OCR Interpretation


Herald of the times. [volume] (Newport, R.I.) 1830-1846, September 15, 1831, Image 1

Image and text provided by Rhode Island Digital Newspaper Project

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83021167/1831-09-15/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HERALD OF
VOL. 2. NO. 240
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
JAMES ATKINSON,
PUBLISIIER AND PROPRIETOR.
Orrice, corner of Thames-street and Sher
man’s wharf, a few doors south of the Brick
Market. ji_7=Entrance first door down the wharf.
Terms—
$2 in advance, or §2,25 at the end’of the year
REMOVY AL.
—ert ) @Qe
DR. R.R. HAZARD,
HAS REMOVED HIS MEDICAL
ESTABLISHMENT FROM THE
STORE FORMERLY OOCCU.
PIED BY THE LATE
CHARLES FEKE, TO
THE STORE IN HIS
OWN HOUSE, THE
3d EAST OF SAID
FEKE'S STORE,
AND A FEW
RODS WEST
OF THE
STATE
HOUSE.
AT THE SIGN OF THE
WHERE HE T9FFERS FOR SALE,
A very extensive assortnient of
DRUGS, MEDICINES, AND DYE.
STUFFS,
Together with many of the most Valuable
PATENT MEDICINES,
PERFUMERY, &XC.
OF THE FIRST QUALITY,
AND ON AS GOOD
TERMS AS CAN BE
OBTAINED AT
ANY STORE
IN NEW.
PORT.
~——ALSO—
HULL’S, STONE’S and other Her-
nia TRUSSES.
el ine CHeste,
With plain directions for Ships, and
family’s use, put up and replenished in
the best manner,
sc N. B. The most particular
personal attention paid to Physicians’
prescriptions, and MEpiciNgs (I,clivercd
at any hour of the night.
Newport, May 18,
s‘) :}I‘::%‘(‘I‘:ASI;RFI S
\ _-_,",_—j‘j;;,'. 20 prlmo Canal E:L‘})UR.
this day expected per sloop Nimrod, by
S. NEWTON,
NO. 150, Thames-street.
july 14.
FRENCH GOODS.
A FEW CASES THAT ARE
NEW,
ELEGANT,
FASHIONABLE,
are just opened and for sale at
- JAS. HAMMOND’S,
june 8.
ELEGANT
RICH RIBBONDS, BLOND,
GAUZE & STRAW, AND
FANCY MUSLINS.
are just opened at
TILLEY’S,
CHEAP IRISH LINENS.
lOHN F. TOWNSEND has just received an
OF asmorted lot of Irnisu Linewns, in half
pieces, of a handsome bleach and good texture. |
—=ALSO-—~
IRISH SHEETINGS
17 On hand as oswal, & complete assortment
of Bobbinet Laee and - unillings july 21
COSAS
JU!!‘ RIEC OVED AND FOR SALFE two
good SOLK'AS, Hair cloth spring seats, by
M. HALL.
Jane 204,
NEWPORT, R. I. THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 15, 1831.
DRY GOODNS,
’ J‘onx F. TOWNSEND has just received
| from New York, a supply of
, NEW and FASHIONABLE GOODS,
amony which are—
| Superior English ginghams of new style, also
calicos.
| Elegant French muslins,
English and Freneh mourning ginghams,
| Pongees, silks for dresses,
' Elegant fancy hdkfs. a great variety;
I Tlrish sheeting, linens,
Superb cloths, cassimeres,
Green barege aud green gauze veils,
} Real sil bobbinet lace veils,
' Wide black hombasin, crapes, &e.
A great variety of goods to equip children for
Election.
| Laca footing, wide bobbinett lace,
. Black lasting; bl English caniblet, very fash
onable for men’s wear.
. ALS O—a great assortment of superior Me
rino Shawls.
| The above with a great variety of GOODS not
enumerated, will be sold ut prices which cannot
fail to be satisfactory april 18
NEW PAPER.
’l‘l]E undersigned proposes to pnhlish, in his
. native town, a semi-weekly paper, under
the title of the
CHRONICLE OF THE TIMES,
for which he respectfully solicits the patronage of
his old friends and the public in general. 1t will
be issued on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons,
about 2 o’clock, on a sheet of the comumon size,
with new type, at the price of $3,50 if paid sewi
annually, or 4 at the close of the year,—and
will be commenced so soon as the necessary ar
rangements can be made.
