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St. Paul recorder. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1934-2000, July 18, 1952, Image 6

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Page 8, St Paul RECORDER, Friday, July 18, 1952
WOMAN'S WORLD
Make Practical, Pretty Clothes
For Tots to Wear in the Summer
By Ertta Haley
ONE of the main requisites in
dressing children, especially the
younger ones, is comfort This is.
of course, true of any clothing they
wear but it's especially important
in their clothes for sunning and
playing out-of-doors during mild
weather.
Play togs for tots indicate defi
nite styling, as well as an eye for
comfort these days. They're not
only practical, but they’re pretty
because they’re colorful and casual.
Mothers are cheering them for
another reason also: they're easy
to tub and few of them require
Ironing. Some require none at all
while the remaining ones need only
the lightest press of an iron to
smooth out the material tor perfect
ly pressed, good looks.
New materials now on the scene
are one of the big advances made
in the clothing picture. This has ex
tended far beyond the entrancing
fashions for teen-agers and older
Women. Even tots who are Just dis
covering the world can discover it
In comfort.
Seersucker, for example, is not
a new material, but the current
types are a far cry from the old,
somewhat wrinkled and messy fab
rics. The crinkle is so fine in the
new materials as to be almost un
seen by the eye unless you’re close
enough. This adds up to material
which looks smooth and pressed,
and all without any work with the
iron, on a hot summer's day.
Texturizing is another important
advance because these materials
not only resist soiling, but they're
virtually wrinkle-free. In addition
body is added to the material by
this means and no starching is re
quired. Everyone who does laund-
B’ \
'"h
■ I
13
--i
Ltl girlr 1 lummor drtuti itrvt ...
ering will admit the big time-saving
feature of this!
Practical Styles
uive more wear
With the new styles now avail
able, you'll find, happily, that your
youngster requires less clothing for
summer than in the past You can
tub these fashions so easily, dry
them and have them ready for wear
so quickly that you don’t have to
figure on having extra clothes while
you get the ironing done.
There are the clever one-piece
sunsuits for boys and girls alike In
the two and three year old bracket.
Those for boys, naturally, are tail
ored and they dry wrinkle-free. The
suits for the girls have clever ruf
fling in the back, but you don't
have to worry about them, as they,
too. need no Ironing.
The same holds true of over-alls
for this same group as well as old
er children. Many of the older ma
terials required light pressing to
smooth out wrinkles and make
them look neat, but these do not.
If you like to vary the fancy
with tailored clothes, you'll like the
boxer shorts available for both boys
and girls. Here, again, seersucker
is used, and so is denim in many
wonderful and attractive colors tor
the younger set.
Boxer shorts may be worn with
all kinds of shirts, the most popular
being the T shirt since it's comfort
able, soft and easy-fitting. The
shirts as well as the shorts can be
mixed and matched provided you
choose all of them in colors that
can be worn with each other.
«i
For rll 4<ll»rrul Mtiiititi
On the very warm days, and
pecially after the youngsters h
acquired enough tan so they an
no danger from the exposure to
sun, the boxer shorts can be w
by both boys and girls without
coverings.
Simplicity Featured
In Youngsters' Clothes
One of the newest topping:
wear with the boxer shorts are
loose, tailored Jackets. These are
excellent for little boys because
they give such a tailored outfit
They may match or contrast with
the shorts and are fastened simply
by a tie or single button at the neck
Terry cloth or toweling is being
used extensively in the little fastiion
Just described. White as well as
JIT'l ER _____________ By Arthur Pointer
d r Tijn i
V-J-LL.I I d'doT
Cool Comfort
•’I
1
Whisk through your household
chores In a comfortable and cool
dress, and then go about your
marketing and errands without
having to change. The dramatic
contrast of white pique banding
against dark blue chambray
styles this coat dress that's suit
able for every occasion. The
fabric should be aanforlrcd be
cause of frequent washings, and
you'll want no shrinkage to mar
perfect fit.
pastels are featured, nnd the con
trasting piping for trimming Is an
effective touch.
The little Jackets serve a double
purpose, actually: they may be used
to shield the shoulders from the
sun. <• •* they can also be used If
the weather suddenly turns cooler
and more clothing is needed.
