OCR Interpretation


Macon beacon. [volume] (Macon, Miss.) 1859-1995, November 25, 1910, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016943/1910-11-25/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

TheMacon Beacon
rCBUIUO WKEHLT.
MACON. Ill MISSISSIPPI.
Tbe eliy man la the man o! the century-
.,.,..,
Aviation ti, after all, lesi dangeroui
than football. ! ; - .
The freak hat Is doomed, we are
told. Ah, but which freak hatT
Dont keep your mouth open when
looking at airships. It la a bad habit
Ballooning la somewhat ilke tobog
ganing, but the walk ' back la more
fatiguing.
It Is just as fatal to be killed In a
football game as In an aeroplane
catastrophe.
Perhaps the hobble skirt Is the
cause for the new fashion of large
pedal extremities.
The mau-blrd should not attempt at
this stage of the game too many
shines In the air.
When a man lives in a boarding
house he lets somebody else worry
about the price of coal.
Aerial wonders top one another un
til the general public Is beginning to
tie surprised by nothing.
According to reports, the govern
ment will soon have to set aside res
ervations to prevent the Yankees from
becoming extinct
The Chinese may adopt a compro
mise. When they stop pinching the
feet of their girls they may put on
them hobble skirts.
A German banker spent eight
months In America and did not mar
ry. He is rich, so there must be
some other reason.
.Dunning by postal card has been
forbidden by the post office depart
ment. Hereafter the dunners must
use two-cent stamps.
A Russian military balloon went up
ever 80,000 feet the other day. That
la enough to get out of range of any
ordinary Japanese fleet.
We bare grown as a people this
year 6,275,000,000 bushels of corn,
oats, wheat, barley and potatoes, and
no one should go hungry.
One woman of the "400" paid $11,'
000 In duties on her gowns recently.
The '400" has ceased to practise smug
gllng except at odd times.
Everything seems to Indicate that
It will be several years yet before the
science of aviating can be considered
entirely out of Its Infancy.
One of Tale's professors Is afraid
America is soon to become a mon
archy. He probably has nothing else
at this time to be afraid of.
A trick horse that had been stolen
hook hands with the rightful owner,
to the undoing of the thief. We defy
a trick automobile to do that
The prune supply at a New Tork
hospital was short and boarding
houBe guests will be surprised to hear
there is quite a fuss about it.
The police have discovered a man
leaning against a corner building who
had been dead three hours. "All
things come to him who waits."
As to the consequences, there does
not seem to be much to choose be
tween a woman automoblllst turning
thief and her machine turning turtle,
People hooted at a woman in Colum
bus, Ga, because she wore a hobble
skirt in the streets. Can It be possible
that the age of southern chivalry is
past?
Six billion cigarettes were consumed
tn the United States last year; yet
there are In this country a good many
young men whose fingers are not
stained.
In Cranford, N. J., a thief stole a
$100 gold watch from the pocket of
a police sergeant while that official
dosed In the police station. What
that policeman needs Is a chaperon.
The life of the city boy Is Indeed
hard. No more Fourth of July, no
more hallowe'en and an Increase In
the number of vacation schools is only
matched by a condemnation of moving
picture shows.
Aviation is becoming extremely
profitable if not for the country, cer
tainly for the aviators. But the cash
Inducements to risk life and limb
cause the science of airship building
to get a move on.
Wireless lighting Is now announced
by a Danish Inventor. Nature's light
ing has always beon wireless, and
here mere man only Imitates.
In St Louis there Is a robber who
Is known as "the candy kid." He prob
ably got the name owing to his pos
session of sticky fingers.
A western scientist claims to have
discovered a chemical which is death
and destruction to germs. Is this cen
tury approaching the climax of a dls
aseless world?
MEXICAN REVOLUTION
HUNDREDS OF ARRESTS OP AGI
TATORS HAVE BEEN MADE.
