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Worcester daily press. [volume] (Worcester, Mass.) 1873-1878, April 01, 1873, Image 1

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IN PVBMBIIBD
EVERY MORNING, HUNDAY EX (KITED,
’ —AT—
• K per anuumi 75 eta. per month.
I
«BIeehI» snss,
KVKRV 8 A TURDAY MOHN INO,
Al per annum.
EDWARD R. FISKE 4 CO., Proprietors.
B. 11. FMKK, J. A. WAiniMU.
New AdvertiNenieiitN.
**B IV G TRADE.
Carpets!
: D. B. HENCHMAN,
Han now in store a full assortment of every grade
of
BKUMELfI,
TAPESTRY,
INGRAINS, AC.,
WINDOW SHADES,
RUGS,
MATS.
LOOK AT MY
EXTRA BARGAINS!
I
Best Body Brussels
•l.
from *1.75 to 81.90 per yard.
»
pi
s.i English Tapestry
ost,
‘ 1« at *1.25 per yard.
iti
lr - 50 ROLLS
litoi
."t Straw Matting,
»r th
ers .j »t 25c. per yard.
hi* f
orw!
ho v THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT OF
, it h
Oil Cloths
x-aJ
K ‘ nl is market, at the LOWEST PRICES, can be
hron
mil at
nan;
“S?. B. HENCHMAN’S,
111 1 No. 1 Foster St., cor. Main.
laß i-tr
mt
I N E ARTS
il> LOVERS OF THE FINE ARTS
•r'ill find at my store one of the best collections of
•erne Steel Engravings; English, French,
, j German and American Chromos,
Oil and Water Colors, to be found in New
ngland outside of Boston.
- Stereoscopic Views,
"rangs' Beautiful Productions
ZPliotographs,
'" BRACKETS AND WOOD CARVINGS,
Picture frames
MADE TO ORDER
from latest patterns of mouldings.
ni GOLD FRAMES, BLACK WALNUT, 4C„
d all desirable kinds. Picture Knobs, Cords and
•like fixtures.
, Particular attention given to re-gild ; ng old
fi auies.
’ A. E. PECK, Art Dealer,
alts Lincoln House Block.
4^ICE, WHITING & BULLOCK,
r BANKERS,
'orner Main and Pearl Streets, Worcester,
Buy and sell Railroad, City and County Bonds.
Special attention given to orders for the pur>
। chase and sale of Stocks at NEW
YORK and BOSTON
BOARDS.
11
v gents for the Various Lines of
f European Steamships.
r Persons contemplating going abroad will find
.t our office Cabin Plans of the Steamers of the
•veral Lines, thus enabling them to select and
Jeeure rooms without the delay and expense of
pplying at the principal offices in New York or
doston. Letters of Credit furnished available in
]II the principal cities of Europe.
9rafts Drawn Payable In any City in Europe.
C’F'-United States Passports procured without
charge. ts al
STR 0N G & ROGERS,
t
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN COAL,
Fire Brick, Clay and Kaolin.
Office, No. 416 Main St.,
al dtf WORCESTER, Mass.
JOSEPH CHASE & CO.,
375 MAIN STREET.
1 F. E. Smith’s & Co.’s Crushed Wheat, delicious
nd nourishing.
The best Canada, Scotch and Irish Oat Meal.
Baltimore pure Hominy and Meal.
S. G. Bowdlear’s Maize Meal. Try it.
PURE SPICES.
The best Teas and Coffee to be found in the city.
Pullna and Seltzer Waters, warranted genuine,
al 3m _ _
QLD GOV’T. JAVA COFFEE,
3 Pound* SI.OO.
Hlest Black Oolong Tea per lb.. - -90 c.
Be.t Vncoloreil Japan Tea per lb., - .100
Ollier goods in proportion.
Enterprise Tea Co.,
a , ,2t Na Me Main Street.
H . JOURDAN,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
ANTHRACITE AND BITCMINOCS
COAL.
fiwrOV* I YARD.
2 Lincoln Block, | Green Street.
WORCESTER, MASS.
nits .
„ At FULLER’S Coal Yard,
Buy Coal black and hard,
XSfiggSy T<» Keep the fire bright
Bv day and by night.
A ’f is better than gold
taiRSS* To keep out the cold.
Softer coal for the cook
Will do like a book.
HIKE CENTRAL STREET COAL
A YARD, is in a central location, easy of ac
cess near Main street, and there is kept constant-
L v on hand and for sale
franklin and Chestnut Coal I
Lehigh Coal, Four Diffarent Sites, for
Stoves and Furnacesl
BUF^h FILLER.
alts J?—
AKTINE L L E Y ,
FASHION A 11lD
Boot and Shqe Maker.
Repairing Neatly Done.
No. 39S Main Street, ■ Worcester Ma»».
I
Bail® ptm
VOL. 1, NO. 1.
New AdvertlHementH.
JUST OPENEDI
OUR HFHINO ABHORTMKNT OF
CLOTHS
VOB OCR
CUSTOM DEPARTMENT,
In the choicMt vMictle. ol Foreign .nil DomesUe
manufacture.
The reputation of our house for fine garments
ia well known, and all desiring to leave their or
ders will do well to call early before the rush com
mences.
D. H. EAMES & CO.,
One Price Clothier*,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MASS. dly_
SPR I N G
OVER COATS,
NOW READY,
A good assortment of the anost approved styles.
Prices from B 7 to *2O.
Spring’ Suits
FOB
GENTS AND BOYS
In all varieties and prices, now in stock, at
D. H. EAMES & CO.’S
Owe Price Clothing House,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MASS. _ dly
OFFER TO-DAY,
465
PAIRS ALL WOOL CASSIMERE PANTS
AT ONLY
$5.00
A PAIR, FORMER PRICES FROM SIX TO
EIGHT DOLLARS. THIS IS LESS THAN
THE CLOTH IS WORTH. WE BOUGHT
THESE IN A JOB LOT, AND GIVE OCR
CUSTOMERS THE ADVANTAGE OF IT.
WE ALSO OFFER TWO HUNDRED COATS
AND ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY VESTS,
AT EQUALLY LOW PRICES.
D. H. EAMES & CO.
al illy
j^NOWLTON BROTHERS,
NO. 282 MAIN STREET,
WE ABE RECEIVING
Spring Importation* of
CROCKERY,
FRENCH CHINA,
FINE CRYSTAL GOODS,
BRONZES, CLOCKS, &c.,
direct from Manufacturers, thereby enabling us
to sell our Goods as low as any house in the
country. Our stock of
SOLID SILVER AND PLATED
WARES, CUTLERY.
Lamp Goods and Gas Fixtures
IS COMPLETE IN EACH DEPARTMENT,
And will Bear Close Inspection.
Orders from country trade promptly attended
to.
Knowlton Brothers,
282 MAIN STREET,
alts Opposite Bay State House.
E W ENGLAND
Concrete and Roofing Co.