Made In denim, the same outfit
is also effective. It’s crisp, durable,
and even more tailored than the
toweling. Striped fabrics in heavy
cotton are also employed for this
style.
For older or younger boys, an
other alternate topping is a man
tailored sports shirt. Many of these
are made in rather large, masculine
prints and they are worn loosely
over the shorts Just described or
over boxer shorts in matching fab
rics.
As can readily be seen these
clothes are made for comfort, and
that means comfort during active
play. Just as it does in the less
strenuous activities. The shirts and
shorts are roomy without being
bulky, they're tailored looking but
not fussy so they're ideal for play,
and the light pastels as well as ma
terials make them as cool as any
clothing can be during the hot
weather.
Select Dresses
For Party or Play
Mothers with little girls usually
find themselves investing in one set
of clothes for parties which are sel
dom worn and usually outgrown be
fore they've given sufficient wear
for the money spent Then clothes
for play are worn and worn so
much, that they have to give more
than should be expected.
Why not get some dresses that
will go to both parties and play* In
that way you can have more clothes
for the girl, and distribute wear
more easily.
The pinafores remain as popu
lar as ever and they may be made
of so many different fabrics from
the sheere .t to the heaviest mate
rials. You may choose organdie and
ruffle it In lace or more organdie
Go to the other extreme and choose
a, texturized chambray which
doesn't need starching and trim it
in rick-rack or with Contrasting
binding
The pinafores will be lovely for
playing, for dressing up a tut in the
afternoons, or for going to a party.
Occasionally you might like to team
a Simple dress with a pinafore, or
even use a blouse underneath the
pinafore. They're versatile
Then there are very enchanting
sundresses for the younger set
Made of texturized pique, they shed
wrinkles and dirt, tub easily and
dry almost wrinkle-free These come
with and without the briefest of
bolero Jackets and may be worn
with or without them
Sun dresses, as you’ve guessed,
can go to parties, they're excellent
for Sunday school, or they II serve
admirably for play or going shop
ping with mother.
* p ** r
i HOUSEHOLD gF
i M tM.OStn lyjtunn Chichi
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Can with Care to Avoid Spoilage
(fee Reiipei Below)
Preserving Vegetables
GARRENS AKE BURSTING, liter
ally, with their produce, and the
canning cupboard Is undoubtedly
empty after yielding meal after
meal of health-giving vegetables
over a period of
/ many months
W*'7 <Z It's time for can-
•J*' jC.2 nin #- °B ain!
// How did you
come out on your
supplies for t h e
Bv P ilst year? Too
” many cans of
green beans, or not enough? Used
more corn than usual? Or did the
peas disappear rapidly?
Needs may vary slightly from
year to year, but you should take an
Inventory each year at the begin
ning of the season and have some
Idea of the amount of vegetables you
need to put up. Take into considera
tion increased appetite needs of
growing children or perhaps rela
tives spending more time at your
table. Only in this way can you
gauge with any accuracy the amount
you'll need to can.
Take Time to Get Ready
Eor Vegetable Canning
It may take you a day or even
two days to get ready to can some
of your vegetables because all equip
ment must be ready, as well as in
order once you start. Here are some
things that must be done in ad
vance:
Wash jars and covers In hot soapy
water and rinse thoroughly. Check
jars for cracks and nicks and use
only those which are in perfect con
dition.
See that you have enough covers
as well as rubbers if you're using
the type which the manufacturer
recommends.
Check the pressure cooker or
boiling water both to ascertain that
everything is in good operating or
der.
You'll need also utensils for hold
ing the vegetables during the prepa
ration, large trays or colanders or
kettles. If you're going to use a hot
pack, then have a utensil large
enough for the pre-cooking
Other items which you'll need in
clude the following: wide-mouth
funnel for filling jars, tea kettle for
hot water, salt, measuring spoons,
towels and dish cloths, pot holders
and newspapers for setting the jars
on for cooling.
• • •
Select Young Produce
F»r Best Results
Plan to choose only those vegeta
bles which are young and which
have grown quickly. It's better to
use vegetables which can be picked
as clean as possible, as very dirty
ones may have microorganisms on
them that are diffiC’ • to remove
Try not to handle too many vege
tables all at one time Work must
proceed rapidly or bacteria develop
while the food isn't packed into the
jars, especially when the food is pre
cooked and packed hot Bacteria de
velops rapidly between tempera
tures of 105 F. to 150 F.
