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The Appeal. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, May 14, 1904, Image 2

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THE APPEAL,
A NATIONAL AfRQ-AMER1CAN NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHED WEEKI/r BT
ADAMS BROS. EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS
49 E. 4th St., St. Paul, ninn.
ST. PAUL OFFICE,.
N 110 Union Blk. 4th & Cedar,
J. 0 ADAMS, Manager.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE,
Guaranty Loan Bids. Room 1020
HAkVEY B. BOUK, Manager.
CHICAGO OFFICE.
323-5 Dearborn St., Suite 310,
C. F. ADAMS, Manager.
1EMS, STRICTLY IN ADVANCE:
6IN~, LE COPY, ONE YEAR $2.00
Sir, _._ COPYs SIX MONTHS 1.10
Gi.^GLE COPY. THREE MONTHS 60
When subscriptions are by any means allowed
to run -witnour, prepaj ment, the terms are
ho cents for each 13 weeics and 5 cents for
each odd week, or at the rate of 82,40 per
ypar.
Remittances should be made by Express
Money Ordei, Post Office Money Ordei, Re
gistered Letter or Bank Draft. Postage
stamps will be received the sim as cash for
the fractional pai ts of a dollar. Only one
cent and two cent stamps uiken
Silver should never be senc through the mail.
Jt is almost sure to wear a bote through ths
en\elope and be lost, or else it may be sto
len. Persons who send silver to us in letters
do so at their own risk.
fWrriage and death notices 10 lines or less Si.
K.ich aotM^nal line 10 cents. Payment
strictly in advance, and to be announced at
all must come in season to be news.
Advertising rates, li cents per agate line, each
Insertion There are fourteen agate lines
in an inch, and about seven words in an
agate line. No single advertisements less
than SI. No discount allowea on less than
three flsontbs contract. Cash must accom
pany all o-dcrc rj-ona parties unknown to us.
Further ptr^iouurrs on application.
Shading notices 25 cents per line, each insertion.
No discounts to\ time or space Reading
matter is set in brevier typeabout six
woids to the line. All head-lines count
double.
Y"hr date on the address label shows when
subscription expnes Renewals should be
made two weeks pi ior to ezpiration, so that
no paper may be missed, as the paper stops
when time is out
II occasionaKy happens that papers sent to sub*
scribers aie lost or stolen In case you do
not receive hny number when due, inform us
by postal card at the expiration of five days
from that date, and we will cheerfully for
ward a duplicate of the missing number
Cammunlcations to receive attentions must be
newsy, upon important subjects, plainly
written only upon one side of the paper
must reach us Tuesdays if possible, anyway
not later than Wednesdajs and bear the sig
nature of the author No manuscript "re-
turned, unless stamps are sent for postage.
We do ov. -old ourselves responsible for the
views of our correspondents
Soliciting: agents wanted everywhere. Write
for terms.
In every letter that you wiite us never fail to
give your full name and address, plainly
written, post office, county id state. Busi
nessnetters of all kinds must be written on
separate sheets from letters containing news
or matter for publication
I KNOW CF THE BRAVERY AND
CHARACTER OF THE NEGRO SOL
MER. HE SM/ED MY LIFE AT
SANTIAGO. AND I HAVE HAD 'OC-
CASION TO SAY SO IN MANY ART-
|C1 ES AND SPEECHES. THE
Ri.UGH RIDERS WERE IN A BAD
ro^lTION WHEN THE NINTH AND
NTH CAVALRY CAME RUSHING
UP THt HILL, CARRYING EVERY-
THN! BEFORE THEM. HE NE-
C?0 SOLDIER HAS THE FACULTY
~"WtNG TO THE FRONT WHEN
i,E IS NEEDED MOST. IN THE
CIVIL WAR HE CAME 400,000
STRONG, AND I BELIEVE HE SAV-
tED THE UNION."President Roose
velt.
SATURDAY, MAY 14. 1904.
NATIONAL CONVENTION.'
The date tor holding the next Na
t TI Republican Convention, June 21,
at Chicago, is the latest of any con
vention in the history of that party.
