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St. Paul recorder. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1934-2000, September 21, 1951, Image 3

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SOCIAL & PERSONAL
* MINNEAPOLIS •
Mt. John Love of Dallas,
John Brown, 1406 Seventh Av
friend of the Browns. On Sept
Wilburn, 1201 Humboldt Ave.
breakfast. Others who have ent<
Lone Star State are Mr. and A!
Ave. No.
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Milton,
605 Aldrich Ave. No., are the
happy parents of a bab
girl born
at Maternity hospital on Sept. 4
Mr. and Mrs. 11. O. Newman of
Kansas City, Mo., are visiting Mr.
and Mrs. Cecil Newman. 4053
Third Ave. So. The Kansas City
Newmans are the parents of
Cecil Newman. Guests at a din
ner for the visitors Saturday
night. Sept. 15. included Mrs.
Jessie Shannon, Mrs. Maxine
Jones, Mr. Roy Hooper and Mr.
Walter Lowe.
Mr. and Mrs. Claude Lytle. 3515
Fourth Ave. So., returned to th
city Friday. September 14, after a
four week vacation in Philadel
phia, Atlantic City, N. J., New-
York. Charlotte, N. C., Spartan-
burg, S. C., Louisville, Ky., anc
Indianapolis, Ind., where they vis
REAIT H A ' S
BEAUTY SALON
624 Rondo
Offers All Lines of Beauty
Culture for Milady
Shop: EL 4005 Reo.: Mi l 4 l!l
Reaitha Carter. Mgr.-Operator
wHfen
HOME OF
FAMOUS QUALITY
APPAREL
for the family
Quality that’s higher
than ever to give you
value that saves. The
largest and finest se
lections of men’s,
women’s, hoys’ and
girls’ clothing in the
Northwest
For guaranteed satisfaction
ihofr at Rothschild's
MAURICE L
ROTHSCHILD & CO
Robert at 7<N
111 OUR COMPLITI DISPLAY OP
LAWN AND OARDIN TOOLS AND
IMPLIMINTS AT lOWIIT PRICU.
WHEELER
Hardware
101 I. 3th St. GA. >397
"Better Meats for Less"
Meats Priced to Fit the
Average Purse
CAPITOL
MEAT CO.
515 Wabasha Street
'STORE or HAITOtEJW
Herbert S. Bernstein:
JEWELERS
QUAUTi WITH A CHEiIT S£SYI>S
1! EAST SEVENTH STREET
SHOP AND SAVE AT •
WARD'S FOOD MARKET |
Meats Poultry Dairy Products 4
Frasb Pruitt and Vofiotablot J
Oondo at Farrington UK. 6100 J
A. A. C A R LSO N
998 Selby Avenue (Across from Oxford Theater)
MEN’S and CHILDREN S NEW SHOES and TENNIS SHOES
RUBBERS and OVERSHOES
LOOK and WEAR like NEW ! EXPERT SHOE REPAIR
ELLISON POPCORN PRODUCTS, INC.
• Carmel Crisp • Cheese Corn • Popcorn Balls
'KeHle Fresh"
Bring in thi* advertiwment and get the .Wk- Family Size
hag of Popcorn for 39c
42C Wabasha St. Cl. 9764
We are proud to announce the appointment of
READUS W. FLETCHER
to our sales staff.
Come in at your earliest convenience
and let Mr. Fletcher show you our
complete line of New & Used Appli.
ances.
TIESO & KOSTKA
913 Rice St. St. Paul HU. 7925
Texas is visiting Mr. and Mrs.
e. No. Mr. Love is a longtime
tember 15, Mr. and Mrs Boley
No., entertained Mr. Love at
ertained for the visitor from the
It's. Charles Palms, 1051 Bryant
ited with relatives and f riends.
Mr. and Mrs. Lytle motored to
Philadelphia with Mr. and Mrs.
W. M. Barnes, 2909 Fifth Ave. So..
and went the rest of the way by
train.
Misses Dorothy Stovall, 3815
Fifth Ave. So., and Doris Jones.
411 E. 24 th St., spent the Weekend
in Duluth, Minn., where they vis
ited with friends. Misses Stovall
and Jones attended the wedding
of Miss Gertrude Johnson and
Walter Foster which took place
Saturday evening, September 15
at St. Mark's AME church. They
returned to the city Sunday e
ning, September 16.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard K. Thom
as, Los Angeles, Calif., returned to
their home Wednesday. September
19 after spending two weeks visit
ing Mrs. Thomas' parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Everette W. Walls, 3537
Fourth Ave. So. They were ex
tended many social courtesies dur
ing their stay here.