‘l'he intention of the publisher is to present to
the community a useful business paper, which
shall contain the latest authentic intelligence on
every interesting subject, interspersed with light
and amusing articles, and oceuasionally varied by
political speculation. He will call to his aid tal
ent and tact, with the aim at once to instruct and
amuse; and will engage correspondence abroad, in
order that his readers may be enlightened upon
every momentous topic which is agitated through
out the Union, and in foreign countries.
| 'T'he political character of the paper will be Re
publican, in the most enlarged vense. The pub
lisher is of the MApison school. He canuot
conscientiously support the measures, much less
the men, of the present administration of the Gen
eral Government. An indiscriminate opposition,
however, is not contemplated;—the right shall be
sustained,—the wrong, wncompromisingly con
demned. !
With respect to the exciting question of foster
ing domestic manufactures and internal improve- |
ments, it is well known, that the publisher has ev-|
er been a warm advocate for the policy of protec- |
tion: this, however, was a result, not of his c:-I
| elusive attachment to those interests, but of al
settled opinion, that a prosperous state of domustic
‘manufactures, and an improved gystem of land and
water communications, would mightily subserve
and extend the interests of Agriculture and Com
merce. In this view of the subject, now so hap
pily and abundantly fertified by the experience of
the last fifteen years, protection to Manufactures
and Internal Impravements will receive the steady
.and cougistent support of the ChroNlCLE—while
the great and diversified concerns of the Farmer,
the Merehant, and the Mechanic,will be ardently,
if not ably, sustained.
| Advertisements will be inserted on the usual
terms, and it is believed, that the circulation of the
CuronicLe will repder it an advantageous me
dium for advertisers. :
Persons holding subscription papers are respect
fully requested to return them to the residence of
the undersigned, No. 97, Broad-street, near the
new Brick market, or send themn to the Bookstore
of Messrs. Hutchens and Shepard, No. 1, Market
street, or to S. W. Wheeler, No, 1104 Westmin
ster street, by the 16th September next. ;
‘ B. H. WHEELER.
I Providence, sept. 1, 1831. I
ECONOMY.
OLD MADE NEW!!
J JONES, from London, cLOTHES DRES
e SER AND RENOVATER, respectfully
begs leave to inform the public in general, that be
has opened an establishment at the Store corner
of Market square, where he will attend to the
cleaning of gentlemens' Coats, Pantaloons, and
Vests, of every description, on an entirely new
plan from that pursued by Dyers. By compar
ing the artigles cleaned by him, they are pro
nounced by competent Judges, equal to new, and
which has been noticed by the public. Spots,
grease, &c. taken frem the cloth, and apparel put
in complete form. When requested, he applica a
stiffening and restores the color to faded seams
Where the nap of a coat is bare, he can restore
it to its original gloss and beauty, without any ia
jary to the fabric.
TO THE LADIES,
Ladies Habits, Boat-Cloaks, and Cloth Shawls,
spotted or faded of their pristine beauty, restored
to their original colors, with the greatest care.—
Specimens of his work may be seen at his Shop,
where a fit person will attend to the receipt of all
orders and delivery of all work, with punctuality
and despatch
I 7 N. B. 'To persons disposed to patronise
him in his business, he pledges hinself, if any of
his work is not done to their satisfaction, he will
make no charge for his labor.
Newport, sept 8.
r NLW BOOKS.
The Church Members Guide by J. A. James, A.
M.—edited by Rev. J. O. Choules, Newport, 1
vol.
Imitation of Christ by Thomas A. Kempis, 1 vol.
edited by Rev. Howard Maleom, Foston
The Saints Everlasting Rest. by Jiav. 1 Paxrer
The Christian ( ontemiplated 10 a course of Lec
tures— by Rev. Wi Juy, o
The Travels of True Godines vy rov Pen) Keach
revised und 1 proved by K vird Valeow,
I VoI
Memoirs of oward the Plhilant st | LT
Faldwu | oW, b e |
FOU BAT Y AL
W. Callahan’s Book-Store,
8 CIRCULATING LIBRARY.
“LIBERTY and UNION;, NOW AND FOREVER, ONE AND INSEPARABLE !”—wgssTEß
NEW GOOIDS.
