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The Appeal. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, April 06, 1918, Image 2

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THE APPEAL
AN AMERICAN NEWSPAPER
ISSUED WEEKLY
J. .ADAMS, EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
ST. PAUL OFFICE
No. 301-2 Court Block, 24 E. 4th st
J. Q. ADAMS, Manager.
PHONE: N. W. CEDAR 5649.
TRI-STATE 23 776.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE
No. 2812 Tenth Avenue South
J. IV. SBIXRRH. Manager.
Entered nt the PostofBce In St. Panl,
Mlnnota, aeeond-claMi aaall
matter, June A, 1885, under
Act of Cong-rets,
Marek 8. 1879.
TERMS, STRICTLY IN ADVANCE:
SINGLE COPY, one year 92.00
SINGLE COPY, six month* 1.00
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gistered Lettei or Bank Draft. Postage
fctamps will be leoelved the same as cash for
the fractional parts of a dollar. Only one
cent and two cent stamps taken.
Stiver should never be sent through the maiL
It Is almi'St sure to wear a hole through the
envelope and be lost, or eltw it may be sto
len. Perrons who send silver to us In letters
do so at their own risk.
Marriage and death notices 10 lines or less 81.
Each additional line 10 cents. Payment
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all must come in season to be news.
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words to the line. All head-Uses count
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when time is out.
I occasionally happens that papers sent to sub
scribers are lost or stolen. In case you do
not receive any number when due, inform us
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from that date, and we will cheerfully for
ward a duplicate of the missing number.
Communications to receive attentions must be
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turned, unless stamps are sent for postage.
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views of our correspondents.
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for terms. Sample copies free.
to every letter that you write us never fail to
give your full name and address, plainly
written, post office, county and state. Bust.
neat letters of all kinds must be written on
separate sheets from letters containing news
or matter for publication
"Any prejudice whatever will
be Insurmountable If thosewho
do not share in It themselves
truckle to it and flatter it and
accept it aa a law of nature."
John Stuart Mill.
SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1918.
"HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL IN THE
HUMAN BREAST."
Every once in a while something is
said toy somebody, somewhere, that
gives us fresh hope for the future.
One cannot talk intelligently on any
subject, unless he has given that sub
ject intelligent thought. Everything
that man has ever done good, bad or
indifferent was the result of thought.
Thought created the universe thought
has maintained it, and will forever do
so. When people think right and ex
press their thoughts, right must event
ually prevail.
So many white people in the United
States think wrong, speak wrong, act
wrong, in regard to their colored fel
low citizens, that it is very, very re
freshing when we hear expressions of
right thoughts from them.
The above thoughts were en
gendered by expressions made by
Bishop Woodcock and Dr. R. W. Pat
ton, executive secretary of the Home
and Foreign Missionary Board of the
Episcopal church at a largely attended
meeting in Maculey's Theatre, Louis
ville, Ky., Sunday, March 24. Bishop
Woodcock who presided said, after re
counting the progress the colored peo
ple had made: "You would better get
right on the 'Negro Question,' or, God
helping you a time will come when you
will wish you had, and you ought to
feel it."
Dr. Patton said among other things:
"The Negroes have given to the
world the highest of all virtues, the
Law of Love. They, more than any
other people, demonstrate the ideals of
patience and loyalty. They_are loyal
when they have some reason to be dis
loyal. When the war is over, the
Negroes having given their sons to die
on the battlefields of Europe, will have
an awakening, and will never again be
satisfied with past conditions. WE
CANNOT WIN THIS" WAR WITHOUT
THEM. We had better get ready to
meet them in a fair, just and econ
omical manner."
Dr. Prank Crane, the great thinker
and writer in a recent article on,
"What W Ail Can Do," said: "Thiftk
humanity instead of race hate. Thi
WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
The following appeal is appearing
in the daily press:
To the Editor:
May I be permitted to appeal in this
personal way to your readers for a
war need very pressing and very de
serving of patriotic attention, and yet
easily overlooked. The newly-organ
ized Circle for Negro War Relief is
trying to provide for enlisted and
drafted men the same comfort and
cheer that numerous societies are giv
ing the white troops also to care for
the many cases of distress in Negro
families where the wage earner is
serving the country.
One-tenth of our troops are colored
men. Surely a movement to organize
them and work toward a great com
mon end will make the Negroes bet
ter citizens (just as all other war work
Is making better citizens) and will
have results reaching far beyond the
present crisis.
