OCR Interpretation


Herald of the times. [volume] (Newport, R.I.) 1830-1846, September 29, 1831, Image 1

Image and text provided by Rhode Island Digital Newspaper Project

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83021167/1831-09-29/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HERALD OF
VOL. 2. NO. 26.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY,
JAMES ATKINSON,
PUBLISHER AND PROPRIETOR.
Orrick, coruer of Thames-strest and Sher
wian's wharf, a few doors south of the Brick
Murket. L~ Entrance first door down the wharf.
Terms—
$2 in advanee, or $2,25 at the end of the year
TOTHECONSUMERS &« VEN
DERS OF SCHUYLKILL
COAL IN NEWPORT AND
ITS VICINITY.
PuinLAavenrura June Ist, 1831,
Yl‘"i‘. subscriber is extensively engaged in min
ing Anthracite coal in Schuylkill county,
(Penn,) and from the extent of his landed interest
in that region, is enabled to furnish the article of
superior quality and on the best terms: he will sup
ply Schuylkill coal delivered on his landing at 1.0-
cust street, on the river Schuylkill, free from im
purity or slate ut $4,50 cts, per ton of 2240 lbs. or
he will engage to deliver it at any of the wharves
in the town of Newport, at $6 per ton: the quan
tity taken to he not less than a cargo; when the
price at which this descripiton of coal has hereto
fore sold in Newport, and the very great saving
that will result from an arrangement with the sub
scriber is taken into consideration, he trusts that
the ditference in cost will irduce those feeling an
interest in having their supplies on the best terms,
to favor him with their orders.—l'erins of puy
ment 4 months for approved paper or three per
cent discount for cash. Satisfactory references
will be given (us to the ability of the subscriber to
conform to any arrangement he may make if re
quired.) B iT i
SBAMUEL . WETHERILL,
No. 126, drch street, Phil.
THEOLOGICAL AND
BIOGRAPHICAL BOOKS.
I LFCTURES in defence of Divine Revelation,
A by Rev. David Pickering. ‘
The Light of 'l'ruth and Pleasures of Light. ;
Mem.oirs of the late Mrs. Sarah iluntington. |
Notes on the Parubles of the New 'l'estument,
by losea Ballou.
The Assistant to Family Religion, by William
Cogswell, A. M.
Records of the Life of the Rev. John Murray.
Essays on the distinguishing T'rait of the Chris
tian Character, by Garduer Spring, D. D, ;
‘The Family Monitor or helps to Domestic
Happiness, by John Angel James. ,
Memoir of the Rev. Fdward Payson, D. D. |
Christian Charity explained, by John Angel
Juies.
FOR SALE AT I
WILLIAM CALLAHAN’S !
Bookstore and Circulating Library, |
aogust 25 .
BOOKN,
WORTHY OF NOTICE.
Fexeron.—Selections from the writings
of Fenelon, with a memoir of his life. -~
Fenelon was pious,—pious in the high
est sense of the term.—lle was in spir
it and in truth a Christian, a lover of
God and man
Tue Times o THE Saviour, by Harriet
Martincau.— 1
This work exhibits in a just light the
agitation produced in the minds ol the
Jews by the wonderful works & preach
ing of Christ. |
Curistiay Cuaracrer.—On the forma
tion of the Christian Character, addres
sed to thcse who are seeking to lead a
religious life.—-By Henry Ware, jr.
Proflessor, &c. :
Heartu.—The Catechism of Health, or
plain and simple rules for the preserva
tion of the Health and vigour of the
constitution from infancy to old age. |
Tue Cuirp’s Book ox Tue Sovi,—To
teach a child that he has something
within him, distinct from the body; un
like it; wonderfully superior to it; and
which will survive it after death, & live
forever;—is the simple elementary prin
ciple of all religious instruction by Rev.
T. H. Gallaudet, ;
Daicy Piery.—DPjous reflections for ev
ery day in the month.—translated from
the French of Fenelon, Archbishop of
Cambrag.
For sale at i
JAS. HAMMOND’S ‘
DRY GOOD and BOOK-STORE. |
Newport, Sept. 8, 1881,
BOOKS, STATIONARY AND
BOOK BINDIN (. |
HENRY BARBER,
No. 1563, Thames Sireel.
HAS just received an assortinent of School
and Juvenile Books, and Stationary of wa
excellent quality.