CONCRETE
Walks, driveways, ground floors, &c., by a com
bination of the important features of the most
approved methods. Scrimshaw’s, Ford & Moor’s,
Snow & Davis’ and the Latham patents have been
purchased by this company, and no expense or
pains have been spared to qualify them to pro
duce the most perfect bituminous concrete gthat
can be made.
GRAVEL ROOFING,
Of best material, and applied with superior skill.
Ready Roofing, Widely and Favorably Known.
SHINGLE PAINT.
Shingle paint is great economy. If taken in time
no money for repairs is so judiciously expended.
ROOF PAINTING IN OIL OF ANY COLOR,
Ornamental or plain. Painting confined exclu
sively to roofs. By making roof painting a speci
alty we can do it 20 per cent, cheaper than any
other parties.
Shingle Paint for Tin has no rival. Concrete
and Roofing Materials for sale,
In quantities not less than 40 gallons at manu
facturers’ prices. Raw and Distilled Tar, Black
Varnish, Asphalt, Pitch, Dead Oils, Napthas, and
every form of Bitumen.
OFFICES—36O Southbridge St., 26 Pleasant
St., at Knowlton & Bacon’s Paper Store.
P. O. BOX 285, WORCESTER, MASS.
T. C. Rice. - - Lorin Foskit.
Concrete.
Having disposed of my interest in the Concrete
Bussiness to Messrs RICE & FOSKIT, of this
city, I take ple:isure in recommending them to
tha patronage of my old customers and the public
generally.
al dim J. J. RANDALL.
GO. HILDRETH
• Would respectfully inform the citizens of
Worcester and vicinity that he is still engaged
in the business of undertaking, as heretofore,
although entirely disconnected from Mr. H. C.
Willson, his former partner. His present place of
business is at No. 15 Waldo street, first door
north of Waldo House. Orders left at No. 7
Waldo street. Residence No. 32 Oread street.
al d3m
(JHICKERING & SONS’
CELEBRATED PIANOS,
FROM tsn UPWARDS.
The Best in. the Market.
— AT —
S. B. LELAND A CO.'S.
JJALLETT, DAyiS & CO.,
HAYNES BROS., HALLETT * CUMSTON,
And Other Noted Pianos,
.at prices that defy competition, at
S. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
VEW ' ROSEWOOD 7-OCTAVE
PIANOS,
From S3OO Upwards,
— AT—
8. R. LELAND & CO.’S.
MASON & HAMLIN, BURDETT
XU ORGAN CO.,
Smith American Organ,
And Other Organs, from *75.00 Upwards
—AT—
8. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
■piANOS AND ORGANS SOLD ON
A EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS,
. — AT —
8. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
THANOS TUNED, REPAIRED.
A POLISHED AND MOVED.
Work Guaranteed.
— AT —
,1 ly 8. B. LELAN^I A CO.’S.
WORCESTER, MASS., TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 1, 1878.
New AdvertlHementH.
J . H. CLARK & CO.
would liirlu the attention ol their customer, and
the public to their large Block ol
NEW DRY GOODS
w
— FOR TIIK —
SPRING TRADE.
ATTENTION is SPECIALLY INVITED to our
Superior Stock of Black Silis.
■We have all grades from 81.25 (for the cheapest
silk in this city; and upwards, that for real value
cannot be surpassed in this city, Boston or New
York.
STRIPE SILKS
are much cheaper this spring. We have a large
stock in
WHITE GBOUNDS,
with hair lines and fancy stripes.
Black Grounds,
with white stripes,
GREY GROUNDS,
with black stripes, and many other styles and
colors, at from 12^ to 25 cents a yard less than
last season’s prices.
Black Brillantines,
Black Mohaira,
Black Alpacas.
W’e have the same superior makes in these
giMMls that have given perfect satisfaction to
our customers for two years. Selling a| satis
factory prices.
10 Ps. Black Cashmere and Hen
rietta Cloths,
JUST RECEIVED.
New Goods Opening
Daily.
OUR STOCK OF WOOLLENS, LINEN GOODS
AND DOMESTICS LARGE AND FULL,
AND PRICES WILL BE
FOUND LOW.
J. H. CLARKE & CO.,
a 2 5t 353 Main St.
AT CHAMPION’S KITCHEN
STORE,
No. 13 Pleasant Street, (North Side,)
You can find a great variety of the most useful
goods, consisting in part of
Clothes and Reels, Wringers, Baskets,
Lines, Wash Tubs, Clothes Frames, Wash
Benches, Rolling Pins and Molding Boards,
Chopping Trays, Pails, Tin Ware, Ac., Ac.
Call and see for yourselves. Goods at low
PRICES.
R. CHAMPION.
a! eodlw
ESTABLISHED A. D. 1850.
R. McALEER
Successor to D. Brown,
Manufacturer of
Fine Harness
AND DEALER IN FIRST CLASS
Stable and Carriage Goods,
228 Main St.
al dtf
BATCHES!!
Mv life work has been the manufacture, sale
and* repair of Watches. If this experience, to
gether with a large and carefully selected
STOCK OF WATCHES
Bought, not on Credit, but for Cash, my intimate
connection with the largest Manufacturing and
Importing Houses in the country, and my very
small store expenses, are of any advantage to
me, 1 am abundantly able to make it so to my
patrons.
My unexpected success in my new enterprise
has encouraged me to fill my store with a com
plete stock of
Genuine Waltham Watches,
And to resume the sale of
Celebrated Chas. E. Jacot (Swiss) Watches,
(Having introduced them into Worcester when at
the old stand), and a fine stock of LADIES AND
GENTS’ GOLD CHAINS, RINGS, STUDS, BUT
TONS, SETS, LOCKETS, &c., &c. This stock
will bear inspection as to price and quality.
I solicit fine and difficult Watch Work, and shall
take no more than I find time to do with my own
hands.
IRA G. BLAKE,
Formerly Superintendent of Watchmakers’ De
partment at Waltham Factory, and Manager of
the Watch Department in the late firm of Blake
& Robinson.
480 MAIN STREET, opposite the Common.
al
OEO RG E R. SPURR,
DEALER IX
DRUGB, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS,
PERFUMERY,
Soaps, Brushes, Patent Medicines, Pure
Wines and Liquors for Mctlleinal Pur
poses. Agents for the Great United
States Tea Company.
337 Main St., Worcester, Mass.
Physicians Prescriptions Carefully Compounded
alts at all hours.
0O M S TOO K & EVERETT,
Wholesale Dealers in
Pork, Lard and Hams, Poultry, Sausages and
Dressed Hogs. Prices as low as any house in
New England.
No. 21 Southbridge Street.
JAMES K. COMSTOCK,
EDWARD S. EVERETT.
Vorcestcr, April 1, 1X73. M_ <l&w4w
EG(Fs I bIFy THE BEST I
The best Eggs to hatch are from
Healthy Thoroughbred
FOWLS,
whether they are awarded Brst premiums or not.
I claim to have the largest and iiest collection of
Thoroughbred Brown Leghorn Fowls of any man
in the world; legs free from disease, and the
fowls pefectly healthy. Circulars on application.
FRANK J. KINNEY,
No. 3 Olean st., Worcester, Mass.
al dTnTSlm&wtt (Tatnuck.)
