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The Progress. (White Earth, Minn.) 1886-1889, April 14, 1888, Image 1

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VOL. 1.
The Progress.
Gus. H.'Beauiieu,
Theo. H, Beau lieu,
Publisher.
Editor.
White Earth Agency, Hlfnn.
3 A WEEK LY NEWSPAP ER de
voted to the interest of the White
Eaith Reservation and genoial Xoith
wostern jSTews. Published and man
aged by members of the Reserva
tion.
Correspondence beaimg on the In
dian questionpiohlem, or on geneial
interest, is solicited.
Subscription rates: $2.00 pei an
num. For the convenience of those
who may feel unable to pay for the
paper yearly or A\ ho may ibh to take
it on trial, subscuptions may be sent
us for six and thiee months at the
yearly rates. All subsci lptions oi
sums sent to us should be foiwaided
by Kegisteied lettei to insme safety.
Adderess all communications to
THE PROGRESS,
White Eaith, Minn.
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**\*4 I t:i:t^^^miS^^'iJmJ^MHn^^ mH^^sJ^^f^s^^^\f^^^%iuW^^kiS
The Indian Right and Wrong.
^"Wi, hold these truths to be self-evident,
that ALL MEN are created equal that they
are endowed by their Creator with certain
unalienable rights that among these, are
1,1* E, LIBFItTY, AND THE PUKSUIT OP IIAP-
pixFSfe "Declaration of Independence, Julv
4th, J776.
Lake Traverse Sioux Reservations.
Enoch Mahpiyahdinape''s Case
SISSETON- AGENCY, Dak,,
December 3, 1886.
Gabriel Eenvilleprincipal chief.
Wi th great respect and rever
erence for you the undersigned
council of the Sisseton and Wah
peton bands of the Lake Traverse
reservation represent that during
the past summer one Enoch Mah
piyahdinape came upon this reser
vation as a visitor fiom the Brit
ish possessions, and remains here
still. He is not a member of the
Lake Traverse band and has no
right whatever upon the Lake
Traverse reservation, and is con
stantly creating trouble among
che people.
W therefore request that you
lay these facts before agent Green
and ask him to remove said Enoch
Mahpiyahdinape from the Lake
Traverse reservation.
Wicanrpinonpa, President
Council.
[The above is also signed
nine councillor.]
BHWwnti
of
by
SISSETON AGENCY, Dak.,
*Jan. 21, 1887.
Major Israel Greene, S. In
dian Agent, Sisseton agency, D. T.
Sir:We, the council of the
Sisseton and Wahpeton nation,
respectfully ask that you will, as
soon as the weather permits, re
move one Enoch Mahpiyahdinape
from the reservation. He belongs
to the British possessions and is
not a member of these tribes, but
is a visitor only and while on the
reserve has created disturbance
among the people.
Yours respectfully,
Amos Ecetukiya, Sec'y
Wicanrpinonpa, President of
the Council.
WASHINGTO N, D. C.
March 0, 1888.
Hon. J. D. C. Atkins.
Com'r of Indian Affairs.
Sir:The following statement
of facts in relation to one Enoch
Mahpiyahdinape is respectfully
submitted for your consideration.
On December 3, 1886, I receiv
ed a communication from the
Council of the Sisseton and Wah
peton bands of the Lake Traverse
Reservation, relative to said Enoch
Mahpiyahdinape (see copy of same
herewith submitted, marked "A"),
and in compliance with the request
therein made, I called upon the
S. Indian agent and laid the mat
ter before him and urged that he
remove said Enoch from the reser
vation, which he promised to do.
After the lapse of nearly two
months and no action in the mat
ter having been taken, the said
Council on January 21, 1887, com
municated with the agent direct
on the same subject, a copy of
which is herewith submitted,
marked''B."
The agent thereupon informed
me that as soon as the weather
permitted he would order said
Enoch, off the reservation. More
than a year has elapsed since then,
and although I have repeatedly
called the agent's attention to the
matter and urged upon him the
necessity of compliance with the
wishes of the people, in this re
gard, yet for some nnaecountable
reason the said Enoch has not been
ordered off and still remains on
tlie reservation. Although the said
JEnoch is a Wahpeton Sionx yet he
is not a member of that "portion'
1
of said bctfads entitled to locate up
the Lake Traverse
reservation,
se aAeamble to treaty of 1867), women and children from a
bnt he belongK to the "othei
members of said l^ands referred
in the 4th article t said trerty.
At the time of th\ outbreak
the Mdewakanton Sikux, in Min
nesota in 1862, the satt Enoch fle
with the hostile element when thJ
troops moved into the country in*
pursuit and finally reached the}
British possessions where he wa|
employed by the Canadian fu
trade. As his employment depend!
plains he resorted to all sorts
expedients to affect his object.
