OCR Interpretation


St. Cloud Democrat. [volume] (Saint Cloud, Stearns County, Minn.) 1858-1866, May 04, 1865, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016836/1865-05-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

to-
1
^-«i
Hanna
•J I
*i
VOL. VII.
THE DEMOCRAT
Is published at St. Cloud, Stearns County,
Minnesota, every Thursday afternoon.
Orrici—1* Post Omci Bum»a, WAsmaatoJi
ATKNTK.
W. MITCBELl, Editorft1-roprlelor.
I
TBHMS I
TWO DOiJUJM T3MJ?, Ifr ADtJiNCE.
R.VTK9 OF ADVERTISINGI
»ne column, one year, $75 00:
One-half column, one year, 40 00
One-fourth column, one year, 25 00
One column, six months, 45 00
t)ne-half column, six months, 30 00
Vne-fourth column, six months, 18 00
One square, one year, 10 00
One square, six months, 7 00
Business cards, five lines or less, $5 per
anum six lines, $6 seven lines, $7.
Irffal advertisements at statute rates,
lines of this sized type oojMsfiate a
Square, and cards will be charged propor
tion te to the space they occupy in brevier
Valid.])
O
Of all kinds executed with neatness and
dijpntch, and at reasonable rates.
Real Estate Agency,
JIT.« LOCO I I MINNKSOTA.
E^-H£'NSIV"
E Explorations of Land in
tliis Djl
,t
subject to private entry,
and expe "»encc I»anJ Office business,
*iv« die artera^™
1
iu the
P««»«« advantages
S on of a
And location of Land Warrants.
a W a a t*f
I or sale at a small advance on New TtsrV
I rices.
Contested Pre emption cases prosecuted
I oibre tlie Local and General Land Offices.
Attention paid to
THE PATIENT OF TAXES
In Uenton, Sherburne, Morrison and
t^te-irns counties.
T.iWoBtts for tale in St. Cloud.
vfinlS-tf L. A. EVANS.
H. WAIT,
A N E
AND LICENSED DKALEJl IN
fcs»w« Warraiilt Scrlfif
Cwmnty,. a a State Order*.
AISO—
LEALEB IN SEAL ESTATE.
Collations and Remittances promptly
nitlf.
T»xc!» paid for Non-residents.
Offije on Washington avenue, one door
south of the Central House. v6al8-tf
W I I A A S O N S
Attorney and Counsellor at law,
17. 8. Botsut y, Claim a Paten Agent,
ST. CLOUD, MINN
PRACTICES
in all Courts, State and Fed-
eral prosecutes claims before any of
the Departments at Washington.
7 Particular attention paid to thecol
«-tion of Bountv and Arrearages of Pay
"if Sol tiers, Pensions for Discharged Sol
iers or for the heirs of those who have
»od in the service.
Offioe in 3d story, Broker's -Block, over
J. C. & H. C. Burbank & Co. v6n23
EDWARD O. HAMLIN,
Has resumed the
A I E O A W
IN ST. CLOUD, MINN.
Ofice, Five Doors south of H. 0. Wait's Bank
GEO. W. SWEET,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Y1 TILL attend promptly to Collections,
V\ and payment of taxes in Stearns aud
Benton Counties. Special attention given
te oases be. ^\the Local and General Land
Oiiices.
Office on St. Germain at, over Broker's 8tore.
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
TOLMAN & WHEELOCK,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
Will attend to the practice of Medicine and
Surgery in all their various branches.
Office over Edelbmck's store,
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
J. WHMLOCK, M. 9. M. C. TOtJtAW, M. ».
WM. R.
PHYSICIAN
ST. CLOUD,
HUNTER,
AND SURGEON,
MINN.
I V. W E N
S I I A N A N SURGEON,
Will practice Medicine in all its branches
including midwifery and operative surgery
St. Cloud, Minn, Dec. 11th, 1862.
A- T. AM
Eli
ir.
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
O A KIND S O
JOB PRINTING,
BIND TOUR ORDERS TO
a a O
ffJO'l'*-? -i."
3 II
ST. CLOUD BOOKSTORE
J. M. ROSEN#ERGER,
BOOKSELLER, STATIONER A NEWSDEALER
Has always oh battelftTint, Assortment of
a S a
^AtSft—
THE. LATEST PAPERS & AIAQAZINES
THE STANDARD SCHOOLBOOKS,
And everything usually found in a first
class Bookstore. v6n!8-tf
PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY.