—ALS O~
A new assortment of
JRugic and Prints,
Sanday School S(:‘cietinb luupplim.l with Boeks, en
avorable terms.
BOOK BINDING,
Of every description, either in plain or orna
mental hinding.uw‘nmd as wbove. Blank and
Account Books bound in Russia or other bindiugs.
T 0 LET |
’ -
: Possession giren nnmedialely
mjfi THE store lytely oceupied by
Benj. 11, Aiimau. Laquire at this
Oftice. way 11|
NEWPORT, R. I. THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 29, 1831.
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS, I
Board of Hoalth, Newport, Sepl. 20,1851,
T“I': Board of lealth upon infor
mation received of tho prevalence
of the CHOLERA at St. Peters
burg, and elsewhere in the North of Fu
rope, have deemed it expedient to sub-
Jject all vessels coming from the Baltic,
‘the Levant, Gulf of Venice, or any place
in the Mediteranean Sea, or any other
Iplace in the passage from which it is ne
‘cessary to pass the 9th deg. of East lon
‘lgitudo, as calculated from Greenwich,
;nnd all places known or suspected to be
infected with the above named disease,’
Ito quarantine; and they do hereby order
that all vessels arriving at the port of
Newport, from any of the places above
‘mentioned, be ordered by the Health
Officer te the Quarantine ground.— And
further order, That all vesscls arriving
at said port of Newport, constwise from
any place in the United States, or the
British posscssions in America, laden in
whole or in part with articles imported
from the above places, shall also be car
ricd to the quarantine ground, there to
remain until further orders from this
Board. |
The Health Officer is directed to or
der all vessels subject to quarantine as
above, immediately to the quarantine
ground, and order a color placed n the
shrouds to be kept there until she be dis
charged from quarantine, without going
on board said vessel, and make report
forthwith to the President of this Board.
Pilots meeting with vessels coming in
to port from places where cholera is said
to prevail, are directed to pilot them to
the Quarantine ground without going on
board for that purpose; any pilot or pilots
who shall presume to go on bourd con
trary to these regulations, lLie or they will
be kept on board said vessel during her
quarantine. |
T'hat no person on board of any vessel
arriving from either of the ports or places
mentioned in the first section of these
regulations, shall leave said vessel after
she enters the harbor of Newport, on the
penalty prescribed inthe fourth section of
“‘an act appointing the several Town
Councils of this State, Boards of Health
Ix officio. l
All persons are heraby forbid going on
board of any vessel arriving in the har
bor of Newport from either of the ports
or places aforementioned, on the penalty
of being kept on board said vessel until
she shall be discharged from quarantine.
T'hat if the master or other person hav
ing the charge of any vessel arriving at’
this port, shall evade or attempt to evade
any law of the State, or any regulation of
the Board of Health, by making a false
representation to the IHealth Othcer, as
may respect the length of the passage,or
the health of the people on board at the
time of arrival, or at any time during the
vovage, such master or other person
shall pay a fine not exceeding three hun
dred dollars, nor less than one hundred
dollars. I
It shall be, and hereby is, made the
duty ot the Health Oflicer to inform of
all violations of the foregoing regulations
which may come to his knowledge, and
if he shall neglect or violate any of the
duties prescribed to him by the laws of’
the State, or by the regulations of this
Board, or permit any other person to vi
olate the same, he shall pay a fine of one
hundred dollars and be dismssed from
office, . ;
Ordered, That the aforegoing regu
latipns be published three weeks in all
the papers printed in this town, and a co
py of them handed by the Health Offi
cer to the commanding officer of every
quarantine vessel for his government.
By order,
B. B. Howranp, Clerk.,
SILKS,
BLACK AND FANCY COLOURS,
The very clegant
GROS DE TOURS,
GROS DE BERLINS,
GROS DE NAPLES,
GROS DE SWISS,
SATTINLEVANTINES,
Real ITALIAN, &c. §c.
FOR SALE BY
JAMES HAMMOND.
Meptember 1.
A FINE CIHMANOR!
s
It‘l
by e
'G F()R A’A{ILE,
THE ESTATE,No. 144, Thames-st.
owned and improved by the subscriber,
in good repair, For terms &c. enquier
of PARDON WHITE.
| F.h ’, 1081.
