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St. Cloud Democrat. [volume] (Saint Cloud, Stearns County, Minn.) 1858-1866, November 29, 1860, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016836/1860-11-29/ed-1/seq-4/

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SBSWSE •„.
ST. CLOUD DEMOCRAT,
AM a. awissauv, aouea raopouxoB.
THURSDAY NOV 29th, 1860
O 3
A POSITIVB WlTMMS.—It is of War
.«a the author "Ten Thousand a
Year," that this sharp practice in the ex.
aniioation of a man accused of swearing
falsely in a will case is related. It shows
great dramatic power unconsciously exhib
ited in his business.
ren,
The prisoner being arraigned, and thelocation,
formalities gone through with, the prosecu
tor, placing his thumb over the seal, held
up-the will, and demanded of the prisoner
if he had seen the testator sign that in
strument, to which he promptly answered
he had.
And did you sign it at his request as
subscribing witness
I did/
5
Was it sealed with red or black wax?"
With red wax."
Did you see him seal it with red wax?"
I did."
••Where was the testator when he sign
ed and sealed this will V*
Iu his bed."
Pray how long apiece of wax did he
use?"
About three or four inches lon»."
"Who gave the testator this piece of
wax?"
I did."
Where did you get it?"
From the drawer of his desk."
"How did he light that piece of wax?"
With a candle."
•'Where did that piece of candle come
from?"
I got it out of a cupboard in his room."
"How long was that piece of candle
Perhaps four or five inches long."
"Who lit that piece of candle?"
I lit it."
"What with?"
••With a match."
"Where did you get that match?"
"On the mantle shelf in the room."
Here Warren paused, and fixing his
large deep blue eyes upon the prisoner,
he held the will up above his head, his
thumb still resting upon the seal, and
said, in a solemn, measured tone:
"Now, sir, upon your solemn oath, you
saw the testator sign that will he signed
it in his bed at his request you signed it,
as a subscribing witness you saw himwith
seal it it was with red wax he sealed it
a piece of one, two, three, or four inches
long, he lit that wax with a piece of can
dle, which you procured for him from a
cupboard you lit that candle by a match
which you found on the mantle-shelf
I did."
Once more, sir upon your oath, you
didr
"I did!"
"My lord, tVs a ica/er."—Blachcood.
E S FOR E A A A A
—Never go to bed with your feet sticking
out of the window, particularly when it
is raining or freezing.
More than three pig's feet and a mince
pie eaten at midnight will not generally
cause the consumer to dream of houris,
paradise, accommodating bankers and oth
er good things. A least they are not
apt to do so.
Never stand in a rain barrel all night.
It checks perspiration, and Bpoils the wa
ter for drinking purposes.
Never spank your children with a hand
saw, or box their ears with the sharp edge
of a hatchet, as it is apt to affect the brain.
Ear-ache in children is a common and
vexatious complaint. To cure it at once,
bore a hole in the tympanum with a gim
let, and pour in oil and things. I the
child keeps on crying, bore it all the way
to the other ear.
E TREATMENT NORTHER N E N
E A fresh Southern outrage is no
ticed by the Wilkesbarre Pa Record, as
follows:
"3fr. David Levi has just returned
from Arizona. Coming up tho Mississip
pi, as tho boat stopped at Natches, a vote
was taken for Presidential preferences
among the passengers. One' very re
spectable looking merchant from Ohio,
voted for Lincoln, with the remark that it
was useless for him to attempt to disguise
his sentiments. The other passengers
immediately stripped him, covered him
with tar and feathers, and set him afloat
in a canoe."
WONDERFUL CHANGE OF SENTIMENT.
—About eighteen years ago, John Quincy
Adams presented a petition to the House
of Representatives praying for a peaceable
dissolution of the Union, and proposed its
reference to a special committee, with in
structions to report against the object of
the petitioners. This petition was receiv
ed by the South with a storm of indig
nant denunciation, and Henry A. Wise
was foremost in insisting upon the censure
of the venerable patriot and friend of the
Union for, simply, out of mere reverence
for the right of petition, offering such an
insult, as he regarded it, to the Nation.
