 31.More than
1,000 lives will be saved by Minnesota
farmers, on the basis of relief corn
pledges already received by the Minne
sota Farm Bureau federation and its
county organizations.
Offers from 16 county farm bu
reaus, aggregating nearly 30 carloads
of corn, already have come in, and
25 more counties are at work to in
crease the state's shipments, federa
tion officers announced today. The
first Minnesota corn, donated by far- As a result of the meeting, six Min-
mers in the nation-wide famine relief nesotans, representing five farmer
movement launched by the American organizations, will meet with the rep-
Farm Bureau federation, already is on
the way to Europe. Nicollet and Big
Stone county farmers were the first
in the state to get their gift corn load
ed into cars furnished free by the rail
roads.
The 16 counties which already have
reported their relief drives well under
way probably will contribute 30,000
bushels, the state federation esti
mates.
Pipestone county leads the state in
the size of its offer. The county bu
reau there is planning to load six car
loads The Stearns county farm bu
reau has set out to raise $800 in cash,
to buy corn in some other county with
a surplus crop, and Meeker county also
is considering collecting cash. Blue
Earth's bureau has sent out a call to
every farmer to give five bushels
Lyon county expects to ship three
cars Martin county plans to load two
or more Le Sueur county expects
two.
The corn relief appeal will be car
ried to thousands of Mmnesotans
from the pulpit within the next two
weeks. The state federation today
sent out a call to every county bureau
in the state to urge every minister in
the county to tell his congregation
how Minnesota farmers are saving
lives in famine zones of Europe, Asia
Minor and China. Nobles county was
the first to appeal to its ministers to
call on their followers to help swell
that county's gifts on three county-1
wide "Corn Relief Days," March 311
and April 1 and 2.
Giant posters, nailed to the sides of
the corn relief cars, aTe carrying the
names of the county farm bureaus that
have donated grain, to the seaports
and terminals.
"We must act quickly," said an ap
peal sent out by the Minnesota Farm
Bureau federation today. "Thousands
are dying. Only the gifts of gener
ous Americans can save them. A sec
ond urgent call has come from the
Polish legation, seconded by the Amer
ican Farm Bureau federation. Every
day adds to the list of women and chil
dren dead of lingering starvation.
This is the first nationwide appeal ever
made drcct to the farmers themselves.
They have a chance to set a record
that will astonish the world. They
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(must haul their gift corn quickly, or ly on human nature, but on social or
lives they might have saved will be community organization, which does
]08k not function, cannot function, alto-
Other counties that have answered gethor free from politics,
the plea for relief corn from Minna-1 Private ownership of national or
sota are Renville, Goodhue, Jackson,' community utilities has defects
Rock, Yellow Medicine and Swift. Six- enough, to remedy which even in part
ty carloads is the goal set by the state requires constant public vigilance and
farm bureau federation as Minnesota's censorship. But private ownership
gift to
East, Chinese, Polish and European re- management, because such is mdis-
lief committees, the latter under Her- pensable to earning a profit on the
bert Hoover, are distributing the investment. Eliminate private owner-
American gift corn.
ENDORSE GRAIN SALES PLAN.
Six
\ttend
gates sent to the state
convention here, have approved
national co-operative grain marketing
pl|n drafted by the committee of
seventeen.
tn
res ntatives of 22 other states in a
convention in Chicago on April 6.
They will go to Chicago empowered to
ratify the plan for a national sales
agency to market the farmers' grain
on a co-operative basis.
With ratification by the national
convention considered virtually cer
tain, the Minnesota Farm Bureau fed
eration today announced that it will
throw its full support to the establish
ment of the new co-operative grain
marketing system in this state. More
than 100 farmers, representing coun
ty farm bureaus, voted unanimously
to help put the plan into effect if it
is approved at Chicago.
Wherein Public Ownership Fails.
The leaders of the street car unions
in Seattle declare their disenchant
ment with municipal ownership, and,
were it feasible, would prefer the re
turn of the city'3 linos to corporate
ownership. They lay their finger on
the difficulty that has vitiated all their
hopes for municipal ownership. The
trouble is, in one word,-politics. The
commissioners who administered the
municipally owned and operated lines
ought not, and ihcorotically do not,
owe their selection to politics, but
actually politics enters into their se
lection or determines it. So cay the
labor union leaders, Wiio believe there
is no possible way to ellminnto the
political factor.
As a consequence municipal owner
ship is proving satisfactory neither to
the car ir^n nor to the public of the
Puget Sound metropolis. And Seat
tle citizens who have the city's future
at heart feor that municipal ownership
is going to damage the city's develop
ment materially. 'Certainly develop
ment will be retarded, albeit Seattle
is so fevcrebly, even strategically,
situated to become the great Pacific
seaport.
The political factor in any form of
governmental ownership is one that
cannot bo eliminated by any provision,
no matter how well devised. Popular
election as the mode of selecting com
missioners or directors or manpgers
doco not serve. Indeed it would be
more consultative of the politicr.l fac
tor than selection by appointment.
The impossibility is founded not mere-
Light Draft Kentucky Drill
As the name indicates, the lightest draft of all drills
made. Has short axles turning in two roller bearings thus
keeping your wheels always in line, something you can-
not do with any long axle drill.
Caley Hardware Co.
Princeton, Minn.
famine abroad. Near has a personal interest in efficient government cannot help him much
jeven with the best will and the wisest
measures.