Revolutionists Reported to Have En.
listed 8ervlces of Yaqui Indiana In
Fight Agalnat Diaz
San Antonio, Tex. Troop K, Third
United States cavalry, left here Mon
day In a special train for Del Rio. The
troop is equipped tor a stay of a month
in the field. It Is understood that the-j
troops will be sent from Fort Houston
to do duty along the Mexican border,
A telephone message from American
Consul Luther Ellsworth at C. P. Dial,
said the situation looked darker. -
Mexico City Gomez Palaclo, a town
of 7,000 inhabitants, anu the junction
point on the railroad near Torreon, Is
said to be In the hands of revolution
ists.
The war minister, in explaining why
troops were hurriedly sent to Orizaba,
in the state of Vera Cruz, said It was
feared that the rebels might dynamite
the railroad bridges.
The secret service has been extreme
ly active, In the last few days, it is
said, 200 arrests of agitators have been
made here.
Fierce Fighting at Durango.
Fierce fighting occurred at Durango,
Torreon, Parral and Gomez Palacio,
the latter town falling into the hands
of rebels. Three hundred of the fed
eral troops at Gomez Palaclo are said
to have gone over to the insurgents,
who have now turned their attention
to attacking the loyal forces at Tor
reon.
It is reported on good authority that
twenty-five persons have been killed
at Zacatecas. The government troops,
it is also reported, quelled the upris
ing there and are in control.
100 REPORTED KILLED.
El Paso Hears Report of Bloody Fight
at Zacatecas.
El Paso,- Texas. One hundred per
sons were killed in riots which took
place at Zacatecas, In the interior of
Mexico, opposite Tamplco, according
to reports received here. Soldiers fired
into a straggling body of rioters with
disastrous effect. One hundred is the
lowest estimate of the loss of life,
which may reach 600. '
The American consul at Zacatecas
telegraphed the first news of the riot
to the Mexican consul at San Antonio,
stating that that town was in a state
of terror and that the loss of life was
no less than 100.
RENEW RIOTS AT PUEBLA.
Mexico la Conscripting Citizens for
Service.
Laredo, Texas. Reports reaching
this city from what is considered to
be a reliable source are to the effect
that rioting was renewed in Puebla,
Mexico, and that thirty persons were
killed in the fighting.
It is stated on the streets here that
the Mexican military authorities are
conscripting large numbers of the res
idents of Nuevo Laredo into the army
for emergency service.
INDIANS BEING ENLISTED.
Over 1,000 Red Men Will Take Field
Against Diaz.
El Paso, Texas. A report reached
here from Cananea, Mexico, that re
volutinolsts are enlisting the hostile
Yaqui Indians for service against the
Mexican government. It is said that
over 1,000 warriors will take the field
if actual war breaks out.
Wholesale smuggling of arms and
ammunition across the border near
Naco, Ariz., Is said to be in progress,
PLUNGER CHILDS.
Five Years Ago Inherited Million and
a Quarter, Now la Poor,
New York. Irving W. Childs, who
five years ago inherited $1,250,000
from the estate of his father, William
H. Childs, has lost $500,000 of his in
heritance In Wall street during the
past four years, it was alleged in state
ments by counsel In a hearing before
Justice Blackinar In the supreme court
at Brooklyn.
The fact of the young man's plung
ing was the basis for application in be
half of his wife, Mrs. Gertrude E.
Childs, for a bond to protect' the ali
mony granted her when she obtained
a decree of separation.
WHY TUBERCULOSIS RAGES.
Many Children Contract Diaease From
Tubercular Parenta.
New York. Fully one-half of the
children who contract tuberculosis do
so because they are cared for by tu
berculosis adults. Dr. Woods Hutch
inson and Dr. W. H. Park made this
assertion In arguing before the com
mittee on congestion of population for
consumption hospitals and camps. The
total outlay necessary lor New York
city, they estimated, would be $9,000,
000 for" the plant, with $5,000,00J for
maintenance the first year.