Avery davis,
413 Main street, Worcester.
The public are invited to my spring opening of
piece goods for
CUSTOM GARMENTS,
Fine Furnishing Goods and Ready Made Cloth
ing, which is complete in all the latest styles and
novelties.
FINE SHIRTS
mand to measure and warranted. Patterns cut.
Cloths sold by the yard and cut to measure ii
desired.
p O R SALE,
Clothing, Hats, Caps, Furnishing Goods, Boots
and Shoes, &c., &c.
The subscriber wishes to sell his entire stock at
once. Terms reasonable. A good chance. Rent
I OW . R. MONTAGUE,
Northboro’, March 25,1873.
D H. WHITTEMORE’S MEAT
• CUTTER will cut two pounds of Pie Meat in
one minute and Hash for the Family in one and a
half minutes. Works extremely easy. Sells for
$3. May be taken on trial at 570 Main st. al 3m
ffuilg ^ress.
TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 1, 1873.
UNBATIBFIED.
Oh, heart of mine! you’re a willful thing,
And a trouble to me at best;
I have taught you long, and tutored you well,
But still you are never at rest.
What is it you want, you greedy gnome,
That you moan like a child in pain ?
If I crowned you monarch of rolling spheres,
I believe it would be in vain.
I have wrought in the midnight's starry hours,
And on till the morning gray;
I have toiled in the sultry tropic’s heat,
Till the cease of the weary day;
My pen has brought you a measure of fame
Heaped up to the very brim,—
A name that shall live when centuries roll
Back into the ages dim.
I have gathered you wealth that might dower a
I have throned you In regal state; [queen;
For you I wrestled with many a foe,
Conquering even fate.
I have knelt at your shrine like the veriest slave,
With trophies from every land:
Gems from the sea, and gold from the mine,
Have been scattered with lavish hand.
And honor unstained—oh, heart of mine,
What is it you ask for more ?
Knowledge is thine; 1 have sought it out
From the pages of ancient lore.
Love! love! my heart, that I taught so loug?
My heart, that I crushed with a will ?
How dare you stir 'neath your silken robes,
Moaning and fretting still ?
How dare you ask for impossible things,
Oh! viper that I have fed?
W’hy do you madden me, day by day,
Till I wish I might see you dead?
Love! never, never, my traitor heart!
So comfort yourself with pride,—
Fold it royally over your sharpest pain,—
For you there is naught beside.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Boston Correspondence of the Daily Press.
Boston, March 31, 1873.
Dear Press: —The mild weather and warm
rains of the past two or three days have had
a surprising effect in removing the wintry
look which our streets and public squares, as
well as the suburbs, have worn for months
back. Except in out of the way corners
which the sun cannot reach, the snow’ is
gone, and on the Common, save where the
snow’ carted from the streets has subsided
into little hillocks of Iceland notably in
front of the State House^Jie grass shows
the first uncertain tinge of Q t | ie \ On Bea
con street, where the suw^,.^ all day,
the venturesome snow- - *?<ocuses,
amply protected by th ^^^^gß of snow,
are showing their he^^S^nng promise of
the wealth of foliage and flowers that is now
preparing to burst forth. Its winter gar
ment has been so ample that the earth has
been well protected, and the long and tedi
ous process of getting the frost out of the
ground, which, here as elsewhere, means
days and weeks of mud, will hardly be ne
cessary this season. But enough of the
weather. It is a good subject upon which
to begin conversation w ith a new acquaint
ance, and is admirably suited to be a starting
point for this, my first chat with the readers
of the Presw. It has served its purpose,
therefore, pass on.
a re. l estate operation.
Your re^; A doubtless remember the para
graphs tl< went the rounds of the papers
last S» rng concerning the enormous price
paid by a prominent banking firm for a cor
ner lot, covering only a few hundred
square feet, which stood in the very midst of
the stamping ground of the bulls and bears
of Gotham, and possession of which was ab
solutely necessary to enable the firm in
question to carry out their proposal building
operations. Eli Perkins, the genial contrib
utor to the N. Y. Commercial, devoted a
column or two to the subject, and gave the
family history of the three old ladies who
owned the land from the time of the old
Dutch rule in Manhattan dow n to the pre
sent degenerate days. For once, financial
experts were cornered by unsophisticated
“outsiders,” and there was a general chuckle
all around. We have just now a somewhat
similar case here, although there has been no
sharp practice, and it is believed that the
buyers have paid no more than it is really
worth to them, and, on the principle that a
thing is worth what it will bring, no more
than was just to the sellers. Your readers
remember the locality of course, although
the firm from whom it took its name moved
away some years since. It stands next
door to what was the splendid
rescript building. As yon know,
that went down in the great fire, and the
comer building, without any earthly reason,
was “gutted out” on that fatal night by the
explosion of a number of kegs of powder in
the basement. Who ordered this I do not
know’; but I saw the whole transaction, and
a more senseless thing I never saw done.
Well, our city fathers have determined to
widen Washington street, taking off ten feet
from the front of this comer lot, and to do
the same on Milk street, reducing its width
by some five or six feet. The remainder is
hardly large enough to be used separately for
business purposes, although, considering the
location, a tenant could probably be found
for a small store built upon the lot, who
would lie willing to pay a handsome rent.
But the Transcript folks wanted it, knowing
that its possession woni I enhance the value
of every foot they already own. Overtures
were therefore made to the owners, but for a
long time it seemed as though no agreement
would be reached. At last the Messrs. Dut
ton, the Transcript proprietors, offered to
submit the question of price to three disin
terested parties, chosen in the usual way,
and to pay SIO,OOO over and above whatever
their award might be. But this offer was
declined, and it was only on Saturday, after
no end of dickering, that the .owners finally
agreed to accept a round hundred thousand
for all their right, title and interest in the
lot, and the mins that stand upon it. Now
that this is settled, active operations will
begin forthwith, and before many months
the new Transcript building, complete in
every detail, and provided with every con
venience that can possibly be used in the
publication of a daily paper, will stand on
this prominent comer, a monument to the
enterprise and success of its owners, a worthy
peer of the many firm structures which are
soon to rise from the ashes of the burnt dis
trict.
TENEMENT HOUSES.
Having successfully grappled with the
small pox, and got it so under control that
now’, instead of holding the first place, It
stands well down on the list of the ordinary
diseases that figure in our weekly lists of
mortality, our new Board of Health is about
to tackle the tenement house nulaancs, a
more fruitful source of disease even tlian Uie
epidemic aforesaid—one which scatters its
seeds broadcast, and which is mainly respon
sible for the fearful sum total of deaths
which every returning summer brings.
These buildings are mere shells, often
out by neighboring structures from the ligMt
and heat of the sun, dark and damp. Ui
which are huddled together the poor, tab
ignorant and the depraved. Many of t’A«n»
are owned by persons residing in the
most fashionable quarters of the c ßyi
men who wove in the highest circles;
who ire careful not to endanger their im
maculate broadcloth by contact with squalid
tenants. The business of letting rooms and
of collecting rents Is left wholly to agents,
a hard-hearted, hard-fisted Mass, who receive
generous commissions for acting as buffer
between the aristocratic landlord and the
miserable occupant of his yet more misera
ble house, and, in addition, squeeze every
(MMslble cent out of these forlorn families.
