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St. Paul recorder. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1934-2000, January 26, 1951, Image 3

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SOCIAL & PERSONAL
* MINNEAPOLIS *
- - - , r - - - -
Mr. Rudy Pope was host to a small get-together at his
home, 908 Aldrich Ave. No., Saturday, Jan. 20. Among those
present were Misses Juan Witherspoon, Harriett Myers, Gwen
Miller, Mary Kate Breedlove, Bessie Davis, Della Ruth Wil
kerson, Patricia Witherspoon, Gloria Brown; Messrs. Walter
Lowe, Sonny Martin, Nat Walker, Johnny Beasley, Lawrence
Shannon, Eddie Manderville, and
Charles Logan.
Mrs. Essie Wyatt, 1407 Third
Ave. So., entered Fairview hos
pital Wednesday, Jan. 17 for a
minor operation. Mrs. Wyatt is
vevry much improved.
Mrs. O. L. Alexander, 3832
Fifth Ave. So., was confined to
her home with illness. Mrs. Alex
ander became sick Monday morn
ing Jan. 22.
The Jolly Sixteen Club met at
the home of Mrs. Floyd Poole,
3032 Fourth Ave. So., Thursday,
Jan. 25,
the
iley,
laid
the
and
isey
The
it 8
pre
ome
ting
non.
Mrs. Marion Andrews, 906 Bry
ant Ave. No., is confined to her
home with illness.
’hen
was
ver
rom
ong
The Booker T. Washington
Study Club met at the home of
Mrs. Emanuel Grimes, 3815 Fifth
Ave. So., Tuesday, Jan. 16, for a
business meeting. A light lunch
eon was served. The next meeting
will be ,held at the home of Mrs.
Mae Jones, 2900 Portland Ave. So.
Sunday, Feb. 4.
ung
ited
nter
and
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ney.
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held
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the
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also
and
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i of
I. I
ank
and
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The Senior Usher Board of St.
Peter AME church met at the
home of Mrs. Minnie Rhodes, 3824
Fifth Ave. So., Wednesday, Jan.
24. Mrs. Floyd Madison was hos
tess.
The Birthday Club will meet at
the home of Mrs. Floyd Poole,
3032 Fourth Ave. So., Sunday,
Jan. 28.
Miss Eunice Boswell returned
to her home in Los Angeles, Calif,
after spending a month in the
city as guest of Miss Eunice Lev
erette and Mr. L. G. Leverett,
3605 Clinton Ave.
Mrs. Viola Madden, 409 E. 39th
St. Was hostess to a “Bon Voy
age” party Thursday, Jan. 18, in
honor of Mrs. Clara Warfield-
Motley. Those present were
Mmes. Eva Tell, Allie E. Wilson
and Miss Ronna Cuff. Mrs. War
field-Motley will join her husband
in Saginaw, Mich., where they
will make their home.
Miss Eunice Leverett, 3605 Clin
ton Ave., will leave Sunday, Jan.
28 for a two weeks visit in Evan
ston, 111.
Phyllis Marie, infant daughter
of Rev. and Mrs. M. L. Simmons,
3756 Fifth Ave. So., was bap
tized Sunday, Jan. 21 at St.
Peter AME church by her father,
who is pastor at that church.
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? RATING THE !
I RECORDS l
J By I. Henry Randal] \
RECORDED JAZZ OIMS
RCA Victor has finally answer
ed a fervent wish of many a disc
fan by re-issuing a collection of
18 waxings which have weathered
the test of time and popularity,
and which were recorded by some
of the great names in the jazz
idiom.
The collection is an adjunct to
the discery's Red Seal category
entitled "A Treasury of Immortal
Performances.” Broken down into
six albums of three discs each,
the tunes are for the first time on
the revolutionary 45 and 33 H
rpm speeds.
Lest there be any confusion or
hesitance about smoking these
over, let's run through the titles
and personages in each packet.
First, there is the one entitled
“Theme Songs," the signature
tunes so closely associated with a
band or musical group. In this
division, there are Artie Shaw's
Nightmare, Lionel Hampton’s
Flying Home, Duke Ellington's
Take The ‘‘A” Train, Benny Good
man’s Goodbye, Charlie Barnett’s
Cherokee, and Louis Armstrong's
When It's Sleepy Time Down
South.