Kansas Has 1,690,949,
Washington. The population of the
state of Kansas Is l,C90,9i:i, according
to the Statistics of the thirteenth cen
sus. This is an increase of 220,454,
or 15 per cent, over 1,470,495 in 1900.
Will Wed Mother's Maid.
New York. Thomas T. Eckeri, son
and principal heir to the 13,000,000 es
tate of his father, formerly president
of the Western Union Telegraph Com
pany, will marry Miss Minnie Egan,
his mother's maid until Mrs. Eckort's
death elKht years ago. "
LIFE'S DISAPPOINTMENTS
(Copyright, 1910.)
COONT TOLSTOI ISDEAD
CROWD GATHERS AROUND LOW
LY HUT WHERE HE DIED.
One Called Out, His Heart Burst From
Hia Unbounded Love of Hu
" manity.
Astapova. The crowd that gathered
around the hut where Tolstoi lay dy
ing in the early Sunday morning hours
awaited breathlessly a verdict of Dr,
Thtchurovsky and Dr. Usoff, two- of
the leading heart' specialists of Mos
cow, who had been hurriedly called
into consultation.
The examination was brief, lasting
less thau half an hour. Tolstoi failed
to recognize either of the physicians,
and asked: "Who are these stran
gers?''
When informed, he said,. "What fine
men!"
In spite of their natural reluctance
to spread discouraging reports, the
consulting physicians could not see
their way clear to hold out a ray of
hope. However, they hoped to lessen
the pain of the aged patient, whose
parting hours were mercifully free
from physical suffering. His heart
succumbed Bhortly after he had issued
from under the Influence of an injec
tion of stimulant. He died without
regaining consciousness.
Throughout a heart-breaking night
a motley crowd, made up of the most
varied elements imaginable, pressed
around the low hut. There were dl'
tant relatives of the aged author, Tol
stolans, villagers and many church
men. All alike stood spellbound, knowing
that a matchless personality was de
parting us the Sunday dawn dispelled
the foggy, raw November night Vir
tually the whole population of Asia
pova was there. Then a voice from
the hut came quietly: "Leo Nlcbolae-
vlch is dead."
There was a moment of silence.
Then every head was bared and there
were sounds everywhere of sobbing
One called out: "His heart burst
by his unbounded love for humanity.'
This and similar phrases ran from
mouth to mouth through the weeping
Russians gathered there.
Later in the day all the peasants
In the district flocked here. None was
excluded from the death chamber,
through which there was a constant
stream of visitors, including many
school children. ,
HUSBAND SHOT AS HE SLEPT.
Wife and Male Friend Accused of the
Murder.
Lexington, Ky. R. F. Blankenshlp,
a night watchman, was assassinated
as he lay in bed asleep at his home.
His widow, Mrs. Jane Blankenshlp,
and H. Collins, an alleged friend of
hers, were arrested and charged with
the murder.
Troops In Readiness.
San Antonio, Texas. Brlg.-Gea
Hoyt, commanding the department of
Texas, has been instructed . from
Washington to hold the troops In read
lness for service on the Mexican bor
der. Already four companies of the
Twenty-third Infantry from Fort Clark
are encamped on the border near
Eagle Pass.
Troops Guard Court.
Paducah, Ky. State guards arrived
Sunday afternoon from Lyon county,
where a company is doing patrol duty,
to do service during the session of
United States court, which convenes
tomorrow . morning. Federal Judge
Walter Evans arrived Sunday evening.
The Boldiers will be on' duty In the
court room during the trial of night
rider damage suits to prevent a possi
ble outbreak. There are several suits
pending and the total amount of dam
ages sought is about $200,000.
New York's Wealth Grows.
New York. The tax department of
the city government , announces that
the assessed valuation of taxable
property In New York for the coming
year will show an increase of more
than $600,000,000, bringing, the total
up to nearly $8,000,000,000. This will
mean an Increase in the city's debt
incurring caapclty of GO,000,000. Soon
after Mayor Gaynor took office ho an
nounced that he wanted to have the
assessments come as early as possible
to the market value of the property..'