DOMESTIC COTTONS.
l "‘. preces bleacked & unbleached COT'-
d TOAS for sale by : Sk
HARVEY SESSIONS
Ang 11
“LIBERTY and UNION, NOW AND FOREVER, ONE AND INSEPARABLE !”—wWEBSTER,
' DISSOLUTION of CO-PARTNERSIIP ‘
'l‘lll". Co-partnership heretofore existing wader
4 the firmi of ‘
BARKER & MUMFORD,
was dissolved this day by wwutual consent. Al
persons indebted to said firm are requested to make
immediate puviment to Carvrrs [I. Musrore,
who is duly authorized to settle the concerns of
the lute co-partnership. |
) WILLIAM F. BARKER,
CHARLES 11. MUMFORD
Mewport, August 4th. 1831,
OLD STAND,
'No. 102, Thames-st. |
CHARLES H. MUMFORD,
I Has ror = SALE, s
gencral as k‘i‘ sortiment
of Crocks, ANy ) Waren
ks, JrwrL (f\ I 8 py and
Fanerv o\y |} _"I Goopg,
as low as @v”‘f-,u"l *4 can Le
purchas’d in this town
or State., All kinds of siLvER WaRE,|
manufactured of the best stock. Clocks
and Watches cleaned and repaired, and
Jobs in gold and silver promptly attended
to. Aug. 4 |
J. L. CLARK’S
EXCHANGE,~—II6B Broapway
Three Doors below Muiden-Lane,
Vl‘l”': above establishment has recently gone 1o
to operation. Frequently experiencing the
many inconveniences that strangers are subject te
in transacting their business in this place, often in
want of the convenience of a writing apparatus, and
he means of ascortaining the ditierent locations, &e. |
Vhich they may be in pursait ot about the city and
vicinity : 1 have taken the liberty to give the publie
a general invitation to consider themselves at home
with ms, while they remain in the city. All the
principal city papers, together with most of the
New-IFngland, and the principal Southern & West
tern and a fair assortment of foreign papers are con
veniently arranged for the acconmnmmodation of the
public. Any negociations, or any business that may
fall in the line of a Stoek and Exchange Broker,
will be attended to with fidelity , punctuality & des
patch, I
Any commizsion with which my friends may fa
vor me, will be complied with to the full lettor of
their wstructions. P'lease call on |
PER A e J. L. CLARK, |
168, Broadway, New-York, or at the corner of
: Union Buildings, Providenoce, [
| April, 20 1831
BOOTS & SHOKES.
CO-PARTNERSHIP FORMED.
DAVIS &K POTTER,
Al the Old Stand ‘f,' Joun W, Davis,
SIGN OF THE
100,
TITAMES STREET,
I.IA\'I". just returned from New-York with a
superior selection of stock of the fivst qual
ity, for the purpose of manufacturing Ladies, Gen
tlemen’s, misses and children’s BOOTS AND
SHOES, in the most fashionable style, by the
first rate workmen, ‘They are confident the sutis
fuction heretofore received by old customers at the
estublishment (No. 100) will induece them stll te
continue their patronage. ;
Having the ussistance of Mr. Potter in the esta
blishment, every attention will be paid to ull those
wno wish for the first style of Boots & Shoes,
made to measare on the newest fushion lasts,which
they have just received from New York. They
have on hend an extensive assortment of Ladies,
Gentlemén’s, and Misses boots and shoes of every
description, usually called for in a shoo store, of
their own manufactoring. Also a number of
cases of the above articles, which they bought
for cash in New York, and are determined to well
them as low as at any other store in Town.
V'l’hoy keep constantly on hand the following
articles, viz:
Black and colored last-2¢ Grain'd upper leathar,
ings, Hack it buck
R':::iu sheetings, . lsl:fns, ™
No. 2 and 3 ribbons, Qlilark and colored mio
ll)“di'd.. ."II:' galloons, Qnr‘occ"(o. si
m l"' SHK, dCK and folare la,
Silk and cotton braid, o(ioat skin bindings,
Silk and cottam hootQShnp do do.
cord, 0 Lining skins,
Boot quul-Ing. _.G'o___
Fnglish shoe thread, 0 Liguid Blacking,
American do do. ‘Spongo do.
Calf skins, o::ox'rmd past do.
Real skins, eel ball,
Horse skins, Ql"hoc brushes,
Curried goat skine, 3¢ &o. ke,
| JOHN W, DAVIS®
| JOHN N. POTTER.
april 27, 1831,
TO LET,
'-l\ll'. NEWPORT BANK<ITOUSE,
Faquire at the Bank July 21 ||
NEW STAND.