With the exception of Shaw’s
opus, these melodies were not
originally conceived as themes
nor were they written by the
bandleader who made it a byword
in jazz annals. For example, the
composer of the Ellingtonian
theme is not Duke as is commonly
thought but Billy Strayhorn, the
band's top-notch arranger and
Duke's fellow-composer. “Chero
kee,” of course, is the Ray Noble
composition; Goodman’s theme
was written by an unknown com
poser-arranger in those days. His
name is Gordon Jenkins, now a
bandleader in his own right.
"Flying Home” was a joint ef
fort of Hampton and Goodman,
while "Satchmo” used the Leon
and Otis Rene-Clarence Muse
Dixielandish opus. Satch first re
corded the tune in 1931, and the
version in the album dates from
December. 1932. Shaw disdained
the use of his best seller “Begin
the Beguine" for his own exciting
and weird composition, “Night
mare."
Under “Dance Band Hits” are
Tommy Dorsey’s Bbogie Woogle,
which featured Charlie Spivak
and Buddy Morrow (the latter
known then as Moe Zudekoff);
Larry Clinton on Martha, with
Bea Wynn chirping the vocal re
frain; Ted Weems and his Laten
ized styling of Heartaches, ac
companied by the distinctive
whistling of Elmo Tanner and
Hal Kemp's popular staccato
treatment of Got A Date With An
Angel, which had Skinney Ennis
(now bandleader) on lyrics.
Also in this album are the late
Glenn Miller's treatment of Song
Of The Volga Boatmen and the
Ellington (several times record
ed) Mood Indigo. This Is the
authentic 1930 version, display
ing the tonal hues of the Duke’s
aggregation of that period. At
least one other version had the
late Ivy Anderson on vocal.
No collection would be complete
without examples of “Small Com
bo Hits", the third album in the
series. Sides are Stomping At
The Savoy, Benny Goodman
Quartet (The Goodman, Hampton,
Wilson and Krupa clique): Smoke
Gets In Your Eyes, Artie Shaw
and his Grammercy Five; House
of Morgan, Lionel Hampton with
the Cole Trio; the Bix Beiderbeck
immortal In A Mist by the late
Bunny Berigan and his Men; and
Johnny Green’s Body and Soul, a
superb interpretation given by
tenor sax ace Coleman Hawkins.
The sixth side is a Dixieland or
rather "ragtime” excursion on
Blues. Called a "Jam Session at
Victor,” It features Tommy Dor
sey and George Wettling, and the
late "Fats” Waller, Bunny Beri
gan and Dick McDonough.
For the “Keyboard Kings of
Jazz, there are Meade "Lux"
Lewis doing his classic version of
llonky Tonk Train; the team of
Pete Johnson and the late Albert
Ammons on Walkin' the Boogie;
Fats Waller’s classically inter
preted Honey Suckle Rose; trig
ger fingered Count Basie betting
away on Swinging the Blues,
which has the lusty sounds of
"Jumpin' at the Woodside" and
others of that ilk; and Duke El
lington's alluring mood painting
of Solitude. Earl "Fatha' " Hines'
Chicago style jazz appears in his
brilliant arrangement of W. C.
Handy's "St. Louis Blues.” en
titled Boogie Woogie on the St.
Louis Blues. We might add here
that the recorded exhortation to
Hines to "play till 19G1" should be
moved up another 100 years, at
GARDNER'S D-X
STATION
Western and Central DAL MM
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DIAHOIDI
sores mi
MAIN nous
f^^QELCToDSoHuSStF^
A radio show sponsored by General Mills becomes the first air
program this writer has heard in which an American Negro has been
portrayed as giving his life in the fight against communism here at
home. "Armstrong of the FBI” over the ABC net
work on Tuesday and Thursday evenings had as
one of its main characters on its Tuesday, Jan
uary 16 show, Fred Lester, a young elevator oper
ator, who outwitted commie agents at the price
of his own life.
Now I know some of the bre them who are
never satisfied anyhow, are going to be un
happy because the character of Fred Lester
had to be that of an elevator operator. It
won't make them feel any better that the
script stated his father was a postal em
ployee. They’re going to mutter and mumble
that It's a shame Fred couldn't have been
portrayed as a postal worker, too. Or a doctor or lawyer or
scientist, etc. It so happened that the character of the elevator
operator fitted In with the pattern of the script logically without
going all the way around Josh’s bar to manufacture a situation.
Actually, the idea of an elevator operator defying communism
is more in keeping with the true facts of life than if the character
portrayal had been that of a professional or business man. It is
among the rank-and-file of Negro workers that communism has
made its biggest inroad.