It will be the thirteenth National Re
publican convention, which fact will
sivo the superstitious something to
talk about. Other Republican con
ventions have been held as follows:
Philadelphia, June 17, 1856Nomi-
nees. John Fremont, of California,
anl William L. Dayton, of New Jer
sey
Chicago, May 16, 1860Nominees,
Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, and Han
nibal Hamlin, of Maine.
Baltimore, June 7, 1864Nominees,
Abi-aham Lincoln, of Illinois, and An
drew Johnson, of Tennessee.
Chicago, May 20, 1868Nominees,
IThsses S. Grant, of Illinois, and
Jchuyler Colfax, of Indiana.
Philadelphia, June 5, 1872Nomi-
nees, Ulysses S. Grant, of IlliEOis,
^iid Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts.
Cincinnati, June 14, 1876Nomi-
r- es. R. B. Hayes, of Ohio, and Wii
I'am A. Wheeler, of New York.
Chicago, June 2, 1880Nominees,
.imes A. Garfield, of Ohio, and Ches
ter A Arthur, of New York
Chicago, June 3, 1884Nominees,
nes G. Blaine, of Maine, and John
Logan, of Illinois.
Chicago, June 19, 1888Nominees,
^lamin Harrison, of Indiana, and
^evi P. Morton, of New York.
Minneapolis, June 7, 1892Nomi-
nees, Benjamin Harrison, of Indiana,
nnd Wnitelaw Reid, of New York.
St. Louis, June 16, 1896Nominees,
-William McKmley, of Ohio, and Gar
rett A. Hobart, of New Jersey.
Philadelphia, June 19, 1900Nomi-
nees, William McKinley, of Ohio, and
Theodore Roosevelt, of New York.
Since the Republican party won its
first victory, it will be noticed that
,the first name on its ticket has al
^ra been from either Illinois, Indi
ana, or Ohio, with the single exception
*f 1884, when the honor went to
Maine. New York is yet to be give*
jswh a distinction, when Mr. Roose
velt _* _wrnated next JUM,
m^m^f-'^im
BISHOP H. M. TURNER.
Who Advocates the Idea That Afro-Americans Should Go to Africa.
The sDecific sum asked for is ONE
DOLLAR from each person who feels
enough interest in this vital race mat
ter to pay that amount, but no one is
limited, and anyone who wishes to do
There are a lot of "favored sons"
who are being boomed for the vice
P'es'dency just now, and it's hard to
tell which one will get the winning
boom at the Roosevelt ratification
meeting in Chicago in June.
Br^an says Parker is unfit
fif Bijan
9
The bill was paid.
SEND YOUR SUBSCRIPTION.
The Legal and Legislative Bureau
of the National Afro-American Gouncil
has issued a circular letter asking the
people for funds to prosecute the case
of Rev. H. T. Johnson vs. The Pullman
Car Co which has been appealed. It
is the intention of the director of the
Bureau in view of the recent ruling
of the Pullman Car Co., which virtu
ally excludes Afro-Americans from
their sleeping cars in the South and
bordering states, desires to make a
strong effort to get a favorable deci-1
sion in this Johnson case. The only
way the Bureau can get funds is for the National Convention employes
the people to send in such sums ab i chosen last week at a meeting of the
they feel able to subscribe to this sub-committee ot the Republican Na-
eause, in which every Afro-American tional Committee we find thet name of
in this country is vitally interested. Gurley Brewer of Indiana, who was
more is at liberty and earnestly urged lawyer and at one time was a clerk in
to do so. The finincial secretary of the office of the state-statistician. Of
the Bureau is Mr. Jesse Lawson, 2011 more than ordinary intelligence, he is
Vermont avenue, Washington, D. C,' an orator of considerable ability and
to whom subscriptions may be sent. has long been regarded as an lmpor-
________________ i tant factor in the politics of Indiana
Gurley, as he is popularly known, was
Afro-American delegates to the Meth
odist General Conference at Los An
geles are having a tough time finding
accommodations A few years ago
there was no color line in California,
but now, thanks to the propaganda of
The Tillman-Vardaman-Dixon-Graves
combine, hellish race prejudice has
grown
Dr. W S. Hammond, dean of the
Bible School at Walden University at
Nashville, Tenn got the floor Tues
day and presented a ringing resolution
agamst the action of certain hotels of
the city refusing to entertain Afro
American delegates
In his SDeech following the resolu
tion Dr Hammond declared that the
Afro-American delegates looked for a
heaven below on the Pacific coast, but
had been rudely awakened from their
blissful dream
The lesolution was received with ap
plause and adopted. Despite these
protests, there are certain Hotels and
restaurants in this city which will not
entertain the Afro-American delegates.