This occurred at a time when Slavery
was excluded from nearly all the Terri
tories of the Union by act of Congress,
and when not even Mr. Wise dreamed
of repeal. The same Mr. Wise now in
sists that the Union shall be dissolved
because a man has been elected to
the Presidency who insists that that act
of Slavery restriction was constirntional.
HELLISH OUTRAGE.—A
smouEssKEr: -MES*e»i«» a ••*-*•-...
ISO- 18
man named
Robert Burns was shot dead by a lawyer
named Kinkead in Paducah, Ky., last
week, for hurraing for Lincoln in front of
the St. Francis Hotel. Burns was a poor
min, and the man who shot him was rich:
consequently the murderer was not pun*
|3hed.—Evamvillc (Ind.) Journal.
A
""i .'KswanMHrniu
TOWNS.
St. Cloud is the. point at wuioh tho Boa Riv
or trains cross the Mississippi on their way to
St. Paul, which proves it to be the natural
•unction of land travel between these two great
arteries of trade. It is at the present head of
steam navigation on the Mississippi. Boats
run regularly, during the Spring and early
Summer months, from St. Anthony to this
place.
The map gives its position correctly with
reference to all the most important points in
the Territory, but the peculiar beauty of its
and fertility of the surrounding coun
try cannot be transcribed. Within fifteen
mile of St. Cloud, on opposite sides of
thehave
river, and at different points of the compass
are eight lakes varying in size from 1 mile to
5 miles in circumference, all, save one, beau
tifl, exceedingly, three oi them at .least, deep
enough to. float a man-of-war. Wooded banks,
clean pebbly shores plentifully mixed with
cornelian and waters abundantly supplied
nithfish.
When Gov. Stevens made his survey of a
northern railroad route to the Pacific in '53,
he camped "on the western side of the Mis
sissippi below Sauk Bapids." The place was
nameless—the present site of St. Cloud but it
is here his route leaves the river. In the sum
mer of '55 a claim cabin was built on the spot
where we now write, a good saw mill, the
frame of a large Hotel and eight other dwell
ings were put up that summer. This last fall
there were three hundred and thirty-two votes
polled in the precinct, Not the votes of Indi
ans or Half Breeds, for there are none here.—
A majority of the inhabitants of the country
are hardy Germans, with sturdy wives aud
children cultivating the soil and working at
mechanical employments.
Tho subsoil is sandy and although the soil is
from one to three feet deep, a rich black loam
supporting a rank vegetation, the drainage is
so perfect and the air so pure that breathiug
is a perpetual pleasure. As yet, our physi
cians have discovered no diseases peculiar to
the olimate, no indeg:nious complaint except
the "Minnesota Appetite" which requires one
fourth more treatment than a modest Pennsyl
vania or Ohio attack of a corresponding dis
ease.
Any body who wants to drink whiskey in
peace had better not come here, for the treaty
by which the land was acquiredfrom the Sioux
forbids its introduction and the Legislature
has passed a law enforcing that provision but
people of moderate means andindustrious hab
who have children to educate, will find few
places where the opportunity for correct moral
training, healthy development of muscle, and
the means of pecuniary independenee are bet
ter combined.