Nell Russell
The more I read about this flying saucer business, the more I
am convinced somebody’s giving somebody the old razzle dazzle.
Bob Considine's recent article in Cosmopolitan debunking the
flying saucer "hoax” was directed mostly at Frank Scully’s book,
“Flying Saucers Are Real.” However, Considine, while exposing
several of the proven, deliberate hoaxes perpetrated by practical
jokers, didn’t have much other than a printed sneer to discredit the
statements and figures in the Scully book.
Scully’s book either contains the most amazing facts ever
printed or is a collection of the most fantastic parade of gibber
ish ever to appear on the bookstands.
Scully states that after the Air Force spent eighteen months
studying and running down 375 reported Incidents of flying saucers,
explanation was found for all except 34 incidents which currently
remain unsolved. He also states and Considine's article hinted the
same, that the Air Force flying saucer project is still going on, al
though without fanfare and publicity.
Most unbelievable of all in the Scully book was the tale that
on March 8, 1950, about 850 students of basic science classes at
the University of Denver, heard a very hush-hush lecture by an
unnamed and unidentified speaker who said that flying saucers
had landed within 500 miles of the University, and described the
ships and their personnel.
The Scully report (as given to him) tells of three space ships
made from a material that "looked Ake aluminum” but wasn’t of a
material “known to this earth.” The first disc reportedly was 99.9
feet in diameter with a cabin measuring 72 Inches in height. The
second ship measured 72 feet in diameter, the third, a smaller saucer
only 36 feet in diameter. There was not a bolt, rivet or screw in any
of the ships.
There were 16 men "ranging from ages 35 to 40” taken from
the first craft, their bodies charred a dark brown. There were 16 men
in the second craft, and only two in the third ship. Those two had
apparently died, the Scully book says, while attempting to escape
from the cabin.
The little men were described as of "fair complexion” and lack
ing in beard except for a growth on their faces resembling "peach
fuzz.’’
Scully stated there was a fourth ship which was unoccupied
but when members of the group which had found the ships went
for camera and equipment to analyze the saucer, several little
men hopped Into the saucer and it disappeared!
Well, Considine mentioned nothing of the University of Denver
lecture, nor of the facts, measurements and descriptions in the
Scully book, probably thinking it all to fantastic to bother with or
purposely ignoring it.
Mind you, Scully has no explanation for his readers of what
happened to the ships after they were found or of what happened
to the bodies of the little men, but he hints both were spirited
off and kept secret from the public.
Scully, in his description of the ships, also stated water in small
containers was found in the ships, and when it was analyzed, it was
found to be almost twice as heavy as our water. Little wafers of food
found in the ships were so condensed that when one was put in a
gallon of water, It swelled up and overflowed. “It was fed to guinea
pigs and they thrived on it," Scully writes.
Neither Considine, Scully, the Air Force nor anyone else has yet
come up with an explanation of the object pilot Frank Mantel was
chasing that day when his radio communication suddenly went dead
and his wrecked plane was found several days later. The last heard
from Mantel was that the large aluminum-like object he was after
was not far from him and he was going to keep after it.
Meanwhile the Air Force describes the flying saucers as no
thing more than the following:
(1) Misinterpretation of various conventional objects.
(2) A mild form of hysteria.
(3) Hoaxes.
Somebody's hysterical all right. Either it's fellers like Scully or
it's Air Force brass carrying a bee in their bonnets they don't dare
let loose.
MOVIE REVIEW: Another excellent film from the British
studios, "Operation Disaster," the story of men trapped in a sub
marine far beneath the sea.
If this movie had come out of Hollywood, we would have
had all the conventional gimmicks appropriate for such situa
tions. There would have boon the handsome commanding officer
showing the Hollywood version of suppressed emotion —mainly
displaying the facial valor of a guy at a formal dinner wanting
to burp but keeping It down for the sake of Emily Post. There
would have been the usual hard-boiled non-commissioned officer,
the weakling, the wise guy and the happy ending.
"Operation Disaster" has only one of these ingredients, the
weakling. He is played with such a sensitive, human touch that his
tragedy becomes a personal thing with every member of the audience.
John Mills, as the commanding officer of the sub, is not the
handsome Hollywood type. He looks and acts like one would expect
a man to look and act in his position. The superlative cast of English
actors portraying members of the sub crew doesn't have a handsome
Hollywood type in the whole lot.