Clean the vege
tables
p ' ts of ' ,::g
X water. Most of
them are pre
-fl' S -4 pared just as
V,. 'ap; they a . w hen
you’re cooking
■ * them for the ta
ble.
To prevent flat-sour, can these
vegetables as soon a. possible after
picking; asparagus, peas, beans and
corn. •
When sizes vary greatly, tt ma>
be wise to sort the vegetables so that
the contents of each jar are as uni
form as possible You'll be able to
get better processing in cases of this
nature.
TRADE WITH SAFETY WITH AD
LYNN CHAMBERS' MENU
Fried Chicken Macaroni Salad
Sliced Tomatoes, Cucumbers
Biscuits Jam or Jelly
Chilled Melon Cookies
Beverage
Fill canner only with as many
jars as it will hold easily, leaving
space in-between the jars for proper
i circulation of the steam.
Corn and Greens Need
High Pressure Cooking
' Corn, because of its high starch
content, needs high temperature
processing to can without spoilage
The same is true of greens, but, in
this case because heat penetrates
the layers of leaves with difficulty
For both of these use 15 pounds pres
sure.
To can corn, kernel style, simmer
cars of corn in water 4 to 5 min
utes. Cut from the cob, but do not
scrape the cob
\"vps. Weigh corn and
W ___ add H the weight
'-Q . ' n wa ' er - Add 1
teaspoon salt and
C.. Xx* '( 1v 2 teaspoons
I sugar for each
Wtjquart. Mix well,
heat to boiling
and pack at once into jars. Process
80 minutes for quarts, 75 minutes
for pints, e
For cream-style corn, remove
corn, uncooked from the cob by cut
ting through grains and pressing out
with the back of a knife Add water,
salt and sugar and proceed as
above.
To can greens, wash, remove
stems and imperfect leaves. Sim
mer until leaves melt, then pack
into jars and loosen center with a
knife Process 85 minutes for quarts.
60 minutes for pints.
Here are Directions
For Beans, Peas
For canning green beans, pre
pare as for table, removing ends
I and cutting into lengths. Cover with
i boiling water and cook 3 to 4 min
utes ick hot, process at 10
. pom. or 35 minutes for quarts
i Only small lima beans should be
canned, large ones dried. Wash
• beans, then shell. Cook in water 5
1 minutes. Pack, add salt and process
1 55 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.
Only tender very young peas
should be canned. Shell, discard any
imperfect peas, then wash and cook
for 5 minutes in boiling water Pack,
with salt, into jars, adding boiling
'water to fill Process. 45 rm tes
i I at 10 pounds pressure for pints
;l
(a r rots, Rents %re
i : Lastly Canned
| Only small beets should b? u<*i
j for canning Wash thoroughly <• .1
1 off tops, leaving at- .it 1 ncn „r
5 stem. Cook in Iwnling water 15 min
utes, ictnove skins and add <alt
and boiling water when pa
jars Process quarts 35 n :r. - i
10 pounds pressure
To can carrots, wash, then s.
r off skin; or. cook until skins :> . n
, I and slip off Pack into jars, ad I sa t.
j fill with bailing water, then proc
,. ess 35 minutes for q,.arts at 10
pounds pressure
„ Asparagus should bo cut in lengths
„ to fit the container after being thor
oughly washed and all sand re
moved. Cover closely to precook for
. 3 to 4 minutes Pack in jars, ald
, I salt and boiling water Process .10
j I minutes at 10 pound> pressure for
I pints, 3.5 minutes for quarts
\ ANN SAYS:
i Fresh poiK cuts »Lhich -i ••
o simmered to make d lie < i
s types of entrees include spa: cribs,
hocks, kidrnv and heart
ERTISERS IN THESE COLUMNS
WYLDE AND WOOLY
WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME IT "j (
, RAINEP HERE. MISTER P
qa < { AftAjp Ggl
BESSIE
IP >W WONT uET ME BE
/OuR PARTNER .