Mr Rindge, a wealthy local manufac
turer and Methodist connected with
the local committee on entertainment
ordei ed the committee to purchase a
hotel if necessary for these men and
send Mm the bill.
""Who
Hard Earned Wages.
An old church in Belgium decided to
repair its properties, and employed an
artist to touch up a large painting
Upon his oresenting his bill to the
mmittee in charge payment was re
fused unless 'he details were speci
fied whereupon he presented the
items as follows:
To coirocting the Ton Command
ments $5.12
Embel'ishmg Pontius Pilate and
putting new ribbons on his bon
net 3 02
Putting new tail on the rooster of
St Peter and mending his comb 2.20
Repluming and gilding the left
wing of the, Guardian Angel 5 18
Washing the servant of the High
Priest and putting carmine on
his cheeks 5.02
Renewing Heaven, and adjusting
the stars and cleaning the mcon 7.14
Touching up Purgatory and re
storing lost souls 3.06
Brightening up the flames of Hell,
putting a new tail on the Devil,
mending his left hoof and do
,ng several odd jobs for the
damned 7.14
Rebordeiing the robes of Herod,
and adjusting his wig 4.00
Taking the spots off the sun of
Tobias 1 30
Cleaning Balaam's ass and put
ting one shoe on him 1.70
Putting earrings in Sarah's ears 1.71
Putting a new stone in David's
sling, enlarging the head of Go
liath and extending Saul's legs. 6.13
Decorating Noah's ark and putting
a head on Shem 3.31
Mending the shirt of the Prodigal
son and cleaning his ear 2.39
$58.42
CORRESPONDENT WANTED
With View Matrimony Good
Chance for Young Lady.
Manila, Philippine Islands.
Editor Appeal:
I have the honor to advertise through
the columns of your valuable paper
for a lady correspondent who possess
es a good knowledge of stenography
and typewriting. I desire this corre
spondent with a view to matrimony.
I'll give references: Edward Cheat
ham, Quartermaster's Department,
Washington, D. T. Thomas For
tune, The Age, New York City Wil
liam McKinney, 1614 W. Houston
street, San Antonio, Texas.
The lady must be between 18 and 21
years of age^ My age is 21. Occupa
tion, business manager for the firm of
Lack & Davis, Manila, P.^L, and
Shanghai, China. IS**^ "S
Respectfully, *"\tA*
^*o ,T. Nimro*d-V McKinney, i
_r ^$*$~s
*:J O. Box 499,,
**i*
*8$$!
THE __B_-UC A NATIONA
WASHINGTON
THE CITVOF MAGNIFICENT DIS-
TANCES.
A Collection of a Few of the Events
Occurring Among the Afro-Ameri
cans of the Capital of This Great
and Glorious Nation for Our Many
Readers.
Washington, D. May 12.Among
selected as the messenger to the chair
man or the convention.
Mr. Brewer is a graduate of Wilber
force University and is the editor of
the "Indianapolis World." He is a
an alternate at the last national con
vention and we fully expected to hear
ot him as a delegate to the coming
convention.
Messrs. Rufus Estees and Chas. A
Jordan, two wellknown citizens ot
Chicago, spent several days in the city
visiting friends and attending meet
ings of the Atro-American Mercantile
Association -which they are promi
nent stockholders
Mr Charles W Chestnutt of Cleve
land, Ohio, addressed the Bethel Lit
erary Tuesday evening on The Ele
ments of Citizenship." The music was
furnished by the pupils of the Arm
strong Manual Training School, Miss
H. A. Gibbs directress, assisted by
Miss Mary Europe, pianist.
Mrs Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Miss
Mabel Brooks and Miss Kruse, teach
ers in the schools of Wilmington, Del.,
are enjoying their spring holidays in
this city.