ISAAC GOULD,
No. 176, Thames-Street,
HAS JUST RECEIVED FROM
NEW-YORK,
I AN assortment of BRoavcrLorHe, Cassiineres
‘ and Vestings, of the most fushionable colors
and patterns,
| ALSO, centlemen’s new stoclis and cravatsex
tra beaver, Berlin and thread gloves; randomn hose,
&e. All of which he will sell at a small advance
for cash or approved credit.
| Newport, April 23,
WOOL CARDING, &
CLOTII DRESSING
IT"E subscribers inform their friends and the
‘ public, that they continue at the Union Fae
tory, Portsmouth, to card woor, color and dress
cloth, manufacture wool into yarn or cloth, &e. in
‘as good style, and on as reasonable terms, as at
any establishment in this vicinity.
i i 7 Their CARDING MACHINES are in prime
‘order, having recently been fitted with new cards.
| WOOL or cloth, (for the subscribers) may be
left with Edward Stanhope, or R. R. Carr, New
port; George Lawton, "l'iverton; or Jeremianh Gif
ford, Bristol Ferry—where it will be taken, and
'manufactured agreeably to the directions, und re
‘turned to the above places. ;
GRINNELL & BAKER. |
I Portsmeuth, June 1. ,
JUST RECEIVED,
a fresh supply of
BUTLER’S INDIAN SPECIFIC
for Coughs, )
DR. RUSII'S ANTI-DYSPEPTIC
PILLS,
DR. THOMPSON'S GENUINE
BYY WaLdl,
and
SPECIFIC DROPS for Toothache,
R. R. HAZARD,
At the Sign qfi the Great Mortar— Wash
july 7
BOOTS & SHOES.
CO-PARTNERSHIP FORMED.
DAVIS & POTTER,
At the Qld Stand of Joun W, Davis,
SIGN OF THHE
100,
| THAMES TREET, |
“AVE just returned from New-York with a
BB superior selection of stock of the first qual
ity, for the purpose of manufacturing Ladies, Gen
tlemen’s, misses and children’s BOOTS AND
SHOES, in the most fashionable style, Ly the
first rate workmen. ‘They are confident the satis
faction heretofore received by old customers at the
establishment (No. 100) will induce them still to
continue their patronage. |
' Having the ussistance of Mr. Potter in the esta
blishment, every attention will be paid to all those
wno wish for the first style of Foots & Shoes,
made to measure on the newest fashion lasts,which
they have just received fiom New York. They
have on hand an extensive assortment of Ladies,
Gentlemen’s, and Misses boots and shoes of every
description, usually ealled for in a shoe store, of
their own manufactoring. Also a number of
cases of the above articles, which they bought
for cash in New York, and are determined to sell
them as low as at any other store in "T'own.
I'hey keep constantly on hand the following
articles, viz: ;
Black and colored last-3/<Grain’d upper leather, |
ings, Q Black and buff’ buck
Russia sheetings, sking, ;
No. 2 and 3 ribbons, OBluck and colored mo-
David's best galloons, Q rocco, ,
Binding silk, ¢ Black and eolored kid,
Silk and cottpn braid, Goat skin bindings,
Silk and cotton [email protected] do do.
cord, 0 Lining skins,
Boot webbing, 110 1o @) eoev
English shoe thread, & Liquid Blacking,
| American do do. ¢ Sponge do. I
Calf skins, QBox and past do. ‘
Seal skins, Heel ball,
Horse skins, Q‘Shoe brushes, I
Curried goat skins, 3 &e. &e, |
JOHIN W. DAVIS,
JOHN N POLTER.
apnl 27, 1831
‘- .J "‘ -)" !“c ‘Q . (
g 1 ARV - Np e Madeira,
o ot Vo Madeira, sweet
wmd D v M o, and Muscat w I VES,
| quihties, for sale on liberal
terms, by 8. NEWTON, 150, Th-st
| June 23, I
FOR SALE BY
inglon-square.
From the Poston Recorder
MISSIONARIES
ARRESTI
D, CHAINED, AND ABUSED
The following letter, giving an account
of some of the most unchristian outra
ges that Christian missionaries, whether
among the civilized or the barbarous,
have in this age suflered, was received
at so late an hour that we have not room
to add a word of remark. Norisit nec
essary that we should. Thesame thoughts
must crowd on every honorable mind; the
same feeling spring up in every human
and generous bosom.—T'he letter is from
the Rev. Samuel A. Worcester, to one
of the Secretaries of the American Board
of Foreign Missions, and is dated,
Jail at Camp Gilmer,July 18, 1831,
Early on Friday morning, July Bth, I
with my guard joined sergeant Brooks,
at the house of a near neighbor, and
rode thence ten miles, to where Col.
