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The Progress. (White Earth, Minn.) 1886-1889, September 01, 1888, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016853/1888-09-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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CARSOWS PHARMACY,
DETROIT, :'*aj?j MINX.
Vruff, Chemical*, and
AGriMAnJOnnntts wilt reoelvelPrompt
99.
r Attention, tf
Quay-yuck-o-ohee.gaid.
OL: I.
The Progress!
Cu8. H, Beaulieu,
Then. H, Beaulieu,
*?9u A WKKKLT
JOB
Vf $*%-
^fe%MiHwUdlMa
Publisher.
Manager.
XKWBPAPBU
dian questionproblem, or on general
--M^^. nteres S S
de
voto^ to tho interest of the "White
Earth Reservation and general North
western Xews. I'ublisheil and man
Aged by members of the Reserva
tion.
Correspondence bearing on the In- is
Subscription rates: $2.00 per an
num. For the convenience of those
who may feel unable to pay for the
paper yearly or who may wish to take
it on trial, subscriptions may be sent
us for six and three months at the
yearly rates. All subscriptions or
sums sent to us should be forwarded
by Registered letter to insure safety.
Adderess all communications to
TUB PROGRESS,
White Earth, Minn.
THE PROGRESS
WORK
AND
Printing
Establishment
Bill Heads, Letter Heads,
Blanks, Cards, Tags etc., noli cite
Work Warranted and SatleftetiM
r.-, i
All kinds of Job Printing, such &s the one case the parties operate
arisen out of the tariff discussion,
is that of the relation between
tariff duties, and trusts or com
bines.
The bills recently
introduceid
by Mr. Breckenridge seem to
indi.
cate that the honorable gentleman
i one of those who views the ex-
tariff and
the various trusts as so inter
twined, that the removal ol the
enc of the present
nrs wou
without government assistance,
nay in spite of law- The combi
nation here is only less compre-
fcehBive than the other.
TARIFF AND TRUSTS, their monopoly by means of,
_ with the aid of government?
One of the questions which have latter Ui taken inasamembeifof
or at least its modification,
f?
a disastrous
effect,
up
on the latter.
But it is argued by others, that
the one does not affect the other,
in other words that trusts are pos
sible independent of the tariff.
Instances are given where com
modities upon which there are no
duties, or are so light as to make
them comparatively free, have
fallen into the clutch of the mon
opoly and held at prices dictated
by the monopolists.
The Pioneer Press takes this
ground and cites the case of coffee.
It shows that although there is
absolute free trade in coffee, mon
opoly has still "succeeded in es
tablishing a control over supply
sufficiently complete to manipu
late prices at will." We partially
admit the force of this argument.
Monopoly is possible in any Com
modity which has a commercial
value.
The stability of the ground ta
ken may be manifested by refer
ence to the corners obtained upon
our domestic products and mainly
upon provisions.
So long as there is ample capital
in the hands of an unscrupulous
few, monopoly will obtain, and
this too, perhaps, in spite of high
taiff, low tariff or free trade.
But the concessions made in the
same article also indicate that the
tariff reformer has good reason for
the position he takes, which is,
that he can consistently occupy
himself with trust reform at the
same time that he seeks to effect
a modification of our tariff laws.
It is admitted that "a trust man
aged industry should feel the knife
of revenue reduction, before an
industry in which the force of
competition is allowed free play."
But in oui view it is not, "inci
dentally that a tariff reformer will
take cognizance of trust opera
tions." He must proceed with de
liberate purpose, and make direct
war upon monopoly whether it
possess in the guise of trusts, com
bines, or other form.
In the relation which these or
ganizations stand to protected
commodities, they must be attack
ed, and althongh they may not be
entirely destroyed by tariff reduc-
tion, they can still be shorn of the ing the creation of euch world
greater port of the-1 strength. For wide and comprehensive combina-
under careful analysis we find that
ti(ms
Itself Is, Practically
p*otestlota itsel is Practically., *na*
The case of proceduremay be
slightly different, as in the case
where the Armours obtain control
of the pork market without gov*
ernment interference, and Carne
gie et 1 control iron products. In
find
sa
I
~t i^nu ^OJ,
"4 A/flf^r CMIfrathm Th$ mtntenahce of Law and Order."