This Mankato affair was un
doubtedly the outgrowth of
Enoch's visit as above stated as the
old fellow has an oily tongue and
is capable of winning cohorts.
not only kept the young men on
the war-path (the scouts intercep
ted and killed thirteen of the ras
cals during the month of May
1865), but he continually kept the
Chiefs and old men in fear, by j"st
such reports, circulated from time
to time, to counteract any disposi
tion for peace. Gen. John M.
Corse, who relieved Gen. Sibley as
District commander, in an official
dispatch, dated, Headquarters,
District of Minn, St, Paul, Minn.,
Feb. 15, 1866, said If those bands
desirous of coming in will do so,
the accomplishment of a very de
sirable object will be affected. For
the remnant will be so small, I
could afford to buy their scalp.
I do not know what can be done
with Enoch bnt I expect the old
rascal had better be bought
Now, after all this, and after an
absence of twenty years four years
as a refugee under the protection
of the British flag, during man
years of which he labored assidu
ously to keep the Indians on the
war-path, and during all of which
time he nursed (and still nurses)
a revengeful spirit and a most bit
ter hatred against all Indians who
acted as scouts, the man Enoch
comes sneaking into the reserva
tion that was set apart for *'Sib-:
ley's hireling," claims residence
among those of his tribe that (to.
quote from the treaty) "freely
peiilled their lives in behalf of the!
whites."
The treaty of 1867 provided a
reservation at lake Traverse for
that portion of the Sissetons and
Wahpetons -who at the time of the
massacre saved hundreds of white
^^m&-^skS
WHITE EARTH AGENCY, MINtffSOTA, SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1888.
traders and used in the Sicu^ doned and released from prison in
1866, were provided a reservation
ed upon retaining the Sioux on tie!
During the summer of 1864, he
visited a scout station near Foit
Wadworth, Dak. for the pourpose,
as he said, of seeing how the In
dians were treated, so that he
could tell the Indians on the plains
and induce them to make peace.
Instead of doing so, however, on
his return he reported that all the
Indians that had been captured by
Gen. Sibley had been hung, and
that the bones of the Indians were
hanging on trees from Yellow
Medicine to Lake Traverse. That
the same fate would be met by all,
whether friendly or not, should
they fall into the hands of "Sib
ley's hirelings,"as he termed the
Sisseton scouts, which report so
exasperated the young men that
the Chiefs and the older heads who
had been counseling peace since
the thrashing Gen. Sibley gave
them the summer befoie, lost all
control over them, and the Indian
war, so far as raiding parties were
concerned, was renewed with such
vigor that it became necessary, in
view of the exposed condition of
the frontier settlements in Minne
sota to employ more scouts, which
was done and an organization was
effected that fall, and early the
following spring, before the scout
ing stations were established, a
war party of sixteen made its way
to the settlements and committed
those horrible butcheries known
is the "Jewett" murders near
Mankato, Minn.
cap-
lil
tivity worse than death, joined
and did good service with the ex
peditions sent against the hostile
Indians, protected fhe frontier
settlemests for several years, kill
ing many Indians who were on
hostile raids, and finally by the
terror they inspired among the
hostile Indians, stopped all hos
tile expeditions against the whites,
these, with a few who were par
a lake Traverse, while that por
tion of said bands who at the time
pf said outbreak fled to the great
Prairies of the North-west when
thev^roops moved into the country
in pursuit, and remained with the
hostile Indians, were provided a
reservation at Devil's lake. There
fore Enoch, if he belongs any
where in the United States, belongs
at Devil's lake! Yet he has been
allowed to take for himself and
family undei the general land in
severalty la over a thousand
acres of land at Lake Traverse.
The Government cannot make
the Lake Traverse reservation the
"botany bay" for the criminal
classes of the Enoch stripe with
out violating treaty obligation (if
not the letter, certainly the spirit
of it), and without a terrible in
jury to the morality of the Indi
ans. Already incendiary fires
have occurred there destroying
houses and barnes and much other
property, one Indian losing four
teen head of horses, cattle and
sheep, the accumulations of years
of toil.
In view of these incontestible
facts, I feel it my duty to write
this protest, and ask that the al
lotments made to said Enoch and
his family, as appears from the
records in your office, may be can
celled, and that he be ordered off
of the Lake Traverse reservation.
Very respectfully,
Gabriel Renville.
Principal Chief of Lake Trav
erse band.
[We are not conversant with the
facts in the case which has led to
the above controversy, and can
but publish the correspondence as
it was handed to us, and therefore
forbear further comment.Ed.]
"Wedding Presents in China.
The ceremonies employed in Chi
nese marriages differ widely in the
various provinces and districts.