To keep in favor with the owners, and thus
retain their places, it Is the aim of these
agents to make to their principals the largest
returns possible, the result being that needed
repairs are left undone, and that everything
goes to ruin in the most reckless way. It is
well for the good name of Boston that these
buildings are to be taken in hand, and the
occupants ordered out of those which,
through accumulated tilth, lack of ventila
tion. or want of sunlight, are pronounced
unfit for human habitations. If, besides
publishing, as they do every year, descrip
tions of these disgraceful buildings, the daily
and Sunday papers would also give the
names and residences of those who own
them, there would be a public sentiment cre
ated which could not but materially aid the
work of the health officers.
AMUSEMENTS.
A word about amusements, of which w’e
are to have a surfeit the coming week. To
morrow evening M’lle Aimee and her French
troupe begin a short season at the Globe, and
the sale of tickets lias thus far been very
satisfactory. Offenbach’s music is every
where popular, and although his operas some
times, and in fact generally, contain some
thing hardly up to the orthodox standard,
the people will flock to hear them, especially
when rendered by such favorite artists as
Aimee and her troupe.
At the Boston Theatre, Mr. Edwin Adams
is to play Enoch Arden, and in the hotels,
saloons, and music-store windows, are plac
ards representing him in character, watching
for the long-expected ship. The Boston
Theatre has been well patronized of late,
Maggie Mitchell having just closed a most
successful engagement.
There is no “star” at the Museum just
now, but the regular company appears night
ly in the comedy entitled “ A Christmas Sup
per,” and fpr Fast night a glorious bill, in
cluding “Follies of a Night” and “Breach
of Promise,” is announced.
Not to be outdone by the rest, Mr. Stetson
of the Howard brings out to-night the latest
sensation, called “Bijou and Babii,” a spec
tacular piece of the “Black Crook” and
“White Fawn*’ order, which is said to far
surpass those well know productions.
Whether it is to surpass these in indelicacy,
as well as in grandeur of scenery and stage
effects, will not lie known until this letter is
well on its way to the “Heart of the Com
monwealth.”
Easter is coming, and with it comes many
things that interest your lady readers, such
as new dresses, new bonnets, new fashions,
and fresh gossip. But of this next week.
This is a rambling sort of a letter, made
up of odds and ends, strung together in no
ven’ connected way. But what can you ex
pect from one who signs himself
Will Wander?
People that We Hate. —There are
son.^subjects on which we feel more deeply
than we have ever “given out” in editorial
or on the platform,—some people toward
whom we harbor the most bitter intentions,
although we have never Wore publicly de
nounced them. There is the man who
makes furniture and bed casters, and “heads
down” the little axles so poorly that after
trundling about for a brief season, the little
wheels run off and the stumps snag the car
pet. We hate him. There are all the men
who ever had anything to do with devising
the fastenings to car windows. We hate
them jointly and generally, and we should
like ever so much to head a party which
would never vote for them. We hate sub
scription-book agents. We hate inventors
of yeast powders. We hate the inventor of
the shirt button, and should like to kick
him out of the west end of the depot with a
locomotive, clear round the world, and in at
the east end again. We hate the fellow who
is “perfectly candid,” the other one who
“means it all for your good” and the other
one who is going to speak “only just a min
ute,” and “make just one other point.” We
know it Is heathen, but we are satisfied that
we are hopelessly incorrigible in these deep
seated enmities. — Springfield Rep.
Like our friend we have some of old
Adam’s blood, but we show it in a different
way; for instance, we like the man tliat
makes furniture, and bed casters that roll on
axles so poorly as to break and snag the
carpet, for it makes us mail and gives us
a good opportunity to make some whole
some remarks in an emphatic manner when
the general run of things don’t go to
suit. We feel better for it. The man who
invented car window fastenings is a bene
factor ; we like him, for it very often affords
us the pleasure es being gallant and the
winner of smiles. Neither do we hate book
agents, but are favorably disposed to like
them especially if they are ladies and pre
possessing in their appearance. The yeast
powder factor is not to be despised, for poor
afflicted Jobs will find incorruptible virtue
in his “proprietary” that will forego the
bitterness of quinine; while the inventor of
shirt buttons is the prince of good fellows,
and we wish we hail to double the number
on our shirt bosoms, for we should delight to
remove them for the sake of having gentle
fingers attach them again. All these hate
ful persons and commodities we like; for
thorny stings bring blessed balm and peace
offerings at the hands of angelic Samaritans.
Life is a gravelly walk, but some of the
pebbles are gems. We hate as well as like;
but w’e keep like uppermost.
[Communicated.]
Rare Musical Entertainment.
The Choral Union announce an entertainment
for the evening of Fast. Day, Thursday, April 3d,
which will be very interesting to all lovers of
good music. The principal work to be performed
is a new cantata, by William Carter, of London,
entitled, “Placida: the Christian Martyr." The
story is generally so well known that the slightest
sketch will suffice to remind the reader of those
portions specially alluded to in this cantata. The
scenes are laid in and near Rome, and the period
is in the reign of the Emperor Nero. The persons
represented are Nero, Emperor of Rome; Metellus,
a Patrician; Rufus, his friend; Fabian, a Chris
tian Priest; Placida, Metellus’daughter; Bertha,
her slave; with quartettes and choruses of an
gels, Roman citizens, Christians and slaves.
Placida has been awakened to the light of Chris*
trinity by observing the devotion of her slave,
and especially by hearing her sing a "Magnificat."
She accompanies Bertha to the catacombs, where
she is baptised by Fabian: and while she and her
fellow-Cnristians are singing chorals of joy, the
soldiers enter and make them prisoners. Rufus
communicates to Metellus the fact that his daugh
ter is among the number of the captured, and he
hastens to her and, flrat in love, and then in anger,
calls upon her to abjure her adopted religion.
Placida refuses, and is visited by her father s
malediction. She is then brought with Fabian
and the other converts before the Imperial Tribu
nal, and again refusing to recant, is condemned
with the rest to death. On her way to the place
of execution or torture, an attempt is made by
Metellus’ slaves to rescue her, and in the midst of
the tumult she faints and dies. Metellus. moved
by the Might of her lifeless form, and dreading lest
qualnted with the .Uire wi'f reuiembif the
WrHtine picture (beautifully represented by Pau|
Ilelaroche) of Placida'. tody, floating onthe
stream, the oMartyr'a Glory" enclrrlingher brow,
The muric is highly dramatic, and will be ably
rendered by thefulUor.aof Ao Solely in the
choruses, and by Mias Nellie Piake,l|r, A.