Mrs. Chas. E. Hall, who has been
quite sick for several we^ks, is conval
escent
Mi Webster Barton Beatty'" of Oak
Park, 111., graduated from the dental
college of Howard University this
week
The iriends of Mr. Chas ^Pickett
gave a "German lunch" in his honor
last Saturday evening, and those who
were present will long remember the
occasion Mr. Frank A Byron of Chi
cago was toastmaster. Although Mr
Pickett made no special announce
ment, bis filends are inclined to be
lieve the rumor that his engagement
to a charming Washington teacher and
society leader will soon be announced
and anticipation ot this event Mr
Pickett was congratulated Among
those who ate the cheese, "red hots,"
sour kraut, etc., were Messrs. Chas. J.
Pickett, Henry Slaughter, Frank A.
Byron, Campbell. J. Harry Harris,
G\ Davis. W. S Crouse, Fred D.
McCracken, Willis Mitchell and Chas.
E. Hall.
It has been discovered by one of the
capitol expert stenographers, Joseph E.
Johnson, an Afro-American, who was
Speaker Henderson's confidential
short-hand man, that the author of
what is known as the "Tironian Notes"
was an African freedman by the name
of Tiro. This ex-slave invented actual
short-hand characters and an alphabet
over a hundred years before the bi/th
of Christ-
While looking over some old manu
scripts in the Congressional library
the other day, Mr Johnson hit upon
an ancient volume which was printed
in the fifteenth century in Latin, and
which gave him an inkling to this in
formation. A further search'Sn the
same direction revealed the fact that a
modern author as late as the year 1882
had made a similar discovery and had
written a book upon the suDJect.
It is now Mr. Johnson's intention to
interest as many ^foreign stenograph
ers as possible in the subject of the
"Tironian Notes" and obtain a picture
or likeness, if one can possibly be had,
of the celebrated though long forgotten
Marcus Tullius Tiro, called by histjO
rians "The Father of Stenography."
"One interesting feature of this sys
tem of short-hand/.' said Mr. Johnson
in speaking of the subject, "is that
Tiro did actual verbatim reporting with
his system, and history shows that the
great orations of Cicero, which he re
ported verbatim, would have been lost
to posterity had he not invented his
"Tironian Notes," which consisted of
certain short-hand/' signs, many of
which are still usfed in the best sys
tems of the stenography orthe present
day."
Mr. Johnson, who numbers among
his friends many of the white steno
graphic reporters of the country is an
expert stenographer and wks appointed
as an assistant in the House of Repre
sentatives by the late ex-Speaker
Thomas B. Reed, who held him in very
high esteem. Mr. Johnson was re
tained by ex-Speaker Henderson and
also by Speaker Cannon.
The Woman's League, an organiza
tion, of Afro-American women of this
city, which has for years maintained a
day nurserya place where the chil
dren of Door mothers can be fed and
cared for while the, mothers are absent
at daily labor, has just closed a very
successful rummage sale which has
Manila, been in progress for two weeks.
'p
Helen A. Cook, president of the organ-
iZatloII 5 S {$*
^'{pim
."iW-rftli fit
*?*#}&-_ _L.
The cfioir* of St. Paul's A.**" M. E.
Church'on Eighth street S. W., assis
ted the choirs of Metropolitan A. M.
ifi.- Zion, Israel C. M. E., Ehenezer M.
and Zion Baptist churches, made a
presentation of a gold watch chain and
xocket to Prof. John T. Layton, director
ot the S. Coleridge Taylor Choral So
ciety, as a mark of appreciation and
esteem for services rendered these
churches.
Mr. George W. Small wood was chair
man of the committee, and presented a
program of entertainment as follows:
omg mg by St. Paul's choir, orchestral
accompaniment welcome address, Mr.
George Smallwood solo, Mr. James
Lancaster, Ebenezer Church recita
tion solo, Mrs. G. Moxley, Israel C. M.
E. Church recitation, Prof. E. A. Mc
Girt, editor of Girt's Magazine solo,
Prof. J. T. Layton, accompanied by his
little son, Turner recitation' instru
mental solo, Master and Turner Lay
ton solo, Miss Gertrude Brown, Zion
Baptist Church presentation by Rev.
F. P. Lewis, pastor of St. Paul's mu
sic by choir.
