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St. Paul recorder. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1934-2000, January 07, 1949, Image 3

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SOCIAL & PERSONAL
* MINNEAPOLIS
Mrs. Lucille Cooke, 2308 Fifth Ave. So. is in Deaconess hos
pital for an operation.
The Ladies’ Auxiliary of St. Thomas Church celebrated
its Christmas party Wednesday, December 29, at the home of
Mrs. Hobart Mitchell. On January 5 they were invited to be the
luncheon guests of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of St. Paul's Church,
Bryant and Franklin Ave. _
Mrs. Gloria Green, 723 Emerson
Ave. N., had as her dinner guests
New Year’s Day. Mrs. Lou Etta
Childress, Lathrop, Mo., Mr. and
Mrs. Willis Gates and Mr. A. J.
Wilkerson.
Mr. Isadore Spencer and Mr.
Marvin Nance, both of New York
City, arrived Christmas Day to
spend the holidays here. Mr. Spen
cer visited his sister, Mrs. Tessle
Burt and brother Booker Spencer.
Mr. Isadore Spencer and Mr.
Nance were entertained at a tur
key dinner Sunday, December 26
by Mrs. Dolly Berry. His sister
entertained them at a cocktail
party Christmas Day. Those pres
ent were: Mr. and Mrs. D. W.
Willis, Mrs. Dolly Berry, Misses
Toni Alfred and Saye Primm and
Mr. Booker Spencer. Mr. Spencer
and Mr. Nance left Friday, Dec.
31.
A personal bridal shower was
given for Miss Ruth Pittman on
Wednesday, December 29, at the
Specializing
Is Bifocals
MH and Trifocals
Dr ’ Rob,rt lauilon
Optometrist—< redlt
I •I. 7rh CA. 8246
MU Open Monday
Air Conditioned for
To«r Comfort
CAPITOL
MEAT CO.
515 Wabasha Street
"Better Meats for Leu"
Meats Priced to Fit the
Average Puree.
llO»lw.&‘x/U.|
H UE. Bth Bat. Wab. and Cedar ■
W OPTOMETRIST & OPTICIAN V
GA. IMO
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1 interest from Jon. Ist. I
1 BANK BY MAIL I
■ 11 59 P” • “O"'* o ’’' , , u ppi, o<
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I OMM UHTa *
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I BRIQUETS g
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home of Mrs. Avis Carter, 4109
Fourth Ave. So. Some twenty-five
guests presented the bride-to-be
with many lovely gifts. Those
present passed the time away by
playing games. The prizes wgre
won by Mmes. Jack Rainey, Hal
lie Nelson, Doris Bowles and Miss
Ruth Pittman. Miss Pittman open
ed the gifts under a beautifully
decorated shower umbrella. All of
the gifts were neatly wrapped by
Miss Mary Turner. The refresh
ments consisted of homemade
cake and coffee. Some of those
who sent gifts but were unable to
attend were: Mmes. Thelma Wade,
Mary Johnson, Alva Jones, Max
ine Jones, Jessie Shannon, Wen
dell Jones, Mattie Boyd, Alice
Brown, Vassie Perkins and Jose
phine Escue and daughters. Miss
Mary Turner, Mmes. Hallie Ew
ing, and Avis Carter were host
esses.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Childress,
987 Aldrich Ave. No., entertained
with a dinner Sunday, January 2.
The guests were: Mrs. Lou Etta
Childress, mother of Mr. Childress,
Mmes. Clara Bowers, St. Paul,
Faye Bakion, Gloria Green, and
Messrs. Herbert Browning, A. J.
Wilkerson and Mr. and Mrs. Wil
lis Gates.
Mr. and Mrs. James Jacoway,
561 Bth Ave. No., returned to the
city Saturday night, January 1,
EVERYTHING IN JEWELRY! XT
Not the Biggest jewelry Store
in St. Paul... But the Biggest
VALUE STORE IN TOWN!
