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The Progress. (White Earth, Minn.) 1886-1889, May 26, 1888, Image 1

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JBP THIS WEEK*$ ISSUE,
"EARLY DAYS*
Historioal, Instructing and En*
tertainfng.
VOL. 1.
The Progress.
Bus. H. Beau lieu,
Theo. H. Beaulieu,
Publisher. Editor.
White Earth Agency, Minn*
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER de
voted to the mteiest of the White
Eaith Reservation and general Noith
western News Published and man
aged by membeis of the Reserva
tion.
Coirespondence beaiing on the In
dian questionpioblem, 01 on general
interest, is solicited.
Subscription lates. $2.00 pel an
num Foi the convenience of those
who may feel unable to pay for the
papei yearly 01 who may wibh to take
it on trial, subscriptions may be sent
us foi six and thiee months at the
yearly lates. All subscriptions 01
sums sent to us should be forwarded
by Registered letter to insure safetj.
Adderess all communications to
THE PROGRESS,
White Edith, Minn.
Flesh Turned Into Stone.
Dakota is truly a marvelous and
wonderful country. Not only won
derful in mineral and agricultural
resources, but it abounds in geo
logical formations that afford con
stant surprise and study for the
student in this most interesting
science. The bad lands located,
seventy miles southeast of this
place, have no equal on this con
tinent as a receptacle for petrifac
tions of amphibious animals. The
peculiarity of the soil transforms
flesh into stone, but this power is
not confined to the soil of the Bad
Lands, put exists in many locali
ties the Black hills. A case has
just come to the knowledge of
your correspondent that has nev
er been made public, and proves
that many bodies buried in the
hills have turned to stone. The
case at hand is that of a little son
of Mr. Engene Holcomb, a promi
nent citizen of Rapid City. Some
years ago the boy died and was
buried in a spot not set aside foi
general burying purposes. When
the city grew and a cemetery was
selected Mr. Holcomb had a large
monument erected and the depart
ed disinterred. The family expect
ed when the sho\el of the grave
digger reached the casket it would
need replacing, and had made pre
parations to that end.
The coffin was reached, and as
the man endeavored to place a
rope underneath to twist it to the
surface, he was surpiised at its
great weight. Thinking it Was the
narrow, contiacted hole that ie
duced his strength, he made sever
Ml more efforts, but only moved it
a few inches, and was compelled
to call for aid. Two men succeed
ed placing the rope about the
casket, and With a hard pull it Was
brought to the surface. An exami
nation followed, and upon the de
ceased being revealed, it was found
that the body had turned, not as
the Scripture says, lttto dust, but
into solid rock, From a gentle
man who was present, and whose
word can be relied upon, it Was
learned that the parents easily
recognized the child. The body
has assumed a dark brown Color,
the features slightly shrunken,
and he compared it to the appear
ance of a mummy. The eyebrows
and hair were of a lighter hue,
while the hands looked perfect. It
was the most singular sight he had
ever witnessed and only the sensi
tive feeling of the parents kept the
matter from the newspaper col
umns. The body was agaid in
terred, and now rests peacefully
in the family lot for aught we
know.
The Strang transformation of
this body is Hot the only instance.
The small number of dead removed
npfrxj1
has not afforded an opportunity to
learn how common an occurence
this may be, but learned gentle
men tell me that when Gabriel
blows his bugle, or the disinterring
of bodies becomes necessary in the
Black hills country, many will be
found turned to stone. The other
instance related is that of Wild
Bill, murdered in Deadwood by
Jack Call ten years ago. Bill was
buried on the mountain side, and
the building of residences com
pelled the unearthing of his bones.
What was the surprise of his
friends when they discovered that
the famous frontiersman was a sol
id stonepetrified. This revela
tion may appear strange to east
ern readers, but here it is an open
secret.Milwaukee Journal.
Atmosphere of Alaska.
Lieut. Schwatka, in making the
inland passage to Alaska, at one
point went ashore among the
wilds of the Alexander archipela
go, and he describes the vegeta
tion which he encountered as be
ing most rank and luxuriant.
