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St. Paul recorder. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1934-2000, August 17, 1934, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016804/1934-08-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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’ Volume 1 Number 2
MINNESOTA MASONS’ ANNUAL
MEETING HERE AUGUST 21
Ax Victim Found
In Bed Dies On
Way To Hospital
AXE MURDER SHOCKS
MINNEAPOLIS
A gruesome murder startled the
quiet of Minneapolis, Sunday. A
man, Richard Williams, 37, in Min
neapolis for only two days, was
found unconscious with his head
split open, at 612 Bassett Place.
The axe victim died before he
reached the city hospital, where
he was rushed, after he was dis
covered lying across a bed at the
Bassett address.
Hold Four Persons
Police are holding Fred Jones,
who lived at the same address, for
the grand jury. Others who are
held in the county jail as material
witnesses are “Herbie” Jones, in
whose house the man was found,.
Lucille Brose? and James Johnson
Discovered by Woman
The axe victim was found by
Mrs. Albert Walker, mother ot
Herbie Jones and Fred Jones, who
was left in charge of the house by
“Herbie” Jones.
Brunskill Arrests Suspect
Police, led by Inspector Frank
Brunskill, arrived on the scene
shortly after 1 p. m., with the am
bulance. The inspector noticed in
the crowd James Johnson, the lat
ter half of the famous Hardiman-
Johnson Gateway ease. Johnson
was arrested by Brunskill and is
being held.
The bloody axe, with which the
dhapprehended arch-fiend com
mitted his brutal act, was found
in its customary place in the base
ment of the house. Detectiv
Leonard Colston has charge of th
investigation of the case.
Ship Body to Mother
' The dead man’s relatives live ir
Carry Mills, 111. The Woodard
mortuary shipped the remains
there Thursday.
SOCIAL TWELVE TO GIVE SEC
OND DANCE TUESDAY,
AUGUST 28
The Social Twelve club of St,
P»ul is sronsorinr its second dance
at the Weequv Country club. 1492'
East Shc-re Drive, across Phaled
Beach. Dr. Earl S. Weber is’
chairman of the affair and com?
mittee nrrnbers are J. J. Jackson,
C. D. Jackson, Earl Cannon, H. W.
Schuck. A. Wycoff, Charles Gra
ham, Ray Walker, J. T. Grice, R.
Busby, D. J. Payne, and Rufutf
Dodd. Tickets 35 cents, Tuesday
August 28. 9p.m. to la. m. The
public is cordially invited.—Adver
tisement
BLAINE ASH FREED BY
COMMISSIONER
Blaine Ash, arrested on charger
of menial incompetence filed by Ws
wife, was discharged by Court
Commissioner Arthur L. Jones,
Wednesday, after a hearing at
which several witnesses testified.
Court Commissioner Jones dfi
missed th? case after it was dir
covered that most of the trouble
was because of a domestic quarrel.
Ash is well in Minneapolis.
ST.
Tennis Meet
Opens Sunday
ALLEN DEFENDS TWIN CITY
NET TITLE AGAINST
STRONG FIELD
When Sunday morning, August
19th, rolls around to seven o’clock,
the Seventh Annual Phyllis Wheat
ley Twin City tennis tournament
will swing into play at Chicago
Field, 38th and Chicago Ave., in
Minneapolis. Albert Allen, Jr., a
tennis product of Minneapolis but
now a resident of St. Paul, will be
defending his ’33 title against a
strong aggregation of net men."
A large number uf entries have
been received.
World Baptists
Roundly Condemn
Race Predjuice
CONDEMN RACIAL DISCRIMI
NATION AND OPPRESSION
Berlin, Aug. 12.—1 n unmistak
ble terms the Baptist World Con
ress in session here condemned
ace discrimination in all its forms,
n strong resolutions it struck
>lows at Germany’s treatment of
he Jews.
The chief resolution passed read
n part, “This congress deplores
nd condemns as a violation of
he law of God, all racial animosity
: "very form, oppression, unfair
iscrimina'ion toward Jews, the
colored people or subject races in
ny part <-f the world.”
Baptists from every country on
he globe attended the world con
fess here.
Bonner R. Clark
Funeral Rites
Bonner R. Clark, 47 years old.
-esident of Minneapolis for twenty
'ears, passed away at his home
2319 4th avenue south, on August
11, after a heart attack.
The funeral sermon wa r
□reached by Reverend Wm. E
Guy, of St. Peter A. M. E. church.
Members of the St. Peter senior
choir, Mrs. Lida Charmon, Loretta
Walls, Jessie Shannon, and Cora
Brown sang. Many beautiful flora l
offerings were received.
Just prior to his death, Clark
was employed by Carver’s Inn as
head waiter. He filled a number of
responsible positions as chef dur
ing the twenty years of his resi
dence here.
Surviving relatives are his wife,
Mrs. Melissa Clark; three sisters,
L .he Misses Sarah, Leona, and Pearl
Clark, and two brothers, St. Mat
thew of Minneapolis, and Oscar
Clark of Milwaukee. Services at
Veal Funeral Home, interment at
Crystal Lake cemetery.
PAUL RECORDER
Home For
Short Visit
Miss Rachel Gooden, University
of Minnesota graduate, and now
a social service worker in Toledo,
Ohio, motored to St. Paul, Sunday
night, to pass a few days. While
here Hiss Gocden will be the house
guest of Miss fcstyr Bradjtey, 934
St. Anthony avenue.
L. L. Keith, 3119 18th avenue S.,
r eteran Pullman employee, is still
* very sick man, after three months
of continuous illness. Mrs. Keith,
his wife, is in constant attendance
on him. Friends are hoping for a
change for the better.