The Circle for Negro War Relief is
approved by, and is working with the
National Red Cross. It aims to do a
needed work that might have to be
left partially undone in the present
enormous demands on our national
Red Cross.
Our office (donated by a friend) is
at 489 Fifth avenue, New York. We
need funds at once. Every penny will
go to actual relief work. jOur colored
troops have been brave, loyal fighters
from the days of the Civil war to San
Juan hill. Whatever one's view of
race problems, there can be no two
opinions of helping thousands of col
ored men and women to be more effi
cient soldiers and citizens and so help
win the war.
EMILIE BIGELOW HAPGOOD.
It is possible that the American
Red Cross has become so UNAMERI
CAN that it has drawn the color line
and made the formation of a separate
organization for colored soldiers nec
essary?
What does the RED CROSS stand
for?
Thousands of colored Americans
are members of the National Red
Cross having donated their dollars
during the drive for membership last
MOOREFIELD STOREY DRIVE.
For 50,000 Members of the National Association for the Advancement
of Colored People.
The National Association for the Ad- zens and an essential element of na-
yancement of Colored People was tional strength and all are asked to
founded on Lincoln's birthday, 1909, join the Association for this common
with headquarters in New York, principle of justice and civil liberty
There are now ninety branches in as The Association admits members upon
many of the cities of the country, and payment of any amount from one dol-
all are to jom in a drive for 50,000 lar per year upwards
members from April 17 to 27 as a The Association feels that the
testimonial to Hon. Moorefield Storey, American people have a right to be
of Boston, the Association's president proud of the one hundred thousand
in recognition of his services to the colored soldiers now serving in the
nation in the Louisville segregation regular army and the national army,
case which was declared unconstitu- As a result of an active campaign on
S?* J. Supreme Court of the the part of this Association an officers'
United States last November. This de- training camp for colored men was in-
cision is considered the greatest vie- augurated at Des Moines, la., as a con-
tory since the enactment of the Fif- sequence of which nearly seven hun-
teenth Amendment. dred colored officers were commis-
The Association appeals to all fair- sioned.
minded citizens, white and colored, to The Association, through an anti-
join with it in the effort to secure lynching fund contributed by believers
simple justice under the law for law and order, investigates as many
colored citizens who represent over cases as possible of lynching and
mobBoston
one-tenth of our citizenship. This na- violence, gives publicity to the fa~cts
tion-wide appeal for membership is not regarding them, and endeavors to
on narrow grounds of race or class arouse public opinion against the mob
privilege but on the broad ground of spirit. Annually, through the gift of
justice, of equal protection of all citi- the Chairman of the Board of Direct-
zens under the law without distinc- ors of the Association, the Spingarn
tion of race or creed or class. The Medal is awarded for the highest or
maintenance of these just principles is noblest achievement by a colored
ot equal interest to all classes of citi- American during the preceding year
fellowship and not egotism. Thoughts year. They asked no questions about
are soldiers Drill them, feed them, the way the money was to be used but
and make them fight in humanity's
cause
supposed it was for the benefit of
ALL AMERICAN SOLDIERS.
A strange condition seems to have
arisen.
What does it mean?
Let us have light.
SOLDIERS OUGHT TO INSURE.
Congress has enacted what is know
as the War Insurance Law which pro
vides, for a small sum, a war risk up
to a limit of $10,000 and every soldier
and sailor should carry this insurance.
The cost is so small that it never
would be missed from the monthly
pay.
Under this law, every soldier now
in the services, commissioned, enlisted
or drafted, no matter what his age,
has the right between now and April
12, 1918, to take out life and total
disability insurance up to $10,000 at
low cost, and, what is very important,
without medical examination. Those
hereafter enlisted or drafted may
take out War Risk Insurance within
120 days after enlistment.
In case of the soldier's death, each
$1,000 of War Risk Insurance will pay
his beneficiary $5.76 per month for
twenty years. War Risk Insurance
holds good after the war.
This is a great opportunity and all
friends and relatives of colored sol
diers should write and urge them to
insure now before it is too late.
Application blanks and full infor
mation about War Risk Insurance may
be procured by any soldier from the
Bureau of War Risk Insurance, Wash
ington, D. from his
commandin0
1= .f.H Bai an
THE SIN OF SILENCE
To sin by silence when we should
protest makes cowards out of men.
The human race has climbed on pro
test. Had no voice been raised against
injustice, ignorance and lust, the in
quisition yet would serve the law, and
guillotines decide our least disputes.