Munroe, Sir. S, Richards, Mr, W, £ DauleM, Mr,
B. F. Hammond and Mr. Wuu»m Thompson.in
the solos. The beautiful cantata, by Mendelssohn,
"Hear My Prayer," which so favorably
ceived at th*« flrot concert, will also, bv special
request, be given at the Concert, in Which Mr,
J. Stewart Brown will sustain the sourgno solo,
No one should lose this opportunity of hearing the
finest musical entertainment of the season,
Tickets may be found at the music store of Rich
ards, Metcalf & Co.
JOHN, THE DISCIPLE OF CONFUCIUS.
Hit Characteristics and Peculiarities in His
Transplanted State.
Our people of the Eastern States have seen
but little of that remarkable branch of the
Mongolian race which boasts of the highest
and most ancient type of Oriental civiliza
tion, and know still less of their manners
and customs. Their migratory propensities
are just beginning to be developed, and they
are now rapidly finding their way to, and
spreading themselves out over the fairest
portions of tire Pacific coast of this Conti
nent. In this new home they find all the
conditions favorable for their industrial
predilections and specialties.
Yet, bringing with them, as they do, their
Asiatic traditions, and their peculiarities of
social life and religion, they do not mingle
readily with the European races with which
they are brought in contact, but remain
isolated in distinct colonies, with apparently
no political aspirations on the score of Amer
ican citizenship. But their mission, in the
subordinate departments of industry, on tlie
whole, has thus far fawn a useful one; and
as this despised and persecuted pagan element
of our immigrant population is evidently
destined to play an important part in the
future development of our national resources,
w’e presume the following racy description
(from Lippincott’s Magazine) of life and
character, as seen in the “Heathen Chinee”
quarters of San Francisco, will be of interest
to the roaders of the Press :
NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS.
John is a sort of museum in his character and
lipbits. His new year comes In February. For
the Chinaman of limited means it lasts
for the wealthy it may endure _thfee. His con
sumption of flre-crftCkers during that period is
immense. He burns strings a yard in length sus
pended from poles over his balconies. The uproar
and sputtering consequent on this festivity in the
Chinese quarter at San Francisco is tremendous.
The city authorities limit this Celestial pandemo
nium to one week. He does not fursake the
amusement of kite-flying even when arrived at
maturity. His artistic imitations of birds and
dragons float over our housetops. To these are
often affixed contrivances for producing hollow,
buzzing sounds, mystifying whole neighborhoods.
His game of shuttle-cock is to keep a cork, one
end being stuck with feathers, flying in the air as
long as jsissible, the inqielling member being the
foot, the players standing in a circle, and number
ing from four to twenty. Some show great <le»-
terity in kicking with the heel. His vocal music
to oiir ears seems a monotonous caterwaul. His
violin has but one string; his execution is merely
a modified species of saw filing.
AMUSEMENTS AND RELIGION.
He loves to gamble, and especially in lotteries.
He is a diligent student of his own comfort.
Travelling on foot (luring a hot day, he protects
himself with an umbrella and refreshes himself
with a fan. lu place of prosaic signs on his store
fronts, he often inscribes quotations from his
favorite authors. He is a lover of flowers. His
balconies and window sills are often packed with
shrubs and creepers in pots. He is not a speedy
and taciturn eater. His tea-table talks are full of
noisy jollity, and are oiten prolonged far into the
night. He is a lover of the drama. A single play
sometimes requires months for representation,
being like a serial story, “continued” night after
night. He never dances. There is no melody in
the Mongolian foot. Dancing he regards as a
species of Caucasian insanity.
To make an oath binding fie must swear by the
head of a cock cut off before him in Open court,
Chinese testimony is not admissible in American
courts. It is a ‘legal California axiom that a
Chinaman cannot speak the truth. But eases
have occurred wherein, he being an eye-witness,
the desire to hear what he might tell as to what
he had seen has proved stronger than the preju
dice against him; Mid the more effectually to
clinch the chances of his telling the truth, the
above, his national form of oath, has been resorted
to. He has among us some secret government of
his own. Before his secret tribunals more than
one Mongolian has been hurried in star-chamber
fashion, and never seen afterwards. The nature
of the offences thus visited by secret and bloody
Kunishments is scarcely known to Americans. He
as two chief dieties —a god and a devil. His god,
he says, being good and well disposed, it is not
necessary to propitiate him. But his devil is
Ugly, and must be won over by offering and peti
tion. Once a year, wherever collected in any
number, he builds a flimsy sort of temple, deco
rates it with ornaments ^f tinsel, lays piles of
fruit, meats, and sugared delicacies on an altar,
keeps up night and day a steady crash of gongs,
and installs therein some great, uncouth wooden
idols. When this period of worship is over, the
“josh-house” disappears, and the idols are uncer
emoniously stowed away among other useless
lumber.
TONBORIAL AND AGRICULTURAL.
He shaves with an instrument resembling a
bhtclier’s cleaver in miniature. Natnre gen
erally denies him beard, so he shaves what a
sailor would term the fore and after part of his
head. He reaps his hirsute crop drj, using no
lather. His cue is pieced out by silken braid, so
interwoyen as gradually to taper into a slim
tassel something like a Missouri mule-driver's
“black snake” whip-lash, To lose this cue is to
lose caste and standing among his fellows. No
misfortune can l>e greater. Coarse cow-hide
boots are the only articles of American wear that
he favors. He inclines to buy the largest sizes,
thinking he thereby gets the most for his money,
anil when his No. 7 feet wobble and chafe in No.
12 boots he coinplains that they “fit to much."
He cultivates the vegetables of his native land in
California. They are curiosities like himself.
One resembles our stringbean, but is circular iu
shape and from two to three feet in length. It is
not Id the leant stringy, breaks off start and
crisp, boils tender very quickly and affords ex
cellent eating. He is a very careful cultivator,
and will spend hours picking off dead leaves and
insects from the young plants. When he finds a
dead cat, rat, dog or chicken, throws it into a
small vat of water, allows it to decompose, and
sprnikles the liquid fertilizer thus obtained over
his plantation. Watermelon and pumpkin seeds
are Tor him dessert delicacies. He consumes his
garden products about half cooked in an Ameri
can culinary point of view, merely wilting them
by an immersion in boiling w’ater.
PIGEON ENGLISH AND POSTHUMOUS GRATITUDE.
There are about fifteen English words to be
learned by a Chinaman on arriving iu California,
and no more. With these he expresses all his
wants, and with this limited stock you may learn
to convey all that is needful to^iim. The practice
thus forced upon one in employing a Chinese
servant is useful in preventing a circumlocutory
habit of speech, Many of our letters the Mongo
lian moutii has no capacity for sounding. Rhe
invariably sounds like 1, so that the word "rice"
he pronounces “lice”—a bit of information that
may prevent an unpleasant apprehension when
yo.u come to employ a Chinese cook. He rejects
the English personal pronoun I, and uses the
possessive "my” in its place; thus, "My go
home," in place of "I go home," When he buries
a countryman he throws from the hearse into the
air handfuls of brown tissue paper slips, punc
tured with Chinese characters. Sometimes, at
his burial processions, he gives a small piece of
money to even’ person met on the road. Over
the grave he beats gongs and sets off fire-crackers.