At the feet of the evergreens
clothing the land grew a dense
mass of tangled bushes and vines,
and at the roots of these was a
solid carpeting of mosses lichens
and ferns, which often run up the
tiees to a height greater than a
All this dense growth is as moist
as a sponge The thick carpeting
of moss extends from the shore to
the edges of the glaciers on the
mountain summit, and the con
stant melting of ice through the
warm summer keeps it saturated
with water. The air is burdened
with moistuie, and everything is,
like Mr. Mantahni's proposed body
"moiBt and unpicaeuuii*.''
It is almost impossible to real
ize the dampness of this region
without having experienced it.
Water drips from overhead like an
April mist and oozes up beneath
the foot as one walks.
As an example of the luxuriance
of the vegetation, take the Indian's
"totem poles," which, although
they aro dead timbers standing
on end near the native houses,
bear huge clumps of dupping moss
and foliage at heights varying
from ten to thirty feet from the
ground.
It will be well to explain, in
passing, that these totem poles are
covered with Very curious carv
ings, and although no one is at all
sure of their significance, it is
probable that they represent gen
ealogies or tubal histories of the
Indians.
It often happens that the seed of
a Sitka spiuce becomes lodged in
the tangle of moss resting upon a
totem pole, and there germinates.
Its roots crawl down the pole, and
having reached the earth, find ad
ditional sustenance there, which
they send to the branches flourish
ing above, and which have thus
far been nourished by the juices
furnished by the moss.
Imagine a city boy tossing a
walnut from his window, so that
it lodges Upon a telegraph pole,
sprouts there, sends down its roots
to the earth, and Waxes into such
a tall tree that the boy can lean
from his window and pick Walnuts
from it every autumn.
That idea iB incredible, and yet
its equivalent often happens in
Southeastern AlaBka^~Youtn*s
Companion,
Summer colds are the worst of
all colds oftentimes, as it is then
very difficult to protect one's self
properly, A ten grain dose of
quinine will usually break Up a
cold in the beginning. Anything
that Will set the blood actively in
circulation will do it, whether it
*'$** **-s|IV &LM
be drugs or the use of a bucksaw* at $1,00 per pound and flour at 60
"A higher Civilization The Maintenance of Law and Order."
Reminiscence of the Fur Trade
Half a Century Ago. UM
Related by Old Traders, Trappers*
and Voyag-eures. 4
PKEFACE.
In the publication of "Early
Days," it is the object of the man
agers of the Progress to give to its
readers a series of reminiscences
incident in the early history of tie
geheralry beyond
the subordinates. Pork Was rated
WHITE EARTH AGENCY, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1888.
Early Days. It
Northwest and the lives of its har^ trip with the price of his hire
dy pioneer^. And thereby pro
duce a varied collection of useful,
instructive and entertaining liter
ature. Our aim will be to publish
THE FUR TRADE SIXTY YEARS AGO.
EARLY VOYAGEURES, ETC.
only such facts and incidents as
we shall obtain and which are yet
fresh in the memory of pioneer also indulge in an occasional
traders and voyageures now living.
EDITOR.
Upwards of sixty years ago,when
the territories that now comprises hearty, meeting
the prosperous States of Minneso
ta, Wisconsin and Michigan was placid indifference worthy the disci
one vast, unbroken wilderness, and
the gloom and silence of its interi
or was yet deaf to the echo of thrift
and commerce, and broken only
by the blood-thirsty war whoop
of the ever warring Siouxs and
Ojibwas, the Fur trade, then, was
an occupation surrounded with
hardship, privations and dangers.
But the wild romantic nature of
the pursuit seemed to lend it an
enchantment that spiced it with
many pleasures.
The American Fur Company,
at that time, had their headquar
ters at Mackinac with John Jacob
Astor at its head, and.Hkeahuge
t)ctopus,Teld sway anX dominion
over the Northwest fur districts.
This portion of the country then
was a veritible 'happy hunting
ground' to the fur hunter and
trapper and a mine of wealth to
the fur trade. The lakes, rivers
and smaller streams awarmed with
colonies of the industrious beaver,
and in their vicinity great num
bers of otter, martin, fisher, coon,
and minks abounded. The for
ests teemed with moose, elk, deer,
bear and numberless other games,
whilst fish, in endless variety,
swarmed in lakes and streams.
