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The Progress. [volume] (White Earth, Minn.) 1886-1889, April 13, 1889, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016853/1889-04-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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9riMr ChemleiU, Pa.snt
Me4icins.
r MAIL 0*D* will roelveJPrompt
AttdBfttOB. it.
Quay-TUck-o-chee-gaid.
VOL.II.
J^- Progress.
THEO. BEAULIBU.
BPITOJt AKD M1XAOII.
AN INOCPCNDENOENT NEWSPAPER,
Published Irv the tntarest of the Whlti Earth
Reservation and the Northwest generally.
An Exponent of a Higher Civilization, a
Fearless and Zealous Advocate whenever
Right and Justice may need a Friend, and
to Fraud and Oppression a 8iopless Foe.
Terms, St.OO A Tear* In Advance.
THE PROGRESS
JOB
tfiit.
Correspondence besA-ing on the In
dian questionproblem, or on general
interest, is solicited.
WORK
LUD|
Printing
Establishment.
All kinds of Job Printing, such as
Bill Heads, Litter Heads,
Blanks, Cards, Tags etc., solicited
Work Warranted andflSatisfaction
Guaranteed.
WWBL Xkok 86. to $58.
ih*ZStU{
IIPR1GD.!
This KlegantParlorOrgan
style TO containingfioo-
ftfcTM. 4 Utl Of Mftdt,
(ail.) kBMiwella. Stool
aad Boek free. For only
$M0. With right and left
eempler. Warrantee for 6
ItU onlyneeesaarytosend
lefeMBoia as to your re
eeulbillty from any bank
er, postmaster,msxehant or
expressagent and ttteOrgan
lrfll beshippedpromptlyon
tan day'test trial
OtMalsr free io all""
suretovritt and asre money
Valnnt esses.
Mention ttft wan* this "ID ii
i
OoUd
le alerted Mayor April 0, 188, by a Igrgg
majority.
Hi W. ALLEGER,
Watittagtaa, i WarnsGoutj,:Kw foMrt
UNITS* STATBe or AMBBJieA. f^^
AOCMT8WANTED, (Only $8.75.)
EABTHSE/^SKY Val graphic description of Entttis and Germa Mgnasws
"r in Nature, tfirlHing adreatnrw
Pin?r*
P^ll
ae
"PERFECT COFFEE MAKER.
A MW invention for natftf
Coffee and Tea. better than any
tartcgno-sr tn use, saves of the
Coffee andtaa be used with ny
Cofferer Tea Pot, 8amplewill be
sent by mU for twenty cents in
atamns, Asente TCrated to
!2&&rBfiparttenUw
of this
and other fit selling articles.
Forsfcee4 MtMakln.Cincinnati,*1*%*^
Go*a8'youpiease Justice.
From an article which appeared
in the issue of March 1, of the little court *oom.
fees weie collected
Paul Daily Globe, giving a
graphic description of the ridicu- those who had wrought her
lous absurdity of the so-called In- which she promptly proceeded
by the Indian bureau, on this and
than Police Court, as maintained do. She charged that the fellovf
AN ILLUSTRATIVE CASE.
"As the three legators were sit
ting in the court room about three
weeks ago, masticating some bread
and jerked beef, a young girl broke
in upon their silent feast and com
manded the deciples of justice to
arrest a young man living twelve
miles away and lock him up on a
charge of illegitimate parentage.
Without further ceremony the
judges, after asking her for the
fee, mounted their "git thars" and
dragged Mr. Seducer into the lock
up and put him into a stall next
to the horses. The horses didn't
enter any particular complaint
other than to make night hideous
for the young prisoner. The next
morning the trial was set for a
few days later, and all the cattle,
yellow dogs, fleas and Indians for
miles around were attendance
and ready to give such evidence as
the court would permits I the
meantime the girl again made her
appearance and demanded the ar
rest of another villain whom she
also charged with being the father
of her unborn child. Again the
ble throng of dissolutesthose
and*
divided who
J*
1
hungr
another fellow was caged.^f Thi
day of the great trial arrived ant
the multitude crowded into tin
The girl wa|
placed upon the stand to accusfl
first
other reservations, we clip the fol
lowing as worthy of reproduction:
''In defiance of all law govern
ing Indians established by the
United States government, three
self-constituted judges have
ensconced themselves in a hut on
the borders of the reservation,
there te administer law and justice
as they interpret the one and con
strue the other. Intelligent half
breeds do not recognize these dus
ky tribunals, nor do they submit
to their erroneous decisions. The
court seems to be maintained by
the Indians, gall and whisky and
the conclusions of law and fact
that the mighty and austere trio
generally hand down are perfectly
consistent with their learning and
wisdom. Two of them are buck
Indians, and evidently are not
guilty of concealed brains. They
cannot read or write, but indulge
in profanity and chew tobacco
with impunity. The other, a half
breed, discovered on a dump of
human rubbish about sixty years
ago, is, compared with his breth
ren, a fairly enlightened person
age, that he would probably
not blow out the gas more than
once or mistake a cigar sign for a
long lost brother. He knows the
alphabet by hear-sight and is
ac"The
cused of being able to make his
mark, if not with a pen, at least
upon the face of an offender upon
whom he decides to vent his spleen.