BLAMES HOMESTEADER
8ECY WIL80N PRAISES 80UTH'S
CORN CLUBS.
Lands Have Been Exploited and lmmi
gration Has Aided In Avanc
Vs ing Pricea.
Chicago. Secretary of Agriculture
Wilson blamed the homesteader of the
West In part for the present high cost
of living, In an address at the opening
here of the United States Land and
Irrigation Exposition,
. "The homesteader," he said, "is re
ducing the field of operations of the
ranchman, which is reducing the meat
harvest of the West and becoming
quite a factor in the cost of living."
Other causes, he said, was the great
immigration to this country, and the
movement to the cities. The recent
tumble in prices of meat he atvrlbuted
to drouth In the range country and to
the big corn and oats crops.
"The new lands opened up under the
homestead act of half a century ago
were often exploited," he said, for
temporary profit by soil robbers, who
were experts of their kind. Owing to
such farm management, the yield of
the acre in the United States gradual
ly decreased. Very little intensive
farming was done.
"But none of our soils,'' be added,
'are beyond redemption. The soils of
tha country are the grea'.ist asset the
nalon has. Progress In all directions
44JMijlipm the condition of the soil,
and there is no material inquiry of
such great value as that which per.
tains to our soils."
He spoke in glowing terms of the
work being done in the Southern
states in the way of offering prizes to
boys who would produce bumper crops
of corn, potatoes, tobacco and other
staples.
'It is only a question of time," he
Bald, "when the South will ship fat
cattle and hogs to the great centers of
population and contribute toward tho
food of, our people. It has raised its
maximum crops the last two years.
BROKERAGE OFFICES RAIDED
Swindled Public Out of $40,000,000 on
Worthless Stock.
New York. In raids so important
that Postinaster.leneral Hitchcock has
taken charge in person, his inspectors
fell on two concerns Monday after
noon, which they charge with swln,
dllng the public out of more than $40,
000,000 by fraudulent use of the mails.
Sheldon H. Burr, president of Burr
Bros.; Eugene H. Burr, secretary and
treasurer of the firm, and Charles H.
Tobey, Its Jlce-presldent, were arrtst-
ed in the first raid and held in $20,000
bail each. The government charges
that the firm sold between $40,000,000
and $50,000,000 of mining and oil stock
worth little or nothing.
Charles L. Vaughan, a director of
the Continental Wireless Telegraph 4!:
Telephone Company, was taken In the
second raid and held in $1,000 bail. In
spectors say his company has sold
stock to the amount of at least $1?
000,000, which has brought in no re
turn to the investors.
Postmaster-General Hitchcock esti
mates that the public has been fleeced
out of at least $100,000,OCO by get-rich-quick
concerns in the last five years.
Many Women Arrested. -
London. The militant suffragettes
reopened hostilities against the gov
ernment, and, marching 1,000 strong
on the parliament buildings, gave the
police a lively fight The women,
many of whom were placed under ar
rest, were led by Mrs. Emmellne Pank-
hurBt. The suffragettes had deter
mined If possible to force the police
cordon about the house of commons
and reaching Premier Asquith to in
sist upon the adoption of the woman's
suffrage bill. The police, however,
were too strongly entrenched.
Court Relieves Haskell.
Chlckasha, Okla. All cases against
Gov. C. N. Haskell were nolle prossed
Friday. This action ends the legal
fight against C. N. Haskell ana others
In connection with the Muskogee lot
charges. .
Big Poultry Deal,
Dalas,, Texas. W. H. Norton sold
forty-one registered White beghors
chickens for $1,500 Friday. This Is
the largest deal in fine poultry ever
made in T exas. The chickens broughl
A a pound.
FOOD DECLINE A TRICK
PR. WILEY SAYS INTERESTS WILL
TAKE FRESH GRIP.