PHOTOGRAPHS, AMBROTYPES, &c,
*Mx»s. a a
Opposite the DEMOCRAT Office, Lower town.
Hours between 9 A.M. and 4 p. M.
Every variety of Albums, Frames and
Oases kept on hand. v5n52-tf
F. C. E E
[FROM LIVERPOOL.]
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER,
SAINT CLOUD, MINN.
N. B.—Watches, Clocks, Time-pieces, Mu
sic Boxes, Jewelry, &c,
Neatly Fixed and Warranted.
Old Verge and Lupine Watches made in
to New English Patent Levers at a small
cost.
Engraving done to order. v5n5l-ly
ANTON SMITH,
BOOT AND SHOE S O E
A full supply of
a S
BUFFALO OVERSHOES & MOCCASINS,
Kept always on hand, and for sale at fa
Toi^ole prices.
(jt'^d stock of Leather and Shoemaker's
Findin '8.
ParticuMi attention paid to Custom Work.
The highest market price in Cash paid
for Hides. ANTON SMITH.
Washington a*., St. Cloud. v6nl9-ly
N I O A S AI A E
JtiMufiielurtr and Dealer in
Boots, Shoes, Leather and Findings',
(Between Tobey's and Book Store)
ST. CLOUD. v7n24-ly MINN.
JOHN SCHWARTZ,
Keeps constantly on hand
Satldlu, Harness, Carriage Trimmings, $e.
St. Germaine street, near Washington ave
nue. Saint Cloud, Minn.
W. T. TUTTI.E,
MANUFACTURER OF CABINET WARE.
Building aij«f Carpentering attended to.
Near the Stearns House, Lower Town,
ST. CLOUD, MINX
ST. PAUL HAT STORE.
W IT. A S O N
WHOLESALE DEALER BY TUB
Case or Package,
Cornerof 3d and Wabasha* sts., opposite the Bridge
WATSON, DENSMORE & CO.,
Mannlacturera and Dealers In
BREAD, CAKES, CRACKERS,
CONFECTIONERY,
Also, Carbon Oil, Burning Fluid $ Benzol*,
At North-Western Steam Bakery,
Corner of Robert street and the Levee, 8t. Panl.
E N W. W E A
CARRIAGEMAKER.
I
A E removed to my new shop near
.the Bridge, here I am prepared to do
all kinds of work in the Carriagemaking
line. Wagons, carriages and sleighs made
in a neat and substantial manner at low
rates. Particular attention paid to repair
ing. V8-tf
J. W. E O
MERCHAN A I O
WOULo
snui
invite his friends and the pub
lie call and examine his New Stylet
13 Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods. Partic
ular attention paid to custom work.
Nath' Pope Causin,
A I A O N E
WASHINGTON, D. C.
Having held a situation in the General Land
Office, for upwards of twenty years, in
charge of the Pre-emption Bureau, Mr. C.
offers bisservices in theprosecution of claims
before the Department, under the Pie-emp
Laws, Town Site Act of 1844, &c.
He will also attend to Mail Contractors'
Claims, business before Indian Bureau, &o.
tGg* Special attention given to the collection
of Claims/or Indian Depredatvms—Sioux, $c\
REFERS TO
Hon. A. Ruuey, u. 8. Senate,
Hon. M. 8. Wilkinson, U.S. Senate.
Hon. T. A. H«ndrick«, u. s. Senirto, and late Com.
missioner of the Land Office. wm-
Hon. Wm. Wlndom. House of Representatlros.
HCTXRfcrin&S.nkeW-
WMUn«ton-
Hon. O. L. Becker,
Hon. John Wilson, Third Auditor U. 8. Treasury
Hon. Geo. C. Whiting, late Commissioner of Pen
sions, and now of D4pt. Interior.
A. 8. H. White, Esq., Dept. Interior.
Also to the District Land Officers gener
ally, and to all who have had land business
at the seat of Government for years back.
Charges moderate. A retaining fee expect'
ed in every case.
Met" Office No. 6, first floor "Intelligen
cer" buildings, 7th street, Washington
v7n22-6m
ItfNBR SIGHT
I
nv l'Hicna caav.