The suspense In "Operations Disaster” Is at times too real
to be classified as entertainment. The finale Is heart-breaking
and could never have happened In Hollywood.
LE MAY’S
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NEW YORK CITY
BIRTHDAY
GREETINGS
BIRTHDAYS
Jan. 28 Raymond Cannon.
2905 Fifth Ave. So.; Louie R.
Perkins. 3620 Clinton. Carrie Wal
lace, 3632 Snelling Ave.
Jan. 29—Mrs. Phoebe Mae
Givens, 1014 Fourth Ave. No.
Jan. 30—Alvin J. Rowe, 2546
Hiawatha; Leonard Vaughn, 834
17th Ave. So.; Mrs. C. E. Beck,
3705 Fourth Ave. So.; Alonso Lee,
2023 Bloomington Ave.; WUver A.
Lee, 2023 Bloomington Ave.
Jan. 31—Rev. Henderson Red
dick, 3908 Clinton Ave. So.; Vi
vian Patterson, 3512 Clinton Ave.
So.; Cynthia Daviess, 98 Hyland
Ave. No.
Feb. 1 Miss Martha L. Kay,
3748 Fourth Ave. So.; Clifford
Harris. 2614 31st Ave. So.
Feb. 2—Alice Cook. 2709 30th
Ave. So.; Gordon Granger. 3624
Fourth Ave. So.; Clarence Pal
mer, 530 Tenth Ave. No.; Alice
Morgan, 3827 Fifth Ave. So.;
Mrs. E. W. Lee. Jr., 2023 Bloom
ington Ave.
Feb. 3—Worthy Turner, 1130
Emerson; Margaret Kelley, 948
Bryant Ave.; Rosalie Day, 117 W.
15th St.; Ben Warfield, 1019 Lyn
dale Ave. No.; Gary Miller, 522
Emerson Ave. No.
Out-of-Town Birthdays
Jan. 29 Mrs. Ann Albright,
Duluth, Minn.
Jan. 30—William Seymour, Chi
cago, 111.
Feb. I—Aaron Shauntee, Evan
ston, Ill.; Frank Jones, Chicago.
Ill.; Mrs. Lillian McOavock, San
Francisco, Calif.
Feb. 2—N. E. McCoy, James
town, N. D.; W. B. Williams. San
Bemadino, Calif.
ST. PAUL BIRTHDAYS
Jan. 26—Mrs. S. E. Hall. 996
Iglehart Ave.; George C. Shan
non Jr., 895 St. Anthony; Mrs.
Anna Wooten. 512 Carroll Avo.;
Mrs. John Dodd. 385 Rondo Ave.
Jan. 27—Lillian Rose Brown.
221 Bt. Anthony Ave.; Mrs.
Buena Hughes, 405 Farrington;
Mr. William Goddctte. 628 St. An
thony Ave.; Mrs. Clara B.
Shelby, 288 Rondo Ave.
Jan. 28—Mrs. James Oliver, 943
Iglehart Ave.; Mrs. Daniel Taylor,
776 Rondo Ave.; Mr. James Jack
son, 865 St. Anthony; Charles A.
Danforth, 833 Carroll; Mrs. James
Walker, 323 W. Fisk; Mrs. Har
rison Davis, 441 St. Anthony
Ave.
Jan. 29—Mrs. George H. Todd,
638 St. Anthony Ave.
Jan. 30— Carlos Moffatt, Jr.,
458 Mackubln.
Jan. 31—Horace
St. Anthony Ave.; Paul Church,
954 Fuller, Ilene Dawts. 299 N.
Avon; Crystal Lewis, 243 St. An
thony Ave.
Feb. I—Mrs. D. E. Cotton, 663
Iglehart Ave.; Mr. Clarence
Roper, 982 Fuller Ave.; Mr. A. S.
Myers, 868 Iglehart Ave.; Mrs.
George Shannon, 693 Carroll Ave.
Howard House, 747 W. Central
Ave.; David Gardner, 581 Igle
hart.
UNOLEUM
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on the farm, in the office, or plant? Reddy is on duty
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BymjagTU iliy Tbat's Roddy Kilowatt Power for yoasl
NORTHERN STATES POWER COMPANY
Friday, January 26, 1961, SL Paid RECORDER, Page S
SOCIAL & PERSONAL
* ST. PAUL •
Hn. Lovely Brown of 460 Iglehart Ave., returned home
Monday, Jan. 8 after visiting her sister, brother-in-law and
family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cason, in Denver, Colorado. On
her return trip, Mrs. Brown stopped in Omaha, Nebraska to
visit her brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John Henry
Davis.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Golden of
456 St. Anthony will celebrate
their 43rd wedding anniversary
Sunday, Jan. 28.