'I‘IIF. subseriber having re
. moyed his establishinent te
o] 20 010
o No, 138, Thames-stveet,
recent! ¥ ascupied by Mr. D, C. Denham, jeweller,
and opfosite Messia. G, Engs & Co.) is now rea
dy to supply his customers and the publie, with
o BOOTS & SHOES,
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION,
From the most smproved Manufactories,
ANL NEWEST PATTERNS,
and Lopea by his unromitted attention, to he able
to ment a wotinnance of that liberal patronage
which he hus heretofore received.
As a furtler inducement to cuxtomers, he has
Just received 1 cenmiplete assortinent of stock from
New-York, fo manufacturing work to masure:
comprising dilerent colored kid inorocca, lining,
bindings, and he much adiired bronze and clieq
wered Freneh noroeco, &e. &e, together with six
new sets of the first fashion Lasts, made by M.
Coit, of New Tork, The work to measures being
made ander hs own immediate inspection, will
bear comparisen with any made in the place. The
best attention paid to repuiring.
Constantly on hand and for sale, shoe naily,
thread, lining and binding skins, Day & Martin, &
other kiuds of Hacking, &e. e,
BENJAMIN I AILMAN
Newport, Apil 23d
NEW GOODN.
ISAAC GOULD,
N, 176, Thames-Street,
HAS JUST RECEIVED FROM
NEW-YORK,
Z\N assortment of Broapcrors, Cassimeres
i and Vestings, of the wost fushionable eolors
and patlerns,
ALSO, gentlenien’s new stocks and eravats:ex
tra beavor, Berlin and thread gloves: random hose,
ke. All of which he will sell at a small advance
for cash or approved credit.
Newport, April 23,
VIEWS
IN THECITY OF NEWYORK &
I'TS ENVIRONS
Ao publishing in Numbers, at 37} cts, each
\9 aspecimen of American shill this work has
& no equils and it i asserted, by several Jour
nals, that even the well known * I ews in the U
nited States,” and *Jones’s Vieiwes in London?y
cannot compare with the * Fiews in New York,
this being preferable to the former on account of
its reduced price and excellence of engraving*
and surpissing the latter in its deseriptions and
typogruphical depariment. |
Only 874 cents per number is charzed for foar
beautiful Engravings, eight pages of letter press
deseriptions, with an elegant cover, being at this
rate, ons of the cheapest works ever ofiered to an
American Public. The whole will be cemple
ted in tea numbers. |
Subscriptions to the above splendid work wiII;
be received at
W. CALLAHAN'S Book-store and Cir
cnlating Library, A few copies of the fist two
numbers, are for sale as übove, which the public
are invited ty call and examine.
Aug. Ilih
JUST RECEKIVED,
e {resh supply of
BUTLER'S INDIAN SPECIFIC,
Jor Coughs,
DR. RUSII’S ANTI-DYSPEPTIC
PILLS,
DR THOMPSON'S GENUINE
Wra WAL NME,
and |
SPECIFIC DROPS for Tunlll.’chlC,l
FOR SALE DY
R. R.ITAZARD,
Ml the sign «flfic Great Movtar— Wash
july 7
ingzlon-squanre,
PROVIDENCE ACCOUNT BOOK
MANUFACTORY,
Sigmn of the Fheger,
No. 28’ Market-Strect.
lg()fll\'.‘l of every deseription for Merchanots
and Banks, made of the best materials and
warranted to give entire satisfiaction.
Paper ruled to pattern, free trom broken lines.
Book-BinninG ganerally, exccuted at short
notice, and moderate prices.
If any recommendation of the subscriber’s
work is wanted, it may be inferred from the fact
that more books of his manufacture have been
sold during the last eight vears, than has been
made hy any other person in this town, and that
his work is now used by more than half’ the
Bauks in Providence: and by a great proportion
of the Banks in the vicinity,
Stationers who do not make their own Books
will find this establishment to offer Books for
quality and price equal to any in the Union.
Wiiting Books of a superior quality, constantly
on hand. . : i x
4= Orders are respeetfully solieited. I
THOMAS DOYLE, !
Povidenee, R. 1. June 10,1831, [J. 151 yr
SUPERIOR COLOGNE
AND
LAVENDER WATER,
In fancy bottles.
FOR SALE AT
W, CALLAMAN'S
Bookstore and Circulating Library
July 28,
THE TIMES.
SIMPSONS LETTERS.
