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Worcester daily press. [volume] (Worcester, Mass.) 1873-1878, April 02, 1873, Image 1

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RVKRY MORNING, SUNDAY RXCEPTKD,
—AT—
It per Annum; 75 «t«. per month.
&(jt Mtthlg
MVKKY SATURDAY MORNING,
At It per nnnum.
EDWARD R. FIRE 4 CO., Proprietors.
E. B. nullß. J. A. HPAI.MNO.
New Adrertinements.
P R I N (I TRADE.
Carpets!
D. B. HENCHMAN,
i O (1 J ifi J I v, w
Hah iihwt In «u»r« a full *»*ortm«>ut of nfory grade
of
BRUSSEL*,
TAPESTRY,
INGRAIN*, AC.,
WINDOW SIIADIHI,
KIM,
MAT*.
KK)K AT MY
EXTRA BARGAINS!
Best Body Brussels
from 51.75 to Si.9o per yard.
English Tapestry
at 11.2 S per yard.
50 ROLLS
Straw Matting,
at 85«. per yard.
THE LARGEST ABBORTMENT OF
Oil Cloths
h ila market, at the LOWEST PRICES, can be
found at
R. B. HENCHMAN’S,
Xo. 1 Foster St., cor. Main.
al-tf
Y I N E ARTS
LOVERS OF THE FINE ARTS
will find at my store ono of tho best collections of
Fine Steel Engravings; English, French,
German and American Chromos,
in Oil and Wator Colors, to bo found in New
England outside of Boston.
Stereoscopic Views,
Prangs’ Beautiful Productions
BRACKETS AND WOOD CARVINGS,
PICTURE FRAMES
MADE TO ORDER
from latest patterns of mouldings.
GOLD FRAMES, BLACK WALNUT, &C„
of all desirable kinds. Picture Knobs, Cords and
like fixtures.
Particular attention given to re-gilding old
frames.
A. E. PECK, Art Dealer,
alts Lincoln House Block.
JJICE, WHITING & BULLOCK,
BANKERS,
Corner Main and Pearl Streets, Worcester,
Boy and sell Railroad, City and County Honda.
HpecJal attention given to orders for tho pur
chase ami sale of Stocks at NEW
YORK and BOSTON
BOARDS.
Agents for the Various Lines of
European Steamships.
Persons contemplating going abroad will find
at our office Cabin Plans of the Steamors of tho
several Lines, thus enabling them to soloct and
secure rooms without the delay and expense of
applying at the principal offleos in New York or
Boston. Letters of Credit furnished available in
oil the principal cities of Europe.
Drafts Drawn Payable in any City In Europe.
States Passports procured without
charge. ts al
gTR ON G & ROGERS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN COAL,
. Fire Brick, Clay and Kaolin.
Office, No. 416 Main St.,
.1 dtf WORCESTER. Ma»«.
JOSEPH CHASE & CO.,
375 MAIN STREET.
F. E. Smith’s & Co.’s Crushed Wheat, delicious
and nourishing.
The best Canada, Scotch and Irish Oat Meal.
Baltimore puro Hominy and Meal.
8. G. Bowdiear’s Malzo Meal. Try it.
PURE SPICES.
The best Teas and Coffee to be found in the city.
Pnllna and Seltzor Waters, warranted genuine,
al 3m
QLD GOV’T. JAVA COFFEE,
3 Founds SI.OO.
Best Black Oolong Tea per lb., - • 00c.
Best Unoolored Japan Tea per lb., - B 1 00
Other goods in proportion.
Enterprise Tea Co.,
al I2t No. 546 Main Street.
yy H . JOUIi DA N,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS
COAL.
OFFICE: | YARD:
B Lincoln Block, | Green Street.
WORCESTER, MASS.
al if
»At FULLER’S Coal Yard,
Buy Coal black and hard,
To keep the fire bright
By day and by night.
’Tis better than gold
To keep out the cold.
Softer coal for the cook
Will do like a book.
rfIHE CENTRAL STREET COAL
X YARD, is in a central location, easy of ac
cess, near Main street, and thero is kept constant
ly on hand and for sale
Franklin and Chestnut Coal I
LeMgli Coal, Four Different Sizes, for
Stoves and Furnaces!
RUFUS FULLER.
al Jf
KELLEY,
FASHIOSAHLK
Boot and Shoe Maker.
Repairing Neatly Done.
No, 898 Main Btreot, - * Worcester Maw.
n*ttf
VOL. I, NO. 2.
( New Advertisements.
J I, S T OPENED)
Ol'R Hl'KlNfi ANHORTM ENT OF
CLOTHS
for oui
CUSTOM DEPARTMENT,
In the choicest v;irletle« of Foreign and Domestic
manufacture.
The reputation of our house for fine garments
is well known, and all desiring to leave their or*
dors will do woll to call early before the rush com
mences.
D. H. EAMES & CO.,
One Price Clothier*,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MARB. dly
Cl p R I H a
OVER COATS,
NOW READY,
A good assortment of the most approved styles.
Prices from S 7 to S2O.
Spring Suits
FOR
GENTS AND HOYS
In all varieties and prices, now in stock, at
D. H. EAMES & CO.’S
One Price Clothing House,
CORNER MAIN AND FRONT STREETS,
al WORCESTER, MASH. dly
E OFFER TO-DAY,
465
PAIRH ALL WOOL CASSIMERE PANTS
AT ONLY
$5.00
A PAIR, FORMER PRICES FROM SIX TO
EIGHT DOLLARS. THIS IS LESS THAN
THE CLOTH IS WORTH. WE BOUGHT
THESE IN A JOB LOT, AND GIVE Ol'R
CUSTOMERS THE ADVANTAGE OF IT.
WE ALSO OFFER TWO HUNDRED COATS
AND ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY VESTS,
AT EQUALLY LOW PRICES.
D. H. EAMES & CO.
al dly
NOWLTON BROTHERS,
NO. 282 MAIN STREET,
WE ARE RECEIVING
Spring Impositions of
CROCKERY,
FRENCH CHINA,
FINE CRYSTAL GOODS,
BRONZES, CLOCKS, &c.,
direct from Manufacturers, thereby enabling ns
to sell onr Goods os low as any house in the
country. Our stock of
SOLID SILVER AND PLATED
WARES, CUTLERY,
Lamp Good* and Gas Fixtures
IS COMPLETE IN EACH DEPARTMENT,
And will Bear Close Inspection.