Miss Esther J. Byars, 2409 E
Lake of the Isles Blvd , returned
to the city Sunday, September 16
after visiting relatives and friends
in Philadelphia. New- Jersey and
New- York. Miss Byars spent tw'o
weeks out of the city.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kirby, 522
Aldrich Ave. No., wall return to
the city Saturday, September 22,
after a two weeks vacation in Chi
cago, Indianapolis and Dayton,
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CEDAB 0483 I
The WAY I SEE IT
★ BY NELL DODSON RUSSELL
NEW YORK CITY Instead of dragging my creaking bones
homeward after a hard day at the office last Tuesday evening, I re
viewed a movie for you lovely people. As a result, I ended up the eve-
Hning in a theatre alleyway off Broadway with a
mob of palpitating teen-age young ladies trodding
on my toes and trying to push me through a wall.
More about that later. The review first.
Some of the nation's football coaches and
college alumni associations aren't going to take
kindly to "Saturday's Hero." It is a rugged,
brutal indictment of commercialization in col
lege football, and the exploitation of players.
Based on Millard Lampell's serial in Cosmo
politan awhile back, the story doesn’t suffer
„ too badly in the transition except for a concea-
Nell Burnell
sion to the Hollywood pattern of a happy fin
ale.
The film pulls no punches. It's a close-up of the sordid, behind
the-scenes story of commercialization as it is practiced in too many
of the schools today. There's the rigged grades, the manufactured
"jobs" for players, the pirating of athletes. Columbia Pictures has
timed the picture to hit theatres right at the opening of the 1951
grid season.
The story deals with Steve Novack, a poor milltown boy of Polish
parentage who is a high school football sensation. After graduation
he is swamped with bids from colleges. Determined to be a success
both as a scholar and as a "gentleman”, Steve choses Jackson Col
lege, a southern school long on tradition but short on successful
football squads.
Steve, living up to his high school reputation, becomes the star of
the freshman team in his first year at Jackson. Then the disillusion
ing process begins. He finds that although he has become a campus
idol as a football hero, he isn't asked into the college's best ‘‘gentle
man’' fraternity. T. C. McCabe, a wealthy alumnus, takes Steve on as
his protege. McCabe is determined to build the Jackson football team
into one of the best in the nation. He buys players, takes the varsity
on publicity tours, spares no expense to accomplish his end. Steve
falls in love with McCabe's niece. His marks begin to slide downward
as a result of having to spend so much time on football. In spite of
all this, he is a candidate for All-American when he suffers a shoulder
injury. Doped up by the team doctor, he returns to the game. The
shoulder becames so aggravated that he is warned he may sustain
permanent crippling. Equipped wwith a special shoulder brace, he
still continues to play because there is nothing else for him to do. His
final injury closes his football career and all the glory that goes with
it. Steve leaves Jackson College and its "gentlemen'' but he goes away
a stronger, wiser person.
The cast of "Saturday's Hero" is excellent That fine actor,
Alexander Knox, is superb as a professor of English who looks
upon pampered football players as an unnecessary evil but ac
cepts them in his classes with cynical boredom. Otto Hulett as
the Jackson coach, turns in a sound characterisation. The veteran
stage and screen actor, Sidney Blackmer, scores heavily as T. <’.
McCabe and Donna Reed is sincere as the niece.
John Der< k. as Steve Novack. proves conclusively that he is mak
ing headway against the tremendous handicap of having the most
beautiful male puss before the Hollywood cameras. The picture is
his first serious bid for big-time stardom. If the opinion of most of
the critics here means anything, the boy is on his way.
Now to the hassel in the alley. Derek and Miss Reed made per
sonal appearances with the film on opening day only (Tuesday).
They didn’t do anything except come on the stage after <ach show
ing and go through the usual uninspired routine such appearances
call for. They were introduced by Hal Tunis, a local disc jockey and
exponent of the cutie-pie school of emcees. Tunis asked them several
obvious questions. They replied with several obvious answers.