DIAMONDS
' WATCHES
1 JEWELRY
'****>!
Jt < M CLOCKS
RINGS
Ovw M Years fiporteeae
CASH OR CREDIT!
CEORCE CRAVE
We/cAmoAef, Jewe/oc Diamond Iroiar
Bremer Arcade, 6th Floor
Open Mondiy-Thursdiy TW 9 P. M.
BIRTHDAY
GREETINGS
Minneapolis Birthdays: Jan. 14—
Webster E. Stovall, 3815 Fourth Ave.
So.. Jan. 15—Frank Graham, 3437
Snelling Ave. So.; Mrs. Richard Ses
sion, 3853 Snelling: Ave.. Mr*. W. B.
Freeman, 2306 Portland Ave. So.;
Jan. 16 —Mias U, R. McClelland, 4UQO
Clinton Ave. So.; Jan. 17—lira. Fern
Helm, 4U03 Fifth Ave. So.; James
Parker, 1306 17th Ave. So.. Jan. 18—
Thoe. tangums, 523 Girard Ave. N.;
Jan. 13 —Shirley Kyle, 3637 4th Ave.
So.
Out-of-town Greetings: Jan. 15—
Wilmoth Bowen, Chicago, Mrs. Dick
Gale, Mound, Minn., Jan. 17—Vir
ginia Lee, Kansas City, Mo.
ST. PAI 1. HIHTHDAYI
Jan. 12—Eloise Toussaint, <53
Ighhart Ave.; U>ia Smith, 337 St.
Anthony Ave., Jan. 13 —Mrs. Theo
dore Allen. 336 Iglehart Ave., Pa
tricia Brown, 331 St. Anthony Ave.;
Jan. 14—Rita Jean Holloman, 763
St. Anthony Ave.; Mrs. Melvin Hen
derson, 450 St. Anthony Ave.; Jan.
16—Mrs. W. Crouch, 783 Aurora
Ave.. Mr. John McCoy, 618 Rondo
Ave.; Jan. 17—Mrs. James Rid
deaux, 707 Rondo Ave.; A. W. Jor
dan, 547 W. Central; Paul Thoma
son, 732 St. Anthony Ave., Jan. 18—
James Culver. 1483 N. Western Av ;
Jane House, 747 W. Central Ave.
from Fort Smith, Ark. and Kan
sas City, Mo., where they spent
the holidays.
The Cantinas met Saturday
night at the home of their direct
ress, Mrs. Hallie Ewing, 4048 4th
Ave. So.
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Shepherd
entertained some friends at a din
ner New Year's Day, in the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hayes,
3749 Fourth Ave. So., mother of
Mrs. Shepherd. The guests were:
Messrs, and Mmes. Claude Mason,
John Carter and Mrs. T. M. Moore.
The Donforjours met Wednes
day, January 5, at the home of
Daisy Mae Cox, 254 13th Ave. S.
at 8 o’clock.
Rl TH PITTMAN WEDS
SIDNEY ANDERSON
Miss Ruth Pittman and Sidney
Anderson were quietly married in
the home of the bride, 3812 4th
Ave. So., Friday evening, Decem
ber 31, at 8 o’clock. The best man
was Fred Anderson, brother of
the groom and Mrs. Dorothy
Simms, sister of the bride, was
matron of honor. The bride wore
a grey silk dress with a corsage
of yellow roses. Rev. H. C. Boyd
married the co\iple. Mr. Jake Col
lins took pictures of the ceremony.
After the ceremony, Mrs. O. J.
Thornton, 2609 Fourth Ave., sister
of the bride, gave a party in her
home. The couple spent several
days in Fergus Falls, the home of
the groom. Miss Pittman is the
daughter of Mrs. Harvey L. Pitt
man, 3812 Fourth Ave. So.