Mr. Fred D. McCracken of St. Paul
was recently elected a member of the
governing board of the Pen and Pencil
Club of this city.
Chas. E. Hall.
HE AFRO-AMERICAN AND THE
PUBLIC.SCHOOLS.
_____
To the Afro-American in the South:
The problem of providing proper
school facilities for our children is of
gravest importance to us as a race.
The thinking people of New York and
of Massachusetts feel that a ten
months' school session is necessary to
fit their children for life, and a gener
ous public school system answers this
demand. How much less can we af
ford to give our children? The object
ot this appeal is to force from Afro
American fathers and mothers, ftfom
Afro-American men and women who
feel and think, a prompt and effective
answer to this vital question.
The great majority of our people
must depend upon the public schools
for all the education they will receive.
Not more than one per cent of the
Afro-American children of school age
will enter a private or an endowed
school, and upon Ihe public school
rests the burden of educating the re
maining ninety-nine per cent, if indeed
they receive any education. It is evi
dent that our progress in the indus
tries, in business, in college and indus
trial schools, as in morality and relig
ion, will be based upon the foundation
woik doiie in the public schools.
To fail here, then, to neglect our
yeuth in the most formative period of
their lives, is to do them an irreme
dial harm. To speak more definitely,
I find f%gt after careful investigation
the Afro-American children in the ex
slave stages are in school on an aver-
age are in school that in North Car
olina, for example, the average school
teim is only 68 days, and that only
22.5 per cent of the Afro-American
children attend school at all I find
that in thirteen of the former slave
states 90 per cent of the Afro-Amer
ican children of school age did not
attend any school for as much as six
months during the year 1900, taking
that year as an example.
It requires no argument, then, to
prove that if these conditions control,
we shall continue to be classed as ari
ignorant, illiterate people.
With these facts before us, the main
question, then, is, What shall be done?
The first answer is that we pay our
taxes, and thereby aid the state in
supporting the public schools. Be
cause of their poverty, and perhaps,
in some cases, their indifference, the
states are not supporting an effective
school system for our people, espe
cially in the smaller towns and rural
districts 'The system is but little
better for white children outside of
HIP large cities. Mere fault-finding
with public officials will not educate
our children In the present condition
schools, I would urge
with all the earnestness I can summon
that our ministers, teachers, business
men, leaders, parents and newspapers
insist that our people shall
1. Go before the public school au
thorities and ask for better school fa
cilities.
2. See that all taxes, especially the
poll taxes, which go directly in most
states into the school fund, are
promptly paid.
3. Co-operate in every way possible
with the public school oflScials, and
raise money by private taxation, or
other methods, to supplement the pres
ent school funds until the school terms
are extended to at leasteight months.
Unless the'child is not kept in school
for at least seven or eight months
the year, we cannot expect him to be
educated. A three months' school
means practically no school.
4. In connection with the school
term of proper length, erect a good,
comfortable school house and properly
furnish it Some of the schools to be
found in the rural districts are not fit
-for any child to spend a day in.
In conclusion I wou'd repeat that in
the present important period in our
growth as a people, immediate atten
tion to the public schools is fundamen
tal. If each community will do its full
duty, the whole race will be lifted and
strengthened, and a general quicken
ing will bo evident everywhere.
Booker T. Washington.
Tuskegee, Ala., April 25, 1904
AMERICO NEWSPAPER.
age ofToT^ys In the7ea7 and That |S9th Infantry Roge^r ^war d^ 107th
only one-third of the children- of school
iREV. G. W. GAINES.
hmiirientCarulid|Lte^op Election to
P0LI1TCAL P0IN1|B
FROM ALL PARTS OF OUR GREAT
COUNTRY.
The Politicians and Their Dofngs in
the ^Country, State and City. Al
though the Campaign la a Long Way
Off, the Pot Begins to Boil.*
Talk of Secretary Shaw for vice
president has been renewed at Wash
ington. He is a good campaigner and
mixer.
"President Roosevelt will be nomi
nated by acclamation and elected by
a large majority, as the Democrats
cannot bring torward a candidate who
can defeat him," says Senator Albert
J. Hopkins of Illinois.
Senator Hopkins, in predicting he
nomination and election of President
Roosevelt by a large majority, said
Democrats are without issues and that
Bryan's attack on 'Albany platform
eliminates Judge Parker.