In all, however, a "g between"
is engaged to find, in the first in
stance, a fitting bride for the
would be bridegroom to conduct
the preliminary pioceedings of
bringing the parents to terms, and
to see to the casting of the horo
scopes and the exchange of pres
ents. The gifts presented are of
infinite variety but in almost ev
ery ease a goose and a gander, the
recognized emblems of conjugal
fidelity, figure conspicuously
among the offering made by the
bridegroom. Th choice of these
birds is so strange that one is apt
to consider it as one of the pecu
liar customs of the topsy turvy
Chinese mind, which regards the
left hand as the place of honor
and the stomach as the seat of the
intellect. But this is not quite so,
for we find from George Sand that
at the marriage of french peasants
in Berry a goose was commonly
borne in the bridegroom's pro
cession.Blackwood's Magazine.
Person^ troubled with a tenden
cy to stoop, and who are becoming
round shouldered, are advised to
walk with the palms of the hands
forward, the thumbs outward. I
will do wonders toward straight
ening a bent form, as any soldier
will testify.New York Sun.
seen
Oft times after a man
his "'ant e" he is compelled to go
and see his uncle,"The Enoch.
ITT
1888. SPRING ANNOUNCEMENT
BLANDING & SMITH
DETROIT MINN."
Editorial Humor.
A young lady, visiting for the
first time the country, was al
armed at the approach of a cow.
She was too frightened to run,
long time. Usually chess players
want to move.New Orleans
Picayune.
The figures of this year, 1888,
resemble three big girls and a dude
as they spread themselves across
the pavement on a fine afternoon.
-Williamsport Su and Banner.
Some one asks: "Does it pay tc
be good Perhaps our evidence in
the matter will not be taken, and
so we shall not answer the ques
tion directly, but we will say that
it is good to be paid.Lowell Citi
zen.
The young man who would
waste time kissing a girl's hand
would eat the brown paper bag
and leave the hot house grapes foi
some one else.Somerville Jour
nal.
Lei a man sit down on a bent
pin and he will arise promptly and
speak briefly to the point.New
Orleans Picayune.
It is hoped thai the man who
predicted that we were going to
have a warm winter hasn't a bush
el of coal in his bin, and is snow
ed up 100 miles from a coal yard.
Norrisiown Herald.
"See here, waiter, how it that
I find a button in this salad
"Dat am a part of the dressen'
sah."Life.
A W A E!
Tinware, Crockery,
Glassware and Lamp.
-TTT-0-
BAKER'S BARB WIRE,
OHN DEERE PLOWS,
HARROWS AND' CULTIVATORS.
COMPLETE LINE OF
CARTRIDGES AND GUN SUPPLIES. FISHING TACKLE, etc.
25m2 I3TJfa/7 Orders will Receive Prompt Attention.
I3T ATTENTION FARMERS! .Sf
WE HAVE FOUND IT A GENUINE BONANZA AT
A FAIRBANKS & BROS,
-DEALERS NN-
Dry Goods, Groceries,
Provisions
Boots & Shoes, Hardware.
Everything First-Class, and at Astonishingly Low Prices.
Car-Loads of New Goods Arriving Every Day.
WHITE EARTH AGENCY,
NO. 28.
THE BEST
In the World!
Do You Want Something to Read
and, shaking her parasol at the STAR"N EWS%
animal, she said in a very stern
T- i t* Published at Minneapolis, wheie-
tone: Lie down, sir! lie down!
-New York Tribune. by we a
The chess club has occupied its dngly low price of FOLK DOLLARS A
present quarters for a remarkably |YE AR FOR THE TWO The Xews is
"We have the pleasure to announce
to our readers with this issue, that we
have made arrangements with the
publishers of the
i enabled to fmni.h the same
with the PROGRESS at the astonihh-
is an eight column folio, contains 32
"olimrns of reading itter daily it is
wide-avuike, fie.sh, and newsy and all
together one of the best soiuces of m
foimation for the money tint one can
lecuie. Its News aie condensed and
eliable. Try it, and you will not be
lisappointed. [email protected], Keineniber you
you get'a first-class DAILY Newspaper
worth alone the price of yo.tr money,
uid the Progiess, the two for $4.1)0 a
year.
[email protected] We have also secured the priv
lege of club rates with the
St. Paul Weekly "Farmer,"
The Best Farmer's paper published
the Noithwe.st. The Faiuier* is
vbly conducted, and its columns are
lied with seasonable and valuable
eading for the Farm, Family and
he Kitchen. We will furnish the St.
Paul FARMER and the Pnoavss for
one year to any addresfl for &3.0O.
HOTEL
HINDQUARTEKS.
Ed. Oliver, Proprietor*
Everything in first-class keeping with,
the times.
The tables are always provided with.
Fish, Game ad Vegetable* in
their season. Good stabling,
ample accommodation for
both, man and beast.
BOARS BY THJE !5AT OE VTV.TX.
3
Come Early.
MINN.
46
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