Nelson was, with a detachment of which
that under Mr. Brooks, by which I was
arrested, was only a part. There |
found the Rev. Mr. Trott, a Methodist
Missionary who has a Cherokee fawily,
and a Cherokee by the name of Proctor.
Proctor was chain’d tothe wallof'the house
by the neck, and had another chain a
round his ancle. He had been arrested,
on Tuesday, on the charge of digging for
gold; chained the first night by the an
cle only, the second and_ third by the
neck tothe wall and by the ancle to Mr,
Trott. Mr. Trott was arrested on Wed-
nesday, and taken on horseback about 10
miles to where Col. Nelson then was,
He had been before arrested, and was
under bonds to answer at court for the
offence of residing in the nation without
license, and now was tuken again, as
having commiitted the second offence by
returning to his family while the cause
was peunding. On Thursday he and
Proctor were marched on foot 22 miles,
to the place where I found them, Proc
tor being chained by the neck to the
wagpron. This manner of treatment, [
supposed, was occasioned by his having
offered resistance when arrested, and
afterwards attempted to escape. '
When I was arrested gergeant Brooks
inquired the state of my fawmily, and
when told that Mrs. Worcester was still
confined to her bed, remarked that he
regretted that Col. Nelson was not him
selt’ present, implying, as 1 understood
him, that if he were, he probably would
not arrest me under such circumstances,
When we arrived where Col. Nelson
was, I requested Mr. Brooks to mention
to him the state in which he found us,
which he very readily promised to do;
but certainly had not fulfilled his prom
ise when I heard him say that I was to
go on to Head Quarters—i. e. to this
place. Perceiving, therefore that the
state of my family was not to be regard
ed, I said no more, |
We were then marched on foot 22 miles
to the same place from which Mr. Trott
and Mr, Proctor were taken the day be
fore, Proctor being again chained to the
waggon. We had proceeded about 3
miles when we met Messrs. Mcl.eod and
Wells, two Methodist clergymen, not
residing within the charter of Georgia.—
With leave of Col. Nelson they turned
and rode along some distance in our com
pany. In conversation Mr, Mcleod
asked Mr. Trott whether he had been
chained the preceding night, and being
answered in the affirmative, asked il it
were according to law to chain a prison«
er who manilested no disposition to es
cape. Mr. Trott said he thought not,
but that we ought not to blame those un
der whose charge we were, asthey were
obliged to act according to orders. NMr.
Mcl.eod remarked, “It scems they pro
ceed more by orders than by law.”—
This gave offence. A few woids had
pussed between Mr., Mcl.eod and some
ol the guard, when Col. Nelson rode up,
and being told of the remark, asked Mr,
McLeod where he resided. He re
plied “In Tennessee.” Col. Nelson,
with a curse, ordered him to “‘flank off.”
Mr. McLeod, turning his horse, said,
“I willy Siry if it is your command,” but
added, hastily as he afterwards said,
“You will hear from me again.” He
was then riding away, when the Col. or
dered him to halt, and then to dismount
and lead his horse along in the regr.—
He then inquired of Mr. Trott whether
this was “one of their circuit nidors,” e
Mie. Trott answercd “Yes.” Mr. M
lLeod’s horse was then takes from hun
and dehivered to Mr, Wells, and he was
declared a prisoner, and ordered to walk
on with the rest. For a shoit distance
Brooks compeiled him to keep the cen
tre of the road, through mire and water,
threatenmng to thrast him throngh with the
bayonet if he turned aside. In the mean
time he was heaping upon all onr heads
a load ol tremendous curses and reviling
missienaries and all nnmsters ol the gos-
THE TIMES.
pel in language which, for profanences
and obscenity, could not be exceeded.
The words of our Saviour he turned in
to ridicule—*Fear not”’—suid he taunt
ingly—“Fecar not, little flock, for it is
your Father’s good pleasure to give you
the kKingdom!” The manner in which
these words were uttered did not prevent
me, at least, from rejoicing in the con
solation they afford.—-Brooks was the
chief speaker, and exceeded all; though
some others joined him in his revilings.