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stokes Sr.
of 757 SL Anthony will celebrate
their 36th wedding anniversary
Saturday, Jan. 27.
The Alpha Kappa Pal fraternity
held a closed Stag party at the
Sterling Club, Friday, Jan. 19.
Mr. and Mrs. Little WllHe C.
Robinson of 251 Rondo Ave. will
celebrate their 34th wedding an
niversary Saturday, Jan. 27.
Mrs. Charles Young of 577 SL
Anthony was ill at her home this
week.
Mr. Lionel AUen of 608 W.
Central Ave., Is up and around
after being confined to his home.
Mrs. George Wilson, formerly of
570 Rond Ave., Is now residing at
337 Rondo Ave. while caring for a
retired mail carrier, Mr. Ralph
Allen.
Mias Sandra Jean Anderson of
707 Iglehart Ave. will celebrate
her birthday Sunday, Jan. 28.
Miss Patricia Moore of 966 Igle
hort Ave., entertained a group of
girls with a "Hen" party Friday,
Jan. 19. Among those present
were Misses Joan and Norma
Howell, Julia and Roberta Jones,
Sylvia Byrd, Carlotta Doyle, Jean
Southern. Marcheta Allen, Patri
cia Dodd, Marion WilUama.
Beverly Kirk, and Patricia Brown.
A "Going Away** party was
given for Mr. Delbert Cruahehon
of 662 SL Anthony Ave. by the
Los Caballeros Club Saturday,
Jan. 20 at the home of Mr. Philip
Freeman of 857 Iglehart Ave. Mr.
Crushshon left with the 47th Na
tional Guard Division last week.
Mr. Eugene Harris of 565 8L
Anthony Ave., left Saturday, Jan.
20 with the 47th National Guard
Division for Camp Rucker, Ala
bama.
Mrs. Mabel Farmer of 402 Ron
do is ill in Ancker hospital.
Mrs. James Watson of 776 SL
Anthony Ave. la confined to her
home.
Mrs. Martin Weddtngtoa of 714
W. Central la recuperating at her
home from a minor operation.
A baby shower eras given for
Mrs. Louise Oliver of 490 SL An
thony Ave Friday, Jan. 19 by
Mrs. Rufus Williams of 506 W.
Central. Among those present
were Mmes. Flora tine Garcia,
Viola Watts, Mildred Bueford.
Evelyn Patterson, Esaie Stewart,
and Mias Betty Vassar. Also
among those present were Mrs.
Russell, Mrs. Oliver’s mother, and
Mrs. Oertrude Christmas of lowa.
NEW ARRIVAL
Mr. and Sirs. Robert Inderaea
of 800 Iglehart Ave, are the
proud parents of a baby boy bant
Thursday, Jan. 11 in SL Joseph's
hospital The baby weighed 6
pounds 11 ounces at birth. His
name is Gregory Robert Ander
sen. The maternal grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Robert Heidberg
of California and the paternal
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs.
Martin Anderson of 429 Front SL
Mr. E I. McK night of 960
Fuller Ave., has returned home
after bring ill in the University
hospital.
Blood dooon in neodid for
Mies Dorothy Hampton of 701
Carroll Ave., who is ill In Aneker
hospital.
Mra. Margaret Moore of 960
Iglehart Ave., is IB at her home.
Mr. N. N. Smith of 309*4 Jack
son SL, is lU at his home.
Blood doners are needed far
Mr. Edward Ramsey who is ill la
Ancktr hoapltaL
The Ivy Leaf Club, pledge club
of the Eta Chapter of the AKA
Sorority, will hold a tea Wednes
day, Jan. 24 from 4-6 p. m. In the
Coffman Memorial Union of tbs
University of Minnesota.
The Ladies AM Society of Pil
grim Baptist church held n busi
ness meeting Thursday, Jan. 26 at
the church.
The Gospel Chorus of Pilgrim
Baptist church will hold their
Midwinter Musicals Sunday, Jan.
26 at S p. m. at the church.
St. MIL NOISE
Furnishing Co.
008 MOTTO
'"Wldsws ri4 Ofp4ou NMlsslsd**
m 4 Mu. sa at tm

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