ELECTRIC & HAND
HAIR CLIPPERS
CE. 6743
479 St. Peter
Cat pel*--Tiip»— LinoPu*
61 E. sth St. - CE. 1193
COMMANDER
RADIO SERVICE
Formerly Superior Radio Shop
All Work Guaranteed
619 UNIVERSITY Dale 7856
A. sc:
Watchmaker and Jawalar
Watch. Clock and Jewelry Repairing
All Work Guaranteed
495 NO. DALE ST.
FAST EXPERT
PEN REPAIR
CHASE PEN SHOPS
Bremer Arcede er*d 21 W 7th
MARTIN'S FOOD
MARKET
Meat*, Grocaria*, Froth Ft win and
Vapatabia*
Dairy Product* Peverau**
Rondo & St. Alban* DA. 7854
Open Sunday* Joe Martin, Prop.
Wl DILI VER
ST. PAUL HOUSE
Furnishing Co.
Home Furnishora and Jewelers
OUR MOTTO
"Widows and Orphans Protected"
6th & Minn. Sts. CE. 4776
tour rrn
«rMrnrtoti
Dr. H. Chas. Dafaer, O.D.
tUlakartM. ■**!]
There was only one dissenting voice when the Minneapolis city
council gave A. B. Cassius his liquor license last Friday. The lone
“no” vote came from Edgar Buckley, alderman of the Minneapolis
sixth ward. Buckley not only voted "no’‘ but de
manded that his vote be recorded.
ib think, th Brother Buckley protesteth ton much.
In (act. hi. actions throughout the ahole license
fight hate lt.su such as to arouse considerable Hk
spet iilation 11, <1 hardly warmed his scat after lie-
Ing el.ati'd to the city council trlien ho announetsl jKSH
that he lias all for proba ting the Iniestment" of
the bar operator whose llcens.- had is. it r. toked
iilteti on.- considers that an attorney in Buekley’s MMf pM
offlee r. presenting Mneent I |, ar J
owner In question, there's room for the nasty little
suspicion that maybe brother B. wasn't quite an NELL RUSSELL
unbiased party to the proceedings. Ills vehemence at Friday’s council
session was obvious enough to cause even Grandma Snorkel sitting tn
the back row with her ear trumpet to sit up and wonder what was
a'cookln'.
Nevertheless. Cassius has his license and he's the first man in a
good many years in Minneapolis to obtain an on-sale liquor license
without playing footsie with an odd assortment of individuals, plus
passing a stack of greenbacks under the table. Harold Kauth, chair
man of the city council health and hospitals committee, termed the
granting of the license “an experiment." WhyineU should it be an ex
periment? It s not an experiment when a license la granted to any
other citizen. Kauth's statement may have inadvertently been the tip
off as to what to expect in the future.
It's possible that some of the same parties who used every
lowdown, shady device to keep Cassius from getting his license,
may resort to equally shady tactic* to try and get It revoked.
There’s the “frame" In which adult-looking minors are sent into
a bar to obtain service. Then there's the one In which ofay (white)
chicks are planted In a Negro operated .'stabllshment where they
can claim they were picked up by browns and used tor purpose*
of “vice.” (That’s as old as the hills.) Of course, everybody knows
about the deal In which a couple of rata who will do anything for
a dollar are scat Into a place to start a brawl so that somebody
can call the oops and claim the establishment constitute* a "pub
lic nuisance.
Cassius may find any one of these three Uttle gimmicks pulled on
him just to make things tough. The boys who have padded their pock
ets off selling liquor license* to the highest bidder aren’t going to for
get that their racket has been temporarily, maybe permanently nipped
in the bud, by the persistence of Mr. Cassius.
There were a whole lot of smarty-alecs in the Negro group around
these two towns who advised Cassius to play along with the rackets
and pay the usual heavy sugar. Now they are all patting him on the
back and telling him what a great guy he is. At the last minute when
things were looking up and there seemed to be a fighting chance for
him to get the license, a number of these eager beavers jumped on the
band wagon so that they could get in on the kill.