TO THE PUBLIC—-LETTER 1,
- Having been singled out by the pub
lic Journals in the pay of General Jack
son, from the signeis to the protocol of
the original Jack<onmen, as one whose
motives might be unpeached with sue
cess; and upon whom abuse and vituper
ation might be lavished with most profit
to the government, it becomes an act of
Justice to myselt and friends, to give to
the public a true exposition of the rela
tions in which | have stood towards Gen,
Jackson, since his election to the Presi
dential chair; with such circumstances,
having connection with the history of the
times, as way promise to benetit the coun
try or elucidate principles.
At the urgent solicitation of many per
sonal and political friends, I was induc
ed in the early part of February, 1829,
to proceed to Washington, there to meet
and congratulate the new President.
This step 1 adopted with great relue
tance, and remonstrated strongly with all
my hriends against its wisdom and expe
diency. My forebodings of evil had long
preceded any suggestion of theirs, us to
the policy of' such an interview with the
new President. These torebodings of a
dereliction of principle on lus part, had
been grounded on the general declara
tion of hig adherents, that he must be re
clected for a sccond torm, under the a
vowed object that four years of oflice
would be too short a period to recom
pense his friends for their labors and
sacrifices. 1 then perceived, and sta
ted to those around me, the fotal change
of system and of principles, which such a
course on the part ot General Jackson
must produce. I anticipated that he
must abandon his principles against the
appointment of mewmbers of Congress and
open the portal of expectation of ofiice
to all the leaders of the adverse fuctions
that had combined and coalesced to se
cure hig clection, I anticipated, that
under such a change of system, *Coi-
RUPTION WAS TO ELCOME THE ORDRK OF
THE DAY '——that Lis integrity was pros
trated by this single intention; and that
every movement must correspond, 1n or
der to produce a concentrated action to
wards the success ol his re-election; that
the primary objects ot his election, would
be sacriliced to this ultimate consumma
tion—and that men, measures, and prin
ciples would equally be made to bead to
this darling object ot a powe:ful, ambi
tious, and mercenary combination, |
It hud already been hinted, who were
to compose the new Cabinet; and every
member named was a member of Congress,
and the leader of one of the factious, thal
at the eleventh howr, had come into his
support, after having exhausted the stores
of abuso, ribaldry, and detraction, to keep
him from interfering with the claims of
their several candidates. He secmed
to have made it a point, to heap the
highest honors on his most active and
malignant foes; as if to muke sure oftherr
adhesion for the great ulterior move
ment of a re-clection; and to cement the
green ties of mercenary friendship by the
golden fetters of a mutual interest, deep
and protracted.
Rumer assigned M. Van Burer as
Secretary of State. To me, the contrast
of such a man to De Witt Clinton, was
at once so mortifying—so humbling—so
outrageous, that 1 cherished not the faint
est hope of one gleam of honor resulting
from the administration of General Jack
son. Upon Mr. Van Buren 1 had ever
looked as a mere demagogue—an empty
pretender to the character of a states
man—an expert personal politician—a
manager of men—adroit at deception, and
restrained by no principle from the most
atrocious acts of a reckless and ambitious
aspirant, without talent to palliate profli
gacy, or knowledge and accomplish
ments to mitigate or excuse the evil means
by whieh he sought to accomplish his
ends. | had seen him truck the illustri
ous Clinton through a long life, like a
wily Indian, with a poisoned arrow—l
had seen him shed teigned tears over his
premature grave—and then snatch the
reward of lus labors, and wear laurels,
won by hunting his great victim to the
tomb, which he mght well have wusl‘n;'d
to cover himself, out of shecr envy ol its
lory. As governor of New-York, Mr.
Q'nfi Buren had exposed his ignorance
of the principles ol its cnmugcrclal pross
perity, and his total want ol knowledge
of the gcience of the political econonnst
and the financier. rlis insincerity of
friendship towards General Jackson, had
been made manifest, by the long interval
during which he kept open the arenue of
approach, between himsell and Mr. Ad
ams; had that great and |permit me to
add us an act of justice and atonement, |
injured statesman, deemed him of sufli
cient importance, to court, conciliate, or
win him over. But Mr. Adams disdain
ed to surround himselt by pwchased cne
mies, to prowote his re-clection, by -
From the Philadelphia U, 8. Gazette.
WHOLE NO. 78,
'posing the fetters of great patronage up
‘on antagonist leaders—ohoosing to fall
‘as he rose, by the weight of his integri-
Aty and Mr. Van Buren was left to make
such contract and bargain with Gen.