The few who dare must speak and
speak again to right the wrongs of
many.Ella Wheeler Wilcox.
is stationed. All othe.r persons desir
ing information should address the
Director of the Bureau of War Risk
Insurance, Washington, D. C.
"NEGRO" ADVISER. NOT WANTED.
Pressure has been brought by
"neinjustice
groes" so the wires tell us, to have a
"negro" adviser appointed to tell the
Department of Labor what ought to
be done along "negro" labor lines. Sec
retary Wilson has announced that a
"negro" will not be selected as a
permanent representative but 'promi
nent colored men will be consulted.
Secretary Wilson has the right idea.
No patriotic colored American wishes
a jimcrow representative. It would be
all right to appoint a colored man as
an assistant secretary of labor 'but to
appoint a "negro" adviser and confine
Stamps.
._ San Juan, P. R.Ai flame of indigna-
officer, or from the insurance officer
tio
at the camp or contonment where he Eii^wS^ n^
him to jimcrow duties would be segre
gation in its worst form.
"Negroes" who are asking for segre- ..-^u
gated places in the department of the
government are doing the colored peo
pie a great wrong. Any man who
CENSUS PLUM CAKE.
The 1920 Census Bill provides for
a staff of 92,000 employes to take
the census. Conforming to the
policy of the administration with re
spect to partisan appointments they
will all be Democrats. This is added
evidence that the army will be re
cruited from the ranks of the Repub
licans. The party out of power and
spurned by the President is the party
which has made possible this draft
law and which is furnishing by far
the greater percentage of the fight
ing force. Milton has a verse "On
His Blindness" which may be aptly
applied to both parties:
To the Republicans
"Thousands at his bidding speed,
And post o'er land and ocean with
out rest."
And as to Democrats
"They also serve who only stand and
wait."
Except that the Republicans wait
for the ships, whilst the famished
Democrats wait at the political pie
counter. Safe for Democrats!
SHOULD ABANDON SEGREGA-
TION.
Dr. Gulick, secretary of the commis
sion on relations with the orient of the
Federal Council of Churches said in
recently:
"America should abandon its humil
iating and discriminating treatment of
Japanese and Chinese in this country,"
he said, "and adopt an oriental policy
fitted to hold those people permanently
to friendly relations with the demo
cratic nations of the west."
Dear Doctor G. would it not be well
for America to begin right here at
home and "abandon its humiliating
and discriminatory treatment" of its
own colored citizens? How about it
dear doctor.
THANK GOD1
The commission on union of the
Presbyterian Church North and the
Presbyterian ehurch South failed to
agree on a plan for the proposed
merger of the two great church
bodies at the final session of this joint
conference at Atlantic City. Thank
God that the North would not agree
to the color line proposals of the in
famus Souhern branch which would
have dragged Christianity in the mire.
A commission appointed by the
Bishops' Council of the A. M. E.
Church to make representation against
discrimination against the colored peo
ple in this country was received by
President Wilson. The delegation
left a written document,
response of the President was
guarded.
dno withou* and still, maintain your ef
ficiency, is a non-essential at a time ALL WORK CONFIDENTIAL.
when the government needs the money
-wi. ^A /i*,r
odious custom of racial separation in
the army would be put in practice upon
them.
A petition in the form of a resolu
tion was^ introduced in the house of
representatives by Mr. Manuel F.
Rossy, one of the white members, set
ting forth in detail and eloquence the
and inhumanity of forcing
discrimination on a country wherein
it was hitherto unknown. The resolu
tion was not only adopted unani
mously by the lower house but passed
the senate without a single dissenting
vote.
Petition Ignored.
The resolution was presented to
President Wilson and it was ignored
The Porto Rican Regiment that was
formerly mixed was cut to pieces and
men of color put In separate divisions
all the draftees have been separated
and shoved into quarters according to
color. Porto Rico has no higher ap
peal it is bitter, indignant, ibut help
less.
Introduced by Native Leader.
Representative Mr. Manuel Rossy,
[who introduced the resolution is the
leader of the republican minority in
the lower house. In studied and tel
ling language Mr. Rossy presented the
reasons why Porto Rico objected to
divisions in the army, based on color
lines.
Porto Rico has long been celebrat
for the unity of the races there.
Members of the darker race are in
every branch of industrial and civil
life. The largest department store
in San Juan, the capitol, is owned by a
colored man. The senior member of
the Senate, who has held his seat by
four consecutive appointments, by the
United States and by an open election,
as a colored man. The judge corre
sponding to our circuit-judge and hav
ing under his jurisdiction the me
tropolis of Porto Rico, San Juan, is a
colored man. The commissioner of
trades and labor is a colored man.