And on the prairies roamed the
buffalo in one vast unbroken herd.
The employe's, outside of the
trader or 'clerks in charge' at the
different stations or posts, were
composed mainly of 'pork eaters'
Canadian voyageurs. These
men were hired in Canada, by an
agent of the company, under a
written contract ahd for a term of
three years, at a salary of $100 to
$120 per year, including rations.
These rations were composed
mainly of one quart of lyed corn
and one ounce of tallow per day
while in actual service, traveling,
trading for furs from one Indian
village to another, collecting ar
rearages, etc. This bill of fare,
occasionally, was diversified by
the addition of fish game, and
wild rice.
It will be Well to esplain,ifl pass
ing, that this lyed corn was the
common 'Indian corn,* which is
prepared by being boiled in lye
(Water run thro* Wood ashes) ufi*
til the hull becomes soft, when it
is Washed and rinsed in clean wa
ter and is then ready to Use.
In these days, flour and
were Considered & luxury which
only the stomach of the bourgeois
and clerks alone, Wag Considered
cts. per pound. And it was only
on some Holiday occasion that
the humble voyageure permitted
his appetite to be regaled with the
dainty taste of pork and flour, and
to wash down the royal /morsel
with a "pusse caffe," in the shape
of 'trade liquor/ valued at $16.00
per gallon, and this price did not
secure the genuine article either,
but that only which was copiously
drenched with water. Still, as
a general thing, men used liquor
whenever they could procure it,
and it oft times happened that a
voyageure coming out of a year's
his pockets, would 'spree* until
the las\ cent was gone. And let
it not b assumed that these de
ba nch y^e restricted to the voy
agear, buH it was no uncommon
thing for tVe bourgeois and clerks
carousals.
The Canadian voyageures, as a
a class, were illiterate, and a pleas
ant combination of honesty, faith
fulness and obedience. Physically,
they were strong, tobust and
the most trying
difficulties and hardships with
pline of trained soldiers. Strong
will power was one of their chief
characteristics, though the vain
conceit of their prowess in the
'manly art' rather inclined them
to be somewhat bombastic,
cially and as friends, they
true, constant and faithful,
know of several of these
ageures who were in the employ
of old traders then, and who have
remained in the service of these
same trader's families all these
years.
The voyageures garb, when in
actual service, consisted of a hick
ory shirt, cloth punts, whifths.
secured to the person by a belt
wound around the waist. And in
winter he wore a blanket coat,
a 'capuchin' or hood of the same
material over his head and with
neaps and moccasins for his feet,
our Jean and Baptiste were ready
for the journey. Journeys that
would extend over the space of
months and years in the interior
of the the then, unbroken forests
and vast wilderness, in the very
midst of wild beasts and wild men.
And here let us state, that to the
coolness, honesty and nerve of the
early traders, voyageures and their
descendants, civilizations owes a
priceless tribute. For to them and
the earily missionaries is due the
the opening of the waythe door
to a new and prosperous era.
They heralded to the wild untu
tored savage the tokens of an in
coming order of things, whereby
a nation's standard could be se
cured, viz! That through industry
alone Could prosperity prevail, and
in Christianitythe Gospel light
Was salvation assured.
After a voyageure had become
acquainted with the country and
familiarized himself with the peo
ple and their language, he was then
subject to promotion. When this
occurred the salary of such was
increased, and the promoted party
allowed an amount of goods, etc.,
to trade by himself and in the in
terest of the company. These tra
ders and voyageures often height
ened their influence ahd populari
ty among the Indians by marriage,
generally, With the daughters of
powerful chieVes, or families.
These marriages Were performed
in accordance With thg aboriginal
pork customs of those days. And may
it be said, to the credit of the hum
ble VOyageUre, that, with but few
exceptions, he respected, with sa-
worthy its digestion. For, in the cred obedience, the woman and
first place, both these articles Were the rude vows that bound them
scarc^and, to add to the difficulty together until "death did them
of its indulgence, thtr value" Was part." fhe6 marriages were often
the means' of rte*solemniged, even in after years,
Whenever the" services of a mission
ary could be procured*
So-
were
We
voy-
1888. SPRING ANNOUNCEMENT 1888.
BRANDING Sc SHXITH
DETROIT
ASSORTMENT!