On it he leaves cooked meats, drink, delicacies, and
lighted wax tapers. Eventually the tones are
disinterred and shipped to his native land. In
the remotest mining districts of California are
found Chinese graves thus opened and emptied
of their inmates. I bavu in one instance seen
him, so far as he was permitted, render some of
these funeral honors to an American, The de
ceased had gained this honor by treating the
Chinese as though they were partners in our
common humanity. "Missa Toin,” as he was
termed by them, they kfiew they could trust. He
acquired’ among them a reputation as the one
righteous American in their California Gomorrah.
Chinamen would come to him from distant local
ities, that he might overlook their bills of sale
and other documents used iu business intercourse
with the white man. The need of such an honest
adviser was great. The descendants of the Fil
grim fathers often took advantage of their igno
rance of the Englsh language, whether written or
spoken. "Missa Tom’ r suddenly died. I had
occasion to visit his farm a few days after his
death, and on the. first night of my stay there
saw the array of meats, fruit, wine and burning
tapers on a table in front of the house, which his
Chinese friends told me was intended as an offer
ing to "Missa Toin’s" spirit.
CHINESE LAUNDRIES.
We will dive for a moment into a Chinese wash
cellar. " John ’’ does three-fourths of the wash
ing of California. His lavatories are on every
street. “ Hip Tee, M ashing and Ironing," says
the sign, evidently the first production of an ama
teur in lettering. Two doors above is the estab
lishment of Tong M’ash—two below, that of Hi
Sing. Hip Tee and five assistants are busy iron
ing. The odor is a trinity of steam, damp clothes,
and opium. More Mongolian tongues are heard
from smoky recesses in the rear. As we enter,
Hip Tee is blowing a shower of moisture from
his mouth " very like a whale." This is bls meth
od of dampening the linen preparatory to ironing.
It is a skilful performance. The fluid leaves his
lips as fine m mist. If we are on business we
leave our bundles, and in return receive a ticket
covered with hieroglyphics. These indicate the
kind and nnmber of the garments left to be cleans
ed, and some distinguishing mark (supposing this
to be our first patronage of Hip Tee) by which we
may again be identified. It may be by a pug
nose, a hare lip, red. hair, no hair, or squint eyes.
They never ask one’s name, for they can neither
pronounce nor write when given. The ticket is
an unintelligible tracery of lines, curves, dots and
dashes, made by a brush dipped in India ink on a
shred of flimsy Chinese paper. It may teem with
abuse and ridienle, but you pocket al) that, and
produce it on calling again, or your shirts go
through the Chinese circumlocution wash-house
office, it is very difficult getting one's clothes
back if the ticket be lost—very. Hip Tee now
dabs a dnpUcßte of your ft
»^|d «pi is aVe» t
4WKWARD MISTAKES.
You will call on Saturday night for your linen.
You do so. There is apparently the same cellar]
thp same smell of sti sin, damp clothes and opi
um ; the same sputter of sprinkling water, and
apparently the same Hip Tee and assistants with
brown shaven foreheads and long cues hanging
straight down behind, or coiled in snakediks
fashion about their craniums. You present your
ticket. Hip Tee examines it, and shakes his
bead, «No good—uder man," he says, and points
up the street, You are perplexed and somewhat
alarmed, You say " John I want my clothes, I
left them here last Monday. You gave me that
ticket.’’ "No," replies Hip Tee,very decidedly,
"oder man;” and again he waves hit armup
wawto. Then you are wroth. You abuse, and wu
PRICE 3 CENTS.
postulate, entreat, and talk a great deal of Eng
lish, and some of it very strong English, which
Hip Tee does not understand; and Hip Tee talks
a great deal of Chinese, and perhaps strong Chi
nese, which you do not understand. Yon com
mence sentences In broken Chinese, and termi
nates them in unbroken English. Hip Tee com
mences sentences in broken English and termi
nate them In pure Chinese, from a like inability
to express the indignation in a foreign tongue.
"What for you no go Oder man ? No my ticket
tung sing lung, ya hip kce-ping.'” he cries, and
all this time the amis;ants are industriously iron
ing, and spouting mist, and leisurely making re
marks tn their sing-song, untelliglblllty which
you feel have uncomplimcntaiy reference to your
self.
Suddenly a light breaks own you. That Is not
Hip Tee’s cellar, th ii Is not Hld Tee. It is the es
tablishment of Hi Sing. This is Hi Sing him
self, who for the last ha;f hour has been endeav
oring with his stock of fifieeu English words to
make you understand that you arc in the wrong
house. But these Chinese, as to faces and their
wash-houses, and all the paraphernalia of their
wash-houses, are so much alike that is an easy
mistake to make. You find the lavatory of Hip
Tee, who pronounces the hieroglyphics all cor
rect, and delivers you your lost ana found shirts,
clean, with half the buttons broken, and the bos
oms pounded, scrubbed and frayed into an Ir
regular sort of embrodiery.
JOHN AS A SKILLED LABORER AND DOMESTIC.
"He can only dig, cook and wash," said the
American miner contemptuously, years ago; "he
can’t work rock." To work rock, in mining par
lance, is to lie skilful in boring earth’s stony husk
after mineral. It Is to be proficient iu sledging,
drilling and blasting. The Chinaman seemed to
have no aptitude for this labor. He was content
to use his pick and shovel in the gravel-banks;
metallic veins of gold, silver or copper he left en
tirely to the white man.
Yet it was a great mistake to suppose he could
not "work rock" or do anything else required of
him. John is a most apt and intelligent labor
machine. Show him once your tactics in any
operation, and ever after he imitates them as ac
curately as does the parrot its memorized sen
tences. So when the Pacific railroad was being
bored through the hard granite of the Sierras, it
was John wno handled the drill and sledge ns
well as the white laborer. He was hurled by
thousands on that immense work, and it was the
tawny hand of China that hewed out hundreds of
miles for the transcontinental path-way. Nor is
this all. He is crowding into one avenue of em
ployment after another in California. He fills
our woollen and silk mills; he makes slippers and
binds shoes; he is skilled in the use of the sewing
machine: cellar after cellar in San Francisco is
filled with these Celestial brownies rolling cigars;
his fish-nets are in every bay and inlet; ne is em
p%yed in scores of thejesser establishments for
preserving fruit, grinding salt; making matches,
etc. He would quickly lump into the places the
carpenter, mason and blacksmith were he aK Ja
for there are numbers of them whose knowledge
of these and other trades is sufficient at least to
render them useful as assistants. He is handy on
shiplioard: the Panama steamers cany Chinese
foremast hands. He Is preferred as house-ser
vant; the Chinese boy of fourteen or sixteen
learns quickly to cook and wash in American
fashion. He is neat in person, can be easily
ruled, does not set up an independent sovereignty
in the kiteken, has no followers, will not outshine
his mistress in attire, and although not perfect,
yet affords a refreshing change from our Milesian
tyrants of the roast and wash-tub. But when
you catch this celestial domestic treasure, be sure
that the first culinary operations perfarmed for
his instruction are correctly manipulated, for his
imitativeness is of a cast-iron rigidity. Once in
the mould, it can only with great difficulty be
altered. Burn your toast or your pudding and he
is apt to regard the accident as the rule.