Orders from country trade promptly attended
to.
Knowlton Brothers,
282 MAIN STREET,
al ts Opposite Bay State House.
ENGLAND
Concrete and Roofing Co.
CONCRETE
Walks, driveways, ground floors, Ac., by a com
bination of the important features of tho most
approved methods. Scrimshaw’s,Ford* Moor’s,
Snow A Davis’ and the Latham patents have been
purchased by this company, and no expense or
pains have been spared to qualify them to pro
duce the most;perfect bituminous concrete . that
can be made.
GRAVEL ROOFING,
Of best material, and applied with superior skill.
Ready Roofing, Widely and Favo-ably Known,
SHINGLE PAINT.
Shingle paint ia great economy. If taken in time
no money for repairs is so judiciously expended.
ROOF PAINTING IN OIL 0| ANY COLOR,
Ornamental or plain. Paintin|«onflned exclu
sively to roofs. By making a speci
alty we can do it 20 per cent, cheaper tnau any
other parties.
Bliingle Paint for Tin has no rival. Concrete
and Roofing Materials for sale.
In quantities not less than 40 gallons at manu
facturers’ prices. Raw and Distilled Tar, Black
Varnish, Asphalt, Pitch, Dead Oils, Napthas, and
every form of Bitumen.
OFFICES—36O Houthbridge St., 36 Pleasant
St., at Knowlton & Bacon’s Paper Store.
P. O. BOX 385, WORCESTER, MASS.
T. C. Rice. - Lorin Foskit.
Concrete.
Ilaving disposod of my interest in the Concrete
Bussiness to Messrs RICE A FOSKIT, of this
city, I take pleasure in recommending them to
tho patronage of my old customers and tho publie
generally.
al dlm # J. J. RANDALL.
CJ. G. HILDRETH
* • Would respectfully inform the citizens of
Worcester and vicinity that ho is still engaged
in the business of undertaking, as heretofore,
although entirely disconnected from Mr. H. C.
Willson, his former partner. His present place of
business is at No. 15 Waldo street, first door
north of Waldo House. Orders left at No. 7
W'aldo street. Residence No. 32 Oread street,
al d3m
(WHICKERING & SONS’
CELEBRATED PIANOS,
FROM #4*s UPWARDS.
The Best in the Market.
— AT —
8. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
JJALLETT, DAVIS & CO.,
HAYNES BROS., HALLETT A CUMBTON,
And Other Noted Pianos,
at prices that defy competition, at
S. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
VEW ROSEWOOD 7-OCTAVE
Lv PIANOS,
From 11.300 Upwards,
— AT —
8. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
MASON & HAMLIN, BURDETT
ORGAN CO.,
Smith American Organ,
And Other Organa, from 175.00 Upwards.
— AT —
8. R. LELAND A CO.’S.
PIANOS AND ORGANS SOLD ON
EASY MONTHLY PAYMENTS,
— AT —
8. R. LELAND A CO.'S.
T>IANOS~ TUNED, REPAIRED,
J- POLISHED AND MOVED.
Work Guaranteed.
— AT —
»1 1 j I. B. LELAND A CO.’S.
WORCESTER, MASS., WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 2, 1873.
New Advertisements.
j 11. CLARK & CO.
would Invite the attention of their euetomore and
the public to their large stook of
NEW DRY GOODS
— FOR TBS —
SPRING TRADE.
ATTENTION U SPECIALLY INVITED to our
Superior Stock of Black Silks.
We have all grades from sl.2o(for the cheapest
silk in this city; and upwards, that for real value
cannot be eurpaseed in this city, Boston or New
York.
STRIPE SILKS
are mnrh cheaper this spring. Wo have a large
stock in
WHITE GROUNDS,
with hair lines and fancy stripes.
Black Ground*,
with white stripes,
GREY GROUNDS,
with black stripes, and many other styles and
colors, at from to 20 cents a yard less than
last season's prices.
Black Brillnntines,
Black Mohairs,
Black Alpacas.
We have the same snperior makes in these
goods that have given perfect satisfaction to
our customers for two years. Selling at satis
factory prices.
10 Ps. Black Cashmere and Hen
rietta Cloths,
JUST RECEIVED.
New Goods Opening
Daily.
OUR STOCK OF WOOLLENS, LINEN GOODS
AND DOMESTICS LARGE AND FULL,
AND PRICES WILL BE
FOUND LOW.
J. H. CLARKE & CO.,
&2 6t 353 Main St.
AT CHAMPION’S KITCHEN
STORE,
No. IS Pleasant Street, (North Side,)
Yon can find a great variety of the most useful
goods, consisting in part of
Clothes and Reels, Wringers, Baskets,
Lines, Wash Tubs, Clothes Frames, Wash
Benches, Rolling Pint and Molding Boards,
Chopping Trays, Pails, Tin Ware, Ac., Ao.
Call and see for yourselves. Goods at low
pricks.
R. CHAMPION.
al eodlw
ESTABLISHED A. D. 1850.
R. McALEER
Successor to D. Brown,
Manufacturer of
Fine Harness
AND DEALER IN FIRST CLASS
Stable and Carriage Goods,
228 Main St.
aldtf
-yy A T C H E S I !
J[, life work has been the manufacture, sale
and repair of Watches. If this experience, to
gether with a largo and carefully selocted
STOCK OF WATCHES
Bought, not on Credit, but for Cash, my intimate
connection with the largest Manufacturing and
Importing Houses in the country, and my very
small store expenses, are of any advantage to
me, I am abundantly ablo to make it so to my
patrons. .
My unexpected success in my new enterprise
has onconraged me to fill my store with a com
plete stock of
Genuine Waltham Watches,
And to resume the sale of
Celebrated Chas. E. Jacot (Swiss) Watches,
(Having introduced them into Worcester when at
the old stand), and a fine stock of LADIES AND
GENTS’ GOLD CHAINS. RINGS, STUDS, BUT
TONS, SETS, LOCKETS, Ac., Ac. This stock
will bear inspection as to prioe and quality.