I tbtuk true lwe bli.wj,
But rather brings »n inner light
An lun.tr vision quicktoflud
The beauUea hid from common tight•
Ifo sout can over clearly tee
Another's highest, noblest part
Save through the sweet philosophy
And loving Wisdom of the heart.
totir ttnannointed,ejr«s than fait
.On him who fills my world with light
1f^doiiotaeVmy'Jri«d|at«|l
Ton see what hides hhii from, our il^St. I
I see the feet that fain would climb,
You but the stops that turn astray
I see the tout unharmed, sublime
Tou but the garment, and the clay.
You see a mortal, weak, misled,
Dwarfed ever by the earthly clod
I seehow manhood, perfected.
May reach the stature of a God.
Blinded I stood, as now you stand,
Till *u mine eyo*. with, touches sweet,
Love, the deliverer, laid Ms-hand,'
And lol I worship at his feet I
KILLING BOOTH.
THRILLING ACCOUNT OF HIS DEATH.
His Last Words,
"1 DI E FOR MY O I
Booth—"Who are you, and what do
you want
Instructions had beeu given to Lieut.
Baker not to disclose the character of
those "whJ were in pursuit.
Lteut. Baker—"We want you. We
intendtotake you prisoner/'
Booth—"This is a hard case. It
may be that I am taken by my
friends."
After some further colloquy of this
sort, Booth, seeming convinced that he
was in the power of the Federal troop
ers, said:
"Give me a chance for my life. I
am a cripple with one leg. Withdraw
your men 100 yards trom the barn, and
I will come out and fight."
Lieut. Baker—"We did not come
here to fight, bnttotake you prisoner.
You must give up your arms and sur
render."
"Booth—"Let me have timetocon
sider."
you two or three times, but I
want to kill anybody."
here to take you/'
Booth—"I will never surrender,
will never be taken alive."
here to take vou
After this conversation took place
tlXr
come out.'' O
Another talk.occurred between Booth
and Harold, in which it appeared that
the latter was begging to be allowed to
take out some arms With him, and
Booth was heard to say:
"Go away from me, I don't want
anything more to do with you."
a W
i" *_ 'it•?
it* I ,\t Hi^" NaVviaS^VrflW
It appears by the Herald's account
that Col. Baker sent Lieut. Col. Con
ger and Lient. Baker, of his detectives
with Lieut. Dougherty and his cavalry.
On reaching Garrett's farm,, they
were toM by a son of Garrett that there
were two men in the barn This was
at two o'clock A. M. on Wednesday.—
Proceeding Jo the barn, Lieut. Baker
was sent forward and called upon Booth
to come out, give up his arms and sur
render, and that young Garrett would
go into the barn to receive the arms.
Upon his entering the barn, Booth
exclaimed
"Get out of here! Jgou have betray
ed me!"
A colloquy then ensued of which the
following is the substance:
Lieut. Baker—"You must give up
your arms and surrender. We have
come to take you a prisoner, and will
treat you as a prisoner. We wi'l give
you five minutes to surrender. If you
refuse We'll burn the barn."
ST: CLOUD. M^NESOTA,^ THURSDAY, MAY 4. 1865
S S
I S
barn he was shot.
a 0
3 £&
at sL 1_
to
The World's.correspondent isays it is
'earned that Harold joined Booth just
after the assassination, and it is believ
ed he brought the horse into the alley.
Sergeant Bout on Corbett, who fired
the shot that killed Booth, says in his
statement:
At 3 o'clock,'or a little after the barn
waft fired, and before the* flames were
kindled,' Booth had the advantage of
us in respect to light.. He could see
us but we could not see him, but after
that the tables were turned against
him. We could see him plainly but
we could not be seen, by him, and he
made a spring towards the door as if to
attempt to force his way out.
A conversation in the barn between
Booth and Harold then took'place,
which was inaudible to those outside,
when Booth again called out:
i'Whoareyou? I could have pick
ed off half a dozen of your men while something just as I fired, that may
we were talking. I could have shot probably account for his receiving the
Lieut. Baker—"Then give up your ^re^
As he passed by one of the beams in
the barn 1 fired at him. I aimed
at his body. I did not wish to kill
him. I took deliberate aim at his
shoulder, but my aim was too highr
Che ball struck him in the head just be
low the right ear and passing through
came out about an inch above the left
I think he stooped to pick ap
ear.