EDCCATION AND FEMININE DEPRAVITY.
The young Chinese, especially in San Francisco,
are anxious to acquire an English education.
They may not attend the public schoole. A few
yearn sinve certain Chinese mission schools were
established by joint efforts of several religious
denominations. Young ladies and gentlemen
volunteered their services on Sunday to teach
these Chinese children to read, They make eager,
apt and docile pupils. Great is their pride on
mastering a few lines of English text. They be
come much attached to their teachers, ana it is
possible, if the vote of the latter were taken, it
would evidence more liking for their yellow, long
cued pupils tlian for any class of white children.
But while so assiduous to learn, it is rather
doubtful whether much real religious impression
is made upon them. It Is possible that their home
training negatives that. We have spoken en
tirely of the Chinaman. What of the China
woman in America? In California the word
"Chinawoman” is synonymous with what is
most vile and disgusting. Few, very few of a
respectable class are in the State, The slums of
London and New Y«rk ore respectable thor-
QUghfaius compared with the rows of "China
alleys" in the heart of San Francisco. These can
hardly be termed "abandoned women." They
have no sense of virtue, propriety or decency to
abandon. They are ignorant of the disgrace of
their calling; if the term may be allowed, they
pursue it innocently. Many are scarcely more
than children. They are mere commodities, being
by their own couutrymen bought iu China, shipped
and t-unsigned to factors in California, and there
sold for a term of years.
AMERICAN PREJUDICES.
The Chinaman has bitter enemies in San Fran
cisco i they thirst to annihilate him. He is ac
customed to blows and brickbats; he is legiti
mate game for rowdies, both grown and juven
ile ; and childr» n supposed to be better trained
can scarce resist the temptation at snatching at
his pig tail as he passes through their groups in
front of the public schools. Even on Sunday,
nice little boys coining from Sabbath-school,
with their catechisms tucked under their jackets,
texts enjoining mercy and gentleness, fresh upon
their lips, will sometimes salute the benighted
heathen as he passes ly with a volley of stones.
If he turns upou his small assailants he is apt to
meet larger ones. Mtn arc Lot wanting, ready
and panting, to take up the quarrel thus wan
tonly commenced by Uie Offspring of the "su
perior race." There are hundreds of families
who came over the sea to seek in America the
comfort and prosperity denied them in the land
of their birth, whose children from earliest in
fancy are inculcated with the sentiment that the
Chinaman is a dog, a pest and a curse. On. the
occasion of Wm. H. Seward’s visit to a San Fran
cisco theatre, two Chinese merchants were hissed
and hooted by the gallery mob from a box which
they had ventured to occupy. This assumption
of style and exclusiveness proved very offensive
to the shirt-sleeved, upper tier representatives of
the “superior race," who had assembled in large
numbers to catch a glimpse of one of the black
man's great champions. Ethiopia could have sat
in tbatnox in perfect safety, but China in such a
place was the red rag rousing the ire of the Dem
ocratic bull, John has a story of his own to carry
back home from a Christian land.
LAROR COMPETITION VS. CHRISTIANITY.
For this prejudice and hostility there are pro
vocative causes, although they may not be urged
in extenuation. The Chinaman is a dangerous
competitor for the white laborer; and when the
latter, with other and smaller mouths to feed,
once gets the idea implanted in his mind that the
bread is being taken from them by what he deems
a semi-human heathen, whose beliefs, habits, ap
pearance and customs are distateful to him, then
there are all the conditions ready for a state of
mind toward the almond-eyed Oriental which
leans far away frpm brotherly love. Brotherly
love sometimes depends on circumstances. “Am
I not a man and brother?" cries John from his
native shore. “Certainly," we respond. Pass
round the hat—let us take up a contribution for
the conversion of the poor neathen. The coins
clink thickly in the bottom of the charitable
chapeau. We return home feeling ourselves
raised an Inch higher heavenward. “Am I not a
man and a brother?" cries John in our midst,
digging our gold, setting up opposition laundries
and wheeling sand at half a dollar per day less
wages. "No. Get out, ye long-tailed baste! An'
wad ye put me on a level wid that—that baboon ?"
Pass round the hat. The coins mass themselves
more thickly than ever. For what? To buy
muskets, powder and ball. W’herefore? Wait!
More than once has the demagogue cried, “Drive
them into the sea!”
What an Old Enubaver Told George
Alfred Townsend. —“Mr. Gath, you
newspaper men know nothing whatever
about the duplication of United States bonds,
and about the quantity of counterfeit script
afloat. If you, as a newspaper man, were to
go to Gen. Spinner and to the heads of the
Treasury and ask how much counterfeit
currency was in circulation, they would
probably tell you ten per cent.; but I tell
you, as an engraver, that they have admitted
to me that there is twenty-five per cent, or
one-quarter of tlie whole amount of the
stamps currtmt in tins country which are
fraudulent. Do you know, sir, that the
postal currency is renewed six times every
year? That is the case, and see the possi
bilities for its increased duplication and
counterfeiting. We could better afford to
pay fifty per cent premium and use gold than
nave to'deal as we do with a lot of paper
which is beyond the control, to a great ex
tent, of tlie government officials. Tire ex
travagantly high prices and the corruption
in our politics hinge upon the currency. The
duplication of the United States bonds will
some day be found such an alarming matter
that it will bring the whole country to Its
feet. That crime began In the Treasury as
far back as Chase’s time. John Covode and
others in Congress made strenuous efforts to
expose it, but they were gagged by the gavel
and a party majority.
“An official, who at that time was con
nected with the printing, had in some way
got a grip upon the Secretary, and could not
be budged from his place by any power in
the country. His accounts were short one
year *83,000, and he could not tell where the
money had gone. They kept after him, how
ever, and on one occasion he appeared before
the examiners with his arms full of bonds,
and, throwing them down, said, ‘There are
your *03,000.’ Now there Mas a press used
for printing at that time, and it ran repeat
edly in the night. The official himsalf was
seen to emerge after dark on two occasions
with a great tin bug 111 his hand, which he
put Into his buggy and parried away. Now,
(tow muqh duplication of bonds do you sup
pose it required to make $03,000 worth of
coupons so as to equallie that account F’
“Several hundred thousand, I suppoae.”
"No, sir; H took beta-een *18,Oli),000 and
*19,000,000 of bonds; and about that time
happened the first duplication.’’
I looked suddenly into the old gentleman’s
eyes, and was lu great doubt whether I was
। speaking to an iuteUV.-ent lunatic or a great
reformer,—CMc<f/o J’rtiuuic.
Messrs. Smith Ji Marsh have been awarded
the contract tor carrying the U. S. mail
iww Woiwtw wi AUwl. j

A»VK*n«INO BATM,
** - ..<•••
Ur* hedule of Ml tfitea furnished on applL
cation.
rubire.no>
CROMPTONI BLOCK, MECHANIC STREET,
WOBCBBTKB, MARA.
THK RAILROAD WAR.