SAINT PAUL
&riJames
PPe
a
Mrs. Mitchell is suffering
fro
Mrs. J. L. Ervin has gone to Sparta,
Wis, to reside.
Mrs. Whitehead has moved to
al Ave
52
2
W
CeHtr
CA
of grippe.
Mrs.e Tattack
sevr
would accept such an appointment,
would necessarily be a jimcrow man sates on the road to Success
and he would do his country great
harm in bolstering up the color line.
Give colored men representation in
the government as Americans, not as
"negroes."
N
you could thereby invest in Thrift ing done in the best possible wax
Segregation in Porto Rico.
(By F. B. Parden Returned War Cor
respondent From Europe.)
(From the Boston Guardian.)
tIme
state
swept through the length and
Unte
th
tha
Po
tol
Jj
Ri
H. Lylesthe is recovering from
You can't very well dodge the toll
Mr. and Mrs. E, W. Graham have
moved to 175 E. Acker street
Mr. John Lewis, 895 W. Central
avenue is ill with the grippe.
After a week's vacation all branches
of the Red Cross has resumed work.
The pocket money of most women
comes out of the pocket of some man.
Now is the time for every good
eater to come to the aid of his coun
try.
Everybody get ready for the Third
Liberty Loan drive which opens April
6th.
Mrs H. Jackman, 574 Fuller avenue
was on the sick list a few days this
week.
Miss Missouri Anderson, Aurora
avenue, is detained at home with
grippe
FOR RENTFive room flat 874 La
Fond street, up stairs, $16.00. Tel
Dale 7557.
Mr. M. Duncan, 57 Sycamore St.,
fell and was painfully injured, fractur
ing two ribs.
The St. Paul allotment for the Third
Liberty Loan is $12,500,000, how much
of it will you take.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Smith entertained
Mme. A. Porter-Rooks at Easter
dinner last Sunday.
The Maids and Matrons club met
on Wednesday afternoon with Miss
Mae Williams, 415 Charles St.
Mr. A. Tripplet called on Mr. Theo
Charleston at Glasgow, Mont., last
week when enroute to the coast.
The stork visited the home of Mr
and Mrs Jas. J. Billups, 1527 Cumber
land avenue and left a little son.
Misses Clara and Freda Alexander
of Mitchell, S. D., are the guests of
Mrs. Charles Saunders, 650 Fuller
street.
FOR RENTTwo rooms, one on
first and one on second floor, for
gentlemen only, 972 Rice near Front.
Mrs E Battles.
The Handicraft Art Club met Thurs
day afternoon with Mrs. Wm B.
Tandy, 593 Iglehart avenue. A dainty
luncheon was served.
Mrs. John Lewis who has been visit
ing in Chicago, St Louis and Kansas
City for the past two months returned
to the city Wednesday.
Mrs. Harvey Esters, 396 Rondo
street was called to Chicago, Wednes
day, on account of serious illness of
her mother, Mrs. Lambert.
LADIES wishing anything in the
line of hair work or scalp treatment
may have their wants supplied by call
ing on Mrs. Elizabeth Battles, 972
Rice street
In this was manifested the love of
God toward us, because that God sent
His only begotten Son into the world
that we might live through Him.l
John 4:9.Selected by E. W. Gilles.
Miss Emily Green died at the city
hospital Monday, aged 15 years. Her
funeral was held at St. James A. M.
E church yesterday afternoon under
the auspices of the Sabbath school.
Mme. L. A. Porter-Rooks has re
turned home from a Southern trip with
her husband, Rev. A. Rooks They at
tended the wedding of his grand
daughter, Miss Marie O'Neill, in
Atlanta, Ga.
Mrs Ida Belle Covington, 553 Rondo
The St. was hostess to the Matinee Whist
Club, Wednesday afternoon. The first
prize was won by Mrs. E. W. Lindsay,
2d by Mrs. T. Scott and 3d by Mrs.
Ida Belle Covington.
What constitutes a non-essential is PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER MRS.
largely a question for each person to H. I. WILLIAMS, OFFICE OF ATTY.'
decide for himself. Anything you can
W RANCIS, SUITE 329 AMERI
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING,
COR. CEDAR AND FIFTH STREETS.
The place to have your shoe repaird-
an
at the lowest price, is at JARVIS', 104-
106 East Fifth street. He also has a
complete stock of men's, women's and
boys' shoes of the best grades for the
money to be found in the city.