The four delegates at large to the
Republican National Convention from
Kentucky are: W. O. Bradley, Rich
ard P. Ernest, Geo. W Lumg and Dr
E. E. Underwood. The latter is an
Afro-American. Kentucky is all right
sometimes.
Senator CuIIom in a recent inter
view says that the Republican party
is in good shape generally s-peaking,
but would be greatly gratified if the
party in Illinois would dwell together
harmony and select a gubernatorial
ticket which* would bring about unifi
cation.
Soldiers' Adarew_cs Wanted.
Henry N. Copp, attorney-at-law,
Washington, D. wa&ts the addresses
of below named Afro-American sol
diers, who served in the Civil War if
dead, their heirs. Information will be
paid for.
John W. Dent, 3rd Cavalry Jerry
Smith, 3rd Artillery Daniel Banks, Al
bert Bates, Peter Broddy, Paton Giles,
Anderson Hoffman, George Nally,
George Nikols, William Robbms,
Joseph Roney, Rowan Samuels, and
Willis Stone, 5th Cavalry George
Bibb, Charles Cantwell, Jesse Dar
nell, Louis Darbney, John Gault, Frank
Mcli'arland, John Price, Dennis Rob
berts, and Washington Smith, 13th
Artillery Charles Browne, George W.
Harmon and Simon Smith, 11th In
fantry Huston Bailess, William Brod
well, Henry Clay, and Elias Smith,
27th Infantry: Edward Washington,
and John C. Louis, 28tn infantry Wil
liam A. Bates, George Cooper, Heijfry
Crouch, Henry Harrison, Patrick Hen
ry, and George Sizemore, 43rd Infant
ry Granville Elliott. Matthew Felts,
David Hunt, Albert Jackson, William
King, Peter Tardy, and William Winn,
S
SX
PROPER USE OF THE LUNGS*
Writer Asserts That Few Persons
Understand How to Breathe.
Mr. Ryder talks entertainingly, anil
with apparent certainty. "Three timea
every minute," he declares, "the blood
makes a complete circuit of the sys
tem, carrying oxygen to the tissues,
and coming back to the lungs laden
with poison. One-third of all the
poison generated by the body is ex
creted through the lungs. The iemain
der is, normally, carried off by the
bowels, skin and kidneys. People
often talk of needing a change of air.
What they need is not so much a
change of air as a change in their man
ner of using the air they have. Most
people in breathing use only a small
portion of the lungs. A recent investi-'
gator makes the startling statement
that in an examination covering sev
eral thousand cases, he found less
than 1 per cent, that breathed cor
rectly.
..tfmSt-"! U9a_jaa '?J9qi3H aotfV-
pooy am oj
0OA" Piaii pa\OI9Cl J3AOT
'j2Bj sasmd }i puv
'poojq aqa ut SAYO[q pu(A\ }oq 3U.1
,JB3p i ajir
and matron
Mon
Venn
^^^Jf&
i
Harrison Butler, Robert Burdette, John
A. Cecil. Simon Cook, David Wilmot,
Moses Etherton, Squire Garrison, Hen
ry Hamilton, John W. Hopkins, Jerry
Morris, Grandison Smith, Beverly Tay
lor and George Washington, 123rd In
fantry Timothy Filan and Patrick Mc
Cormick, 135th Infantry.
Ministers of the gospel and secreta
ries of lodges, and others interested,
may help worthy families by giving
public announcement of the above list
and posting it in conspicuous places.
X.
'ursSB
jduiaj PUB sjisti(M. u{s pio aqj puv
'j**u dais sa^Ca anoX puv
ujuiq aqj uo svAOiq puiAv pBiu aq^.
aiP U^qs Xaqj,
uoos |3ut\{[ ail} so} '9JH PIW* aiti,,
ijo SBq jqSiu aqx
'uooui 9qj tuojj SAVOiq puiM. a?tqM
uooi/\i aqj IUOJJ. pujAA 'Mi.
Gfass IVToney.