I solicit fine and difficult Watch Work, and shall
take uo more than I find time to do with my own
hands.
IRA G. BLAKE, .
Formerly Superintendent of Watchmakers’ De
partment at Waltham Factory, and Manager of
the Watch Department in the late firm of Blako
A Robinson.
480 MAIN STREET, opposite the Common,
al
Q~E ORGE R. SPURR,
DEALER IN
DRUGS, MEDICINEB, CHEMICALB,
PERFUMERY,
Soaps, Brushes, Patent Medicines, Pure
Wines and Liquors for Medicinal Pur
poses. Agents for the Great United
States Tea Company.
337 Main St., Worcester, Mass.
Physicians Prescriptions Carefully Compounded
alti at all hours.
(QOMSTOCK & EVERETT,
Wholesale Dealers in
Pork, Lard and Hams, Poultry, Sausages and
Dressed Hogs. Prices as low us any house in
New England.
No. 21 Southbridgo Street.
JAMES K. COMSTOCK,
EDWARD S. EVERETT.
Worcester, April 1,1*73. al <lAw4w
Egg s hut y the best!
The best Eggs to hatch are from
Healthy Thoroughbred
FOWLS,
whether they are awarded first premiums or not.
I claim to havo the largost and beet collection of
Thoroughbred Brown Leghorn Fowls of any man
in tho world; legs free from disease, and the
fowls pcfectly healthy. Circulars on application.
FRANK J. KINNEY,
No. 3 Glean st., Worcester, Mass,
al dTuTSI mAw4t [Tatnuck.J
4 VERY DAVIS,
413 Main Btreet, Worcester.
The public are Invited to my spring opening of
piece goods for
CUSTOM GARMENTS,
Fine Furnishing Goods and Ready Made Cloth
ing, which is complete in all the latest styles and
novelties.
FINE SHIRTS
mnnd to measure and warranted. Patterns cot.
Cloths sold by the yard and cut to measure if
desired. _ ts a 1
JP O R SALE,
Clothing, Hats. Caps, Furnishing Goods, Boots
and Bhoes, Ac., Ac. ,
The subscriber wishes to sell his entire stock at
once. Terms reasonable. A good chance. Rent
low. R. MONTAG UK,
Northboro’, March 25, 1873.
DH. WHITTEMORE’S MEAT
• CUTTER will cut two pounds of Pie Meat in
one minute and Hash for the Family in one and a
half minutes. Works extremely easy. Sells for
$A May be taken on trial at 570 Main st. al
gmln gress.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 2.__
TILLY.
nr domixus.
Tilly was lovely, Tilly was fair;
Dark as the night were the folds of herthalr;
Brilliant her brown eyes when sparkling with
gleo;
Soft their love-lustre when gazing on me.—
The folds of hor hair my heart's fetters wove,
Her eyes pierced me through with their keen
shafts of love.
Tilly is charming whenever she smiles;
My heart was rnado prisoner by her sweet wiles;
Her tears wakened sorrow full oft in my breast;
Was it smiling or tearful 1 lovod her the best?—
Her smiles were' deceitful, her tears Insincere;
Love's garlands they withored to leaves dry
and sere.
Blitho was her song—it made my heart heat
In tumultuous passion of agony swoet;
Gaily her laughter rang out on the air;
Was ever a woman so winning and fair?—
Her song was the syren's; it lured mo astray;
Her laugh was a triumph to honor her sway.
Tilly was fickle and false as the sea;
Her smiles hid the dangers that waited for me;
Their glamours but lighted my way to the deep,
And lulled all my senses in Lethean sloep.
Ah! had I but wakened, my heart had been
wholo;
But her memory love is a weight on my soul.
AT THE WINDOW.
BY JAMRH MARIUS THOMPSON.
1 heard tho woodpecker pecking,
Tho bluebird tenderly sing;
I turned and looked out of my window,
And, 10, it was spring!
A breath from tropical borders,
Just a ripple, flowed into my room,
And washed niy face clean of its sadness,
Blow my heart into bloom.
The loves I have kept for a life time,
Sweet buds I have shielded from snow,.
Break forth Into full loaf and tassel
When spring winds do blow.
For the sap of my life goes upward,
Obeying the same sweet law
That water* tho heart of the maple
After a thaw.
I forget my old age and grow youthful.
Bathing in wind-tides of spring,
When 1 hear the woodpecker pecking,
The first bluebird sing.
SANTO DOMINGO.
A full exposure of the Santo Domingo or
Samana Bay project is published by the New
York Sun, and although written in the form
of a personal narrative, bears evidence of a
fair presentation of the main facts in tho
case. They are briefly as follows: In 1863
the Great American West India Company
was organized in New York, having its office
at No. 5 Pine street. The company was
organized under the laws of the State of
New York with a capital of $1,000,000 in SSO
shares. Tho names of the organizers were
Fabens, C’azneau, Currier, Kimball, Peck
and Davis. Cazneau and Fabens professed
to have received from President Bayez a
secure lease of one-third of the island
for thirty years. Mines of copper were to be
opened, cotton, coffee, rice and tropical
fruits were to be raised, colored men from
the United s* «-««« *- —
island, and the company was to be sus
tained by the United States government in
consideration of the gift of the port of
Palenque on flic south side of the island as
a naval and coaling station, and a formal
offer of it was made to Hon. Gideon Welles,
then the Secretary of the Navy. The offer
was not accepted and after doing business
for nearly two years the concern burst,
leaving stockholders who had invested SIOO,-
000 to wonder where their money had
gone. Two years afterward the Great San
Domingo Copper Company was organized by
the same parties, who procured from credu
lous parties nearly $200,000, the capital stock
being fixed at $1,000,000. The company
professed to own five copper mines, and that
they had induced President Grant to support
the project. The company sent a geologist
to report on the mines and laborers to work
them, and despatched Fabens to Africa to
purchase camels for the transportation of
the ore from the mines to the port for ship
ment. Fabens took $30,000 and went on
his camel hunting expedition. About a year
after the office of the company closed its
doors, and the Great San Domingo Copper
Company was among the things that were.