1 A. rin 11 sVKeA 1
don't
a ia««
bead I was no_ta over eigh.t»
or ten yards distant from him when I
a
arms and surrender. We have come wound him he would kill some of our
afraid that if I did uot
the barn. Booth was lying in a reclin-
Lieut, Baker-"If*yJu don't do so ^K position on the floor. I asked him, P,WC8
Booth-"Well, my brave boys, you Peculia brilliancy «Jn "the!
may prepare a stretcher for me.'' feead^Yeti havotfidished jmel S
between Booth and Harold, during iug bunding into the opeu air, where g» am
0
A
pi. ed cWrg. goerd. deo, hU erimo.
momentt, antd thenh started towards the they- wor•e the rebel uniforms,
door. When
about. th, middleior
Col. Conger and Lieut Baker at once
entered the barn and biought Booth
out.
After identification, by order of the
War Department, the body was pri
vately interred in the clothing which
was before upon it
The Herald's correspondent says
that the parley with Booth lasted a long
while that Booth told Lieut. Dough
erty he had a bead drawn on him and
could shoot him if he chose that
Booth could fee those outside plainly
while they could not see him inside
that while the fire was lighted Booth
could be seen, and then Lieutenant
Dougherty ordered Sergeant Corbett to
fire, which he did through one ot the
crevices.
Booth was armed with two six bar
relled and one Seven barrelled revolver.
When the party started to return
with the body, Harold refused to walk,
when a rope was fastened to his neck
and the other end of it to the saddle of
cue of the cavalrymen. As soon as a
horse could be procured, he was mount
ed.
itiifl »ai
W found near him. Southern Termont, New Hampshire
3 S S S He declared that the armsbelonged and Maine, and has a rang/from
^S^rM^^ni^^ tohinvandlnat Harold had nothing the summer heat of Southern
S
Lieut. Baker~«Yes, you have. You brandy, and tour men went in Search Thhs, in the breach of four
0 W 0 W 0 0 a 0
S 8
I S "V A in it, ..rf.ee, 1^.
he p.«ed m.. wi.p of m, ligh,- of pein,,
a S I WsAhgta Star W toree-ioarefce, W eoothero
farther p.rl.,wth Booth bullet which termi..ted hi. .eoureed mwmed bv .«th.rl. I
it W iew .otfordi.ta.t frbto .hieh hi. .umm^he.1, o, the of
& if .wo°°diconfed-
the
S 2 5 5 S
From "Minnesota, as a Home for Emigrants."
CLIMATE
Prominent among the questions pro
posed by the emigrant seeking a new
home in a new country, are those con
cerning the climate, its temperature,
adaptation to the culture of the grand
staples of food, and its hcalthfnlness.
The climate of Minnesota has often
been the subject of unjust disparage
ment. 'I is too far north "the
winters are intolerable "corn will not
ripen "fruit will not grow." These
and other Similar remarks have found
expression by those who should have
known better. To the old settler of
Minnesota, the seasons follow each oth
er in pleasing succession. As the sun
approaches his northern altitude, win
ter relaxes his grasp, streams and lakes
ar« unbound, flowers spring up as if by
the touch of some magic wand, and
gradually Spring is merged into the
bright, beautiful June, with its long,
warm days, and short but cool aud re
freshing niehts. The harvest months
follow in rapid succession, till the gold
en Indian summer of early November
foretells the approach of cold and snow
and again winter with its short days of
clear, bright sky, and bracing air, and
its long nights of cloudless beauty com
pletes the circle.
It will be remembered, that though
Minnesota has no mountain peaks, its
general elevation gives it the character
istics of a mountainous district that,
while it is equidistant from the oceans
that wash the eastern and western
shores of the continent, and is therefore
comparatively uuafTected by oceanic in
fluences, it has a great water system of
lakes and rivers within its own borders.
These, combining with other influences,
give the State a climate in many re
spects dissimilar to the other northern
States.