Such are the greasy aborigines
who sit in judgment upon every
thing dragged before them, from a
rubber overcoat to a superanuated
squaw. The structure under whose
roof these rulers grunt their learn
ed verdicts is across between an
onld dilapidated dressmakers trunk
and a wood pile which has been
bought on trust. Thefirein the
stove goes out whenever the judg
es come in, and the bronchos sta
bled in the private court chamber
stamp and neigh upon the climax
of any great oratorial flight that
the counsels jn&y make. The rules
of the court are strongly against
spitting on the judge's desk, which
is of hide stretched on fence posts
in front of the bench. The rec
ord and library of the court con
sists of a book entitled "Law
byment,
the yard and Justice by the foot''
and a copy of the life of the James
brothers."
arrested had a prior claim
the second, but that they wer
equally guilty, and both should
be walloped while the meek fro4
modest maided, was ieH4n_
story, a third man jumped to his
feet and asked to be sworn. JXAt
fiist the court got into a wrangle
whether the statutes would allow
such a proceeding, but they finally
swapped opinions and declared the
new man sworn. He went on to
tell the extent of his claim, and
swore that he was the father of
the child, and declared his readi
ness, there and then, to marry
the girl. The girl's father, who
had not been heard from, jumped
up to his feet and denounced the
new witness as a horsethief and
liar, and informed the court that
he would never allow such a fel
low to marry his daughter. This
was a pretty mess, and what to do
the court didn't know. At last it
was decided to retire to the pri
vate chamber, where the horses
were practicing the latest things
kicks, and there come to some
conclusion upon so complicated
an affair. The announcement was
made to the gaping crowd, who
were wondering what would come
next. After awhile the court re
turned with the following verdict
delivered by the senior judge.
court adjourns to meet when
the much abused child is born and
we find the man guilty whom it
most strikingly resembleshe to
be sentenced to marry this woman
and live with her for three years.
The fees of this court will be paid
at once$3.50.''
Indian and Labor.
"An Indian who wants to woik'
Show him to us, and we will open up
a dime museum in Cloquet at once
That Indian would be the greatest
wonder ot the nineteenth centuiy
[We die speaking in terms ot genei*
ality, foi we know that theie aie a
few Indians among us who will ork
faithfully and eain then own living].
The Indians surely don't want to
woik, neither will they work unless
foicibly compelled to do so. The
ounk ot starvation beneath their veiy
feet is pieferable to them than the
sight of an a\, a canthook, a bhovel 01
hoe. If they should be given employ
the would lazilj pdst the time
away for two 01 three days, peihaps,
and then call for then time, come to
town and laise a few cents to satiate
their umestramed, uncultivated appe
tites.-Cloquet Industiial Vidette.
Our cotemporary waxes,warm
over the general apathy of the In-
dian as considered when confront-
ed by a job which requires manual
exertion. Our brethren should
rise and make this taunt an im-
possibility. W regret that there
is too much truth the assertion
as stated generally. But there
are Indians and Indians, and
rise to assert that although the
regions of Cloquet may furnish the
germ described, there are loca-
tions where the sweeping charge
will not apply.*' The question,
again, is not one'merely industri-
al, but social, and that, to a degree
of almost infinite importance. The
attitude and the charge rehearse a
Lie of
Wrong and Oppression
they tell of the past cupidity*%f
Government officials and the per-
nicious example of that indiscriba-
formf
'A higher Civilization The mpenance of Law and Order.11
WHITE EARTH AGENCY, MINPfifOTA, SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 18891
of drunkeness and riot thus
Rowing how, in the past, the
"dievn has been seduced from the
pith of industry in those pursuits
which gained him his living.
Although the white man utters
%e truth when he relates the gen-
je**l unwillingness of the Indian
tot work, he should not forget the
coiallary, that, the new surround-
ings, when he is brought into con-
with tire frontiersmanV-are
largely responsible for this condi-
tion of things.
In his old estate the Indian lived
under social regulations and hab-
its which rendered intense physical
exertion unnecessary.