WHITE EARTH AGENCY, MINN1J0A SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1. 18M
the trust, and moreover tmaresihe W
profits as our ~t^m .^P
fmittouio 8t|rjtui Will Provfl
The Armours following certain
xn Armour louowm certain
i lating these methods require]V SZf
Amairtn 4na,iM
crecy to insure success, but
iron manufacturers, and their
partner, our august government,
disdaining covert measures opejpy,
and
StttamtleMsly Acquire the Monopoly
by MeanH of Lawn
passed by the aid of ill-gotten
gold pocket the profits, and when
from the oppressed consumer arise
protests and calls for reform,
comes the answer, Ceasar has so
decreed, "what are you going to
do about it
The "intelligent and -honest
man" is not concerning himself
so much with the possibilities of
the future, as with the fact of the
present, and will give answer in
these words, "a/e oan elect men
whose views SHALL IMPELL THEM
TO REDBESS WBOKo, and that
what we oan do about it
nn
We are not arguing that reform
can be made so complete, so as to
control the capital of grasping
men, and thus to obliterate all
possibilities of trusts, thereby es
tablishing a kingdom of heaven
upon earth. This is above human
means, but we do hold that opress
ion can be lessened and national
monopoly made as difficult and,in
frequent as monetary stringencies.
And furthermore, while it may
be true that social evolution will
bring about cosmopolitan trusts,
still as this is but a speculation
based upon insufficient data, we
can safely leave thisleature to the
generation which would in such
case have the question to deal
with.
Competition always has, and al
ways will be a constant and deter
gent factor in the machinery of
trade and from its very nature will
forever be antagonistic to combi
nations, formed for the purpose of
raising prices.
Where there is a "bull" there
is always a "bear," and IF PRICES
ABE NOT INTERFERED WITH BY THE
GOVERNMENT, PRICES WILL FINALLY
ADJUST THEMSELVES.
This is not an age encouraging
to class supremacy. Already in
the old world may be heard the
rumble of discontent from the
middle and lower stratas of socie
ty. A democratic spirit pervades
the civilized world, the sense of
equality is keeping pace with in
creased general knowledge, arid is
calling for the abolition of opress
ing lordship.
The principle that "all men are
born free and equal" is beginning
to be emphasized in action no
more to find its manifestation only
in words.
Can capitalists as a class disre
gard the demand for justice and
which, like Banquo's ghost, will
not down? *:_ ,f
And added to the spirit of the
times, are peculiar national laws,
customs and antipathies, which
will have their influence in oppos-
in emphatic terms,
Alexander the Great under
las ouisfi OF MONOPOLY CAN
IN THESE,
AYSAl& THE
WOULD]
:'.CO&'Qt7Eft,
THINK
The iroa WMinfafttaftrfft effect Henry Wileoii*
American labor will be
the raw material which entem in-
come in competition with our man
life, which are consumed by the
lift* wWk a
best protected by taxing all the the bee castle is several feet above
necessaries of life lightly placing the ground, and the eyes of the
to our manufacture! on the free attracted by the bees coming in
list raising revenue to support and out in numbers. The third
the Government upen article* that step of the hunt is then taken,
and the leader knows that this
Uiaeturera and upon the luxuries *_i\ A
Wealthy tilasses of society,-
Hunting For Bee Trees/'
6
ftW,
methods obtain control of ifte
commodities they d^.gn man^m- /^"lhlD*!jM
forests west of the
the wild bees swarm in
countless numbers, feeding on the
luxurious vegetation which Bkirts
1 0f.**he
.^f
W kh
0
lbl
^fl^*
Slow-
ing with milk and honey." Hol
low trees are taken possession of
by them, an4 honey stored into
tliem in large quantities. If noth
ing disturbs them they remain in
their old quarters for long periods
atia time, laying up stores of hon
eyjfor their own uso, and, as is
offen the case, for the bears or the
wjiite men in the long run. The
enters who make a business of
collecting the honey are the most
merciless enemies that the little
creatures have. Unlike bruin,
jvho discovers a hive of honey by
ihance, or through the aid of his
sensitive nose, the bee hunter car
fry on their work systematically,
watching the habits of the little
creatures while gathering honey
is (from the flowers, and then follow
ing them as they return to their
home through the air. After an
experience of a year or two in the
business, the hunters can locate
with wonderful accuracy the home
of the bees, notwithstanding the
fact that the hive if often situated
in a dense forest, and in trees
where no one would ever think of
looking for honey. Like most
othey wild creatures, the bees be
tray their hiding place by their
own action.