Glass money has been used front
time immemorial by the Arabs of Fez
zan and Tazili and in Upper Bur*
man are huge leaden tokens issued by*
the late Kins Theebau and wLicfr
still do duty, although they weigh
three-quarters of a pound apiece, and
it takes seven of them to equal im
value a single Chinese dollar.
the Bishopric.
Defective Page
TUSKEGEE
Normal and MostriaJ Institute
TUSKEGEE ALABAMA.
(INCORPORATED)
Organized July 4, 1881, by the State Legis.
latore as The Tuskegee State Normal School.
Exempt from taxation.
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON, Principal.
WARREN LOGAN, Treasurer.
LOCATION
rnthe Black Belt of Alabama where the
blacks outnumber the whites three to one.
ENROLLMENT AND FACULTY
Enrollment last year 1,253 males. 88*4,
females, 371. Average attendance, 1,10S.~
lastructors, 83.
COURSE O STUDY
English education combined with industria.
trailing 28 industries in constant operation
VALUE OF PROPERTY
Property consisting of 2.267 acres of land.
50 buildings almost wholly built with student
labor, is valued at $350,000, and no mortgage.
NEEDS
$50 annually for the education of each stu.
dent ($200 enables one to finish' the course
fl,000creates permanent scholarship Students
pay their own board in cash and labor.)
Money in any amount for current expenses
and building.
Besides the work done by graduates as class
room and industrial leaders, thousand* are
reached through the Tuskegee Negro Confer
Tuskegee is 40miles east of Montgomery and
13o miles west of Atlanta on the Western Rail
ro&x. r.-. Alabama.
Tuskegee is a quiet, beautiful old Southern
town, and is an ideal place for study. The cli
mate 13 at all times mild and un.form, thus
making the place an excellent winter resort.
SCOTIA SEMINAEY
CONCORD, N. C.
This well known school, established for
the higher education of girls will open
for the next term October 1. Every effort
will be made to provide for the comfort,
health and thorough instruction of stu
dents. Expense for board, light, fuel
washing. $45, for term of eight months*
Addi ess
Rev. D. J. 8_tterfleld, D. D.,
Concord, N.
crSpttf
CDI_LE__-ES JUD ECHflQLL..
Knowles Building. Boys* Hall. Sltme Hall. Girls' H_ll. Mods* Homo.
ATLANTA UNIVERSITY, Atlanta- Oa.
_Qsectar!an Christian Institution, devoted .especially to advanced education College, Nor
na!, College Preparatory and ng- ish gh School courses, With Industry Training Saperi*
Athietic f~ boys Physical cul*zjre for girls Home 1^1
advantages in Music and" Printing Ath
ad training. Aid given to needy and deservifrj students
ia October. For catalog-* s__t information, address ._
President HORACE BUMSTEAD. D.&.
Khoxville College Classical, Scientific Agricultural. Mechanical? JCormal and Common
School Courses, together with Theological aitd Medical Schools Filtj -five Dollars a Year
will cover all expenses of boa-rd, tuition, luel, HnphO and furnished room. Separate home
littlie i for littl girls and- another fbr little \oy from 6 to 1-5 years. Term egin.s las.t.
Monday In September Send ior catalogue to _sldeat o* KaocvUle Ctoiicj?, uoxvill^
vnr
AVERY COLLEGE
TRADES SCHOOL
ALLEGHENY, P. A.
A Practical, Literary atid IndoatrtaJ
Trades School for Airo-American BOJA and,
Girls. Unusual advantages for Girls and a
separate building. Address.
JOSEPH D. MASON: Pr'dcipal.
-tHec-heny, Pa.
*loiTistow_NormalCoiiep
FOUNDED IN J881.
Fourteen teachers. Elegant anl oommodli
ous buildings. Climate unsurpassed. Depart
ments: College Preparatory Normal, EDg
Msh. Music, Shorthand Typewriting and _o
dustrlal Training..
FIFTY DOLLARS IN ADVANCE
Will pay for board, room, light, fuel, tuition
and incidentals lor th entire^ year. Board
96.00 per iiontl tuition. $2.00 pentetm
Thorough work, done in each department
Seadffor circuia to the president,
AlfiV. 4 0D8O2I 8. HIIX, D.
l_o~-4tOn 1""-,n.