(WOWN uEMONAPI
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RIMIN' TIME
OLAR6EI
BE
4
WCCO AQUA HEADLINERS
-
Marion Marlowe
I Jk|
> Iill:

Frank Parker
Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy head the roster of celebrated
entertainers booked for WCCO's Aquatennial Radio Show at Minneapolis
Auditorium, 7:45 P.M, Saturday, July 19. Sharing spotlight honors with
Bergen and McCarthy on the gala two hour stage review will be more
than 200 radio and television performers, including nationally famous
Arthur Godfrey Show singing stars Marion Marlowe, Frank Parker and
Julius La Rosa. Ventriloquist Bergen will bring with him his entire
family of dummies Charlie McCarthy, Mortimer Snerd, Effie Klinker,
Podine Puflmgton. the newly created Swedish fisherman. Along with
Bergen and the Godfrey show stars, the audience will be treated to
Krformances by many more CBS Radio stars and Cedric Adams, Bob
i Haven, the Minneapolis Choralaircs and Wally Olson's orchestra.
Mail orders for tickets for the show are being accepted at Aquatennial
Ticket Office, Northwestern Bank Bldg., and First National Bank Bldg.,
Minneapolis.
Chicago Police Make
Quick Work Dispersing
Anti-Negro Mob Of 5,000
ti Xi iri'o sentiment in ('hh ;iu<>
Chicago. (AXi* \i
was hooted last week by an et'lie
halted a mob of ."i.lMkl uhit. s fro
a home by a Xegro in an all ul
Coming on the eve of a >ei
Chicago only a few blocks from
current Republican National Con- ;
vention. the riot was quelled
within 48 hours.
For the first time, Chicago
police put into action its mob con
trol plan and it worked. Ever
since World War II ended in 1915.
summer time has meant nmb time
in Chicago, with weeks of tension
between races because some Ne
groes seek to move his family out
of the black ghetto.
The violence occurred only 10
days less than a year after the
1951 Cicero riot. This one how
ever. happened within Chicago's
city limits at 4511 S. Union St .
in a frame house purchased by a
Negro family from Milwaukee.
Wis
First ac tion was what appeared
to be the innocent burning of
trash in the back yard When the
fire department showed up to put
out the fire, firemen found young
hoodlums beginning to loot the
building They called the police. ,
As the crowd swelled into the
thousands. 50 police squads with
200 police officers moved into ac
tion. Policemen then stopped the
young hoodlums, who were being
cheered by the white mobsters,
from tearing down the house, and
began to push the crowd back In
than 94 hmim t crowd h.tii
from tearing down the house, and
began to push the crowd back In
less than 24 hours, the crowd had
Want Ad Column Is Twin Cities Best Market Place
WELL, M/ GREAT-GRANDPA
HAO A NEIGHBOR WHOSE UNCLE
SPREAD THE RUMOR THAT IT
SPRINKLED FOR A FEW r—r'
MINUTES BACK IN 1867. )
y
I
rttMoMADS
Poor Me-100 hasn’t got the
price. « t
,' W 'V
liMr
Bergen and friends
Julius La Kosa
iti-Negro sentiment in Chicagi
dent police force as alert actioi
nm rioting over the purchase o
liite neighborhood.
■ries of political conventions it
the Amphitheahre. scene of th
broken up.
| This occurred the night am
I morning of July 1 and 2. The nex
night, police stood guard, but m
mobsters showed up. A regula
police watch has been assigned ti
the building.
Victims of the mob destructiol
were Mrs Harriet Garrett of 552:
Wentworth Ave. She bought th
home through her attorney. Ar
thur H Bellamy, a colored Wes
Indian, a month ago from its fou
owners who new live in Milwau
kee, Mr and Mrs. Walter F. Al
win and Mr and Mrs Wilhard F
Loomis
Active in the background n
helping to quell the riot wer
Maynard Wishner. acting head o
the Chicago Commission on Hu
man Relations, and Fritz I’ollarc
former football star and membe
of the commission.