The Cassius case shed so much light on the disgraceful liquor
liquor licensing system In Minneapolis that it was almost impossible
NOT to grant him the license without blowing the lid off the whole
messy business. Others who have applied for licenses apparently have
succumbed to intimidation and graft. Cassius had a personal taste of
the first and refused to submit to the second.
It doesn't make an lota of difference that Cassius Is the first
Negro to get an on-sale liquor license as far as this writer Is con
cerned. It lIOICS make a difference that the first man in years to
get a liquor license LEGITIMATELY and above board liappens to
be a Negro. The others wouldn’t stick with It. Cassius did.
Cassius has always conducted a well-run, orderly establishment.
He has never allowed any rough stuff. 1 understand he will have a
bouncer (maybe fighter Elmer Ray?) to give the heave ho to any
knuckleheads who neither respect themselves nor other customers. He
knows the difficulties confronting him, having already had a sample
of how certain characters operate?
If he’s given even half a break and is left alone to run his bar
business as he’s run his restaurant-tavern, he’ll be one of the most
popular bar owners in town in another year.
The Saturday morning broadcasts of Grand Central Station over
CBS are usually dramatic high spots, but they could have done with
out that "Hattie’s Happy New Year last Saturday a. m. This was an
Uncle Tom script done with all the Uncle Tom cliches in the book. It
was about the simple southern mammy with the son who went away
to the big city and got on the radio. The airways were cluttered with
“dese,” “dose” and "dem,’’ and “Praise de Lawd.” I listened for the
cast and credits at the end of the broadcast. The script was written
by a white gal. No self-resp<‘cting Negro writer would have been a
party to it, I hope. Frank Wilson, Mildred Smith and my friend Milton
Williams were in the cast. They should have known better.
My step-son listened for about ten minutes of it and then rebelled.
“Hey, Mom, turn that off, will you? They oughta’ be ashamed puttin'
stuff like that on the radio! lie protested.
This show, incidentally, Is sponsored by Pillsbury Mills.
Won’t these white folks eevr learn? And when are some Ne
gro ac tors and entertainers going to realize that every time they
submit to such “Toming," they may put a few shekels into their
own pockets but at the same time they give the whole race a slap
In the face.
Hollywood is now going through a western fever. Big name stars
are being put astride hossea and filmed galloping hell-bent-for-leather
across the plains. In “Blood on the Moon,” Robert Mitchum and Bar
bara Bel Geddes were the victims of the current craze for hoss opera.
In “Yellow Sky” Gregory Peck, Ann Baxter and Richard Widmark
had to emote through western corn.
The writers of these extravaganzas show remarkable lack of
originality, or maybe the same guy Is tatting all of ’em out under
a series of pen names. In Ix-th of the pictures mentioned at>ove,
there were Indians and Indian re«wrxations. In t»oth films, the
leading ladies were hard bitten young fillies Hearing britches. In
both films, the leading men were bad boys who were actually good
as apple pie once they canic under the influence of their loves in
jeans. In both films, said loves could uirld a mean six shooter and
pistol.
Both Gregory Peck and R< bert Mitchum come up with bow-legged
gams when they’re encased in cowboy pants, although Mr. Peck’s bow
legs aren’t as noticeably akimbo as Mr Mitchum’s. Maybe Mr. Peck’s
legs aren t bowed at all. Maybe- I am just bowlegged-happy from see
ing so many hosses.
“Road House’’ -Richard Widmark being nasty, Ida Lupino being
nice on the eyes and Cornel Wilde—WOW! Lupino, as the disillu
sioned night club entertainer, will get you. It’s entertaining, but not
exactly for the kiddies. (P. S All I want for Christmas is Wilde.)
Celeste Holm loses her man again, an unhappy fate for such an ex
cellent actress.