NewEnfllaiuJ
CONSERVATORY
OF MUSIC
BOSTON, Mass.
AiIm
equit
the Advantages of (be finest and most oompletelj'
equipped Conservators building in the world) the at-
mospbereofA recognized center of Art-andMuMcand
sasociatioiitwith tbe masters in the- Profession are
offered students at tbe New England Gonseriaiory of
MSiaic. Thorough work in nil tftpartinents-of music
Courses can oejuranged in Elocution and Oratory
GEOR0E W. CHADWICH, Musical Director.
All particulars and year booA trill be sal on apphcaii ,n
I
BAITIMOREr r OHIO R. R.
JSJJL TRAINS VIA\VW_SHINGTON
Term begins the first Wed_es_$
Virginia Normal Collegiate
Institute.
PETERSBURG, VA.
"^-partments- Normal and CoJ'e*-
criate Special attention to Vocal an*
Instrumental Music,Theoretical Agn
culture, Sewing andiokin_-.
Healthy Location heated by steacr
Ji-hted by "'^ctricity: room, ooasv
tuitiou, light a n- h-at.$80.
For Catalop and Pai*tlc-
write to J. H. JOHNSTON,
Pre*udea_
_,_..,..
oAMMOfi THE0L06ICAL SEMINARY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
AIMS AND METHODS
The aim of this school is to do prac
tical work in helping men towards suc
cess in the ministry. Its course of study
is broad and practicali its ideas aie high
its work is thorough its methods are
fresh, systematic, clear and simple
CCUfteE O STUDY
The regular course of studv occupies
three years, and covers the lines of work
in the several departments of theo'ogical
lnstiuction usually pursued in the lead
ing theological seminajies of the country.
EXPENSES AND AID
Tuition and room rent aie free The
apartmBnts for students aie rlainlv fur
nished. Good' board can be had for
seven dollars per month. Buildings heat
ed by steam.
Aid from loans without inteiest, and
gifts of friends, are granted to deseiv
students who do then utmost in the
line of selfhel No joung man with
graoe, gifts-, and energy, need be depmed
of the ad\antages now opened to him
this Seminary. Fbr further particulars
address
G, ADKINSON, D. D.,
Ptes* Gammon Theological Seminary,
A^LANNTlA, G30RGIA.
BISHOP COLLEGE,
MARSHALL, TEXAS,
OFFERS EVKRY ADVANTAGE
TO STUDENTS.
For beauty of situation, commodious
nee* of buildings and oompleteness of
outfit, this institution, ia unsurpassed
by any school for colored people west of
the Mississippi Speoial courses for
prenchere-and-teaohera. LAB6K AND
EXPERIENCED' VVUCCIStTt. Five
large-brio- buildings, also steam plant
laundry. A new briok dining hall and
dormitory now building. Chemical,
physical, biological laboratories.
Courses io carpentry, printing, black
smithing, sewing* dressmaking, bouse
keeping, cooking,.nursiD&. COL1I1EGK
GRADUATES UAT APPLY FOR
PERMANENT CERTIFICATES.
Students canimake para of espouses by
work. For particulars and cata'ogue
address ARTHUR B. CHACTBE, Pre dent.
TILOTSd COLLEGE,
AUSTlim, TEXAS,
The Oldest and Best School in Texas for
Colored Students. Eaoclty mostly gradu
ates of well known oolleges in the north.
Beputation unsurpassed. Manual train
ing a part of the regular course. Music a
special feature of t'10 school. Special ad
vantages for earnest students seeking to
help themselves. Send for catalogue and
circular to
REV. MARSHALL R. GAINES, A.M.,
E'RvB^HB EST,
Attt-Kfclt-t- Texat.
SAMUa HUST0\ GOUESE,
A Chrf8fi.ni Sttrcroi i^e^ce- pa_uitr
Progressive imall departments, best Method*
Oftlfcatriuctioni Bfealth- of Students carefully
looked] after Students taught to do manual
labor as well as- think* Fo catalogue and
other, information, wriite to the preoideat,
R..SR. LGMMMXBfiOOD. AUSTIN, TBXAH,
-SeND FOR BOOKLET TO
.i%Y,gro50Mf6CeYPSILANJI.MICH-
t\
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