Juckson, as circumstances might war
vant, or Major Faton suggest,
It was also bruited, that Jous I Ea«
TON wusto be uppninlc-(I secrctary ul'war,
and here every anticipation of evil arose;
which has been so abundantly realized,
to his mortification, and to the shame of
the country, IHis mcompetency for the
staticn, was to me, as well as to the pub
lie, mauifest—-but to me in a peculiar
manner, as | had frequent occasion to
discern the shall 'wness of hig acquire
ments, the medioerity of his talents, and
the indolence of his disposition. As a
writer, he was tame, bungling, and eve
ry way deticient—destitute of all beauty
of style, harmony of arrangement, and
thut last, most humble, but most useful
quality of" composition—-perspicutty of
expression, The trouble and distresa
caused by his essays communicated to
me for publication; the labor of revision,
and after all the neflicicucy of his pro
ductions, enable me to pronounce no
dubious opinion on this point, It was
unpossible to conceive in what his states
manship consisted. s carcer as a
Scnator had been a blank,dull,and mono
tonous progression from mute wisdom fo
an cloquent aye; and it he ever rose to
the distinction of the chair of a commit
tee, it was conlined to that of the district
of his adoption. We had no reports from
his peny and no speeches from his tongue,
But his intunacy with Gen, Jackson was
well known, to whom he stood in the
triple Light of friead, furvorite and mana
ger. To what extent this triple relation
was carried, will appear in the course of
these letters. Major Eaton arrived
Philadelphia during the month of Janua
ry, and his presence was greeted by the
announcement ol lis marrnage in the New
York newspapers, accompanied by the
most offensive comments, and a predic
tion of all the discord which his admis
sion into the cabinet, weuld necessaril
produce in the society at Washington.-
It was generally supposed by his triends,
that he would immediately assume un
attitude so belligerent, as to silence all
future attacks of so gross a character;
but he remained passive, and returned to
Washington, to listen to the echoes ol
the same strictures; modulated by court
complaisance, or aggravated by indig
nant envy, oflended morals, of insulted
religion,
The name of Samvern D, Ixanaym was
mentioned as secretary of the treasury,
The sclection appeared to me too sinis
ter and factious to secure general appro
bation. To Mr. Inghamn I had been
politically opposed-—sometimes from prin
ciple, and at others from peculiarty of’
position, or the force of party movements,
His talents did not appear toe me, at that
tune, to justitv the appointment;—but, |
have since seen ample cause to yield
him praiso for his ability, vigour aud in
dustry., It was chiefly as a prominent
leader of a party opposed to Generul
Jackson, at first, that his appointment
struck me as objectionable—Dbeing one
of those alliances with a conflicting can«
didate, without which a re-clection could
not be sccured, and which | have con
clusive proot would never have been en
tered into, if the single-minded intention
of oxe lerm had been faithtully adhered
to by the President: and it a cabinet had
been chosen for the sole purpose q}'ill =
biity to benefit the country, instead of Ity
adaptation to the ulterior object of his res
clection! Mr. Ingham was represented
as a warm partisan—a devoted friend,
and an unforgiving foe,—l have sinco
learned to appreciate hun higher; and
have proof, under the signature of the
President, that he never misused his offis
cial power to the detriment or prejudice
of tus original friends. 1 now respect
him as a statesman and a patriot. As o
man he has extorted my esteem; as a cit«
izen, 1 yield him my applause, livery
father and husband of the country, must
admire, though they may fail to extol
him, fram the force of prejudice, or the
rivalry of position,
The intention of Gen. Jackson to ap.
point Mr. Baldwin to this station, is now
only important, as it proves the change
of his mind to stand for a second term, to
have been wrought after his arrival at
Washington, upon a consultation with
Major Eaton, and the adoption of his suns
ister counsel. The fact of this intention
to appoint Mr. Baldwin, | had from tha
lips of the President himself, as well ag
I\Fujor Lewis, & since from letters from
Mr. Baldwin, awthorized by the Presie
dent. At Pitsburg, General Jackson
had resolved to appoint Mr. Ealdwin; &
invited him to Washington for that pur«
pose; and thither that gentleman went to
reap disappointment and mortification, to
feel the warm friend transtormed into tho
congealed President—to meet the snecrs
of the herd —the triumph of enemies, knd
‘the regret and condolence of frieads,

xml | txt