The operators transferred their base to Wash
ington, and endeavored to induce the ad
ministration to assume a protectorate over
that portion of the island they still professed
to hold. Secretrry Soward sent a commis
sioner to the island but his report was not
satisfactory. General Babcock was sub
sequently sent with three naval vessels, and
reported in favor of a lease of Samana Bpy
for $150,000 per year in gold. The writer
concludes by summing up the results of the
scheme:
Very soon after this there sprang up in
Washington one of the largest and most in
fluential lobbies that I ever saw. It was
working in the San Domingo interest. Many
of the most notorious lobbyists of the Capi
tol were concerned in it. All w’ere talking
up Sail Domingo, and all were trying to en
list the press in its favor. Army officers,
heads of bureaus, and even the President of
the United States himself, became persistent
lobbyists—all urging upon Congress the an
nexation of San Domingo. It was indeed
an unusual sight to see the President of the
United States —the man who had not even a
word of sympathy for the struggling Cubans,
and whose administration had played the part
of jiolicemen to Spain—standing at the doors
of Congress and begging for the annexation
of San Domingo, as if his private interests
were involved in the success of the measure.
It has been a question who got the $150,000
in gold paid by Bab*:ock for the lease of the
bay of Samana. Oily a small amount of it
was received by Bae/. I have good authority
for saving that a very large portion of it
went into the pockets of the ring of New
York sharpers who engineered the thing. To
this day these sharper* have refused to share
their spoils with the victims of the Great
American West India Company and the
Great San Domingo Copper Company.
The act of the French Assembly in pass
ing a vote of banishment of the Bonaparte
family is not very creditable to the indepen
dence of the members as constituting a legis
lative body. But the willingness to obey the
demands of M. Thiers was by no means
geheral, for nearly three hundred of the six
hundred and fifty members opposed the
unreasonable project. If opposition to the
present administration and a wish for a dif
ferent form of government demands so severe
a punishment, there should be a deportation
to which those of the wretched Communists
are trifles. The Bonapartes have no voice
in the affairs of tho nation, there arc few
adherents to their fortunes or prospects in
the Assembly, while the Orleanists are a
power in that body, and their pretensions
are openly made and persistently maintained.
The determination of Thiers to vindicate his
intense republicanism by the persecution of
all who were attached to the Empire was
shown sufficiently in liis injustice toward
Marshal Bazaine, and this exiling of the
Bonapartes is but another illustration of the
intense egotism and ambition of the man.
As the measure lias neither expediency nor
good policy to recommend it, possibly the
vote will be rescinded even against the
desires of the Preeidout.
PATRONIZE YOUR HOME TRADE.
Many people have nn idea that something
is to he gained by going away from home to
make their purchases of dry goods, clothing,
boots and shoes, etc., needed for current
consumption. These people will ride thirty
or forty miles and back, pay railroad fare and
express charges, spend a whole day’s valua
ble time, and incur sundry other incidental
expenses, all for the sake of trading in what
they call a metropolitan market, whereby
they may effect a paltry saving of twenty
live cents, perhaps, in tho price of some
insignificant article. They serin to set a
higher value on any commodity obtained
from abroad at all this sacrifice of time,
labor ami extra expense, even though the
quality may not justify such a remarkable
discrimination, and take pride in telling their
friends that they purchased such and such
articles in Boston or New York.
Of course such a policy is entirely delusive
so far as it is practiced on the score of econ
omy, and in the end. those consumers wlio
are afflicted with this mania of buying in
distant markets always find that, with the
same income they can afford to enjoy less
of the comforts and luxuries of life than
their neighbors who are content to purchase
their supplies at home. In other words, the
money of the latter will always go the far
thest because the difference in prices (when
ever there is a difference against the local
market) is more than offset in reaching the
remote seller. But in other respects this
notion of buying abroad is a mistaken and
suicidal one. Putting it on tho the grotn*d
of pure selfishness, and making no allow
ance for that public-spirited sentiment which
should induce every man to make some
little sacrifice, if needful, to benefit and
build up the business interests of his own
immediate surroundings, it is, nevertheless, a
short-sighted policy which drives trade away
from the local market, since it checks enter
prise and expansion in all brauches/jf busi
ness, and thus impoverishes both buyer and
seller. •
It is folly for the' former to suppose that
lie can prosper independently of tho latter,
or that his particular interests can be isolated
from the general welfare. In every com
munity there must be reciprocity between
the different branches of trade and industry,
in order that all may grow and thrive. If
the consumer would enjoy the benefit of
low prices, lie must encourage home produc
tion and home trade. In that case, local en
terprise and competition will be sure to
bring them down to the minimum. But if
his patronage is diverted into outside chan
nels, there will be nothing loft for compe
tition to feed upon, and high prices will be
come a permanent and glowing evil, com
pelling the people to rely upon other than
their own resources.
But, on the other hand, there is something
necessary to be done by our merchants and
manufacturers in order not only to keep our
local trade j*t home, but also to con
centrate that of the surrounding coun
try at this point. They must bear
in mind that the consumers of Worces
ter county are mostly of a class who know
wliat choice goods are, who require the best
cf everything the market affords for their
“Ugo. and ill : .if be put off w ith anv inferior
quality or incomplete assortment to select
from. They arc too near Boston, the great
centre and headquarters of the importing
and manufacturing interests, to take up
with styles which are out of date, or to
pay prices that are not based upon a fair
mercantile standard of value.
“Large sales and small profits” is the
motto of the heavy jobbing and retail dealers
of that metropolis, and consequently their
prices are kept pretty close down to
prime cost at first hands. Thus they are en
abled to draw an immense patronage from
the suburban and country towns. The mer
chants of our inland cities, who have the
cost of transportation to overcome, cannot,
of course, be expected to compete with the
former in prices of foreign goods. But
there are many kinds of domestic manufac
tures which the latter can purchase directly
from the mills and factories located in
their own neighborhood, and which conse
quently they can offer to their customers on
fully as favorable terms as the dealers in
Boston and New York. They should take
particular pains to have this fact understood,
ami to hold out such liberal inducements to
the sharp buyers around them as shall con
vince them of the error and impolicy of
seeking bargains away from home.