There areimmense tracts of pine lying above,
from which the mills at St. Paul, St. Anthouy,
and the Minnesota Valley are supplied. These
employ a large and erer-increasing force of
men, horses snd oxen, who are to be supplied
provisions, clothing and feed. The soil is
waiting for an opportunity to produce unlimi
ted quantities of food, without troubling the
farmer crushing clods while the Mississippi
from St. Paul to Little Falls can afford to turn
mill at almost any point and has water pow
er enough to do the manufacturing for a Cont
inent
Our natural meadows produce a grass from
four to six feet high, and the beefkilled off our
prairies is quite equal to any stall fed we have
ever eaten Our venison is fine at ten cents
per pound, rabbits, prairie hens, partridges,
ducks, &c, plenty. Thousands of bushels of
dooms for the hogs that are not here to eat
them. Fuel for the labor of cutting and haul
ing off the ground and there is no likelihood
of the supply running out soon as the "Big
Woods" extend from this place some twenty
miles or more, down this side of the river and
from eight to twelve miles back. Our prairies
are al dotted with strips of wood land, "Oak
Openings which just look like old orchards,
dense thickets of plum trees bearing delicious
fruit, grape vines, doing likewise, thousands of
acres of hazel bushes and strawberry vines, en
gaged in the same business while some hun
dred acres are in the cranberry trade and turn
out an article, which for quantity and quailty
connot be excelled. The blackberries red rasp
berries and hops tack up their shingles in the
woods and seldom dissappoint the most san
guine expectations of their customers. There
is still land ten or fifteen miles back which set
tiers can get, at government price, hy building
cabin and living on it until it comes into
market. Actual settlers can buy lots here at
from one to five hundred dollars, and specula
tors can have the same lots at from five to fif-are
een hundred
In some of the river towns back, places that
will be pleasant villages, lots can be had gratis
by those who will build and live on them.—
This, in places where a house can be built for
fifty dollars, that would be a palace compared
to the dens rented in large cities for 4 and 5
dollars per month, while the lot, with only the
aid of a grubbing hoe and a few days labor,
would bring vegetables to feed a family, and
every township has 600 acres appropriated to
the support ef schools.
Seventy thousand acres are appropriated to
a State University. A fine building has already
been erected for the use of that institution. It
situated a St. Anthony, built of stone on an
eminence commanding a view of the falls, and
no State in the Union has a better foundation
for a good system of popular education. No
other prairie State is so well timbered as Min
nesota and no State more abundantly supplied
with clear water. In the country surrounding
St. Cloud and as far Northand West as we have
any reliable account, settlers find no difficults
in locating land on a running stream or trany
parent lake with plenty of timber at hand for
building, fencing and fuel, and as the land on
the West side of the Upper Mississippi is only
open to pre-emption, there is iittle opportunity
for speculators, and settlers have assurance of
neighbors and that rapid increase in the value
of their lands and in social advantages which
arise from the system of land in limited quan
tities to actual settlers.
The country around SI. Cloud, west of the
Mississippi was purchased of the Indians in a
treaty made with them by the Hon. Alexander
Barasey and Luke Lea in 1852 and ratified by
the senate the same year. The Sioux had
owned the land from 1827 but had not occupied
it, and it was used as a hunting ground by the
Winnebagoes whose land reached within four
miles north of St. Cloud. Their eountry was
ceded to the United States by a treaty began
with Commissioner Manypeny and conclnded
at Washington in Feb. 1856 and ratified by the
Senate March 3d of the same year. In Mayhis
following they removed to their reservation on
the Blue Earth river and only since that time
has Stearns County claimed kindred with civil
ization. Thefirsthouse within the corporated
limits of St. Cloud was built by James Hitch
ens for General Lowry. James Hitohens being
S 5 W.
W^°
Woifn
after
house
flereT
&££&*•$& W 8 the "old
est inhabitant." The site of W Cloud
was taken up as a claim by Martin Wolly, a
Norwegian, who sold his right to George
/t «y«d MidplattedUinthe spring
ef'65. About the same time John L. WilsoS
surveyed and platted what is now called middle
town, which adjoins and lies higher up the riv
er, while General -.*..«-.•-« piatt«d
... -....,....,.
upper town, called Lowry's Addition, the win
ter following. It was Mr. Wilson who gave
the town the name of St. Cloud by this name
it was incorporated in the winter of '65 '66.—
The Land Office was removed in April '58 from
Sauk Bapids to the Upper town. The post office
is in Middle town, which is inhabited by in
dustrious and Well to do German Catholics.—
The Catholic chapel is here, and the bell be
longing to it, is the first church going bell in
Stearns County and has also the distinction of
being the first audible inSherburneand Benton
counties which oorner on the opposite side of
the river. There too is a school kept by a com
pany of Benedictine Nuns where music, draw
ing, needlework and German are well taught
by ladies ef polished manners and unusual
proficiency.