The hunters before starting out
in quest of their rich booty pro
vide themselves with the necessary
equipments. These consist of ax
es, riflesr"matches and a small
piece of honey comb. The rifles
are carried along for their own
protection, in case the hunters
should be hunted by enemies oth
er than honey bees. When an
open glade near the edge of the
forest is reached, the piece of hon
eycomb is placed on a low bush
where it can be plainly seen by
the passing bees. Its sweet aroma
quickly fills the air round it, and
attracts the little honey gatherers
toward it. Like a miser, who has
suddenly discovered a treasure of
gold, they dive down into the lit
tle cells and begin to satiate their
appetite. Then, without suspect
ing the trap set for them, nor
stopping to inquire about the
strange phenomenon of honey
comb growing on a bush, they dart
away through the forest to depos
ite their load in the hive.
This is the hunters' opportuni
ty. Noticing the direction in
which the bees fly, they quickly
start in pursuit, keeping the lit
tle creatures in sight with diffi
culty. Usually an old experienced
bee hunter takes the lead, and his
eagle like eyes can detect the small
black specks the air when the
others have entirely lost sight of
them. Through dense clusters of
brambles and over wet and bogy
ground they hurry, completely ab
sorbed in the chase, and unmind
ful of ttll disagreeable surround
ings. They have to make a bee
line through the woods, and not,
to stop to consider whether there
is better traveling in another but
longer direction. 7
*t^Frequently it happens that the
hunter when in the immediate
neighborhood of the tree are un
able to distinguish the right one
from the others. The entrance to
hunters are unable to see it unless
a
w:l i \Z SLZ cannot fail. A fire is kindled and
a piece of honeycomb placed upon
(Continued on Fourth page.)
f-O/'f
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Dry Goods,
Boots & Shoes,
WHITE EARTH AGENCY, i
1 1
1868.
DETROIT
Ts,^'
1MB.
l'lMB^'
summer mmgres*.
if you mom keep posted on
Indian Affairs Generally. Ail
laws relating^thereto Mil be
5*= -rtt
3*.
^m
ilfy
r-rerM
WNEW FIRM!
A-.R W:A:R: E
Tinware, Cockery, '-^^zZ'rji"
BAKER'S BARB WIRE,
OHNT-DEERE
~iXn^'
^m
rf &,
1
,BMI I
5SS
Gay-go Gway-tunz-zig^.
3NTO. 4 5.
3
.J'i'li'*..'?
-DEALER NX-
Provision
Everything First-Class, and at Astonishingly Lew Prices.
Car-oad8 of New Goods Arriving Every Cay. Ccrr.e Early.
-3*3
A-FAIRBANKS:
Glasswdze and Lamp,
HARROWS AN CULTIVATORS.
-'?K "1
v, COMPLETE LINE OF
CARTRIDGEsflNp GUN SUPPLIES.
25m2 JC3T Mailorders will Receive Prompt Attention.ZJ&X
'^iSf'"'l._
"%S'
IME,
IMS. [MB *p
'St llME.. r*.a
IME
FRANK^M. HUME,
DETROIT, MtXKBSOTA.
-o~
DEALER IN
Clocks, Watches and Jewtl^
dEtfAMMtt A SPECIALTY,
WmtK EARttt Orders, if left with
Benjamin Caswell,, at Fairbanks &
Bit. Stor will irecelxw prompt at*
tention. 4tf
I
Groceries,
Hardware:
i-.^ v--
NN
7
tV-'JI5
S
ii
^-^^^ji^
t^LOWS.i
.y%
THE^BCST
'it-,
:**ji
c^"'
FISHING TACKLE, etcV
IS. C.M. CAMPBELL,-~fp
'^*6ld- &$ DEALER IN-- 'jfa%
MENS AND BOYS CLOTHING,
AND
Furnishing Gooods.
Hats, Caps, Gloves,
Trunks, and Valises,
LADIES & CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR.
Mall Orders will Receive Prompt
Attention.
aXext Door to Ba^er Shop*
(18m6] BETR61*^M1,

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