In the Dominion House of Commons on
Monday a member moved a series of reso
lutions the object of which was to express a
desire for fuller rights as British subjects,
and advocate a confederation of the whole
British empire, or some other plan tending
to the same result. The mover and advo
cate of the resolutions deprecated either'in
dependence or absorption into the great re
public as a means for the country’s improve
ment, but desired that there should be no
political distinctions made between the Can
adian people and those of the British isles.
The resolutions elicited a lively debate, loy
alty being the centre around which all tho
speeches clustered. Some of the speakers,
including the premier, prophesied absorption
into one greot English-speaking nationality
of the Anglo-Saxon race, all looking up to
Great Britain as their head. The equality
to which the resolutions refer is probably
that of direct representation in the British
Parliament, for among other reasons given
for the passage of the resolution was this —
that steam and telegraph have connected
London and Ottawa as closely as were Lon
don and Edinburgh at the time of the union
between England and Scotland.
At present the people of Canada arc prac
tically independent, so far at least as their
own home government is concerned; they
elect their own legislators, designate their
executive officers, subject merely to approval
by the crown—which is rarely if ever with
held—and they enact all the laws they re
quire for llieir own protection. But the
animus of the resoluti was shown in a
notice of a motion which is to be offered
condemning the joint high commission for
ceding the traffic of the St. Lawrence to the
United States without consulting Canada,
and without receiving an equivalent for it;
praying also that Her Majesty take steps
to secure to British subjects the free navi
gation of the Columbia river.
The benevolent old uncle of the stage has
actually turned up in propria persona?, in
Taunton, Mass. A house there was to
be sold at public vendue, and among the
bidders was an unknown man who seemed
determined to have the house at any price,
and got it. He then called the young man
aside, and told him that he would give him
the property. It was thought to be a joke,
but, the young man’s wife being summoned,
it turned*out that the mysterious old gentle
man was her uncle from the West, and that
the house was his present to her.
The Protestants of South Germany are be
coming alarmed at the length to which Bis
marck carries his rigorous policy against the
Homan Catholics. The defiance of all State
authorityJ>y the Homan Catholic bishops of
North Germany is considered no justification
for the proposed governmental interference
with tho internal affairs of churches of all
creed*.
INFLUENCE OF FOREIGN TRAVEL.
The benefits of travel are too apparent to
require argument, particularly if the travel
er has a habit of observation and makos
comparisons and deductions without preju
dice. Since intelligent Englishmen have
taken the trouble to visit us for other pur
poses than to write a book catering to the
naimw tastes of self-sufficient boasters,
much fairness has been shown by English
men in their judgment of onrselves and our
institutions; In fact, travel has improved
their minds by enlarging their ideas as well
as adding to their knowledge. So the in
creasing disposition of our people to make
the European tour is commendable, and
actual benefit will accrue to tho people gen
erally by the visit of those of our citizens
who, the coming season, will go to the Vien
na exposition.
But there is another view of the growing
inclination to visit Europe not so pleasant
to contemplate, and it affects especially tho
young. It can scarcely escape tho common
est observation that our traveled youth ac
quire foreign airs, tastes, prejudices, and
even principles, during a short residence
abroad which do not tend to make them bet
ter citizens of a democratic republic. They
find true democracy is unfashionable, either
in England or anywhere on the continent;
caste and class distinctions confer a sort of
superiority on those who can look down on
their fellow-humans, and it is gratifying
to the innate pride of man to be able to say
“Stand aside,” and have his right to do so
undisputod.
It is useless to there is an in
rVaWfig feifflfeflttJPtfff jflAiguntry to make
distinctions in society that hT *
basis than pecuniary cijcumstances. We
have here no rank or hereditary title, and
so the possession of money does duty for
them; and where wealth can, it does exact
the tribute of obsequiousness. Political po
sition, the possession of office, is eagerly
sought for because it temporarily confers dis
tinction—a proper ambition if properly di
rected, but entirely wrong when sought sim
ply to remove the equality that belongs to
democracy.
It is not uncommon, also, to hear the re
turned tourist enthusiastically praise laws,
regulations, and customs essentially monar
chal, making disparaging comparisons with
ours. When these are the results of foreign
travel, it may be questioned whether time
and money would not be better expended in
procuring information by observations mado
in our own country.
SCIENCE AND MECHANICS.
According to Father Seechi’s opinion the
passage of Venus between the earth and the
sun will take place on the 9th of December,
1873. The French Government has already
ordered the construction of the apparatus
necessary for observing the phenomenon,
and the principal governments have desig
nated the various stations where their re
spective astronomers will make observations.
For example, the French Government has
selected Pekin, Yokohama, the islands of
St. Paul and of Amsterdam, Borneo, Jeru
salem, Tahiti and New Caledonia. The
English have chosen Alexandria, the ialands
of Kerguelen, the Sandwich Islands and
Auckland. The Germans will go to Japan,
to the islands of Kerguelen, the Mauritius
and the island of Auckland. The Russians
will occupy the stations of Siberia and of
as far as the Ural Mountains.
A new’ process for preserving aumcuuuj
substances ha 9 lately been communicated
to the Academy of Sciences of Paris, the es
sential feature of which consists in the use
of acetate of soda instead of tho common
salt ordinarily employed. It is used precise
ly as common salt, ami when the meat or
vegetables are to be cooked they are to be
soaked from twelve to fourteen hours in te
pid water containing 150 grains of sal am
moniac to the quart. Meat and vegetables
so preserved are unaffected by heat, and may
be kept any length of time.
Puscher of Nureraburg has lately suggest
ed a solution of castor oil in absolute alcohol
for the purpose of manufacturing a tracing
paper. The oil is to be diluted with one,
two, or three times its bulk of alcohol, ac
cording to the thickness of the paper and the
amount consequently required for rendering
it transparent. This can be laid on by means
of a sponge; and in a very few minutes after
the application the paper will be dry, trans
parent, and ready for use. It will readily re
ceive the mark of a pencil or India ink.