IN THE COUNTRY!!
rry
Tinware, Crockery,
Glassware and Lamp.
BAITER'S" BARB "WIRE,
JOHN DEERE PLOWS,
HARROWS AND CULTIVATORS.
COMPLETE LINE OP
CARTRIDGES AND GUN SUPPLIES. FISHING TACKLE, etc.
25m2 35"' Mail Orders will Receive Prompt Attention. Jg%
*S" ATTENTION FARMERS! JBl
W E HAVE FOUND IT I A GENUINE BONANZA AT
DEALERS NN
Dry Goods, Groceries*
Provisions
Boots & Shoes,
Largest and Best
DETROIT BOOT and SHOE STORE.
OPPOSITE POST OFFICE).
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.
Mail Orders will receive Prompt
Attention.
A. E, BOWLING,
Boots & Shoes, Hardware.
Everything First-Class, and at Astonishingly Low Prices.
Car-Loads of New Goods Arriving Every Day. Come Early.
WHITE EARTH AGENCY, MINN.
DETROIT,
TIME.
i
rp .EMI I 1MB. r+i
11MB, 11MB.\T
FRANK M. HUME,
DETROIT, MINNESOTA
DEALER IN
Clocks, Watches and Jewelry.
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.
WHITE EARTH OrderB, if left with
Benjamin Caswell, at Fairbanks &
Bi'o.' Store will receive piompt at
tention. 4tt
Mas. E. IRVINE,
LATEST STYLES
MILLtNARY, FANCY OOODS.
LADIES FURBISHING.
Mail orders promptly attended to.
r16m6] DETROIT,
t&*READ WE PROGRESS,
THE ONI,Y PAPER
That Fearlessly and Truthfully
Advocates the Cause of the Red
Man, Justice and Fair-play,
MINN
HARD WAR E!
^^JJ5
A FAIRBANKS & BROS,
C. M. CAMPBELL,
Minn.
Minn.
G. C, NtJNN,
Manufacturer of
LIGHT A HEAVY HARNESSES.
Dealer ifa
Truhks ahd Valises, Whipsv
Blankets, Robes, etc.
Mail Orders will Receive Prompt
Attention.
[19m6] DITROIT CITT, Minn.
DEALER IN
MENS AND BOYS CLOTHING,
A]SD
Furnishing Gooods.
Hats, Caps, Gloves,
Trunks, and "Valises,
LADIES & CHILDBEK'S UNDERWEAB.
Mail Orders will Receive Piompt
Attention.
Next Door to Baiber Shop
[18m6] DETROIT,
~~-*^mjft,.
'iff I
NO. 33.
Z. AND
1
4 --set*
S
i
4
Minn.
Do You Want Somethihg to Read
We have the pleasme to announce
to our readeis with this is-iiie, that we
have made arrangements with the
publisheis of the
8*S & STAR-NEWS,
Published at Minneapolis, where*
by we are enabled to furnish the same
with the PROGRESS at the astonish
ingly low price of tfotn DOLLARS A
YEAR YOU THE TWO I The News is
is an eight column folio, contains 32
columns of leading matter daily it is
wide-awake, fresh, and newsy and all
together one of the best soiuces of in
formation for the money that one can
secure. Its News aie condensed and
reliable. Try it, and you will not be
disappointed. Bgk, Remembei you
you get a fiist-classDAILY Newspaper
woith alone the puce of your money,
and the Piogiess, the two foi $4.00 a
year.
ttgk. We have also secured the piiv
liege of club rates with the
St. Paul Weekly "Farmer,"
The Best Farmer's paper published
mtheNoithwest. The -Paimer* is
ably conducted, and its columns are
filled with seasonable and valuable
reading for the Farm, Family and
the Kitchen. We will furnish the St.
Paul FARMER and the PROGESS for
one year to any address for $3.00.
-4- 1St

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