Lower town has two protestant churches,, in
process of erection, one quite completed We
a public school in the Everett School
house, and a handsome Library dedicated by
Hon. Edward Everett. The engines of an ex
cellent saw mill and plaining mill, sash facto
ry and of a good flouring mill are this mo
ment puffing away within half a dozen rods of
our office. We have from five to six steamboat
arrivals hero weekly and the smallest propor
tion of drones we have ever seen in any hive.
In the fall of '60 Grasshoppers came tn a
cloud and settled down in this and adjoining
oounties, destroying the greater portion of the
crops. They deposited their larvae and died.
Early in the spring of '57 the young brood
came out and made such havoc that serious
fears of famine were entertained by a large
portion of the people but they left in July,and
so many of the late crops survived, that with
the full crops of particular places, where they
did not appear, there was a large amount of
food. In autumn it became a question wheth
er there was enough for winter consumption
with what the peoplehad the means of purchas
ing from below. The German settlers were
generally of the opinion that there was not,and
tke Priests sent commissioners to Dubuque to
ask contributions. When this became known
in Lower St. Cloud Indignation meetings were
held, and strong resolutions passed condemn
ing measure as altogether unnecessary, and
one calculated to do the country great injury
by preventing emigration in the spring. The
Correctness of this view of the case is now pro
ven. The third week of May is here, potatoes
sell at 25cts. per bushel, corn $1,00, wheat
$1,25, oats, 80 cts. and we have heard of no
instance in which any have suffered for want
of food while a very large proportion of the
emigrants who had last year designed emigra
ting to this point have been deterred by this
bugbear cry of famine, and have gone else
where. The time is now paat at which the
Grasshoppers appeared last spring, and the
minds of the people are set on rest as the ques
tion of whether they left lavas, last year, be
fore they emigrated. It is evident that they
went to other localities as they came here to
eat, deposit? their eggs and die. There is no
sign that they have left any deposits here, and
as everybody is putting in a crop of some
thing good to eat, we expect next fall to be en
umbered with a surplus of the good things of
his life, and to inundate St. Anthony Minne
polis and St. Paul, with vegetables and grain
supplying the Pine regions and the la
borers on the Bail Boad.
DOUGLAS COUNTY.
This town is beautifully located in one of
the finest Agricultural regions in the North
West. It is inthe centre of the County and is
admitted by all to occupy a natural point for
Town. Farrmers in quest of superior land
claims combining timber, water, and prairie—
Invalids seeking health and a comfortable re
treat where hunting and fishing may be indul
ged in to any extent or the lover of the
beautiful in nature, will at Alexandria find
their several tastes gratified.
Situated on the State Boad to Breckinridge
and Fort Abercrombie—equally distant from
either—under the management of men possess
ing the utmost energy, Alexandria bids fair
to be one of the largest inland towns in Min
nesota. The country to the south and west
is Prairie and Timber in the finest proportion
while to the North and East there extends an
unbroken body of Woodland, the greater por
tion of it being of good size and quality.
The Prairies and Lakes in the vicinity de
serve particular mention. Eden Prairie is
ten miles long, and from one to one and a-half
miles wide, with timber along the sides and is
well watered. It offers superior facilities to
Farmers and at many points along are beauti
ful building spots on the shore of a beautiful
lake. "Garden Door and "Sedge" Prairies
also worth the attention of Farmers, being
of moderate size high upland and entirely
enclosed with timber. These Prairies all di
verge from the Town Site and are accessible
to the State Boad. Lake "Agnes" and "Wi
nona," skirting "Eden Prairie," charming bod
ies of water and for picturesque beauty cannot
be surpassed. Within one, two and three miles
are Lakes "L. Homedieu" "Carlos" and "Dar
ling" connecting and forming a sheet of water
20 miles in extent. These lakes are grand and
beautiful. Along their banks are thousands
of claims—a country capable of supporting
dense settlements, and to those seeking homes
in the West is presented country possessing ex
traordinary attractions. The Company offe
he most liberal inducements to actual settler
tonthe Town Site. Letters addressed to th
Executive Committee, JOHN BALL, WM
KINKEAD, orJUDGE GBEGOBY, Alexandria
or to GEOBGE F. BBOTT, St. Cloud, will
promptly answered.