CONSERVE by having your family
washing done by the IDEAL WET
WASH LAUNDRY, 430-432 Rice
street, opposite Memorial Baptist
church. Save both money and labor.
Call N. W. Cedar 6112 or Auto. 24 996
They will tell you all about it.
The P. M. N. G. Association met
Monday evening at Union Hall to or
ganize a Past Most Noble Governor's
Chamber. A large number of P. M.
N. G. from Household of Ruth No.
4671 and No. 553 were present. Re
freshments were served.
Mrs. R. F. Wilson has again opened
a rooming house at 607 Rondo street
near Dale and is prepared to take
roomers at reasonable rates. TeL
Summit 1896. The new place will be
known as the Wilson Cottage. It con
tains eight nice comfortable well
heated rooms.
On the 25th of March, Mrs. Edith
Beal, was awarded a decree of divorce
from her husband Paul Leroy Beal,
in the District Court, and again as
sumes her name of Edith Lyons. The
divorce was secured by Atty. W. T.
Francis. Mrs. Lyons has also moved
to 325 St. Albans street.
Easter services at St. James Mis
sion, 808 Rice street, were well at
tended last Sunday. The church was
nicely decorated. Five children were
baptized at the morning service.
There was one adult convert at the
evening service. Rev. Jos. S. Strong,
pastor, preached the offering was
liberal.
LADIES wishing anything in the
line of dressmaking and ladies' tailor
ing should try the new BON TON
DRESSMAKING AND TAILORING
PARLORS, 375 Carroll avenue, Mrs.
L. B. Jackson, proprietor. Style, fit
and quality guaranteed at reasonable
rates for first class work. Quick serv
ice. Tel. Dale 3255. (1-12-18)
The well known and popular BUSY
CORNER, 381 Rondo street, corner of
Western, is now under the manage
ment of N. Shiffer with a full Hne of
staple and fancy groceries, candy,
cake, bakery goods, 1 ce cream and,
soft drinks, school supplies, cigars
and tobacco Th patronage of old
w-. BUUli a
The mayors of numerous towns of and new customers is solicited. You'll
Porto Rico are colored men. be treated right i
^yf^^
z&*2-&-
a*T-3&a&^3i5
1. Star Spangled Banner
2. (a) King of the Main
(b) Dreams
(c) Armor's Song
4. Thy Sentinel Am I
(b) Poems
6. (a) Memory's Flowers
7. Selections
8. (a) A May Morning
"HUMAN NATURE'S FOULEST BLOT."
My ear is pained
My soul is sick with every day's report
Of wrong and outrage, with which earth is filled.
There is nofleshin man's obdurate heart.
It does not feel for man: the natural bond
Of brotherhood is severed as the flax
That falls asunder at the touch of fire.
He finds his fellow guilty of a skin
Not colored like his own: and having power
To enforce the wrong, for such a worthy cause
Dooms and devotes him as his lawful prey.
Thus man devotes his brother, and destroys:
'Tis human nature's broadest foulest blot.
Cowper.
EXTRA ATTRACTION
VOCAL RECITAL
BY
MR. A. E. GREENLAW
CANAI'IAN BASSO CANTANTK
AT
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
UNDBH AUSPICES O TH E N. A. A. C. P.
TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 9,
SAINT PAUL. MINNESOTA
1918
PROGRAMME
Led by Mrs. Hattie Oliver and Mrs. Gladys James
AUDIENCE
ALBERT E. GREENLAW
3. (a) The Years at the Spring Mrs. H. H. A. Beach
(b) J'Ai tie en reve nue
(c) Vissi D'Arte, Vissi D'Amore Tosea
MRS. MAY BLACK-MASON
ALBERT E. GREENLAW
5. (a) When Albanni Sang
MRS. BERTHA HALE SULLWOLD
(b) To My First Love
(c) You Better Ask Me
(d) June Will Bring the Roses
ALBERT E. GREENLAW
MISS EFFIE BARNETT'S MANDOLIN AND BANJO CLUB
(b) God Remembers When the World Forgets
(c) Good Bye
ALBERT E. GREENLAW
Miss Albreta Bell, Accompanist
TICKETS 3 5 CENTS
NOTICEMR. GREENLAW WILL APPEAR IN RE-
CITAL UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE MINNEAPOLIS
SUNDAY FORUM AT ST. PETER A. M.E CHURCH NEXT
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 11. -^U"^H NEXT
Marks
Strsleyki
De Koven
Walson
Drummund
Foley
Greenlaw
Lohr
Lohr
Higgins
Denza
Bond
Tosti

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