One of the most striking of the pe
culiarities of this climate, is the great
a
After he was wounded I went into
re 0 a W
immediately we will set fire to the "Where are you wounded Hereplied %£££& & *r less grandeur
I,*,* in a feeble voice bin «v«b«ll *lnrin
in a feeble voice, his eyeballs glaring
with a peculiar brilliancy,
jjead^ Yeu have ^finishe jmei"
W 0 W a it 3
From 8
which Booth was heard to say: he,diedab,o«t two, hoursIand half af- S S S 1 1 7 7 I
»^L.J.AI 1 S
P*
8 6 0
W 8 a
I a
H« w»« ihan «««.:«j r.t. v. (45 6°) equal to Northern Illinois, last year's toil. Lumbermen are
He was tbeu carried out of the burn- .:. uU \*.
southern Michigan, Massachusetts and
a
«Ypudauined coward, wil.you leave terwards. toiuJhn £r\J. Wint*M in in
New York, New Hampshire and
Boothj^althoughijhe could, have kill- temperature (16.1) equals that of ble to the winters in any section of the
ed several of our party, seemed to be Northern Wisconsin, the southern lim- Northern States,
afraid to fire. Mine was the only shot
0
Tt-!?£P?- Whenh fellhe Now Hampshire, and Northeastern of 81* and a small increase of rain.
had bis hand a s.x-Wrclled revol- Maine. Snow and ice disappear, and the ground
ver.andatbisleetwas lying a seven- Its yearly mean temperature (44.6) gradually prepared for the plow,
adopter, whioh he dropped after he was coincides with that of Central Wis- April with a rise of temperature to*46°
9
twmni
"folvers were consin,'Miciugan Central New YorkT
We gave him Ohio aWd Southern fenusylvania
N E
".eho^etbey differoot *L* i„
,35d
"fltinchesSnelhng
a
ABOVT MIIVNESOTA.
Lh:
I a a
dinia (in Italy,) are followed by the
Slfla
,„,„, fifa
th. left .Id. the b.ek S S S S of h*
8
&
*-*-*fc«pr«.ttaa.«-
whilst the mean yearly
fall a Fort is 25 4 inches, and
th-el meaU summer fall. fot all the places
is 11.2 inches, whilst the mean summer
fall at Fort Snelling is 10 9 inches.
pWee. I
Thus it will be seen, that while Min
nesota had a yearly fall of rain ten
inches less than the mean of all the
places, its summer rain is but a frac
tion of an inch less than the mean sum
mer rain of all the places. It may be
added, that one-half of the spring rain
falls in the month of May, and a frac
tion more than one-half ot the rains of
autumn falls in September, giving more
than two-thirds of the whole yearly
amount of rain to the season of vegeta
ble growth, and leaving but the small
fraction to the remaining seven months
of the year.
Judging from the climate of New
England, where the air is loaded with
vapor from the ocean, and the ground
is for months covered with deep snows
or judging from the moie southern of
the Western States, where rain and
sleet are followed by severe cold, it has
been concluded that winter in Minne
sota is a season of terrible storm, deep
snow, and severe cold. The average
fall of snow is about six inches per
month. This snow falls in small quan
tities, at different' times, and is rarely
blown into drifts so as to impede trav
eling. The first snowfall of November
usually lays on the ground till March,
affording protection to the winter grain.
Occasionally at midday a slight thaw
occurs in places with a southern de
clivity. Two or three times in the
course of eight ortenwinters, the
ground has been uncovered for a few
days Long driving snow storms are
unknown, and rain seldom falls during
the winter months.
With an average temperature of 16°
the dry atmosphere of winter in Minne
sota is less cold to the sense than the
warmer, yet damp climates of States
several degrees further south: With
the new-year commences the extreme
cold of our Minnesota winter, when,
variation between the extreme cold of &r a few days, the mercury ranges from
winter, when mercury congeals, and ten to thirty degrees below zero, falling
the intense heat of midsummer, when sometimes even below that. Yet the
it stands for many consecutive days at severity of these days is much softened
95° above zero, in the shade. by the brilliancy of the sun and the
But these extremes afford no index stillness of the air. Thus, while other
to the real character of the climate of States, in lower latitudes, are being
Minnesota. Fortunately we have am- drenched by the cold rain storm, or
pie means by which to determine its buried beneath huge drifts of wintry
actuall
temperature,,
and also its temper- snow, Minnesota enjoys a dry atmoh-
and also its temper snow Minnesot a enjoys a dry atinob
more phere,- and an almost unbroken success
8
«on of bright, cloudless days and se-
or 8 8 a
"oon scene of MinnesoU is one of peer-
the dates for the fbl- The farmer improves the winter sea
Antral Minnesota son by preparing fencing and fuel, and
S a «P«ng «««n«ket the surplus products
8 1•Q
an
-Southern Maine. Its winter mean cold and snow, pronounced far prefera-
the forests getting ready logs
to be borne on the swollen streams of
(70.6) coincides with that of spring to the various lumber manufac
continued alternations of mud and
Canada East, Central Vermont and March brings an average temperature
:-.-€
NO. 41.
and a rain fall of two Inches, commen
ces the -season of vegetable growth.