Donna Reed is a much prettier, warmer person offscreen than
on. She's blonde and quite a petite package. Derek Is an extra
ordinarily handsome young man. Although the camera makes him
look more mature and taller, he is still very—well, with those
eyes and eyelashes the kid is—all right. He didn't seem to have
his mind too much on the business at hand, but one can't blame
him because the business was so utterly stupid. He’d been on
tour with the picture for weeks and I suppose he was a little tired
of squealing high school fillies, although he made a nice speech
about his fans. All he had to do was look down at the gals in the
front row and the resulting squeals made the theatre sound like
the tlins' little pigs and their cousins down on Cousin Ezra’s farm.
When Tunis announced there would be an autograph session in
the alleyway behind the theatre, half the females in the house tore out
and headed for the alleyway. I went right along, determined to get
a close-up of how Mr. Derek would act when he didn’t have a stage
between him the the female banashees.
When I arrived on the scene, there was a horde of breathless
young women surging around. Some had autograph pads, others had
glossy' pictures of “Johnny” clutched in their hot little hands. Mr.
Derek’s appearance in the stage door was greeted with another out
break of piggy-like noises and a rush forward that slammed me
against a wall and dang nigh through it. That made me mad so I
started using a little ju-jitsu myself. Several gentlemen with ex
pressionless faces arrived on the scene and started a semblance of an
orderly line out of the confusion. Thanks to this marvel of efficiency
I was able to get a vantage point where I could see the autographing
business progressing.
Derek obediently signed autographs. Most of the time he didn't
bother to look up, and he displayed the enthusiasm of a feller strap
ped to the hot seat two second before the current goes on. When lie
did tear his eyes away from what he was doing, he had the sort of
half-way dazed look on his face that I've seen on other newly-arrived
Hollywood stars who haven't become quite accustomed to the shinan
egans of their public.
John Derek appears to be a retiring type of young feller. I
can't say that I envy him. Maybe it's because I don't like squeal
ing young ladies who leave their milliners at home—assuming of
course, they have manners and a home. Maybe it’s also because
I don't like cutie-pie emcees who ask dull questions. Maybe it's
because I wouldn't like to have my life planned by fat little men
who call everybody, men and women alike, “baby" and have only
two words in their vocabulary—‘‘sensational” and "terrific”.
I gill
For years I've suffered from insomnia. I’ve resorted to every
type of sleep-making device on the market, including the yogi gim
mick of standing on my head. Th< other night it suddenly occurred
to me that after years of certainty I’d fall to pieces in a nerv iub
collapse if I didn't get my rest every night, I'd stopped worrj ing
about whether I slept or not. As soon as I stopped WORRYING about
getting sleep, I STARTED SLEEPING!
I'm passing this on to other Insomnia victims and pillow
pounders. It isn’t the lark of sleep that gets you down. It’s worry
ing about same that turns your midnights into horrors.
I our hours of steady sleep will do you more good than eight
hours of tossing, turning and muttering to yourself.
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RATING THE
RECORDS
By J. Henry Randall
Zhey Used To Coll It
Ragtime—
One of the six albums in RCA
Victor's second series of "Treas
ury of Immortal Performances”
—jazzwise—is devoted to the ma
chinations of Muggsy Spanier and
his group, doing eight sides of
Dixieland music (a more polished
name for what was known as
“ragtime”). Album is labelled
"Muggsy Spanier Favorites" and
is the second volume of sides from
the 1940 recordings on Bluebird
label. A previous collection was
issued last spring.
Included in this elghtsome are
the best of the Spanier versions as
done by the ragtime crew he
formed in Chicago and which
played a lengthy engagement in
Greenwich village. A eometist of
the old school. Muggsy rides
supremely over the instrumenta
tions on such standard "rag
timers” as Someday Sweetheart,
Bluin' the Blues, Riverboat Shuf
fle, At Sundown, I Wish I Could
Shimmy Like My Sister Kate,
Dinah, Bliu-k and Blue, and Lone
some Road (Victor).
Another favorite of the swing
era, the late Bunny Berigan,
shows up in the "Treasury" series
with his album of “Bunny Berigan
Plays Again". Berigan, who died
in 1942, is still looked upon as one
of the finest jazz trumpeters the
country has known. The tunes in
cluded in the album are some of
his finest works.
Best remembered is his signa
ture melody. I Can’t get Startl'd
With You. Others are The Prison
er's Song, ’Deed I Do, Trees, Rus
sian Lullaby, Jelly Roll Blues and
Black Bottom (Victor).
There is yet another "Treasury"
album one featuring Louis Arm
strong which we have not seen
as yet, but which is also available.