“The Three Musketeers’’— Gene Kelley as D’Artagnan, is a can
didate for the old Douglas Fairbanks crown. Gorgeous technicolor,
plenty of action. Lana Turner as the evil, ill-fated Countess De-
Winter—WOW! June Allyson lost in period costumes. Intrigue, duel
ing, romance, rough riding.
I "STORE OF HAPPINESS"
Herbert S. Bernstein
JEWELERS
QUALITY WITH A CAEDIT STIVICE
II EAST SEVENTH STREET CEDAR 04 8 3
OPEN FOR BUSINESS
DAVE'S SKELLY OIL STATION
SKEUY'S CERTIFIED PREMIUM « FORTIFIED GAS * OIL
1.-a. A AraatM EL 7744
DAVID PAYNE. Pray
ST. PAUL SOCIALS
"The Comic Book Menace" will
be the title of the second Hallie
Q. Brown Forum to be held Sun
day. Jan. 16. McKinley school
PT A and the Maxfield school PT A
will be the sponsors of thia dis
cussion.
Mrs. Virginia Mitchell of Bev
erly Hills, Calif., recently an
nounced the marriage of her
daughter. Mr* Agnes Klmboll, to
Mr. Enoch Marshall of St. Paul.
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall are at
home at 895 St Anthony Ave.
Miss Darlene Smith left thia
week for her home In Kansas City.
Kans., after apendlng the holldaya
with her cousins, Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Davis, 299 N. Avon St
Miss Smith is a teacher In the
Kansas City, Mo. public school
system.
Mrs. Fred Thomas of Chicago
spent the holldaya with her aister
in-law, Mrs. Emerett Jones, 1021
Rondo Ave. While here she was
present at both Christmas and
New Year’s family dinners.
Mrs. Senora Hunter of Chicago
arrived in the city January 2 to
visit with her daughter and aon
tn-law, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Ander
son, 909 St Anthony Ave. Mrs.
Anderson recently gave birth to
a baby boy.
Book Club No. 1 met Tuesday,
Dec. 28, 1948. at the home of Mrs.
Thomas Hargraves, 963 Iglehart
Ave. Paul Crane reviewed some
of the writings of Mark Twain.
Earl Weber, Jr., left Saturday
night Jan, 1, for Howard univer
sity, where he is a student major
ing in pre-medlcine. He spent the
holidays with his mother, Mrs
Lucille Weber.
Add Lace to Short Slips
To Wear With Long Skirts
“Al! my slips are too short,’’ is
a statement that has often been
made since longer skirts came in.
Wide cotton lace may be sewed
around the hem of any slip to
lengthen it. says Miss Fern .Carl,
clothing specialist. University of
Illinois college of agriculture. First
pin or baste lace on slip. Hold lace
slightly full, easing it on so there's
an allowance for shrinkage. If you
have already shrunk the lace, this
won't be necessary. Finish by
stitching the lace on with your ma
chine. or it can be done by hand.
If the hem of a slip is already
iace trimmed, follow the same
method of lengthening It—by sew
ing lace on lace. If the original
lace trim Is scalloped, slide the
straight edged lace up under the
scalloped lace as far as necessary
ard stitch in place.
When a slip is too shbrt to be
usable, even with the addition of
lace, cut it off several inches be
low the waistline to use as a cami
sole top for a petticoat. Hem it and
run elastic through a casing at the
waistline, so it will stay in place
when it is worn.
a -
o
WELL-BAKED BY
ZINSMASTER
B. E. SCOTT
ACCIDENT and HEALTH
INSURANCE
Prompt. CourtGous Sarrica
51605 Pionaar Building
Phonas—-GA. 2827 - 2828
BOYD APPLIANCE
Sales & Service
631 W. Central DA.9834
SPORTING GOODS
Radio Tubes Tested and Sold
Light Hardware
PACKAGED FUEL
ICE WOOD
WE MAKE KEYS
HOURS
8 a.m.—6 p m.—Closed Sundays
and Holidays
BUY YOUR
Gilt Edge Paint
HARDWARE
from
Seven Corner* Hardware
185 W. 7th St. GA. 2147
PIONEER AUTO
RADIATOR CO.