Secretary Wilson Asserts Reduction It
Abnormal Due to Price
of Hay.
7
Washington. The so-called reduc
tion in the prices of meats Is t delib
erate manipulation of the market, ac
cording to Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, chlel
of the bureau of chemistry of the de
partment of agriculture.
"The Interests which manipulated
the prices'upward," said Di. Wiley,
"temporarily have released their hold
on our throats for the purpose of get
ting a fresh grip. The so-called re
duction in meats- is fictitious, lis ma
nipulation was deliberate, just as the
Increase in priceB was unjust, unrea
sonable and uncalled for by couditions
prevailing throughout the country. The
prices were fictitious at the top notch
because they were forced there arbi
trarily by the interests.
"Developments will show Uiat the
Interests are after some one. It may
be some independent movement they
uurit 10 unve irom cqver."
Secretary Wilson said that the an
nounced reduction in prices was ab
normal. He said It was due to the
fact that the drought in the cattle rais
ing country had increased the cost oi
hay. The farmer with cattle on hia
hands must pay $35 a ton for his hay,
and rather than do this, he was send
ing his cattle and sheep to market,
This accounted for the sudden tumble
in prices, he said.
"This tumble is not all normal and
will not be permanent," declaied Secretary-
Wilson, "but a plentiful corn
crop and plenty of grain will enable
the farmer to feed freely, and we
should get a lower level of prices.
Lower prices are certain to come, pro
vided that somewhere between the
farmer and the consumer there Is no
combination nor agreement to keep
prices up."
RIVERS AND HARBORS MEET.
Waterways Solution. of the Transpor
tation Problem.
Washington. The seventh conven
tion of the National Rivers and Har
bors Congress, which will be held in
this city December 7, 8 and 9, next,
It is expected, will bring to the na
tional capital the largest gathering of
waterways enthusiasts ever assem
bled in this country.
President Taft, who will deliver the
opening address to the delegates, said
in the course of a speech in Chicago
that transportation was the question
of the hour a
r, nil ttiflt TTin nnlY
ouleui was recourse to tcf
OI the problem was recourse
waterways of 'the United States-
Probably next in Importance to the
address of the president of the United
States will be the speech of Judson
Harmon of Ohio, who has for years
been a close student of the question
of Improved waterways.
MRS. SCKENK GAVE POISON
Nurse Telli That Accused Offered Her
$1,000 to Do It.
Wheeling, W. Va. So sensational is
the character of the evidence that was
presented before the special grand
Jury that indicted Laura Farnsworth
Schenk on tbe charge of administering
poison to her husband, Jno. O. Schenk,
the millionaire pork packer, for the
purpose of causing his death, that the
members of the grand Jury are telling
their friends Juet what transpired be
hind the closed doors.
The evidence disclosed there,
though, according to the statement of
Prosecuting Attorney J. B. Handlan.
it is not one-tenth of the evidence he
has against Mrs. Schenk, shows the
most dastardly plot ever conceived In
the mind of a human being.
Miss Kline, who was employed as a
nurse, testified that she was offered
$1,000 by Mrs. Schenk to poison her
husband. .
Two Men Are Cremated.
Pittsburg, Pa. Fighting their way
through dense smoke and blinding
flame in a burning oil house, Howard
Vinkenoff and Wilbert Ellery ' were
burned to death. The men had work
ed all of the day and part of the night,
and had gone to sleep in the oil house.
Sparks from a passing engine fired
the little building, and they could be
seen running around endeavoring to
find the door before they fell.
MANY MEXfCANTARE KILLED
Mexico City. One hundred persons
Including the chief of police, were
killed in riots at puebla.
The trouble began when a number
of policemen, headed by the chief, at
tempted to break up a meeting of antl-
re-electionists, which was being held
in, a large hall. As Chief of Police
Miguel Cabrera and his men advanced
towards the building, a door was
opened by a woman, who shot and
killed the chief. A fight then ensued
between the police and the occupants.