Forest and stream supplied his
wardrobe and larder. Centuries of
this life inbred a wandering, no-
madic spirit and it is but natu-
ral that, this source of livlihood
cut otf, he should be inactive as
concerns the methods which the
Caucasions considers indispensi-
ble. The latter, by his entrance
upon the ancestral domain of the
Red man, deprived him of his an-
cient method of livlihood, and, at
the same time, provided him with
no substitute. Indeed the Cau-
casian
Encouraged tbe Continuance
of the chase that he might gain
profit thereby in selling the Indi-
an coarse supplies at a high price
and vile whiskey at a rate which
could have bought the same quan-
tity of imported liquors.
This, however, is a condition of
things which is passing a^vay, and
the Government has opened its
eyes to the necessity of inaugura-
ting anew policy. Proposing now
to educate the rising generation
industrially and in the letters, we
may hope to see the present gen-
eration of children grow up into
industrious and sober citizens, and
to vie with even the children of
ye editor of the Vidette in indus-
try, sobriety and social import-
ance.
wewif.
the majority in pop-
Natio frontier villagesthe The
THE PHRENOLOGICAL JOIRNAL
and Science of Health foi Maxch gives
the first place to an eminent inventor
the- field of ElectricityRoyal E
House, who han done much towaids
peifectimr the telegiaph. Samoa and
the complications with legard to its
Government is discussed sn the edit
itoi's new installment of XoiaMe Peo
ple, andbketcheb of Mr. bewail Mis.
Benjamin Hamson, and the Cardinal
LdMgeue, with fine portraits, aie in
eluded undei the same title Tucks
of Memoiy. Faith and Pio\idence, A
Woid lor the Ciimmal, The Tene
ment Evil, Two Cases, of Epilepsy,
will enlist the close attention of even
readei. So will Pi of. Sizei's crisp ar
ticle on traveling salesmen and busi
ness men child cultuie, science and
mdustry, and the other depaitments
are solidly packed with what is help
fill every day life, the whole mak
ing a number lich in seasonable topics.
Terms hi.50 a year, 15c. a nunibci,
addiess Fowle &
Wells.
777 Bioadwray,iNe
Co., Pub.,
York
fr^M^V*
They mnsl be passed over to the father
purely for form's sake, as I hey become
ventu.illy the property of the young
Ihe cheapest and, simplest
Uatisic'ion of the kind appears to pre
vail in ipland. It is said that if one
in ihat country asks the father of a
main goable gui to take a drink, and
the off is accepted, the understand
ing is that ihe person giving the treat
is acceptod .is ihe girl's suitor.JS?
aush Magazine. -*v zi
ft
The cultivation of the bunboo for
runcing mateiial has been begun in
''-.lifoinia. It is said that at acre
will produce pickets enough each
yesr to make six miles of fence. i
"Tho man wJio mwiitod tho*
metal-toed Miocs was the beit fue.u
the school bo} evei hid," (omiuuilu
old Biown "No. he -isn't p-i,"
plied little lohnin. who hid Iwei
whipped that luj. "The srlionl 1MM
won't have friend until some one in
vents a paii of metal-seated UOIIMJI:.
Judge.
W4-
yAnd
5 St. Paul Minneapolis G^Manitoba
Mail Orders From
Prompt Attention.
Dry Goods,
[II-13.J L I*. ****WT* ST. PAUL, MINN.
provisions.
Boots & Shoes, Hardware
Everything Fint-Claie, and at Astonishingly Low Price*.
Car-oadt of New Gccdt Arriving Every Say.
WHITE EARTH AGENCY,
1888. 8PRIHG ANOUXC*MBKT
BAKER'S BARB WIRE,
Gay-go Gway-tuns-rig,
i A I L,W A .Ys
THEiGSEAT^DlNINQJAND SLEEPING iSStttSt^f
DAKO TZk^tMONZANA]
S. N. HORNEJCK CO.
Dry Goods!
Clothing
BOOTS, HOES, HATS,
IS,
DETROIT,
THE PRICES TELL, THE QUALITY SELLS.
O N*D EER E LOWS,'
HARROWS" AND CULTIVATORS."
COHPLSTB LIST* or
CARTRIDGES AND GUN SUPPLIES. FISHING TACKLE?
*"*26mS
NO. 19.
Offering choice of Three Routes to the *H
PACIFIC^, CPAST.
F, I. WHITNEY, GenT Faasenger and Ticket Agent,
MINNESOTA.
the Country Will Receive
g: NEW FIRM! -J
G. A. FAIRBANKS.
-DIALBR XX-
Groceries,
4*?^
Cc me Early.
MINN.
1888v
BLANDINe & IHITH
DETKOIT MINN.
HARDWARE!
Tinware, Cockery,
Glassware and Lamb.
is
TUB mrnvri"^
In turn WmwUH .J%j
5s5*

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