But, granting the American far
mer's intention to help himself, more
can be done for him than has been
done. Agriculture has been well ad
vised by the agricultural department,
since 1896 more especially. But our
agriculture needs to be fostered, as
Germany before the war, and France
also, fostered theirs.
American agriculture has been pret
ty well conditioned to flourish by its
own exertions. The government has
been content to leave agriculture
largely to its own energies, which sort
of neglect is no better than pernicious
interference and unwise regulation.
But the alternative is not now be
tween pernicious interference and
healthful neglect. It is between the
neglect and fostering care.
Time has arrived for fostering care.
Secretary Hoover says it is a question
of whether the United States is not
to cease being in the food sense a self
supporting state, and to become in
stead of an exporter an importer of
food. If so there is something wrong
with our economic development, some
thing loose in our political economy.
Such a state of things for us, who
possess the choicest and most various
productive lands in the world, is
shameful.
It is also dangerous. The founda
tion of the republic has been the
farm. Whether a prolct:.iran republic
is a possibility presents a grave doubt.
America requires the farm, not only
to produce food, but also to produce
manhood, character, free men. Let us
foster agriculture by every means,
direct and indirect, as we would renew
the very foundations of the republic.
The best statesmanship we have can
ship and you eliminate the incentive
to official management, becauso man
agemente
ca*
thatinvolved takes caro oaffore th politi
mterst
Minnesota Delegates to
Conentio in Chicago.
St. Paul, Minn., March 31.Mmne-
sota's producers, through 150 dele- narrnly, an earned profit,
ratification! Government ownership of r.ny sort
can to be
careless of what alone is incident to
efficiency and indicative of the same,
is under no particular necessity of
earning anything. It will make natur
ally but a feeble attempt to do so, and
will be usually content with breaking
even as does the postofficc. Unhappily
in this world of human affairs break
ing even isn't enough. The economic
law is that a fair profit must be earned
if for no other reason than to secure
efficiency. What doesn't pay isn't ef
ficient. Fair earnings reflect good
service.
And the victims of inefficiency who
feel the injury most are the operators
of the service, in'this particular in
stance the Seattle motormen, conduc
tors, mechanics, as well as the mana
gers and supervisors.
We have a railroad problem that is
most exigent. It has become so in
volved by years that perhaps it is a
Gordian knot. The sword to cut it
is not, however, government ownership
and operation. The cure is sound
finance, efficient management, loyal
service, all of which together cannot
restore the railroads in a jiffy to what
they ought to be and what the coun
try needs. They are the right reme
dies, nevertheless, and if honestly and
courageously utilized they will surely
work the cure."
For the Farmer.
A temporary tariff enacted in the
interest of the American farmer may
or may not really help the farmer
DURHAM
tobacco makes 50
flood cigarettes for
10c
MEAT AND
PRODUC E
CIGARETTE
No cigarette has
the same delicious
flavor as Lucky
Strike. Because
Lucky Strike is the
toasted cigarette.
Bring in your
Veal, Cream,
Chickens, Eggs
and receive
THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICES.
Fresh and Salt Meats of Every Variety.
Cash and Carry Plan.
CALVI N OLSON
Princeton, Minn.
We Sell at Right Prices
Lumber, Lath,
Posts, Shingles,
Sash, Doors,
Blinds.
Cement, Lime,
Plaster, Roofing,
Brick, etc., etc.
"F5
JwJhtu***^t/&fat^<Zf
Tahteenemy* -111 say it is/
WHEN
yon want quick com
forting' relief from mar
"external" pein, use Sloan's
liniment. Itdoesthejobwith-
ontBtaininr, rubbing, bandag
ing. Use/itefcforrheumatism,
neuralgia, aches and pains,
prainsand strain* backache,
oremuscles.
Keepit hanqy/
35* 7CH
HAQ
At all
druggists
Tak Th Position
1hU You
Are From Missouri
When Anybody Tells
You That
GOO LUMBER
Can Be Sold For Less
Than We Offer It!
We Didn't Buy This
Big Stock OfJ.umber
1 Just^Tu LookfAt.
While It Is Pleasing
To the Eye,
WE BOUGHT IT TO SELL
And You
Can Count On Our
Prices Being Right!
Rudd Lumber Co.
J. V. MORGAN, Manager
:B
etro
Our Policy
has always been to keep the assets of our
institution thoroughly liquid. Our mem
bership in the Federal Reserve System
accomplishss this aim to a degree previously
impossible. In the Federal Reserve Bank
we have an unfailing reservoir of cash
^obtainable in exchange for commercial
paper which we hold.
First National Bank
Princeton, Minn.
Women's Accounts
Increasing
Because the number of women's ac
counts at the Princeton State Bank are
steadily increasing, we are bound to feel the
effort we are making to give the women an
absolutely courteous and efficient banking
service, is appreciated.
Bank accounts of the women of Prince
ton are respectfully and cordially invited.
THE PRINCETON
STATE BANK
5% Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit
FARM LOANS INSURANCE
TEACHINGIYOUR'CHJLDREN TO BANK THEIR MONEY IS
KMIGHTYkIM PORTANT PART OF THEIR EDUCATION. AS
HABITiGROWS ON THEM IT DEVELOPES SELF-RESTRAINT,
MND'AS THEIR BALANCE IN THE BANK GROWS, THEIR
CHA^RACTER.AND SELF-RELIANCE ALSO GROWS.*
WE:WILL WELCOME THE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS OF
CHILDREN. START YOURS.
YOU.WILL RECEIVE 5 PER CENT INTEREST.
Security State Bank
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