Another circumstance ufterwards oc
curred, which was related to me by Mr,
Thompson, who was eye witness. Mr.
Wells, alter Mr. Mcl eod’s arrest, pur
sued his journey in the opposite direction,
till he met Mr. Thompson, riding in the
some direction with the guard., He then
turned, and rode in company with Me.T'.
intending to see what should become of
Mr. Mcl.eod, and to render him any as
sistance in his power. After some time
they came up with the guard. When
Col. Nelzon cut a stick, and making up
to Mr. Wdlls, gave huna severe blow on
the head, M. Wells then said that he
had a right to travel the public road, and
should doat. He persevered according
ly, and rode on till he came to a house
where Mr. Mel ecd had requested him
to stop. I know not what offence Mr,
Wells had given, unless that, in conver
sation with me, he had expressed strong
disapprobation of the policy of the Stute
ol Georgia, and the course pursued by
the Executive ofthe United States. To
wards the end of our days’ journey, Mr.
McLeod was afflicted with a severe pain
in the hips and koees, to which he had
been subject, and requested the privi
lege of nding. Col. Nelson sent him
answer, that Proctor at first thought he
could not walk, but afterwards got along
very well. '
At night the four prisoners were chain
ed together by the ancle in pairs.
Some time after we lay down, a small
detachment arrived with Doctor Butler.
He had been arrested at Haweis on the
preceding day. After crossing a river,
three or tour miles from home, a chain
was fastened by a padlock around his
neck, and at the other end to the neck of
a horse, by the side of which he walked.
Night soon came on, The horse was
kept walking at a quick pace, and Dr.
Butler unable to see any obstruction
which a rough wilderness road might
present, and liable at any moment to fall,
and so to be dragged by the neck till the
horse should stop. After walking some
distance in the dark, on representing the
danger of his situation, he was taken up
behind the saddle, his chains being fast
ened to the horse’s neck and short e
nough to keep his neck close to the
shoulder of the guard. In this situation
the horse fell. Both his riders fell un
der him, and neitherthe horse 10- either
of the men could rise, till others could
come, and, after ascertaining their situa
tion by the sense ot feeling, roll the horse
over. Dr. Butler was considerably hurt,’
but the soldier more, having two ribs
hroken. After this, till they came to
their lodgings, Dr. Butler was permitted
to ride, whtle a soldier walked. In the
mean time they lost their way in the
woods. However, they found a pine
knot, of which they mode a torch by
striking fire; and by this means recover-!
ed thew way, Their lodging place was
only 14 miles from Dr. Butler’s, but it
wis midnight when they arrived, well
drenched with rain, When they laid
down, the prisoner was chained to his
bedstead by the ancle, the officer how
ever, putting a handkerchief around un
der the chain. The next day they had 35
miles or more to travel. Dr. Butler
wore the chain on his neck, but no lon
ger fastened to a horse, e was oc
casionally permitted to ride, one or anoth
er of the soldiers walked in his stead.
At night he was chained to My, Me
l.eod and me.
On Friday morning we had to eross the
Hightower viver in a boat, Asthe pris
oners, with a part of'the gnard were cros
sing, Mr. Thompson was ohserved on the
opposite side waiting to speak with us.—
At the same time Col. Nelson and ser
geant Brooks were observed in conver
sation. Brooks then called to those who
were with us, charging themthat ne per
son should be allowed to speak with a
prisoner privately, and no letter to be
delivered nnexananed,
Proctor was now o unted on his own
hoise, (which had voon taken as a pnze
when he wiug arcesied) wearing a chain
as De. Butier had worn it the day before
He had a bag of elothes for a saddle; and
a rope halter mstead of a bndle,. No
other one was chamed, When we had
travelled a considerable distance, tour of
the soldiers were so kind as to walk tour
or tive miles, and allow the prisoners to
nde, tor which we were told they were
alterwards abused by Brooks, who now
had the command of the detachment,
Colo Nelson aviog parted from them
Afterwards: Mr. Trott, being likely to
twil, was mounted on Proctor’s hoise in
WHOLE NO. 76.
his stead. Still later M, Meleod, have
ing hecome so lame that he could scarce«
iy walk, solicited the privilege of riding.