The proper relatione of onr railroad corpor
ations to the government and the people seem
to constitute the all-absorbing question ol
the day, outside of mere politics. The rep
resentatives of the great agricultural inter
est of the West have become generally ex
cite*! over thia matter of transportation,
which touches them In a very tender point.
The war between tlie farmers and railroads
is getting to be red hot, and has been ren
dered still more acrimonious by the arbitrary
course of the latter in over riding the enact
ments of tilt State legislatures regulating
and limitiaii their passenger fares. Just at
present bdHharties seem disposed to take
tlie law IntSbelr own hands, and the physi
cally strongest, at any given point or occa
sion, settles the particular question at issue
in its own favor.
Here in the Eastern and Middle States,
the attempt of the combined managers of the
great trunk lines to coerce the government
into the concession of a large advance in the
rates of compensation for carrying the mail
has caused great embarrassment to the postal
service, which it threatens to bring to a dead
lock unless some settlement of the difficulty
shall be speedily effected. But as it always
takes two to make a bargain, and the rail
road companies, deriving their charters and
franchises from State instead of national au
thority, being quite independent in their
views, it may be some time before a mutu
ally satisfactory arrangement can be reached,
although great efforts are being made to
bring it about.
We will not undertake to say whether the
demands of the latter are based upon reason
and justice; but it is very certain that this
attempt, to obtain a more favorable mail con
tract by coercion^jnstead of seeking for it at.
Tn^ lTantte of Congress^ the^Kv
(as in the controversy betwwn the Western
Union Telegraph Company and the War
Department) to precipitate the question as to
the constitutionality and expediency of the
assumption by the federal government of the
control of our principal inland transporation
lines, or of entering into competition with
them by opening new ones.
The following extracts from the Chicago
correspondence of the N. Y. World will give
our readers a tolerably good idea of the feel
ing which exists in relation to this subject
in all parts of the West:
Now that Mr. Grant has set himself to the
“construction of ctyeap routes of transit through
out the land, to the end that the productions of
all section* may find a market, and leave living
remuneration to the produce, it is safe to con
clude that the whele Republican press will come
out flat-footed for the “three National trunk
lines" from the "West to the sea, and the direct
control of the railroads by the National Govern
ment. Either of these plans offers advantages to
the Rrdical mind. Three yailroads to the sea-
Iward constructed by Government would afford
chances for Credit Mobilier speculations number
less and gigantic, while, at the same time, the
Western rural Republicans would be conciliated
and kept in the harness. A suggestion that
Congress should lay a paternal hand, after th©
European manner, on the mane of the iron horse
and enact Procrustean traffics, applying impar
tially to the New York and New llaven line and
Northern Pacific road, is not wholly without ad
vantages, inasmuch as it would be an invitation
to Tom Scott and Vanderbilt to imitate the con
duct of Zaccheus In the palm tree (Luke xix., 5),
and “make haste and come down,” so that the
Republicans are taking an interest in the honest
farmer. ^g-
So are the Democrats, and having good legal
cause for doing so, are strengthening the fanners
and predisposing them in favor of the Demo
cratic party.
Oov. Palmer's address to the Sangamon County
Convention of Agriculturists was both able and
adroit. The .vested rights which the railroads
claimed to possess he likened to divine rights of
kings—a superstition of the past, now exploded
:>ua worn out. As people bad done away with the
divine right, so they must now learn to class with
it the vested rights of corporations, and become
accustomed to the idea that the people should
have a voice as well as the carrier in saying what
percentage of the producer's crop, should be taken
by the carrier. With nothing less than this should
they be satisfied. He wanted the ownership of
the roads separated from the transportation over
them, so that any individual or association could
run cars or trains over the lines ou paying a cer
tain tariff. * When the through freight lines and
p dace-car companies could do this, what was to
ninder individuals from doing it? The fanners
are organizing as zealously as ever. lowa takes
the lead, as it has hitherto.* There the farmers
not only form clubs to buy implements at whole
sale, thus saving the middle-man's profits, but
are getting up co-operative stores and banks.
Persevered in it will be seen that the movement
would be of a most formidable character.
Per contra, the railroads are carrying the war
into Africa. The Chicago, Alton and St. Louis
Company have brought three suits for heavy
damages against the farmers of Champaign
county who inaugurated the three-cent war.
This war has made travel in the State of Illinois
exciting. The rule has been tacitly set and ac
cepted that might is right. When the railroad
hands are in the majority the passengers pay full
fare; when the passengers are the stronger the
conductor takes the tendered money. The pas
sengers all carry revolvers, and the trains are
heavily manned and the brakemen furnished with
axe-handles and other persuaders. Iu the case
complained of, the passengers were so many that
the train had to be backed into a siding for two
hours till the railroad company could get up re
enforcements. For this the company brings suit,
as already mentioned, under the provisions of the
Ku Klux'act.
A prominent physician and surgeon re
cently addressed a communication to the
Hartford Courant on the subject of the
mode of inflicting capital punishment, his
object being to show the least painful
method. As the opinion of a surgeon, from
a professional point of view, his communi
cation is interesting; but as a matter of so
cial science and policy it conveys erroneous
impressions. Too many of our humani
tarians appear to be morbidly sensitive to
the sufferings of those who defy all laws,
human and divine, which observed, dimin
ished pain and increase comfort. Why par
ticular efforts should be made to reduce the
legitimate painful results of wrong doing it
is not easy to understand. To be sure, un
necessary cruelty is revolting to every mind
not entirely debased, and the execution of a
criminal should not be made tlie occasion for
the display of the “law’s retributive ven
geance ;” but there does not seem to be any
particular demand for seeking a peculiarly
soothing or entirely painless method of dis
posing of condemned criminals. Dr. Ells
worth recommends the instantaneous de
struction of the organs of sensibility by blow
ing the criminal’s head to pieces by the ex-\
plosion of a cannon. So far as the criminal
is concerned, the proposed change might be
an improvement; but as punishment for
crime is what the term denotes, and not
alone a defence for the community, the
opinio* or feelings of the criminal are not z
of value in tlie consideration, of the question.
If all the gentlenfien appointed as associate
commissioners to the Vienna Exposition by
Governor Washbum are like Hamilton A.
Hill, the able Secretary of the Boston Board
of Trade, he has made a good selection.
Hartford used less xrater last year than for
any of tlie previous ten years. We dare say
it is true, for a good many Maine and Mas
sachusetts men pass through there on their
way to New York.
More than 11,500 conversions were report
ed in the New York Independent of last
week as the fruits of revivals in the various
denominations. We congratulate our con
temporary on this striking proof of th* suc
cess ofj its religions mission, though we fear
it is not doing equally well in the field of
political regeneration.
Next June will witness troubled waters ia;
Springfield by a rowing match between Blg
lin and Ellis Ward.
The kind of “poison" that Foster swak
lowed still maintains its popularity at IS
cents a poison.— New York Commercial Ad
eertiser.
A Western editor who doesn’t like to hang
murderers suggests death by the electric
shock, after the manner in which hogs am
now killed in Cincinnati,
President Grant h* given

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