As the season advances, the warm
south winds, freighted with the vapor
of southern^teas, prevail} lake and"
stream send forth their exhalations
gentle and frequent showers descend
and Minnesota—with the summer*
warmth of Southern Pennsylvania,
Long Island, aw* New Jersey—with
.the long days that, at the sofetiee,
searee admit of darkness between the
evening and morning twilight—pre
sents a scene of rapid vegetable growth
and maturity scarcely paralleled in any
country.
S A S E W S
—Tfie Henderson Monitor says that
Swan Johnson, now in Ramsey county
jailforchopping off the bead of his BOB,
is not insane, hot is- one of the most
shrewd and cunning men in his town^
ship. He is al-o said to be a man of vi*
olent temper, and a tenor to the neigh*
bor*ood in which he lived.
—The LeSueur Statesman learns
that all the available boats and barges'
on the Upper Mississippi River are to'
be put in the Minnesota River this
week, in order to get out as much wheat
as possible «bile the river a navigable.
—A daughter of J. R. Keyser, of
Warsaw, about thirteen years of age,
was so badly burned by her clothes ta
king fire, while lighting a fire in the
stove on Sunday last,, that she died in
great agony on Monday. She Was lit'
erally roasted —Faribault Republican.
—Two Norwegians a few days since
while under the influence of liquor got
into a difficulty at Northfield, when one
ot them stabbed the other with a jack
knife in the region ot the heart.
was arrested tor assault aod battery
with intention to do injury, and held
for trial. The wounded man dying a
day or two after, he waff arrested and
committed for the homicide.—Ibid.
A letter received to-day (April
24th,) written by the wife of the Bish
op of Jerusalem, states that Bishop
Whipple had the fever of the country
and had already been ill with it thir
teen days when she wrote. The Bishop
was cared for by Bishop Gobat and his
family in Jerusalem, where every kind
attention was given him. We hope the
next steamer will inform us that he is
out of danger.—Ibid.
—The Red Wing Argus says that
during the march of the procession on
Thursday last, a premature discharge
of the cannon took place, by which, a
young man named Peter Moser, who
was loading the gun, was teiribly man
gled* and burned.
A large number of rafts—12 to 15
—on the opposite shore of the lake are
being fitted up preparatory to a trip to
the southern markets. It is expected
they will leave during the present
week.—Stillwater Metseuger.
REBEL KINDNESS TO FEDERAL
PRISONERS.—There is a cell in Rich
mond (Castle Thunder) known as cell
No. 3. This cell is four feet eight inch
es high. Mr. McCool, private in Har
ris* light dragoons, a man measuring
six feet and half an inch, was kept in
that cell eleven months and a half.—
Cardinal Balue's oubliette may be read
ax obselete elsewhere, but in Richmond
it is obsolescent. McCool had a ball
and chain on his leg all the time, the
ball weighing thirty-two pounds, the
chain ten pounds. The rain penetrates
that cell, and on wet days McCool lay
in the wet. Eleven months and a half
passed, and he never once stood upright.
He escaped five weeks since through a
hospital window. He had been trans
ferred, sick.
FELIER TRABLERS —If I had bin a
eitin dried apples for a week, an den
took to drinkin for a monf, I coodn't
feel more swell'd up dan I am dis min
nit wid pride and wanity at seeing sich
full tendence hardis evenin' an' when
I reflect dat it am rite in de wite wasin'
season, when de breddrn am seen agoin
round de streets a Ibokin' like ole
Gypshiin mummies pieserved in lime,
an' de sisters are up to dar ancles in de
scrubbin' time, my heart yearns towards
you, like a piece of Ingin rubber hie a
hot stobe, an' I feel dat I hab an af
flickshun for you that nothing can es
trange, or syringe, I forgot now which
but one am jist de same as tedder.
How to catch fleas—go whera they are.

xml | txt