French chalk, used by tailors for making
marks upon cloth, is manufactured by rub
bing ultramarine, ochre, Ac. (according to
the color desired), with pipo-clay softened
with water. The mixture is then poured
into molds, and dried in a slightly heated
room.
GENERAL NEWS.
Work has been renewed on the bridge tower
of the East River bridge on the New York side.
The stone has been contracted for and that
for completing the Brooklyn tower is deliv
ered. Excavating for the cable anchorage
lias been begun on the Brooklyn side.
A bill passed the Michigan, legislature, af
ter a stubborn opposition, providing for the
appointment of two professors of homoeo
pathy in the medical department of the State
University.
A New York correspondent says: “One of
our large dry goods merchants reports
among the items of sale last week, twenty
camels hair shawls at 3,000 each, five of
which were disposed of to one family.” The
same writer adds: “There are women here
whose w ardrobe costs them, or rather their fa
thers and husbhnds, $50,000 annually, and
there are a great many who think themselves
economical because they manage to dress
upon $5,000 to SIO,OOO a year.
The Voz cle Cuba , commenting on the law
for the abolition of sjavery in Porto Rico,
disapproves of the clause providing for the
payment of indemnity for emancipated
slaves out of the revenues of the island,
The saving to the national treasury cannot
compensate for what the country may lose
in a political sense. It also thinks that
three years is too long a term for slaves to
remain under the control of their master-*.
It is not often thht man and wife live to
gether a married life of sixty consecutive
years. This has happened in Newbury, Vt.,
and the prsons are Mr. and Mrs. Hawes
Johnson, who were married March 14, 1813,
and on the 14th of March they had a diamond
wedding. For the feast, the table used was
one used for dining in 1801 by the members
of the Vermont Legislature. The observ
ance of the happy day was concluded by the
singing of several ancient hymns and tunes.
Five persons were present who altogether
were 419 year old.
Mr. Benjamin H. Penhallow died in
Lowell, March 31. Mr. Penhallow was a
member of the typograpical fraternity, ac
quiring his trade in the office of the Ports
mouth (N. II.) Journal, and has for years
been manager of a job office in Lowell,
w here as elsewhere he was highly respected.
In all the relations of life he won and re
tained friends, who will sincerely mourn his
death. Mr. Penhallow was 56 years of age.
Arrest of a Man for the Murder of
Ills Child. —A most horrible crime has
come to light in Charlestown, it being noth
ing less than the murder of an infant by its
father. In the month of Bept, 1871, some
boys at play on the dumps in Canal street,
near the State Prison Charlestown, found
the lifeless remains of a male child in the
water. Notice of the fact was given to the
police authorities, who caused the remains
of the infant to be taken to an undertaker’s
store, where an inquest was held. The cor
j oner’s jury returned a verdict “that the in
fant came to its death at the hands of some
person unknown.” Nothing more was
thought of the* murder, and the child was in
terred. At the time the officers of the law
little thought that the perpetrators of the
deed would ever be discovered, but the old
saying, “that murder will out,” has again
been verified. A few days ago a lady visited
the police station at Charlestown and had an
| interview with Detective Knox. The lady,
j who was the wife of the murderer, staled
j that she and her husband, whose n*mf is
Daniel 8. Marsh, formerly resided in Lflfer-
PRICE 3 CENTS.
ett street, Boaton. During tho month of
August, 1671, she end her husband had
some trouble, and he took their infant, only
nine months old, and left the house. That
was the last that the mother saw of the
child. Early in the month of September
her husband came to his home with a
cape and hat which the child wore
when it was taken away. Mr.
Marsh was asked about tho child, and he
said It was all right, as he had boarded it
out. The officer haring gained the above
Information Informed the lady that he would
investigate the matter. Detective Knox set
immediately at work to find out the where
abouts of the child. While thinking over
the matter, the officer remembered that in
the month of September, 1671, an infant was
found by some hoys on the dump. Yester
day, Detective Knox visited Mrs. Marsh and
interrogated her In regard to the child. The
officer .asked her if there was anything pecu
liar about tho infant The lady said the
child had two small protuberances on its face
near one of its ears. The officer having
found that Mr. Marsh was in the employ of
the Lowell Railroad Corporation and lived
in Cambridge, immediately left Mrs. Marsh.
The officer was now almost positive that Mr.
Marsh had murdered the child, as at the
inquest on the body of the infant a number
of physicians were called to view tho body
and see if they could identify the child by
the two protuberances on the child’s face.
Deem in 5 the evidence sufficient, Detective
Knox visited Chief of Police Ayers, of
Charlestown, to accompany him while he
arrested Marsh on a charge of murder. Ac
cordingly the Chief of Police and the Detec
tive yesterday afternoon obtained a car
riage and drove to the freight depot of the
Lowell railroad company in Boston and ar
rested Maph and brought him to the police
station in Charlestown where he was locked
up. Officer Knox had some conversation
with Marsh, who denied that he killed the
child. He said he took the infant from bis
wife and boarded it in a house on Charles
street, Boston. He said he was unable $o
Tptho number of the house, or the name
ofuif!&toE!X.Xith whom he left the chill.
The officer iskerf- jftofejo describe the
house and he would go over Lftßoston and
find the child, and then he (MaFSfejwould
be allowed to depart. Marsh said the nbttte
had been torn down, and the people haa*
moved away. When further interrogated he
said that the child was dead. Subsequently
the detective had another conversation with
Marsh,when he informed the officer that he
threw the infant overboard from the Fitch
burg railroad bridge one night in August,
1871. Last evening a Herald reporter visited
Marsh, and in conversation the prisoner said
he should not have committed the crime had
he not had trouble with his wife. He thought
while contemplating throwing the child into
the river that it would be better for it to be
dead. Marsh is about thirty-one years old,
and appears to be weak-minded. —Boston
Herald.
AFFAIRS ABOUT HOME.
The German Turn Verein celebrates the
fourteenth anniversary of its organization
with a concert and ball to-night.
Elm street residents who have become
tired of wearing snowshoes pine for the ap
pearance of the Street Commissioner.
The quarterly examination at the Worces
ter Academy takes place this morning, clos
ing at one o'clock.