Would Unionize Teachers.
St. Louis, Mo. -A plan to unlnnl
the school teachers of . the United
States is the aim of a resolution now
before the American Federation of La
bor In session here. T.' V. O'Connor,
a representative of the Longshore
men's Union, is also representing the
teachers of Buffalo, who have neriaM.
ed a union, succeeded In having it
recognized and advancing ' salaries.
The resolution would place the federa
tion on record as calllnc for n hi
standard of wages for teachers and
pledge its support to that end.
WEAK, SICK
Will Be Interested la This Sagge
tion From tbe Pen of
Soui Carolina.
. Lady. . .
Gramllng, S. C "1 was so weak,"
Writes Mrs. Lula Walden, of this
place, "when I began taking Cardul,
that It tired me to walk just a little.
Now I do all the sewing, cooking,
washing and general housework, for
my family of nine, and have not been
In bed a day.
"I was almost a skeleton, but now I
weigh 160 pounds, and am still gain
Ing. I think Cardul the greatest rem
edy for women on earth."
Yon ladles, who have pale faces,
sallow complexions, and tired, worn
out expressions, need a tonic.
The tonic yon need Is Cardul, the
woman's tonic
Cardul is the Ideal tonlo for women,
because Its Ingredients are specifical
ly adapted for women's needs. They
help to give needed strength and vi
tality to the worn-out womanly frame.
Being a vegetable medicine, contain
ing no minerals or habit-forming drugs
of any kind, Cardul ao'ts in a natural
way, and is perfectly harmless and
safe for young and old. "
In the past 60 years over a million
ladles have been benefited by this
standard woman's remedy. Why not
rou?
Please Try Cardul
N. 'B. Writtf: Ladles' Advisory Dept.
Chattanooga Medicine Co.. Chattanooga,
Tenn., for Stretml InstructUm, and 64
pag. book, "Horn Treatment for Wom
en," sent In plain wrapper on request
When a girl exchanges photographs
with a young man she nearly always
gets the worst of the trade.
Good luck likes to visit people who
are not expecting It
"I wish to
say that I
have need
Sloan's Lini-V
- - .
. ' lame lee that
has given me much trouble for six
months. It was so bad that I
'couldn't walk sometimes for a
week. I tried doctors' medicine; -and
had a rubber bandage for my
leg, and bought everything that I
heard of, but they aU did me no
good, until at last I was persuaded
to try Sloan's Liniment The first
application helped It, and in two
weeks my leg was well." A. L
Hunter, of Hunter, Ala.
' Good for Athletes. '
Mr. K. Oilman, Instructor of
athletics, 417 Warren St, Rox.
bury, Mass, says: "I have used
SIOAl'S
IIMIVIMF
with great success in cases of ex
treme fatigue after physical exer
tion, when an ordinary rub-down
would not make any impression."
Sloan's Liniment
has no equal as a
remedy for Rheu
matism, Neural
gia or any pain or
stiffness in the
muscles or Joints.
ploet,25o.,EOo.&t1J)0
Sloan's book on
shortes, cattle, ahoep
and poultry Mot
frtM. AddiM
Sr. Earl S. Sloan.
Boffton, Kw,, U.S. A.
The Wretchedness
of Constipation
Cia quickly b ovocoma hf
(CARTER'S LITTLE
teu, and Watjoa. TW & tlmr datjl
Small Pin. I mill Dom, 'Small Mm. f '
Genuine mi Signature
NEW MADRID SEED CORK
Specially aelecMd, extra clean and pnra. Botj
wait and yellow. Put up tn even weight aaolta,
, Car Lou a Specialty,
faepar Kewnun Co., Maw Madrid, Ho,
THE BEST MEDICINE- I 1
mr-
for Coughs
OLDS IA I J
f"Lame
Well"
UVF.R PILLS. JF fv
fZilTon L CARTER51
W Cora J I9ITTLK

xml | txt