Alexandria, Sept. 30thjI858.-tf.
TEMPLE $ BEAUPRE.
STOJR/^Gr-IEi
FORWARDING & COMMISSION
MERCHANTS
DEALERS IN
6 OERIESri,PROVISIONS 6PRODU CE,
ST. PAUL, MIN.
AGENTS FOR LAFLIN & SMITH'S POWDER*
dec9wly.
A I CHAIRS!! A I S
J.WS TUTTLE
is manufacturing and have now on hand, at
wareroom, Lower Landing, St. Cloud, a
full supply of
WINDSOR CHAIRS,
ROCKING CHAIRS,
OFFICECHAIRS,
SECRETARIES,
BEDSTEADS.
BUREAUS,
WASH STANDS,
WORE STANDS,
DINING AND
BREAKFAST TABLES
LOUNGES,
Ste.t &e„ jc., $e.% $c, gti
Terms, cheap for CASH!
O A .A-IiTID S E E
ST. PAUL ADVERTISEMENTS.
DllY GOODS
FOR THB
TJ :M: I& ES :R
AT
D. W. INGERSOLL& CO.,
ST. PAUL, MINN.
OUB SECOND LABGE SHIPMENT OF
TJIE^IT
O O O S
IS NOW BEINCr RECEIVED, AND
HAVINGBEEN BOUGHT SINCE
PRICES HAVE FALLEN
OFF AT THE
E A S E N A E S
We are able te offer
SUPERIO INDUCEMENT S
to our customers in the way of
NEW AND FASHIONAB E GOODS
AT VERY LOW PRICES!
Our Stock of DBESS GOODS is full of New
and Desirable styles In
O A N E S
S A W S
O S I E
O E S
E O I E I E S
BLEA. & BRO. SHEETINGS
W I E O O S
I N S
O O S I S
&c, Sit., &c.
Our Stock is large, and connot fail
to suit in Style, Quality or Price!
TO COUNTRY MERCHANTS
WE OFFEB THE
LARGEST & CHEAPEST STOCK
IIST S A E
Wc have a Fine Assortment of
PRINTS,
GINGHAMS, DENIMS,
STRIPED SHIRTINGS, COTTONADES,
BLEA. 4' BRO. SHEETINGS,
KENTUCKY JEANS,
And, in fact, EVERYTHING to assort up a
Country Store.
AL I OF WHICH win BK SOLD AT A SMALL
ADVANCE FKOM NEW YORK PRICES, by
D. W. INGEKSOLL & CO.,
may!7-tc* Adjoining the Bridge
LEATHER! LEATHER!! LEATHER!!!
FREDERICK BURST,
IMPORTER OF
FRENCH & GERMAN CALFSKINS
DEALER IN
LEATHER, FINDINGS, LASTS, &c
OPPOSITE THE CONCERT HALL,
I E S E E
SfllHT PAUL, WIHNESOTA.
"WIM:. :F\ :M:_A.SO:N",
SUCCESSOR TO WM. HASLETT,
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
HATS CA FURS,
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS
NO 4 ROGER'S BLOCK, THIBD ST.,
Above the Bridge,
ST. PAUL, MINN.
Oct 13th 1869. tf
E,
S. E E O N
BANKER
DEALER IN EXCHANGE,
Saint Paul, Minnesota.
Collections made on all points of the United
States and Territories, and promptly remitted
for.
I am selling Exchange on New York at
present for the following funds at the rates
annexed, vix:
For Gold at
East'n Currency
Illinois & Wis.
Minnesota
I 8 6 0 £860*
THE PENNSYLVANIA
CENTRAL RAIL ROAD.
260 MILES DOUBLE TRACK.
JQT Tho Capacity of this Boad is now equal
to any in the Country.
THREE THROUGH
PASSENGER A I N S
Between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia,
Connecting direct in the Union Depot, at Pitts
burgh, with Through Trains from all Western
Cities for Philadelphia, New York, Boston,
Baltimore and Washington city thus furnish
ing facilities for the transportation of-Passen
gers unsurpassed, for speed and comfort, by
any other route..