Masons and carpenters are again at work
on the Plymouth Church, corner of Pearl
and Chestnut streets.
A large clock of peculiar construction in
the window of Harrison & Buffer’s, on
Main street, attracts considerable attention
from strangers.
Yesterday having been April Fool’s day,
it may be well to remark that the female
Dones IUUIIU VO MMU SUOU. n«.. _
old fashioned corset.
Agawam Encampment, I. O. O. F., of
Springfield, and King David Encampment,
of Fitchburg, have declined invitations from
Wachusett Encampment of this city, to
unite in the latter’s anniversary parade.
Mr. J&raca F. Goodwin, who leaves this
week en route to tho Vienna Exposition for
the Bigelow Heeling Machine Association,
was presented Monday night with a double
cased silver watch by a few of hi? friends.
The warm weather of yesterday brought
out the customary number of gentlemen of
leisure, who are techinally termed loafers,
and who may be found on the fence rails
and seats on the north side of the Park.
Death of Mr. John R. Greene.
Mr. John R. Greene, an old and esteemed
citizen of Worcester, died very suddenly at
his residence, No. 16 Crown street, early
Tuesday morning, of haemliorrhage of the
lungs. Mr. Greene had been iff for nearly a
month with a bilious fever, but for a day or
two his condition had improved, and at the
time of his death he was reclining in bed
reading.
Mr. Greene was a native of Greenwich, R.
L, from which place he came to Worcester
twenty-five years ago, forming a business con
nection with the firm of C. A. Harrington &
Co. A short time later he entered the count
ing room of G. S. & J. A. Howe, on Foster,
street, wheye he remained till his death, a
period of over twenty years. He was at one
time a major in the Worcester State guard,
and was also actively engaged in the forma
tion of the so called Home Guard during the
early months of the war. Mr. Greene aho
served two years in the Common Council,
and held numerous other offices of trust, be
ing at the time of hi 9 death a vestryman of
All Saints Church. He was a man widely
known and respected in the city, as well as
In a large part of New England, for his busi
ness integrity, as well as for his sterling
social qualities, aud his sudden decease will
be widely regretted. Mr. Greene was sixty
two years of age.
Narrow Escape of a Worcester Lady.
On the night that the St James Hotel, in
Montreal, was burned, among tho guests
were Mrs. Walter T. Sutton, of this city,
and her child. Mrs. Sutton occupied a room
on one of the upper floors and was one of
the last aroused. Those below were unable
to reach her apartment to give her warning
and she was roused from her sleep by the
roar of the conflagration and the cries of the
terror stricken inmates. She hastily rose
from bed, grasped her sleeping infant, and,
finding that her gold watch incommoded her,
she threw it through the window. The air
in her room was like a furnace, the thunder
of the fire was audible in the garret above,
and the poor woman fully expected to be
smothered to death. In desprir she w rapped
her infant tightly in her shawl, opened the
door, by which providentially as a draft of air
came in through the window and drove the
smoke before it, she saw the back stairs, and
ran for them. Her rescue was effected from
the fourth story. She lies in the St. Law
rence Hall, at present, iff from the shock her
system sustained in the flight for life.
The Fairy Grotto this Evening;.
The four-part operetta entitled “ The Fai
ry Grotto,” will be presented in Mechanics’
Hall this evening with a perfection of detail
that should secure its encouragement as a
whole. Miss McQuesten will appear as pri
ma donna, and the Germania orchestra of
Boston will furnish the orchestral music,
with a fuff chorus. The scenery and cos
tumes have been prepared without regard to
expense, and the fact that the composer will
couduct the orchestra should be sufficient to
ensure a correct rendition of the work. The
direction will be in the hands of Mr. E. P.
Morrison, and a very enjoyable entertain
ment may be upfctod*
Cjje gailjj Jjress.
ADVKRTMIMI It ATM I
On. (qoar., nn. tnawtlsn II OO
“ —eh «nh..qn*nt l.nrtli*n. so
" “ on. |W., *0 00
|7-RcMn)n of full mtM fnrni.twJ an .ppU
catloo.
Publication Ofllmi
CROMPTON’S BLOCK. MECHANIC STREET,
WORCESTER, MAH*.
Cntml Dl.trlct Court—William., S.
Tuesday.
There w»» a fall attendance, both of pris
oner. and spectator., at Judge Williams’
reception thl. morning, and a variety of
cases, from simple breaches of the lawa of
temperance to grand larceny, were tried.
About an hour was consumed in a "beer
barrel case,” and those present now under
stand how they can obtain Jones’s, South
er’s, Amsdell’e, or any other kind, all of
which are manufactured in Worcester. Tills
was in the caae of Thomas Mahony, who
was arraigned for larceny of beer barrels
from J. P. Corcoran, on Mechanic srreet,
and though there was a good deal of contra
dictory evidence, fact enough waa developed
to show that a very thorough system of
deception it practiced on the people who
drink ale. Thomas was discharged, but was
immediately rearrested oa a charge of making
a single sale of liquor and was fined tin and
costs, and for maintaining a liquor nuisance
S6O and coats. He appealed In both caeca
and gave bail in the sum of S3OO to appear
at the May term of the Supreme Court.
John Mahony, who frequently adorns the
temple of justice, was again before the court
this morning for keeping a nuisance, and
was fined SSO and costs. From this decision
he appealed, and furnished sureties far his
appearance at the May term of the Superior
Court.
Michael Ariel, whose ease forTieglect of
his family wa* placed on file the 27th of
June, was discharged on the payment of
costs.
James Clinch attended a wake last week,
and became involved in a quarrel with a man
named Earley, during which the latter had
his leg broken by a tomahawk. Clinch waa
arrested, but as the evidence showed that the
witnesses were fall of tomahawk firewater,
or some other equally confusing fluid, which
►SX stated them oblivious to what really oc
curred, fTISKiI was discharged. In his joy
at escaping, he W- ""-h ench
dispatch that his attorney nearly lon *'.3
due for his efforts to obtain an acquittal.
Edward Scanned, for a single sale of liqaor,
was fined $lO and costs. He appealed, and
gave bail in the sum of S2OO for his appear
ance at the Superior Court
Michael Qallagher, for keeping liquor with
intent to sell, was fined $lO and costs.