It’s "Ixuiis Armstrong Town Hall
Concert,” and presents some of
the greatest favorites a la "Pops”
Armstrong.
The sides are on the spot re
cordings, taken from the event
sponsored by Fred Robbins, a
Gotham disc jockey. Tunes in the
album are all old favorites
Rockin’ Chair, Save It Pretty
Mama, Ain't Misbehavin', Pennies
From Heaven, Buck O’Tow n
Bini's, and best of all. the "Satch
mo" hit of the early 30’s, St.
James Infirmary.
Siding with “Louis Pops” are
such top-drawer jazzmen as Bob
by Hackett, Jack Teagarden, the
late “Big" Sid Catlett, Peanuts
Hucko, Dick Cary and George
Wettling (Victor).
Sarah Vaughan, sounding like a
combination of a half dozen other
top femme thrushes, including
herself, has a really good side for
Shop with Ease... Shop with Faith...
Shop the American Wa
Head the ads
in this newspaper
More ion buy!
jK
V.
MR WILLARD W ALLEN
WtUheea Let' laawaarw Ca
Cread W Marytea* 14 YJ
*/ Am* advertised m my own nenj
paper consistently and tut < esslully
tor ocer 20 years and for the same
length of Ume and more, * has
afforded me and my famdy an
counted hours of 'fading pleasure /
could get m no other media 9
Represented Nationally by Associated Publishers, Ine.
31 W. 4«b Street, New York 19. N. Y. 166 W. Sb. Chicago X, lUUab
BIRTHDAY
GREETINGS
■ - ---- . - -
MINN E A POLLS BIRTHDAYS
Sept. 23—Grace Johnson, 561
Eighth Ave. No.; Rosetta Thomas.
606 11th Ave. So.; Bertran
Slaughter, 2906 Portland Ave.; A.
L. Commodore 1031 Bryant No.;
Fred R. Titus, 214 W. 31st St. So.
Sept. 24 -Chalies McCoy, 869
11th Ave. No.; Jonas Schwartz,
501 Pence Bldg.; Mrs. Leia Ban
ham. 915 Aldrich Ave. No.; Hazel
Clark. 4045 Clinton Ave. So.
Sept. 25 Mrs. Clarence Bell.
510 Humboldt Ave. No.; Mrs. Lu
cinda Stubblefield. 532 Tenth Ave.
No.; James Hinkle. 246‘j Fourth
Av< So.; Pascal Todd, 526 Gir
ard Ave. No.; Alcynetta Ballard,
812 Bryant Ave. No.
Sept. 26 Mrs. Leßoy Hall, 3925
Fourth Ave. So.
Sept. 27 Sammy Hale, 3342
Fourth Ave. So.; Jane Stone, 858
Bryant Ave. No.
Sept. 28 Olive Nelson Russell,
2668 Glenhurst.
Sept. 29--Charles DeLaComp
son. 422 Dupont Ave. No.; E. H.
Blackwell, 3817 Fourth Ave. So.;
Karen Broach, 3612 Elliot.
Out-of. Town Birithdays—
Sept. 23 Durprelle V. Criss,
Kansas City, Kansas, Violet Hill
Whyte, Baltimore. Md.
Sept. 24 Charles Ballard,
Springfield, Ohio; Mrs. L. B.
Fouse. Lexington. Ky.
Sept. 26 Martin Brown, Los
Angeles. Calif; Jacqueline Ann
Brown, Kansas City, Mo.
Sept. 28—Cecil E Davis, Los
Angeles. Calif.
Sept. 29 Conseula Townsend,
Chicago, 111.
her latest waving. Title is Out O'
Breath, and she literally creates
the impression that she's “outa
breath” in her vocal version. The
instrumental accompaniment by
Paul Weston ork, in its shifting
tempos, really set off the
Vaughan voice. Mate is Sarah's
moody blued vocal on After Hours
(Columbia).
Two of Duke Ellington's con
ceit tunes of last year have been
placed on wax, both of which
show promise of attracting quite
a bit of furor in the Ellington
comer. On one side there is The
Eighth Veil, a fascinating tone
poem headlining the trumpet of
Cat Anderson. The mate bears the
name of Monologue (Pretty and
the Wolf). This is an oddity. El
lington narrates a tale of a wo
man and her wiles, which brings
about the downfall of the man
(Columbia).