Express and Fast Lines run through to
Philadelphia without change of Cars or Con
ductors.
Smoking Cars are attached to each fraln
Woodruff's Sleeping Cars to Express and Fast
Trains. The Express runs Daily, Mail and
Fast Line Sundays excepted. Three Daily
Trains connect for Baltimore and Washington.
Six Daily Trains between Philadelphia and
New York Two Daily Trains between New
fork and Boston. Through Tickets (all Bail)
are good on either of the above Trains, and
transfers through New York free.
Boat Tickets to Boston are good via Norwich,
Fall Biver or Stonington Lines. Baggage
transferred free.
Tickets may be obtained at any of the impor
tant Rail Road Offices in the West also, on
board any of the regular Line of Steamers on
the Mississippi or Ohio Rivers.
$&§P Fare always as low and time as quick as by
any other Route.
ASK FOR TICKETS BY PITTSBURGH.
The completion of the Western connections
of the Pennsylvania Rail Road, makes this the
DIRECT LINE BETWEEN THE EAST
AND THE GREAT WEST.
The connecting of tracks by the Rail Road
Bridge at Pittsburgh, avoiding ail drayage or
ferriage of Freight, together with the saving
of time, aro advantages readily appreciated by
Shippers of Freight, and the Traveling Public
For Freight contracts or Shipping directions,
apply to or address either of the following
Agents of the Company:
D. A. STEWART, Pittsburgh
S Pierce & Co, Zantsvillc, O Johnston,
Ripley, O McNeely, Marysville, Ky Orms
by & Cropper, Portsmouth, O Paddock & Co,
Jeffersonville, Ind W Brown & Co, Cincin
nati, O Athern & Hibbert, Cincinnati O
C. Meldrum, Madison, Ind Jos. E Moore,
Louisville, Ky O'Biley & Co, Evansville,
Ind N W Graham & Co, Cairo, III Sass,
Shaler & Glass, St Louis, Mo John Harris,
Nashville, Tenti Harris & Hunt, Memphis, Tenn
Clarke & Co, Cliicago, III W II Koontz,
Alton, III or to Freight Agents of Rail Roads
at different points in the West.
The Greatest Facilities offered for the Protection
and Speedy Transportation of LIVE STOCK,
And Goon ACCOMODATIONS, with usual privileg
es for persons traveling in charge thereof.
E I S
By this Boute freights of all descriptions
can be forwarded to and from Philadelphia,
New York, Boston, or Baltimore, to and from
any point on the Rail Roads of Ohio, Kentucky
Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, or Missouri
by Rail Road direct.
The Pennsylvania Rail Boad also connects
at Pittsburgh with Steamers, by which Goods
can be forwarded to any port on tho Ohio,
Muskingum, Kentucky, Tennesee, Cumberland,
Illinois, Mississippi, Wisconsin, Missouri,
Kansas, Arkansas and Red Rivers and at
Cleveland, Sandusky and Chicago with Steam
ers to all Ports on the North- Western Lakes
Merchants and Shippers entrusting the
transportation of their Freight to tliis Compa
ny.canrtly with confidence onitsspeedy transit
THE RATES OF FREIGHT to and from any
point in the West by the Pennsylvania Rail
Road, are at all times as favorable as are charged
by other R. R. Companies.
£3?" Be particular to mark packages via
Penna. R. R.
E. J. SNEEDEB, Philadelphia.
MAOBAW & KOONS, 80 North Street, Baltimore
LEECH & Co., No. 2 Astor House, or No. 1
S. Wm. St., N. Y.
LEECH & Co., No. 77 State Street, Boston.
H. H. HOUSTON, Gen'l Freight Ag't, Philada.
L. L. HOUPT, Gen'l Ticket Ag't, Philadelphia
THOS. A. SCOTT, Gen'l Sup't, Altoona, Pa.
v2n:28-ly
PHILIP
ROHR'S MUSIC, AND MUSICAL
Instrument Depot, (the Bookstore formerly
occupied by Wm. Van Hamm near the St. Paul
Post Office,) St. Paul, Min.