Charles Smith, John Sullivan, Frederick
Burrell, John Casey, John Sniiivan, and
Samuel Dinsmore were fined $3 and costs
each for drunkenness.
John L. Ringalls, for the larceny of an
overcoat from Dr. 8. E. Fisk, was held to
answer in the sum of SIOO.
Probate Court.—Chapin J.
In the Probate Court, Tuesday, the fol
lowing business wa3 transacted:
wills proved.
Mary F. Robinson was apwointed execu
trix of the will of James F. Robinson, late
of Westborough, personal SI,OOO. Betsey
W. Lombard was appointed administratrix
cum testamento annexo of tne estate of
Washburn Lombard, late of Oxford; value
cf estate, SSOO. James W. Hager was ap
pointed executor of the will of Abagail
Hager, late of Phillipston; personal, $3,800.
Caleb S. Williams was appointed executor of
the will of Moses Emory, late of South
borough; real estate, $47,000; peroonel,
S3OO. Mary Jane Brewster was appointed
executrix of the estate of La Rav 8. jttfews
*;»J*to, r i7,uOO: per- .
ecutor of the will of John H. Hefferon, late
of Charlton; real estate, $500; personal, $425.
Julia A. Gilbert was appointed executrix of
the will of 'Coleman W. Gilbert, late of
West Brookfield. Grace H. Banger was ap
pointed administratrix of the estate of Eliza
beth M. Butlen, late of Northborough; per
sonal, SSOO. Joseph H. Allen was appointed
executor of the will of the late Joseph Alien,
of Northborough; real estate, $5,000; per
sonal, $4,000. Washburn Clarke was ap
pointed executor of the will of Charlotte
Clarke, late of Hubbardston; personal,
SI,OOO. Thomas E. Glazier was appointed
executor of the will of Lucy K. Glazier, late
of Gardner; real estate, $3,000; personal,
SSOO. John Farwell was appointed executor
of the will of John F. Priest, late of Har
vard; personal, $5,000. George E. Stearns
was appointed executor of the will of Ed-*
win Steams, late of Millbury; real estate,
$2,500; personal, SSOO. Lucinda Glazier
was appointed administratrix cum testa
mento dnnexo of the will of John Glazier,
late of Worcester; real estate, $6,000; per
sonal, S2OO. Henry M. Witter was appointed
executor of the will of Olive S. Witter, late
of Worcester; personal, $5,000. Isaac M.
Ross was appointed executor of the will of
David L. Warren, late of Hartford, Conn.;
personal, $5,000.
ADMINISTRATORS APPOINTED.
Francis E. Whitcomb was appointed ad
ministrator of the estate of Edwin A. Whit
comb, late of Bolton; bonds given, $20,000.
Samuel W. Cooke was appointed adminis
trator of the estate of Edwin G. Coffin, late
of Millbury; real estate, $1,900; personal,
SI,OOO. Asa Daby was appointed adminis
trator of the estate of Ephraim S. Willard,
late of Harvard; real estate, $3,000; per
sonal, $5,000. Thomas W. Ward was ap
pointed odministrator of the estate of Daniel
Noyes, late of Shrewsbury; personal, S3OO.
Augustus Dike was appointed administrator
of the estate of Amos Dike, late of Lunen
burg; real estate $2,000; personal, SSOO.
Sarah L. Bucklin was appointed administra
trix of the estate of Emmerson Bucklin, late
of Ashbumham: real estate, $250; personal,
SSO. Reuben W. Snow was appointed ad
ministrator of the late Moses Melntire of
Lunenburg; bonds given in the sum of
$3,500. Norton L. Cook was appointed ad
ministrator of estate of T. H. Cushman;
personal, S2OOO. J. Frank Searle was ap
pointed administrator of the estate of Uriah
Searle, late of Grafton. Josiah F. Stoue
was appointed administrator, cum testamento
annexo, not already administered, of the
estate of Lyman Moore of lancaster.
GUARDIANS APPOINTED.
Edwin Bullard, guardian of Annie S. Mc-
Manus, Jame 6 McManus, Mary E. McManus,
Nellie McManus, Sarah J. McManus, and
John McManus, of Westborough. Elnathan
Davis, guardian of Willis H. Bancroft aud
Laura E. Bancroft of Aubu.m. Jaalem
Gates, guardian to Helen M. Gates, Alice M.
Gates and Maud M* Gates of Worcester.
Caroline Melntire, guardian of Simon N.
Melntire of Lunenburg. Avelas D. Gilbert,
guardian of Abbie F. Gilbert, and Julia M.
Gilbert. Henry E. Faverweather, -uardiaa
to Josephine Mongeon of Worcester.
ADMINISTRATORS’ ACCOUNTS.
Final accoimt of William H. Hathome,
administrator of the estate of Ophelia B.
Hathome. The first account of E. D. Howe,
administrator of the estate of James O’Brien.
The account of John B. Pratt, administrator
of the est? t e of Silas 8. Taft of Oxford.
Election of Officers.
At the last regular meeting of Worcester
Division, Sons of Temperance, the following
officers were elected for three months: W.
I\, A. E. Noyes; W. A., H. K. Davis; R.
5., N. L. Allen; A. R. S., J. J. Lamb; F.
8., Charles Bisley; T., D.F. Fellows; Chap.,
G. S. Whittemore; C., S. F. Marshall; A.
C., M. F. Long; I. S., E. F. Nye; O. S., W.
A. Packard.
At the last regular meeting of Washingto
nian Division, of the same order, the follow
ing officers were elected: W. P., L. Q. Spal
ding; W. A., J. F. Sargent; R. S., C. A
Barbour; A. R, S., Miss E. E. BJowneil;
Chap., J. F. Hervey; C., C. B. Whitcomb;
A. C., Miss L. Douglass; I. C., n. P. Blias;
O. S., John McC-eady; L. S., Miss L. S.
Long; P. W. P., Wm. E. Starr.
Lucien W. Palmer has resigned the super,
intcncy of the Passumpeic railroad and ac
cepted the position of superintendent of the
freight department of the Providence and
Worcester road.

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