Still Public Favorites!
v;--- *
Elks Twin City Round Up
Sept. Ist
St. Paul, Minnesota, Friday, A
MISS RACHEL GOODEN
L. L. KEITH REMAINS
SERIOUSLY ILL
FOUR MILLS BROTHERS
ust 17, 1934
I.
Some of the best local writers
write for this paper weekly. All
are specialists.
Read weekly the Scintillating,
youthful, zestful, breezy com
ment of Nellie Dodson; the in
formative “Here and There” of
W. M. Smith; the official St.
Paul social news by Estyr
Bradley; health hints by Dr. W.
D. Brown; sports from the pen
of Leo Bohannon; and timely
news stories, editorials, and fea
tures.
All of these writers and
others are working to give your
city the best community weekly
it has ever had.
Made Money
ELKS’ PICNIC FINANCIAL
SUCCESS
According to unofficial reports
furnished by E. O. Pearce, pub
licity chairman of the recent Elks’
joint picnic committee, profits from
the affair will total over $235.
DIVORCE GRANTED
William Carroll, 3022 Oakland
avenue, was granted a divorce from
his wife, Evelyn Mae Carroll, Mon
day, August 6th.
Don’t be a sucker, get your local
news in the paper which unselfishly
seeks to build your community.
Wait for
Minnesota!'Prince Nall
Masons In 40th
Annual Commuaicatioa
BEAT!
Former Congress
Member Irgos
U. A.A.C.P. Support
MELVIN J. MAAS ADDRESSES
GROUP INTERESTED IN
N. A. A. C. P.
Sunday afternoon, August 12th,
a group of interested citizens met
at the Hallie Q. Brown Community
House to attempt to reorganize
the St. Paul N. A. A. C. P.
A representative group of about
seventy-five were present. Theo
dore AUen acted as. temporary
chairman and presided. He gave a
brief resume of what the commit
tee is trying to do in this effort to
reorganize a St. Paul branch of the
N. A. A. C. P., and introduced the
, speaker, Ex-Congressman Melvin.
J. Maas, who gave a brief, concise
talk on what organization means
to any group of people. His ad
dress was very well received and
was the inspiration for quite a.
number of those present pledging
themselves as the nucleus of a St.
Paul branch of the N. A. A. C. P.
Other temporary officers selected
were Huron J. Shelton, secretary,
and J. W. Taylor, treasurer.
A quartet composed of Mes
dames Belle Salter-Tyler, Hattie
Oliver, Eleanor Walls, and Har
riet Hall, sang. Mrs. Hattie Bell
Smith was at the piano.
MRS. NELLIE McCULLOUGH
HERE
Minnehaha Temple No. 129,
Daughters of Elks, entertained one
bf its most distinguished membeta
Tuesday-night, August 7th. The
honor guest was grand daughter
recorder Nellie McCullough of
Seattle, Wash., who is visiting in
Minneapolis, her former home
town, en route to the grand temple
meeting in Atlantic City.
GEO. B. KELLEY IN VETERANS’
Geo. B. Kelley, veteran Duluth
leader, is confined to the Veterans’
Hospital at Fort Snelling. Mr.
Kelley is a Spanish American War
veteran.
St Louis is one of the smallest
cities In area in the United States.
■ Chicago has,2ol square miles; New
York, 308; St Louis, 61.
Elephants sometimes lie down to
sleep, although, like horses • and
some other large quadrupeds, they
can sleep standing up.
A dagger from the tomb of Tut
Ankh Amen is probably the oldest
iron - weapon from the true Iron
age. '■
Skeeters Like Ice Water
It has been found that mosquitoes
thrive on !cy waters.
HOSPITAL
Area of Large Cities
When Elephants Snooze
Relie of Trne Iron Ago
• I i
Unbiased, imtsrtm,
Price 5 Cents
MINNESOTA F. & A. M. AT
ST. PAUL
The Most Worshipful Grand
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons
of Minnesota (Prince Hall Affilia
tion) will convene in its 40th An
nual Communication in St Paul,
August 21, 22, as the guests of
Perfect Ashlar Lodge No. 4. Ses
sions wili be held at the lodge hall
at Hallie Q. Brown House. It is
interesting to note that .Perfect
Ashlar has given to the jurisdic
tion of Minnesota, Six Grand Mas-
ters in the persons of Thomas H.
Chester Johnson,
Most Worshipful Grand Master
Lyles, H. B. Houston, Rev. W. D. .
Carter, Jose H. Sherwood, George
L. Hoage, Sr., and Frank B. Simp
son.
Of these men, Thomas H. Lyles
was the first Grand Master, elected
at the formation of the Grand
Lodge 40 years ago, of the six
great men given to the Craft by
Perfect Ashlar Lodge No. 4; there
are four very active brothers alive;
Rev. W. D. Carter, Jose H. Sher
wood, George L. Hoage, Sr., and
Frank B. Simpson, a fitting monu
ment to any lodge.
As we look forward to the com
ing Grand Lodge, there seems to
be a longing to see old faces again,
and cement the friendship the as
sociation of many years accorded
ks.
The several lodges have also con
tributed largely in officers to the
Jurisdiction along with Perfect
Ashlar Lodge No. 4. The following
lodges have also contributed many
great men to the Minnesota Grand
Lodge. Pioneer Lodge No. 1,
St. Paul, Minn., have given four
Grand Masters; H. B. Howard,
Walker Williams, William T. Fran
cis, and John H. Dillingham. All
four have gone to their reward,
they have served the Grand Lodge
faithfully. Anchor-Hilyard Lodge
No. 2, Minneapolis, has contributed
seven Grand Masters; John L.
Neal, who was elected to succeed
Thomas H. Lyles as the second
Grand Master; Rufus L. DeLeo,
William R. Morris, Robert S,
(Continued on Page 4)
. newsy
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