The want of a first class Store where the
latest Musical publications can be had at all
times, has long been felt in the North-West
and induced the subscriber to locate perma
nently at St. Paul. His large stock, embracing
not only all the most popular Pieces of the
Day, but also the classical works of the mas
ters, and an Extensive collection of Foreign
Music, has been selected by him personally
and is without, doubt the largest and best as
sorted selection in the West. By special
agreement with Messrs 0. Ditson & Co. in
Boston, and the leading publishers of Philadel
phia and New York all their new publications
aro forwarded to him,as soon as issued. Any
piece of music desired and not on hand, will
at once be ordered and can be had in ten days.
mch8—6m
I per oent premium.
1
2 tt
8 tf
PEOPLE'S BANK, ST. PETER, MIN.
E. S. EDGERTON, President.
D. A. MONFORT, Cashier.
Having purchased the capital stock of the
above named Bank, and the same being enter
ed in my name on the books of the bank and
in the State Auditor's office, I hold myself
personally responsible and liable for the circu
lation, aocordiug to the provisions of the
general banking law. E. 8. EDGEBTON.
Si. Paul, J»««—• ••»««. lan!2W
THE
I
Persons at a distance ordering music in
small quantities, can receive it by mail without
extra expense. All orders whether large or
small, strictly ard promptly attended to. Sole
Agent for the North-West, of the Philadelphia
Musical Loan and Saving Society, in which every
stockholder by the payment of only $3
perTHEMERSON,s
month, will receive a first class seven octave
Piano—valued at $400—for about $150. Cir
culars sent on application gratis. Also, sole
agent for Schomacker & Co's unrivalled pianos,
and H. KnaufPs celebrated Organs.
St. PSul.
A A S S A S A A I A
Greatest Medical Discovery in Existence.
A
SUBE CUBE AND PBEVENTIVE OF
Scrofula, Bheumatism, Fevers, Asthma,
Dyspepsia, General Debility, Fever and Ague,
Headache, Dizziness, Pimples or Blotches,
Dropsy, Syphilitic auJ all Mercurial Diseases,
Nausea, Indigestion Flatulency, Summer Com*
plaints, Billiousness, Phlegm, and all other
diseases arising from an impure state of the
Blood.
The above diseases arise from the great
primitive cause of all diseases, namely: Im
pure Blood. The Sarsaparilln is intended to
purify and give tone to it, so that life wiU be
a pleasure instead of pain. Secure a Circular
and read for yourselves. The medicine is
recommended to all for a fair trial, and as an
inducement it may be properto state that then
is nothing in its composition in tho least det
rimental to the health of the patient.
For sale wholesale and retail at
ItfLAJElJliAJTrr S I S
Sole agents in St. Cloud for the same
GBAEFENBEBGE
Medicines constantly tn
hand at MA?T,ATT'S DRUG STORK.
,.-.J^^^^?*J«W-•••:•?.-•'.iCNtaiJJWfcWt
8TEPHEK MILLEE. HEN«T SWMBHBMC.
MILLER & SWISSHHLM,
DEALERS IN REAL ESTATE
Water Street, Lower Town, St Ckwl
MRS. A E V-'"
I E A E i4:zL
.-.
OPPOSITE THB
"DEMOCRAT OFFICE*'
ST. CLOUD, URN
ALduce
manner of Merchandize,, Country Pro
and Manufactured Articles taken In'
exchange for Pictures. ^iW.--
June 30th 1869-tf 1,
6 Superior Smut Machines for Mills
6 Fanning Milhv
For sale cheap by
HENRY 8WI88HELM.
St. Cloud, Feby. 1st, I860. feb9-4m
BEEDfi & MENDENHALL,
A I E E S
WORTH-WESTERH LAND I COLLECTING
A E N S
I N N E A O-L-T'8 N N
'LUMBE & SHINGLES.
60,000 feet good Season Boards, 7/
50,000 Shingles,
feb23 For sale cheap by
HENRY SWJSSHELM.