Neighborhood One of Chicago's
Toughest
I
GARDNERS
D-X STATION
Wetter* end Ceetrel DAU 996 A
Battery Sarvi«a
D-X GatolUa and Diamond
Graaung. WasAUg and D-X
Malar Oil*
rvitm GAtDNir tray
THIS IS NO Y WHAT
PLACE FOR I rtc, I
A SALESMAN J . y
like me. ;
TELEVISION STORE INC. All
r FB£E A JU KVi
BUT ONE CAN FINO A SHOT
THAT'S SHADY, s
Z / X
The neighborhood m which th'
•iolence occurred is consider*
one of Chicago's roughest and
toughest communities. It has a
history of anti-Negro violence.
located just behind Chicago's
famed Stock Yards, this neighbor
hood was one of the roots of the
ill famed 1919 race riots in Chi
cago. Some of its present resi
dents were active in that violence
of more than 30 years ago. Sons
of these people were active in last
week's violence. A number of
these families occupy the same
wooden homes they dwelled in in
1919.
Mrs. Garrett bought the home
about a month ago for $7,500,
with a down payment of SSOO.
She and her attorney did not act
through a real estate agent. The
home was cheap, compared to
usual prices in Chicago, because it
needed many repairs.
Bellamy said:
“We bought it and sent in Ne
gro workmen to repair the place.
It was old and worn out, that's
why we got it so cheap. All week
long these workmen were in there
fixing and decorating."
In the building's three apart
ments was one white family, Mrs
Bertha Verran, at S2O a month.
Another of the apartments had
been rented to a Negro family for
occupation as soon as decoration
and repairs were completed.
Hoodlums literally destroyed
the building, and Mrs. Verran
was forced to leave her home be
cause of the violence. Nobody can
live there now.
How Police Stopped Violence
Wishner ami Pollard gave all
the credit for stopping the mob
to city police. Key men in the ac
tion. according to Wishner. was
Redmond Gibbons, chief of uni
formed police, with the support of
Commissioner Timothy O'Connor
;C taste .
made
the
iJagfe> t a yp r i
</ wfe»j£tS<* j; -
nnfmffi
Discover th
that has
fyeerti/
ss its A/ame
Su
BRAND
10 PHILLIPS A SONS COMPANY - EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORS - MINNEAPOLIS
Can a Young Wife
I KILL You? ■
gjHB Tluv were a handsome couple But it
"as l^e s{or > °* thr marriage RS|RI|
J i l^e '°ung wife and the
I i AA ddtrh husband (>uld he stand fjc/
I the hot pate of a<ti\i(\ set h\ his Bfefeh
•1 JPJJt too-umng wife.'' (an such a
’„■ '*9 J marriage last' Read "Can A
I I 4|m' \ ung \\ ite Kiil \ou•" in the
' 'i3h &L* August issue of T\X now
”’■ R WBk ”* wZ on \<»ur newsstand t
■ A TAN
Jy 1820 S. Midupn Ao. | ; \
Stab » chic«£o HHH
By Bert Thomas
RAINCOATS AND \«
LIGHTNING RODS? J
—t y ; ■ - *ViT’Ak
« W
By NICK P
By POSfN
By PARKING NEAR A DIG MT
„ LADY’
Gibbons, who actually originat
ed the mob control plan several
years ago following the Peoria
street riot in Chicago, personally
had charge of police action along
with Breitzke.
Introduction of this program
came in the form of classes to
officers of the force on how to
act in racial situations and on
how to handle mobs. All of this
was done efficiently under Gib
bon's direction.
If the mob had been allowed to
do as it pleased, it could have
meant danger for the thousands
of Negroes who work in the Stock
Yards for their living.
Commenting on this, Wishner
said:
"The police department did the
best job in Chicago history in
dispersing the crowd. This is in
deed encouraging. When the
police department enforces the
law, and lets the mob know that
it is going to enforce a citizen's
right to live where he wants to
be he Negro or something else—
then it has made a progressive
step in halting race riots in Chi
cago."
Wishner added, however, that
because of the riot, it will be
much more difficult to get Ne
groes to move in peacefully than
it may have been otherwise. He
said usually the human relations
commission works in advance
when a Negro plans to move to a
"white” community. He said the
commission usually works with
community organizations such as
■hurches and civic groups
f MEN'S Sbh S EL io»i
ig" j°°;M
fils (i
liani
To
Thur
To
Jame:
and 1
Lnda.
week:
He:
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