Brooks, with much cursing, compelled
him to walk on. Afterwards, however,
he ordered Mr, Trott to dismount, and
placed Mr. McLeod in his stead. Our
day’s journey was 35 miles,
At night only Proctor was chained,
Brooks having retired without giving any
orders on the subject, and the officer who
had charge of us not being dispused to
chain us.
T'he Sabbath came, and we had 22
miles to travel, Remoustrance would
only have mnitated. We were under the
command of armed men, and must travel
on. Mr. Mcl eod, being utterly unable
to walk, was mounted on Proctor’s horse.
Mr. Trott was allowed to ride a part of
the way in the waggon, and Dr. Butler
and myself two or three miles on hoise
back.
Arrived here, we were, as a matter of
course, marched into camp under sound
ol fife and drum.—We were then intro
duced to the juil; Brooks saying as we
entered, “There is where all the enemies
o' Georgia have to land,—there and in
hell.” Tlappily man has not the keys
of the everlasting prison.—At night a
white man who has a Cherokee family
was added to our number.
| On Monday Mr. Thompson and Mr,
‘\\'o-Ils came and requested an intervicw
'with us. Mr. Thompson was admitted,
‘under the restriction that no one should
have any private conversation with us,
Inr receive any papers from us without
their being inspected by Col. Nelsor,
'who has the present command,Col. Sand
ford being absent. Mr. Wells was re
fused adnnttance.
| Mr. McLeod sent a note to Col. Ne!-
'son on Monday, requesting a personc!
anterview, On Tuesday morning Col.
'Nelson sent for him, and dismissed him.
He was not permitted to return and bi
lus farewell,
I On Saturday evening, July 16, po
‘ceiving that we should probably spernd
the Sabtbath here, we sent to Col, ‘;\el
son the following request,
| Col. Th. H. Nulson,
Sir,—lf it be consistent with neces
sary regulations, it would be a high
gratificati n to some of your prisoners, ii
M+, Trott and Mr. Worcester might be
permitted to hold a meeting to-morrov
evening at some place where such of tho
guard and of the neighbors as are dis
posed might attend. 1f the favor can
be granted, be so kind as to give us an
answer as soon as convenient. We wish
to be understood that we should ali
greatly desire the privilege of attending
(Signed) S. A WorcestEß,
J. J. Trorr,
‘ Evrzur BurLEer,
' SamuerL Maves.
- This note was presently returned with
the following written on the outside,
We view the within request as an im
pertinent one. If your conduct be evi
dence of your churacter and the doc
trines you wish to promulgate, we are
sufliciently enlightened as to both. Our
object is to restrain, not to facilitate their
promulgation. If your object be true
piety you can enjoy it where you are.
Were we hearers we would not be bene
fitted, devoid as we are of confidence i
your honesty,
‘ (Signed)
From most of the individuals of the
guard we have received noill treatment;
from some of them, kindness. As was,
however, perhaps to be expected in our
circumstances, we have received soma
insults, which it is trying for the spirit to
bear. But we regard it as a testimony
in our favor, that when the desire is to
torture us, it is taken for granted that this
can be best effected by uttering profane
and obscene expressions in our ears,
I July 19 —Yesterday Mr. Thompson
‘and Mr. William Rogers, a Cherokee,
(who acts as agent for the nation, arrived
‘and presented to Col. Nelson, a writ of’
Ilmhms corpus, which they had procured
to remove us from this place. This would
rhuvc been sooner done, but Dr. Butler
and I thought it best for Mr. Thompson
first to consult Mr. Underwood, our
counsel, who lives at considerable dis«
tance, whether that was the bLest coursq
to pursue in reference to the final result,
When the writ arrived we supposed wg
should be immedintely taken Leloro g
court, but we stull remein here,
Nw Echota, July 28.—After | had
written the above, we still remained in
jail till Thursday morning, July 21—y
The renson atterwards assigned by Col.
| Nelson i court for our dotention was,
that Col. Santord, who returned oy
| Wednesdav evening from a journey tg
Milledgesille;, had important testimony
[in his possegsion, Cn 'l‘hul.dlly mofis
‘ming, we were furpished with horses, ang
set out for Lawrenceville, On the wag
(we were taken before a justice of 1
peace and committed to jail, althoog
‘the writ of habeus corpus required
C. H. NELsoNn.

xml | txt