Mrs. Jiiiiics Griffin, 587 Rondo,
returned to the city Monday,
September 3, after spending a
month and a half visiting her
mother, Mrs. Rosa Smoot in West
Virginia. Mrs. Griffin's three chil
dren. Vianne, Linda and Helen
went on the trip also.
TRADE WITH SAFETY WITH
ADVERTISERS IN THESE
COLUMNS
1
w ■■■ • -
' * • Jk- % | 't.*' '
*' 11 it
JjMc j
be *tirh o pleature . . . when you know where to find
are looking for . . . when you know where to find them
when you know where to shop in an atmosphere
Shopping can
the thing* you
al a reasonable price
<J friendship and confidence.
Thu pleature can he yours, when you read the ada in this P*P®*«
These advertisemenls are 1
trade u respected and appreciated. You know you can depend on these
ads to lead you to values you can trust.
Aino, the»e (ulrertmementt help your paper to five you ntore iixiM
tlories, more picture* of your friend* and neighbors. They help your new*
paper maintain on-the-spot new* correspondent* in Europe and in Korea.
So don’t you iron! to patronite the
butineatet that alrertiir in thia neua-
/taper! Don’t you want to read the ad»
before you go to the atore and shop the
American Way!
St. Paul RECORDER
Friday, September 21, 1951, St. Paul RECORDER, Page 3
SOCIAL & PERS
R.MH
Mr. J. E. Johnson, 526 St. Anthony Ave., after spending a
month visiting in California, Houston and Galveston, Texas,
New Orleans, Mobile, Ala., Nashville, Tenn., returned to the
city last week. He left St. Paul Tuesday, September 18, for Chi
cago where he will spend several days on business.
Allen Speese, Pierre, S. D. ( and Leslie Day, Huron, S. D.,
arrived in the city Saturday eve
ning. September 15 for a weeks
visit with relatives and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Dean Speese gave a
family get-together and barbecue
in their honor at their home on
Hazelwood Avenue, North St.
Paul. Sunday, September 16. Allen
is the son of Mrs. Rose Speese.
909 Arceola Ave. and Leslie, a
student of S. D. State College at
Brookings, is the nephew of Mr.
and Mrs. Lue Day. 732 Rondo,
when- they are the house guests.
Mr. and Mr*. Royal Crawford,
522 St. Anthony Ave., were host
and hostess at a get-together
party at their home Friday, Sep
tember 14 for their friends.
Among those present were
Messrs, and Mmes. Joseph Brew
ington, Burt Wade and Arthur
Jackson.
Miss Beverly Halenger, returned
to the city recently after spend
ing a two weeks vacation in St.
Ixiuis, Mo. Miss Balenger was the
house guest of Dr. and Mrs.
August Piper. She is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Russell T. Bal
enger, 812 St. Anthony.
The Hull and Chain club met at
the home of Mrs Royal Crawford,
522 St. Anthony, Saturday, Sep
tember 15. A pow-wow was plan
ned and will be held at Minnehaha
ST. PAUL HOUSE
Furnishing Co.
Homa Fwrnlthora and Jowolors
OUR MOTTO
'Widow, and Orphan. Protected'
•th • Minn. Ms. Cl. 477*
Come To
THE NEST
FOR GOOD FOOD
Cor. Rondo & Grotto
BERDES FOOD CENTER
"BETTEM MEATS AT KMMCR KKES*
MESH MEATS. POULTBY. FW <md DADT MODOCM
FrnHa. Gcoomlm a*d
CE.MT
IM WABASHA
tH'cial invitatiofu that tell you that your
Park on Saturday, September 29.
There will be no regular monthly
meeting on that date.
Mr. and Mrs. Johnathan Me
lman. 328 N. Grotto Ave., are the
proud parents of a baby boy bom
Friday, September 17. The new
arrival weighted seven pounds and
has been named Jonathan Jr. Mrs.
McLean’s sister, Mrs. Essie Phil
lip of New Haven, Conn., arrived
in the city Monday, September 17
for an indefinite visit.
Mr. and Mrs. Janiee Wagner
and son Gregory, 565 Rondo, and
Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Watson, 598
St. Anthony Ave., motored to
Gary, Ind., Friday, September 15,
to spend the week end visiting
relatives and friends. They were
the house g uests of Mrs. Milton
Allen and daughter, Ethel. Mrs.
Allen is the mother of Mrs. Wag
ner and Mr. Watson.
fRESH -AS A DAIS/
gQcl
*
(Vlr
Master
WHITE
BREAD
We// Baited by Zinsmatfer

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