Cleaning & Repairing Radiator*
Satiified Work Since 181 S
178 RICE IT. CE. 7WO
H. C Kelley, Prop.
Friday, January 7, 1949, St Paul RECORDER, Page S
SOCIAL & PERSONAL
• ST. PAUL *
Employe* of the Athletic C
party Sunday night, Jan. 2, at tl
was guest of honor. Others pres<
Irene Jackman, Mae Edwards,
Maggie Jenkins, Virgie Lee Wai
Misses Gloria Gilbert, Donnav
They exchanged gift* and had
dinner at the Elk*.
Sodal dub
entertained with a party Tuesday,
Dec. 28, at the home of Mias De
loria Walker, 722 W. Central Ave.
Guest* present were Lloyd Net
tles, Edward L. Hick*, Herman
CardeU, George Haynes, Frank
Winfield, Sylvania Roberta. Thom
as Copeland, Johnnie Cooledge,
Arllne Allison, Ruth Davis, Ethel
Manning. Ruth Manning, Mary
Richards, Margaret Waldon, De
loris Walker, and Charlotte Wil
son.
Mr*. Lillian Edmund* of Dei
Moines, lowa, spent the Christmas
and New Year's holidays with her
daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and
Mr*. Alfred William*, 719 Rondo
Ave.
Pfc. Maurice Henderson la now
stationed in Okinawa, in the air
force there. He is the son of Mr,
‘WHY DARUNG/ NASH'S COFFEE/'
CUT PRICE SUPER MARKET
(THREE STORES)
325 WABASHA (Cor. 10th), 719 IGLEHART (Cor. Grotto)
734 NORTH SNELLING (Cor. Mlnnohoha)
Visit Our New Enlarged
Super Market at 10th and Wabasha
Which I* the largest and Flnow In the Northwest for
Quality Merchandise at Lowest Price*
Shop at a Cut Price Market
SEE TED BIES
678 University Ave. 678 University Ave.
LIQUOR BY THE CASE
WE DELIVER
DAIe 8832 DAIa 8832
PORTERS & WAITERS CLUB
Regular Meals ■ Short Orders: Steaks • Chops
Chicken
306 North Wettern (Corner Carroil), Kelly Price, Prop.
TED'S LIQUOR STORE
472 N. Lsxingtoa at Univsnity
WHISKEY, WINE and BEER
We Deliver
Front and Roar Entrance DA. 4040 Easy Parirksg
CITY LIQUOR STORE, INC.
COMPLETE SELECTION FOE ANY OCCASION
WHISKIES - WINES - LIQUEURS - CORDIALS - GINS * HI % lEM
DELIVERY SERVICE GA. 8911
544 St. PUw St ((Mwra. IM nt &*■«•)
r*Jr4Jr*ar*Jr*3r*ar*3r*ar*Jr*»r*»r*»r*»r**r*****r*<i
Buy Your Stott Briquets
from
S. BRAND COAL & OIL CO.
Phone GA. 7501 484 Ha Street
lub held their annual Christmas
he Elk ’* Rest. Mrs. Marie Syke*
‘nt at the affair were the Mmes.
Clarence Taylor, Jean Wright,
■hington, Lillian Thompson; the
'el Green, Dorothy Whitmore.
and Mrs. B. F. Henderson. 90S BL
Anthony Ave.
Mr*. Sue William., 71* Rondo
Ave., recently resigned from her
job at the Unlverelty of Minneso
ta, where she has worked for
three and a half yearn. Before
leaving, »he was given two din
ner*, two luncheons and a baby
shower by her fellow workers In
the office.
For the Best
Selections of
COAL
CALL GA. 3712
NORTH WESTERN
HANNA FUEL CO.
ZS R. Sixth BL
Chili • Barbecue
[1
I

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