BUILDING.
rpiIE undersigned takes this method of
J_ forming those who may have houses
build, mills to frame, or carpentry and joinety
in any or all of its branches, that he is prepsr
ed to take contracts, and do all kinds ot work
in this line, on the most reasonable terxij and
in a good, workmanlike manner.
A. E. JSUSSEY.
STEARNS' HOUSE,
THIS
new and beautiful Hotel is situated
upon the bluff just above the Lower Ferry
in he town of St. Cloud, commanding one ef
the most beautiful views on the Mississipp
!fc7«r. The Proprietor assures all who mny,
visit this place that his table shall contain every
bounty and luxury which can be obtained both
at home and abroad. Itis his intention to keep
the above hotel as a first class one in every res
pect
BRECKENRIDGE
I I N A I N OIL 8
For Sale Wholesale and Betail at
ONLY DEPOT IN ST. LOCIS,
NO. 7 SOUTH FIFTH STKEET.
Burns in Kerosene and all Coal Oil Lamps,
IJ
T'BOM15 TO 25 PEB CENT. LONGEB THAN
any other Oil sold, and has the confidence
of all consumers. KOT EXPLOSIVE, don't
congeal, five times as cheap as fluid, and safe
in any hands.
Lamps complete from 75 cents to $75.00.
may24-tf 0 W. CUBTISS.
FURNITURE! FURNITURE7T~
UNDEBSIGNED has constantly on
hand and for sale, at his shop on Washing
lon avenue, a few doors above the Willis House*
co mplete assortment of furniture, comprising
Bedsteads from §2 to $16
Bureaus from 10 to 30
Lounges from 2 to 16
Secretaries from 6 to 5U
Chairs per set from 3.50 to 1»
Hocking Chairs from 1.50 te 8
Washstands from .50 to 110
Tables and Work-tables.
Which he will exchange for wheat, rye,ghe«t
beef, pork, flour or cranberries at the hi
market price. S. 0. CBAWFORD.
septi
E N W. W E A
CARRIAGEMAKER.
ll A E removed to my new shop near the
Bridge, where I am prepared to do all kinds
of work in the Carriagemaking line. Wagons,
carriages and sleighs made in a neat and sub
stantial manner at low rates. Particular at
tention paid to repairing." Y3-H! I
O A S O N E S
BLACKSMITH.
A kinds of work done in the best possi
J\_ ble manner, Particular attention given
to horse and ox-shoeing, plow work, and re
pairing of all kinds. Shop in same building
with H. W. Weary's Carriage Shop.
RAYMOND, OWEN, & Co.,
MANUFACTURERS AK» DEALERS I S
SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS,
Lower Cloud Minnesota.
DOOBdandSt.
Window Frames constantly oa
han and made te order, also, Planeing,
•iawing and Turning of all kinds done on shor
totice.
H. RAYMOND. J. H. OWEK. R. A. SMITH.
THE EMERSON HOUSE,
A S SO?. CTJOTTJD
J. PROPRIETOR.
E above house-ha been refitted and refur
nished and the amplest accomodations have
been constructed for the reception of visitoUc
the proprietor pledges himself to spare no
pense to render his visitors comfortable.
has been erected, 60 by 35 feet, which can ac
commodate 27 Horses and 18 Oxen, and there
will always be a plentiful supply ef feed #a
hand, and careful Ostlers.
AFRICAN SALOON
AND BABBEB SHOP, A FEW DOORS A O I
THE WILLIS HOUSE,
S CLOTJ3D
PROF. CROMWELL PROPRIETOR.
The best of Liquors and Segare in the bar.
nll-tf
STRICKLAND & CO.,
BOOK, STATIONERY
AND SCHOOL BOOK JOBBERS,
Are offering in large or small quantities, the
largest Stock in the West, at prices which must
prove satisfactory to customers.
BLANK BOOK MANUFACtKrRERfc
PRINTERS, B00kBXNDM$9
*WD DEALERS I WALL PAPER.
American Sabbath School Union
Publication*,

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